Reginald the Turkey Commander on Christmas

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Reginald and a Captain in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Reginald the Turkey Commander on Christmas

by Emma Foster

Once again the turkeys were gathering together. They wanted to celebrate Christmas.The hunters were going out into the backwoods to hunt turkeys. The turkeys were going to their secret fortress in the snow. It was a little bit harder getting to the fortress because of the snow. There was a large snowstorm coming so the turkeys had to trudge through the snow and scoop it out of the way with shovels they had to bring with them. Reginald needed help dragging a small Christmas tree to the fortress. All of the turkeys had their Army helmets on in case any hunters were nearby.

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Because of the cold, the turkeys brought lots of blankets to keep them warm. The blankets were piled on a sled. The turkeys also wore camouflage coats and mittens.
Since it was so cold, Reginald built a fire and the turkeys roasted marshmallows. Reginald also brought candy canes.

After they ate all the candy canes and marshmallows, the turkeys gathered around the small Christmas tree and sang Silent Night. This was their favorite Christmas song because the hunters were not shooting so it really was a silent night.

Christmas Ham ©WikiC

Christmas Ham ©WikiC

The good thing was it was so cold that the hunters had to stay at home and have ham for Christmas dinner instead of turkey. That meant all the turkeys were safe.

Merry Christmas!
Gobble, Gobble!


I will sing unto the LORD, because he hath dealt bountifully with me. (Psalms 13:6 KJV)

Lee’s Addition:

Thanks again, Emma, for keeping us informed about Reginald and his turkey friends.

I asked Emma if she would give us another tale about Reginald for Christmas and she has produced this fine new tale. Emma is a fine young Christian teenager.

Check out her other writings:

Other Guest Writers

Wordless Birds

*

I’m on the Right Way

GuestWriter:

Great article by Myra. Enjoy!

Originally posted on Picture My Thoughts by Myra Johnson:

bookmark3-1-1-1-1-2-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1_zps08a42f53

I am grateful to God for placing my feet on the right path many years ago.

Just having turned 19 years of age, I was weary and worn from making my own decisions.

Coming to the place where I realized that I needed to invite Jesus to be the Lord of my life, I repented of my sin and asked for  forgiveness.

Since that time, my feet have been on the right path.

I’ve fallen a few times.

Actually, more than a few.

But I fell while on the right path that God placed me on, and I stood up each time to continue on with His help, continuing on that right path.

In a way that I cannot explain, this path “glows.”

I am drawn to remain there.

It is the only choice, as God holds my hand through the events of each day.

How about you?

Are you…

View original 54 more words

Lizzy and the Penguin Catapult

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

Lizzy and the Penguin Catapult ~ by Emma Foster

Once there was a penguin named Lizzy who lived with many other penguins in cold Antarctica.

As the penguins traveled through the winter, Lizzy watched with great interest all the eggs that lay on the penguin dad’s feet. Lizzy was too young to go fishing with all the mother penguins that year, so she was traveling with the father penguins to someplace slightly warmer.

Emperor with egg on feet ©WikiC

Emperor with egg on feet ©WikiC

Eventually all of the penguins came to an enormous, icy lake that was too large to go around. The penguin parents huddled together and decided to build a catapult out of some wood they brought with them to build their homes. The catapult would shoot penguins one at a time over the lake. The penguins decided this because the dad penguins could not cross the lake with eggs; and, if they all traveled across it at once, the ice might break. The penguins decided the eggs would be safe because there was a lot of snow on the other side of the lake which would cushion their landing.

Gentoo Penguin - Paradise Bay

Gentoo Penguin – Paradise Bay

Lizzy helped build the catapult and it wasn’t long before it was finally completed.

The first penguin had to be launched by the catapult, but no penguin was willing to do it. Lizzy was a brave penguin and decided to go first.

The catapult was launched, and Lizzy flew through the air. She was actually flying!

Adelie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) by Bob-Nan

Adelie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) by Bob-Nan

Lizzy landed softly and safely in the snow on the other side of the lake and waved to the other penguins. One by one, the rest of the penguins catapulted over the lake with the eggs. When they were all safely on the other side, they traveled to their new home.

The End


Lee’s Addition:

“Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; (Philippians 4:6 NKJV)

Thanks, Emma, for another delightful story. Lizzy is one brave little Penguin and also willing to help out.

I am sure the penguins, even though not humans, were thankful to their Creator for taking care of them.

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; And the fish of the sea will explain to you. Who among all these does not know That the hand of the LORD has done this, In whose hand is the life of every living thing, And the breath of all mankind? (Job 12:7-10 NKJV)

*

See more of Emma’s Bird Tales

*

ABC’s Of The Gospel

*

Reginald, Turkey Commander

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

Reginald – (Wild Turkey by Daves BirdingPix)

Reginald, Turkey Commander

By Emma Foster

There once was a turkey named Reginald who lived in the backwoods of Louisiana. Every year Reginald would band together with many other turkeys in a secret fortress underground to protect themselves from hunters hunting for turkeys to eat on Thanksgiving. Reginald and his friends had built the fortress a long time ago.

Reginald could tell it was Thanksgiving when one day he saw many hunters lurking in the backwoods searching for a turkey to eat on that special day. Reginald quickly went home to grab his Army helmet which he used as protection from gun shots, and called all his friends to their special underground fortress.

Many turkeys came prepared for the day. Most of them wore their Army helmets. Many other turkeys were there as well.  They had brought food for Thanksgiving.  Not just people celebrated Thanksgiving, turkeys did too, but without the turkey.

Soon there was a big party going on in the fortress. Not one hunter was aware that all the turkeys in the backwoods were in the underground fortress. The turkeys were joyously celebrating Thanksgiving. They were very thankful they were not “on the menu” that day.

turkey1

Reginald was happy that the hunters could not find any turkeys. All the hunters eventually had to go to the grocery store to get a turkey, and every hunter from the backwoods hates to go to the grocery store and buy a turkey.

Soon Thanksgiving was over, and all the turkeys rejoiced. Even so, Reginald always made sure his Army helmet was where he needed it in case a hunter was nearby.

 

The End


Lee’s Addition:

“… But every man hath his proper gift of God, one after this manner, and another after that. (1 Corinthians 7:7b KJV)

“Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. (1 Corinthians 12:4 KJV)

Emma has given us another great Bird Tale. I have been holding this for a while, waiting to get closer to Thanksgiving, but it is too adorable to hold any longer. So, it’s a little early, but ENJOY!

I keep encouraging her to write a tale for us, because she is developing into a gifted author. May we all encourage our young people to develop whatever talent the Lord has given them.

Maybe we can get a follow-up on Reginald and his friends.

*

Mrs. Patterson’s Parrot – by Emma Foster

George, The Hummingbird

Norman Joins The Baseball Team

Bird Tales

*

Norman Joins The Baseball Team

Wood Stork up close by Lee at Lake Morton

Wood Stork up close by Lee at Lake Morton

Norman Joins The Baseball Team

by Emma Foster

There once was a stork named Norman. Every morning from a high spot in a tree he would watch the children from a nearby neighborhood walk down the street to the bus stop. The bus stop was right next to the zoo, which was where Norman lived.

His favorite part of the day, though, was when some of the kids came to the baseball field to practice. The field was right next to the zoo, and Norman enjoyed the game of baseball so much he decided to join the team.

The coaches were a little shocked at first to see that a stork was trying out for the team, but they decided to give Norman a chance. Norman was given his very own baseball bat, and he stepped up to the plate.

The first time Norman swung at the ball he missed, and a fifth grade boy yelled, “Strike one!” Norman hit the ball the second time, and flew to first base. It was then that Norman learned that you weren’t supposed to fly in baseball, and you had to make sure your baseball bat didn’t go flying as well.

Norman didn’t make it to first base anyway. One of the boys grabbed the ball off the ground and threw it to another boy at first base. The coach said that Norman was out, but Norman was still welcome on the team.

The first game was that Saturday. It was the last inning and Norman was up to bat. The bases were loaded.

The other team’s pitcher threw the ball, Norman swung the bat, and the ball sailed up into the sky. It was a home run! Norman and his team won the game, and Norman was allowed to stay on the baseball team.

The End


Woodstork & Lee by Dan at Lake Morton

Woodstork & Lee by Dan at Lake Morton

Lee’s Addition:

Where the birds make their nests; The stork has her home in the fir trees. (Psalms 104:17 NKJV)

Thanks, Emma, for another delightful story, this time about Norman.

Emma is a teenager now, and I suggested she write us another story. This is her latest. See her other ones in the Guest Author section.

Norman might be that friendly Stork that hangs out at Lake Morton I encountered recently. Didn’t see a baseball cap though.

Emma Foster’s Previous Stories:

*
ABC's of the Gospel

  

  ABC’s of the Gospel

 

*

 

Birds of the Bible – Worry and Sparrows II

House Sparrow by Ray

House Sparrow by Ray

While listening to Wisdom For The Heart on BBN (Bible Broadcasting Network), I heard this message by Pastor Stephen Davey and wanted to share it. His message was “Better than the Birds” and of course it caught my attention. There are four parts, see the introduction and part 1 and now part two here.

Better than the Birds

Luke 12:6-31

2. Secondly, worry depreciates the higher value of mankind

He’s not finished with the birds yet – notice verse 7 again – the last part – Do not fear; you are more valuable than many sparrows.

Matthews account says, “Are you not worth much more than they?

In case we didn’t pick up on the lesson – in case we’re a little slow – God’s care of the lesser creation ensures His care of His highest creation.

Evidently Jesus thinks we just might be a little slow on the uptake here – or maybe find it hard to believe – so He circles back around to this subject again and adds another pearl to the string – look over at verse 24. Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, they have no store room nor barn, and yet God feeds them; how much more valuable you are than the birds!

Maybe Jesus repeated this lesson simply because He knew that billions of people one day would struggle with believing they were less valuable than animals.
Was God peering into the 21st century or what?

You sit through the average Animal Planet program or read the latest evolutionary textbook taught to middle schoolers and you’ll get the message loud and clear that human beings have messed up the circle of life; humans have interrupted the food chain; humans are in the way and if we’d only get out-of-the-way, the animals who evidently have the right to be on the planet – because they evolved first – would get what they deserve; if we’d just go back to living in caves, the animals would be able to enjoy their lives so much better.

That message is coming across loud and clear!

Whenever you remove the glory of God’s created order, Genesis 1 and 2, where mankind was made in the image of God and given the right to rule earth – to train and subjugate and benefit from the animal kingdom – you end up with a culture where animals ultimately matter more.

You now exist to serve them; you now live to make their lives more comfortable.

Now I’m not defending animal abuse, by the way. We’re to be good stewards of earth and the animal kingdom.

But go visit India today, and watch, as I did, sacred cows which have been given superior rights within their culture – watch them meander across busy roadways and down streets cluttered with starving children – and begging mothers with babies on their hips; where a child starving to death is less important than a cow having something to eat.

How do we know that human beings are more valuable than animals? How do we know that?

Apart from God, we don’t.

Apart from the words of Jesus Christ, the creator of all things (Colossians 1), we might be confused – look again at verse 24 – you are more valuable than the birds.

Is that radical news or what?

Thick-billed Raven (Corvus crassirostris) ©WikiC

Thick-billed Raven (Corvus crassirostris) ©WikiC

And this really got the attention of Jesus’ Jewish audience, by the way, because Jesus used ravens as an example here – ravens were considered unclean according to Mosaic Law (Leviticus 11:13-15).vii
The ravens were unclean birds.

I’m sorry for how that makes you Baltimore Ravens fans feel – I’m sorry you had to find that out – you’ve been cheering all along for unclean animals . . . you already knew that.

Here’s why this was so stunning an analogy for Christ to make: It’s one thing to be insignificant like a sparrow and be cared for by God – it’s another thing to be unclean and despised and be cared for by God.
And you know why I’m so glad Jesus added this illustration?

Because the enemy of our heart and spirit and joy will more than likely come and whisper in our ear – sparrows might be cheap, but at least they’re clean animals – no wonder God cares about them; but you’re more like an unclean bird . . . despised and unclean according to God’s holy law . . . you don’t deserve God’s attention.

You have very reason to worry about your life.

But notice – verse 24. God has managed to care for them too – He effectively feeds them too – and get this – “How much more valuable you are than the animal kingdom!”

Worry denies the gracious care of God

Worry depreciates the higher value of mankind.

(Copied with permission from Wisdom for the Heart and Pastor Stephen Davey.)

i John MacArthur, Matthew 1-7 (Moody Publishers, 1985), p. 419
ii Ibid
iii William Barclay, The Gospel of Luke (Westminster, 1975), p. p. 160
iv Bruce B. Barton, Life Application Bible: Luke (Tyndale, 1997), p. 314
v Barclay, p. 161
vi MacArthur, p. 119


Lee’s Addition:

Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds? (Luke 12:24 NKJV)

What a great encouragement not to worry. Thanks, Pastor Davey for part 2 of your great message.

See:

*

Old Mr. Owl Writes A Book

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) by Bob-Nan

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) by Bob-Nan

OLD MR. OWL WRITES A BOOK

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

Old Mr. Owl Danced with the Rest

“Old Mr. Owl wanted to write a book and he asked the fairies how to set about doing it,” commenced daddy.

“‘Well,’ said the fairy queen, ‘it makes a good deal of difference, old Mr. Owl, what you want to write about.’

“‘What nonsense!’ he said. ‘It’s just that I want to know how to start off with my book. Just think what a marvelous book it will be—as for as long as folks can remember I’ve been called the Wise Bird—the bird who’s awake at night and whose eyes are so very bright!’

“‘Before I started saying what a fine book it would be, if I were you, I’d write it and give other people the chance to say so,’ said the fairy queen.

“Mr. Owl began to write with his pen, made out of one of Mr. Turkey Gobbler’s best feathers, on a large, flat stone, which he put in the hollow of his tree. Very late in the night, he awakened the fairies who had been sleeping, and told them to listen to his book. Then he called all the owls from the neighborhood with a loud hoot-hoot. But before he began to read, he said:

“‘I’ve not enough light. I will hurt my eyes—my beautiful, wise, big eyes.’

“You see he had made a special arrangement to have his own lights, and when he said that he hadn’t enough, from all over came countless little fireflies. They sparkled and gave the most beautiful light all over the woods, and Mr. Owl put his spectacles on his nose, and said:

“‘Now I see to perfection—which means quite all right.’ And Mr. Owl commenced reading his book.

“It told about the parties, balls, and picnics in fairyland, and of the wild adventures and happenings in the woods. The fairies were absolutely delighted that a book had been written with so much about them in it.

“And the fairy queen was more than happy, for the last chapter was all about her.

“‘Well,’ said Mr. Owl, ‘you made me ashamed of myself for boasting about my book before I had written it, and so the only thing I could do was to write a wise chapter all about you.’

“And the fairy queen smiled with pleasure and also with amusement—for Mr. Owl had certainly thought he could write a wise book—though the next time, perhaps, he wouldn’t say so before he had written it.

“The fireflies had been sparkling and flashing lights all this time, and finally they whispered:

“‘Have a dance, all of you; we’ll give you the light and dance too. It is not well to read books all the time—you must dance.’

“So they all ended off with a fine dance, and old Mr. Owl, with his book under his wing, danced with the rest of the owls and fairies. But before the evening was over he presented to the fairy queen a copy of his book, which said on the cover, ‘A BOOK, by Wise Mr. Owl.'”


Barred Owl by Ray

Barred Owl by Ray


Lee’s Addition:

But I say to every one of you, through the grace given to me, not to have an over-high opinion of himself, but to have wise thoughts, as God has given to every one a measure of faith. (Romans 12:3 BBE)

But he giveth more grace. Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble. (James 4:6 KJV)

Figured it was about time the first chapter was added to the Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories. We do need to be careful not to think too highly of ourselves. Let other complement what you do.

*

Another Bird Tale From

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks

By

Mary Graham Bonner

With four illustrations in color by
Florence Choate and Elizabeth Curtis

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

These stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.

Daddys Bedtime Story Images
Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917

*

Links:

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

Bird Tales

 

 

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

 

 Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories

 

 

Spanish Sparrow (Passer hispaniolensis) by Nikhil Devasar

  

 Wordless Birds

 

 

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) baby Reinier Munguia

  Owls

 

 

 

*

Eagles and Ravens

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by PattiKru

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by PattiKru

EAGLES AND RAVENS

He is Very Brave

He is Very Brave

 

“Some white-tailed eagles were boasting one day of their bravery,” commenced daddy. “They were also saying how fine they were in every way and that their very name meant something splendid and free and strong.

“As a matter of fact, though the white-tailed eagles won’t admit it, they are less brave than any of the eagle families.
“The ravens are not kindly at all and they love to fight. They had often thought it would be great sport to have those ‘silly white-tailed eagles,’ as they called them, admit that they were not brave and have their leader beg for mercy from General Raven.
“And, as you can imagine, when Brother Black Raven heard the eagles boasting he knew it was high time to begin and frighten them.
“So he called all the ravens together. Some of them were having their naps, but as soon as Brother Black Raven called them, up they got in a great hurry, spread their wings and drilled a little bit just like soldiers. Only instead of marching they flew.
“As General Raven came near the nest of the white-tailed eagles, he said in a very queer, croaking sort of voice:
“‘Good-morning!’ That was rather mean of him to say, for, of course, he didn’t really wish them a ‘Good-morning.’
“‘Do you want to fight?’ asked General Raven.
“Still not a sound from the eagles. There was a slight fluster and trembling, which the ravens could hear and which made them grin with delight, but the eagles never said a word. They didn’t even look at the ravens! For they were so frightened they didn’t dare look at them, and they kept thinking, ‘Oh, won’t those awful ravens and their ugly old general go away?’ The eagles, of course, thought the ravens were very ugly because they were so afraid of them.
“‘For the last time, do you want to fight us, eh?’ asked General Raven. And still the eagles said not a word—nor made a sound. ‘Well, let me say then for all of us,’ said General Raven, ‘that we think you’re very cowardly, and we heard you talking before we came of your bravery. We wouldn’t fight you because you’re afraid of us, but you’ll have to admit it after this,’ and with a deep chuckle off went General Raven and his followers.
“The eagles did not go on boasting, but they were very contented that the ravens had gone away!”

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Kent Nickell

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Kent Nickell

Lee’s Addition:

For I say, through the grace given to me, to everyone who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think soberly, as God has dealt to each one a measure of faith. (Romans 12:3 NKJV)

By pride comes nothing but strife, But with the well-advised is wisdom. (Proverbs 13:10 NKJV)

We should be careful not to think too much or ourselves or boast. We can have confidence through Christ, but should never get “proud.”

*

From Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks By Mary Graham Bonner With four illustrations in color by Florence Choate and Elizabeth CurtisDaddys Bedtime Story ImagesThese stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.Daddy's Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner - 1917Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917

*

Links:

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

 

 

  Bird Tales

 

 

 

 

 

  Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories

 

 

 

 

Spanish Sparrow (Passer Hispaniolensis) female ©WikiC

  

 

 

  Wordless Birds

 

*

Poor Old Mr. Owl’s Toothache

Western Screech Owl (Megascops kennicottii)(captive) by Raymond Barlow

Western Screech Owl (Megascops kennicottii)(captive) by Raymond Barlow

POOR OLD MR. OWL’S TOOTHACHE

"I'm ready now," said Dr. Raven.

“I’m ready now,” said Dr. Raven.

 

Evelyn had been eating a great deal of candy—so much that it had given her a very bad toothache—and when daddy came home he found her curled up on the bed looking very mournful. Jack had been trying to comfort her, but he hadn’t been able to help much. So when he heard daddy’s step he called, “Come along, daddy, and tell a story especially for Evelyn to make her forget about her toothache.”

“That is too bad,” said daddy. “I’m sorry my little girl has a toothache. I’ll see if I can’t tell a good story so you’ll feel better and will be able to sleep and have pleasant dreams. I think I’ll tell you about old Mr. Owl, for he had the most terrible toothache one time. He had been eating a great many sugar-plums and lots of candy, and before he knew it one of his teeth was aching so hard he could hardly stand it. ‘Oh, dear,’ he moaned; ‘my tooth, my poor tooth! Whatever will I do?’

“It ached so badly for several days that he decided at last he’d go to the dentist. Dr. Raven was considered the very best dentist. So off went Mr. Owl to his office in the pine tree. When he arrived there he saw Dr. Raven busily fixing Mrs. Crow’s teeth. She was leaning back on a stump of wood which Dr. Raven used as his dental chair. She had a rubber band over her mouth and looked very miserable. It quite frightened Mr. Owl, but he tried to be brave and sat down, put on his spectacles and began to read one of Dr. Raven’s magazines. In a few moments Mrs. Crow got out of the chair, and Dr. Raven said, ‘I’m ready for you now, Mr. Owl.’ So Mr. Owl took off his spectacles, got into Dr. Raven’s chair and leaned his head back. ‘Open wide,’ said Dr. Raven. Mr. Owl opened his mouth as wide as he could, and Dr. Raven looked inside. First he looked over his upper teeth, then over his lower teeth, and finally he began to poke at one back tooth with such energy that Mr. Owl screamed, ‘That’s my sore tooth, and you’re hurting it terribly!

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Raymond Barlow

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Raymond Barlow

“‘Yes,’ said Dr. Raven; ‘the tooth is a wisdom tooth, and it is much inflamed, so I’ll take it out right away.’ He reached for his pinchers, but Mr. Owl said: ‘If you take out my wisdom tooth I’ll lose my wisdom, and I’m known all over the world for my wisdom. I simply won’t have it.’

“And before Dr. Raven had a chance to speak Mr. Owl had jumped out of the chair and flown off. When he got home his tooth still hurt, but the next morning it felt much better, and the next day it was all well. ‘I know what all the trouble was,’ said Mr. Owl. ‘I ate too much candy. I’ll never eat too much again, for I cannot lose any of my wisdom teeth when I’m known as the wisest bird.'”

“Daddy,” said Jack, “your story would be a very good one, only owls don’t have teeth.” Daddy smiled, and as the children laughingly went to bed, Evelyn said her toothache had gone.


Lee’s Addition:

The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom, And the knowledge of the Holy One is understanding. (Proverbs 9:10 NKJV)

For the LORD gives wisdom; From His mouth come knowledge and understanding; (Proverbs 2:6 NKJV)

What can I add to that story, other than just enjoy it. Also, Owls are known to be wise, but true wisdom comes from God.

Owls and Ravens are both Bible Birds.

*

Another Bird Tale From

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks

By

Mary Graham Bonner

With four illustrations in color by
Florence Choate and Elizabeth Curtis

 

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

These stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.

Daddy's Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner - 1917
Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917

*

Links:

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

 

 

  Bird Tales

 

 

 

 

 

  Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  ABC’s of the Gospel

 

*

The Seagulls Move To Blue Cove

Laughing Gull and Skimmer by Lee

THE SEAGULLS MOVE TO BLUEY COVE

Daddys Bedtime Story Images (5)

“Mr. and Mrs. Seagull didn’t really know what to do,” said daddy. “They loved their home, which was in a big harbor, for they enjoyed seeing the boats pass and hearing the different whistles. All kinds of boats passed—ferryboats, sailboats, old fishing-boats, great big boats that went across the ocean, and little tugboats.

“The seagulls would fly overhead, and then they’d land on top of the water, but they never could stay there long, as the boats would come along, and they would have to fly off. Of late Mr. and Mrs. Seagull, although they were still as fond of their home as ever, became rather worried, for the little seagulls didn’t seem to be able to get out of [p.14]the way of the boats as quickly as the old seagulls could. Mr. and Mrs. Seagull were afraid that one of them might get hurt by a boat.

“Of course the little seagulls were quite certain that nothing like that would ever happen, but one day it did.

“They were playing tag on the surface of the water and so interested in their game that they didn’t notice until too late that a great huge boat was coming along. The captain of the boat had blown the whistle to scare the seagulls away. They hadn’t heard it at all, so busy were they playing, and it hit poor little Bluey Seagull. One of the others called out:

“‘Oh, fly up quickly, Bluey!’ He was not badly hit, for the pilot of the boat had seen the seagulls and made the boat slow down.

“Bluey was frightened almost out of his wits, but with the encouragement of the other seagulls he managed to fly off.

“When Mr. and Mrs. Seagull saw what had happened to Bluey they were horrified and quickly flew off with him, all the other little seagulls following.

“They flew as far from the boats as they could, for, now that Bluey had been hit, they didn’t think life in the harbor where the boats passed was so attractive. In fact, they decided they would never go back there again.

“They flew so far that they reached a little cove at the basin of the harbor, and when Mr. Seagull saw it he said:

“‘This will be our new home.’

“Mrs. Seagull said:

“‘We will never leave this home until all little seagulls are grown up, for then they will always be safe and can play all they want to without being afraid of getting hit by the big boats.’

“So it was decided, and the cove was named Bluey Cove because it had been on Bluey’s account that they had moved there. And of all the seagulls he was the happiest and most relieved.”


Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

Lee’s Addition:

So let’s not sleepwalk through life like those others. Let’s keep our eyes open and be smart. (1 Thessalonians 5:6)

Do you get so involved with what you are doing that you forget to be aware of danger. If a ball go into the street, do you forget and just run after it, not paying attention to cars. Your parents can help you think of other ways to stay alert.

As Christians, we are supposed to watch, and pray, so that we don’t do bad things (sin).

Seagulls are members of the Laridae – Gulls, Terns & Skimmers Family and are known to fly very long distances. So it wouldn’t have been hard for them to fly to a safe place.

Another Bird Tales

From

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks

By

Mary Graham Bonner

With four illustrations in color by
Florence Choate and Elizabeth Curtis

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

 

These stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.

Daddy's Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner - 1917

*
Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917

*

Links:

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

 

 

  Bird Tales

 

 

 

 

 

  Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories

 

 

 

 

Spanish Sparrow (Passer Hispaniolensis) female ©WikiC

 

  Wordless Birds

 

 

 

 

Laridae – Gulls, Terns & Skimmers Family

 

  Charadriiformes Order (Has more Sea birds)

 

 

 

Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

 

  Laridae – Gulls, Terns & Skimmers Family

 

 

 

 

*

Farmer’s Scarecrow Protect A Corn-Field

Hawaiian Crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) ©WikiC

Hawaiian Crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) ©WikiC

FARMER’S SCARECROW PROTECTS A CORN-FIELD

"It's a man."

“It’s a man.”

“To-night,” said daddy, “we are going to have the story of the meeting of the brownies, crows, and old Mr. Scarecrow. The crows had been giving feasts in a corn-field almost every morning bright and early before any of the big people who lived in the nearby farm-house were up. Such feasts as they did have! And one day they asked the brownies if they wouldn’t come to their next one.

“‘Caw-caw,’ said the crows together.

“‘Where are we going?’ asked one of the brownies teasingly, for they had been going around and around in circles and hadn’t reached any place.

“‘I don’t quite know,’ said Black Crown Crow, ‘it’s a question which is very hard to decide.’

“‘But we thought you had chosen a special spot,’ said one of the brownies.

“Black Crown Crow looked very sad, and his black wings seemed to droop. ‘It’s that guest I never asked. He’s causing all the trouble. How very rude it is of folks to come to a feast who aren’t invited, and to arrive before us, too. It’s very e-x-a-s-p-e-r-a-t-i-n-g!’

“‘Who is he?’ shouted the brownies, for every little while Black Crown Crow had gone ahead and then had come back. In these little trips he had seen right in the center of the corn-field a man—a real man, he thought, with a hat and a coat and trousers and boots—and carrying something which he couldn’t quite make out. It was either a great huge stick—or worse still—it was a gun. He shivered whenever he thought of that awful word gun.

“‘Caw-caw,’ again shrieked Black Crown Crow, ‘it’s a man and he has a gun—I’m sure it’s a gun. Now the rudeness of him! As if we wanted a man and a gun at our corn feast!’

“‘Oh, it was to have been a corn feast, and now the man has stopped it,’ laughed one of the brownies. ‘Well, such a joke! But to show you how nice we’ll be when we’re here ready for a party which can’t take place, we’ll give a nice party ourselves.’

“And the brownies scampered about a little grove near the corn-field, and there they made a bonfire over which they cooked some corn-meal which they had carried with them in their bags. They knew all along, ever since they’d started, where the crows wanted them to go for the feast, and they also knew that the farmer had made that scarecrow in his corn-field to frighten off Black Crown Crow and his followers.

“The brownies made a fine feast, but how they did chuckle among themselves that the pole dressed up as a man had succeeded in saving the corn for the people of the farm-house.”


American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) by Daves BirdingPix

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) by Daves BirdingPix

Lee’s Addition:

Come, you children, listen to me; I will teach you the fear of the LORD. (Psalms 34:11 NKJV)

Looks like the Brownies, helped out the “exasperated” Crows and had a good laugh at the same time. The farmer was only trying to protect his crop and the crows were only trying to eat.

What can we learn?

  • The Farmer had a right to protect his food.
  • The Crows were afraid of something that wasn’t really frightening.
  • The Crows were hungry, but maybe they were “over-eating.”
  • The Brownies were helpful and provided food for them.

Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap; they have no storeroom nor barn, and yet God feeds them; how much more valuable you are than the birds! (Luke 12:24 NASB)

This verse tells us that God will provide for the Ravens (and Crows, which are in the same bird family). The Crows may need to go to another field where they can be provided for. Also, are you ever afraid of something, that isn’t really scary?

If the Lord feeds the Crows and other birds, He provides for us and also helps our fears.

From

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks

By

Mary Graham Bonner

With four illustrations in color by
Florence Choate and Elizabeth Curtis

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

 

These stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.

Daddy's Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner - 1917

*
Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917

*

Links:

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

 

 

  Bird Tales

 

 

 

 

 

  Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories

 

 

 

 

Spanish Sparrow (Passer Hispaniolensis) female ©WikiC

 

  Wordless Birds

 

 

 

*

 

Mr. Plain Sparrow Calls on Ducks

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

MR. PLAIN SPARROW CALLS ON DUCKS

"Would you like to join us?"

“Would you like to join us?”

“It was such a hot day yesterday,” said daddy, “that Mr. Plain Sparrow simply could not get cool. You see he never goes away in the winter and so he gets used to really cold weather. On a day as hot as it was yesterday he simply doesn’t know what to do with himself. He called himself Mr. Plain Sparrow because that was exactly what he was. He was just a plain, ordinary sparrow, and he thought it such a wise thing to call himself that—and not put on any silly frills. He prided himself on being sensible.

“‘If there’s anything in this world I hate,’ he said, ‘it’s pretending to be what a creature is not.’ And so he called himself by the name of Mr. Plain Sparrow, and his wife was Mrs. Plain Sparrow, and his children were the Plain Sparrow Children.

“‘I think,’ he said, ‘that I will take a walk or a fly to the duck pond in the park nearby. Yes, it seems to me that’s an excellent scheme. I would like to see those ducks, for they’re right smart creatures, and I like to hear their funny quack-quack talk.’

“‘What are you up to, ducks?’ he called, as he flew over the pond, and then perched on a small bush that was at one side.

“‘We’re well,’ said the ducks. ‘We’re enjoying a cooling drink between swims. Would you like to join us? It’s just tea time.’

“‘Tea time, eh?’ said Mr. Plain Sparrow. ‘And would you give a fellow a good, fat worm in place of bread and butter and cake?’

“‘Quack-quack! ha, ha!’ laughed the ducks. ‘We don’t like bread and butter and cake. But we can’t get the worm for you just now, as we’re not very good at digging on such a hot day!’

“‘Well, then, how about my digging for a couple of them, and then joining all you nice ducks when you’re ready to have your tea?’

“‘Splendid idea,’ quacked the ducks. And off went Mr. Plain Sparrow to a soft place in the earth where he thought there would be some good worms.

“Pretty soon he came back with some fine ones, and he sat on his perch and ate them, while the ducks nibbled at their food, and had drinks of pond water, which they called tea. Mr. Plain Sparrow flew down and took sips of water by the side of the pond, and in one very shallow place he had some nice showerbaths while the ducks were having swims. And before he left he told the ducks what a good time he had had, and how nice and cool he felt.

“‘Well, you’re so friendly we’re glad you came,’ quacked the ducks once again.”


House Sparrow by Nikhil Devasar

Lee’s Addition:

A man who has friends must himself be friendly, But there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother. (Proverbs 18:24 NKJV)

Here is another Bird Tale to remind us to be friendly. Even though Mr. Plain Sparrow was having a rough day, he still showed himself friendly to others around him. When things don’t go the way we want, do we become unfriendly to those around us? What should we do?

Who is the friend who sticks closer than a brother? See ABC’s of the Gospel

 

From

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks

By

Mary Graham Bonner

With four illustrations in color by
Florence Choate and Elizabeth Curtis

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

 

These stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.

Daddy's Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner - 1917

*
Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917

*

Links:

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

 

 

  Bird Tales

 

 

 

 

 

  Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories

 

 

 

 

Spanish Sparrow (Passer Hispaniolensis) female ©WikiC

 

  Wordless Birds

 

 

 

*