Flying Dust

Clipart-Construction-Worker-Smiley-Tipping-His-Hard-Hat-Royalty-Free-Vector-Illustration

Update (9/1) Opened up a new section of the blog called Bible Birds 4 Kids. This is the Introduction for their Bible Birds section, which has links to easier reading articles or ones written for the younger folks.

Some of these articles were here already and others were written just for the Birds of the Bible For Kids blog.  We are placing a copy of all articles on this blog. This will save much duplications. Also, the younger readers will also have the benefit of the wealth of information here also.

Expect to see more articles for both our regular readers and our younger readers. You might be surprised how interesting they can be.

Trust all of this is honoring to the Lord. He is the Creator of all these neat birds and I hope you will be able to easily navigate to the various sections. I really like the new menu on the left side.

Update: (8/29) 10:00pm – Vodpods fixed, now I am trying to adjust the new Sunspot Theme. The dust is really getting thick! Hope you like it, it will get better, I HOPE!

Update: (8/29) All the videos with Vodpod are broken and Peterson’s Bird Series – The dust is getting thick!

I am in the process of preparing this site for a theme change. There are some preparations that are being done behind the scenes. There are over 2,000 post and pages that are being checked.

Missing photos and videos have already been discovered and some broken links are crying for help. So ignore the dust again.

If you want to check out what the new theme will look like, check out the Birds of the Bible for Kids. It will be similar. Click a blog and you will see how the columns change. If you would like to leave a comment or like to let me know if you like it or not, it would be appreciated.

Introduction to Bible Birds

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) ©WikiC

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) ©WikiC

This is an Introduction to the Bible Birds. We have been adding many things about the birds in the Bible and other birds that are not named in the Bible, but the Lord made all the birds.

On Day Five (5) of creation, the birds were created. They didn’t just happen. They were designed by God and each one is different. Each one was given just what it needs to live, eat, and make more birds.

Genesis 1:20-23 NKJV
(20) Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.”
(21) So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, andevery winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.
(22) And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.”
(23) So the evening and the morning were the fifth day.

I know there are some big words in those verses, but the bold letters help find important words.

Did you see the “let birds multiply”? That doesn’t mean they do math. It means that they were to have baby birds, then the baby could grow up and have more baby birds. Then there would be lots of birds.

We will be telling you more soon. Come back and find out about the many birds in the bible.

See:

Bible Birds 4 Kids

Birds of the Bible

Wordless Birds

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(Sept 1 – Opened up a new section of the blog called Bible Birds 4 Kids. This is the Introduction for their Bible Birds section, which has links to easier reading articles or ones written for the younger folks.

Some of these articles were here already and others were written just for the Birds of the Bible For Kids blog.  We are placing a copy of all articles on this blog. This will save much duplications. Also, the younger readers will also have the benefit of the wealth of information here also.

Expect to see more articles for both our regular readers and our younger readers. You might be surprised how interesting they can be.

Sunday Inspiration – Passerines

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) by Michael Woodruff

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) by Michael Woodruff

By them the birds of the heavens have their home; They sing among the branches. He waters the hills from His upper chambers; The earth is satisfied with the fruit of Your works. He causes the grass to grow for the cattle, And vegetation for the service of man, That he may bring forth food from the earth, (Psalms 104:12-14 NKJV)

A passerine is any bird of the order Passeriformes, which includes more than half of all bird species. A notable feature of passerines is the arrangement of their toes (three pointing forward and one back) which facilitates perching. Sometimes known as perching birds or, less accurately, as songbirds, the passerines form one of the most diverse terrestrial vertebrate orders, with over 5,000 identified species. It has roughly twice as many species as the largest of the mammal orders, the Rodentia. It contains more than 110 families, the second-most of any order of tetrapods (after Squamata, the scaled reptiles).

The names “passerines” and “Passeriformes” are derived from Passer domesticus, the scientific name of the eponymous species (the house sparrow) and ultimately from the Latin term passer for Passer sparrows and similar small birds.

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“Sweet Hour of Prayer” by Sean Fielder (Faith Baptist)

Enjoy God’s creation as you watch and listen to Sean play. May we all pray and thank the Lord for all He has given from His Hand.

The LORD will command His lovingkindness in the daytime, And in the night His song shall be with me— A prayer to the God of my life. (Psalms 42:8 NKJV)

Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; (Philippians 4:6 NKJV)

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Sunday Inspiration

PASSERIFORMES – Passerines

Sharing The Gospel

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Peterson’s Field Guide Videos Updated

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) by Ray

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) by Ray

Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9 KJV)

Peterson Field Guide-Videos

Finished updating the missing videos for the Peterson Field Guide videos. The Vodpod company stopped supporting its videos, which was unknown to me. All of these videos were on YouTube and are now working properly again.

They are very interesting and if you haven’t seen them or at least for a while, they are worth checking out. Here are some of the titles:

How-to Videos:

Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9 KJV)

How to Identify Birds
Topography (Parts of the Bird)
Bird Songs and Sounds
Range Maps

Bird Families:

Common Loon
Atlantic Puffin
Ducks, Geese, Swans
Wood Duck
Shorebirds Overview
Shorebirds ID
Gulls and Terns
Heron, Egrets, Bitterns – Updated
Wild Turkey
Raptors Overview
Raptors ID
Bald Eagle
Peregrine Falcon
Owls
Greater Roadrunner
Hummingbirds
Woodpeckers
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Flycatchers
Northern Mockingbird
Thrushes
American Robin
Warblers
Meadowlarks
Finches
Northern Cardinal
Sparrows

Enjoy! Dust is still flying as I’m still searching for other broken Vodpod videos.

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Interesting Things – A Noisy, Bird Brained Harem

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea)  ©WikiC

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) ©WikiC

A NOISY, BIRD BRAINED HAREM

“Whence then cometh wisdom? and where is the place of understanding? Seeing it is hid from the eyes of all living, and kept close from the fowls of the air.” (Job 28:20-21)

SmileyCentral.comScripture frequently makes reference to the fact that birds are not very smart compared to human beings. The tropical wetland bird called the jacana shows that you don’t have to be very smart to be deceptive. The jacana is noteworthy for several reasons. It is one of only 20 species of birds in the world where the female Comb-crested jacana, sometimes referred to as Jesus birdsleaves the care of the young to the males. One flock in southern India was made up of about 50 birds. The males staked out their territory on floating vegetation, often getting into violent fights with other males. Then the females, which are about 60 percent larger than the males, fought with each other for exclusive rights to up to four male territories. Once territories were established, the females would visit each of the males in her territory, mating with each.

Once the eggs are laid in each male’s nest, the female shows no more interest in her offspring. The male will care for the eggs and youngsters once they hatch, until the time they are ready to leave home. But the smaller males have their own strategy for dealing with their situation. They yell. Researchers say a yelling male is really blackmailing the larger female into giving him some attention. A yelling male attracts the attention of other nearby females who might want to take him into her own harem, so his mate comes running to pay attention to him. Sometimes males will even fake an emergency which brings his mate in a hurry. God is the source of all wisdom, and He gave each of His creatures enough wisdom to conduct their lives.

Prayer:
Father, I thank You for Your wisdom in Holy Scripture. Grant me understanding as I read Your Word. Amen.

Notes:
S. Milius, Science News, March 6, 1999, v. 155, p. 149. Photo: Comb-crested jacana, sometimes referred to as Jesus birds. Courtesy of John Hill. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Used with permission: ©Creation Moments 2014


Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian

Lee’s Addition:

Now in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went to them, walking on the sea. And when the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out for fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them, saying, “Be of good cheer! It is I; do not be afraid.” (Matthew 14:25-27 NKJV)

What an interesting behavior from these Jacanas. Never cease to be amazed at how the Lord created His critters and their way of doing things. Did you notice how their feet were designed to support their weight? That habit of “walking on water” is why some call them the “Jesus” Bird.

The Comb-crested Jacanas are members of the Jacanidae – Jacanas Family.

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian's Birdway

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian’s Birdway

More Interesting Things

Creation Moments

Jacanidae – Jacanas Family

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Comb-crested Jacana

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Pale-headed Rosella

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Pale-headed Rosella ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter – 8/24/14

The bird of the week is the Pale-headed Rosella, which I’ll get to in a second, but this is a Special Edition as Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland is at last being published. That is to say, it has been published on Google Play but not yet on the Apple iBook store. That will take a little longer as there are bureaucratic obstacles to be over come. These involve registering Birdway Pty Ltd with the US Inland Revenue and then Apple confirming the registration with the IRS. The first part was easy but the second seems harder as it takes a while for the registration to soak through and finally emerge in the IRS online databases. Anyway, I’ll let you know, loudly, when that happens. In the meantime, you can find it on Google at https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=CblRBAAAQBAJ.

Where To Find Birds in Northern Queensland by Ian

Where To Find Birds in Northern Queensland

End of commercial!

The Pale-headed Rosella, is the widespread and familiar Rosella of Queensland, though it range does extend as far as northern New South Wales. There, and in southeastern Queensland, its range overlaps with the closely related Eastern Rosella and they sometimes interbreed.

The ones in the first two photos were taken outside my house. The first bird is feeding on the seeds of weeds, plenty of those here, and the second is feeding on the fruit of wild passionfruit, another weed, also called stinking passionfruit (Passiflora foetida) as the foliage emits a strong odour when crushed. They’re lovely birds, rather unobtrusive though their soft twittering calls reveal their presence, and I’ll always get pleasure from seeing them. They’re usually in pairs of family parties. The plumage is variable: the bird in the first photo has a much intense blue breast than the second one, but the field guides are tight-lipped about whether the plumage of the sexes differs.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

They’re more forthcoming about the plumage of juveniles, as these often show traces of red or darker feathers on the head, like the one coming down for a drink in the third photo.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

There are two races of the Pale-headed Rosella, a northern paler one on Cape York and south to about Cairns, and a southern darker one south of Townsville with a 300km/200mile band of intergrading between Cairns and Townsville. Originally these were described as two different species, the northern one being the Blue-cheeked Rosella, Platycercus adscitus, the southern one the Pale-headed Rosella, P. palliceps. When they were lumped together, the earlier name adscitus took priority, so the northern race is the nominate one and the southern darker one is race palliceps – unfortunately, given that it is the more intensely coloured. Adscitus means ‘approved’ or ‘accepted’, though exactly what was approved or accepted, I don’t know.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

The Townsville birds in the first three photos belong to palliceps. The two, photographed together at Lake Eacham southwest of Cairns, are much closer the nominate race. The yellow is much paler overall, particularly on the back and the upper breast is mainly pale yellow, rather than blue, but there is a blue patch on the lower cheek. The bird in the fifth photo has clear traces of red on the forehead and is a juvenile; the one in the fourth photo has pinkish traces and may be a young bird too.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

The taxonomy of Rosellas in general has been controversial and is still unsettled. Some authorities maintain that the Pale-headed, the Eastern Rosella and the Northern Rosella all belong to a single species even though they look quite different. Whatever, they’re lovely birds, and the good news is that the Pale-headed Rosella has benefitted from European settlement and the clearing of dense forests – they prefer more open areas.

Links:
Pale-headed Rosella 
Eastern Rosella 
Northern Rosella 

Greetings
Ian

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Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737 ian@birdway.com.au
Bird Photos http://www.birdway.com.au/
Recorder Society http://www.nqrs.org.au


Lee’s Addition:

Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book! (Job 19:23 KJV)

I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith: (2 Timothy 4:7 KJV)

Glad they finally have their book published. I know that Ian has been working on this for some time. It is always a great feeling when a project is completed.

Also, the Pale-headed Rosella is a beautiful bird. Another great creation from their Creator. I especially like that first photo.

Rosellas are members of the Psittacidae – Parrots Family. You can see Ian’s photos of this family by clicking here.

See:

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Sunday Inspiration – Batis and Wattle-eye

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) ©WikiC

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) Male ©WikiC

 

Behold, the eye of the LORD is upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in his mercy; (Psalms 33:18 KJV)

Open thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things out of thy law. (Psalms 119:18 KJV)

The eyes of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good. (Proverbs 15:3 KJV)

Lift up your eyes on high, and behold who hath created these things, that bringeth out their host by number: he calleth them all by names by the greatness of his might, for that he is strong in power; not one faileth. (Isaiah 40:26 KJV)

The Platysteiridae Family has these neat little Wattle-eyes and Batis, plus two Shrike-flycatchers and a Shrike. The family has a total of 33 species. I spotted these while working on the update and decided to share them. Their eyes are what draws your attention to them. They are cute little birds that show again the Creator’s variety.

The Platysteiridae are small to medium sized passerines. They have short legs and an upright stance while perched. The tail length is variable, with the Dyaphorophyia wattle-eyes and batises having short tails and the Platysteria wattle-eyes and shrike-flycatchers possessing longish tails. The bill is flat and hooked at the end, and generally wide with well-developed rictal bristles. With the exception of a few batises the plumage of the family is sexually dimorphic. Overall the family has white undersides and dark, speckled upperparts, with many species sporting a band across the chest. A few wattle-eyes depart from this pattern and possess brightly coloured plumage. The plumage on the back of some genera are erectile, giving the family the alternative name of puffback flycatchers. The iris of the batises and the black-and-white shrike-flycatcher is brightly coloured and used in communication, becoming more brightly coloured when the adults are excited. In the wattle-eyes the supra-orbital wattles above the eyes, which give them their name, are used for communication. In addition the family is highly vocal, giving a range of whistles, harsh calls and duets. (Wikipedia)

 

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“There Shall Be Showers of Blessing”. Hymn – at Faith Baptist Church

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Platysteiridae – Wattle-eyes, Batises

Sunday Inspiration

Birds of the World – Families

4 Things God Wants You to Know

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IOC Version 4.3 Update Complete

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) cc jerryoldenettle

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) cc jerryoldenettle

My son, fear thou the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change: (Proverbs 24:21 KJV)

The update to IOC Version 4.3 is now completed. Along with the spelling changes shown in Working On IOC 4.3 Version – Name Changes, here are some more of the changes that were made.

They added 7 new birds, most raised from a Subspecies to a Species and 3 deleted, which were lowered to a Subspecies.

Lineated Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus) ©Taenos

Lineated Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus) ©Taenos

The Lineated Woodcreeper had 3 subspecies raised to species. They are:

Duida Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes duidae) ©Taenos

Duida Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes duidae) ©Taenos

Duida Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes duidae)

Rondonia Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fuscicapillus) ©Taenos

Rondonia Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fuscicapillus) ©Taenos

Rondonia Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fuscicapillus)

Layard's Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes layardi) ©Taenos

Layard’s Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes layardi) ©Taenos

Layard’s Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes layardi)

The Inambari Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fatimalimae) is one of the 15 new species discovered in Amazonia (IBC).

Here is a link to a photo of the Inambari Woodcreeper.

Seychelles Black Parrot (Coracopsis barklyi) (photo) was a subspecies of the Black Parrot.

Another new species discovered in  the Amazonia is the Inambari Gnatcatcher (Polioptila attenboroughi). (See 15 new species discovered in Amazonia)

Click to see photo of Inambari Gnatcatcher. (IBC)

Sorry about not being able to place the photos here, but some are so new, that the photos available are copyright protected.

The Deletions were the Lepe Cisticola (Cisticola lepe), Kimberley Pipit (Anthus pseudosimilis) and Long-tailed Pipit (Anthus longicaudatus).

What took the most time updating was moving birds from one family to another and adding some new Families in the Passerformes Order.

Lesser Melampitta (Melampitta lugubris) ©WikiC Drawing

Melampittidae – Melamampittas is a new family with the Lesser Melampitta.

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) cc jerryoldenettle

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) ©© jerryoldenettle

Ifritidae – Ifrita used to be one of the unknown families. It has the Blue-capped Ifrit.

 

Plus they took the Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds family  and threw it up in the air and resuffled the whole bunch of them.

Almost forgot there is also another new family, the Oreoicidae – Australo-Papuan Bellbirds Family.

For any other update information, check out IOC’s update page. Click here.

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Birds of the World

Wordless Birds

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Dusky’s and In Love With Words

Burrowing Owl from Dusky's Wonders

Burrowing Owl from Dusky’s Wonders

And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these. (Mark 12:30-31 KJV)

Wanted to share with you two blogs I follow.

Sandra Conner’s, In Love With Words, had a neat post about a truck that  was crying. It is worth reading.

In Love With Words - Crying Truck and Virginia Creeper

In Love With Words – Crying Truck and Virginia Creeper

Virginia Creeper wasn’t beautiful and was generally considered a nuisance wherever she grew. But she had a kind heart, and when she heard sobbing out by the alley, she crawled over to investigate. She found Barney, the discarded garbage truck, soaking the ground with his tears……..

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS – 8/22/14 — ‘LOVE GROWS ON YOU’

I love it! Hope you do also.

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Owl from Dusky's Wonders

Owl from Dusky’s Wonders

Also Dusky’s Wonders released a new set of neat bird photos again today. Check those out.

I am still working on the IOC Version 4.3 Update. All the pages are completed and now I am working on the Indexes. Majority of the work is done. Stay tuned.

Birds of the World

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Working On IOC 4.3 Version – Name Changes

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

It is a good thing to give thanks unto the LORD, and to sing praises unto thy name, O most High: To shew forth thy lovingkindness in the morning, and thy faithfulness every night,
(Psalms 92:1-2 KJV)

I realized that while we were on our recent trip, that the IOC 4.3 Version was released just before we left. So, I am busy working on updating the Birds of the World pages. Not finished, but here are the – Name Changes.

 

Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) ©©Bing-Tapac

Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) ©©Bing-Tapac

Upper Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) – changed to Magdalena Tapaculo

Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) IBC

Macgregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) ©Bing SuperStock

Macgregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) ©Bing SuperStock

MacGregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) – changed to Macgregor’s Bowerbird 

Macgregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) IBC

Macgregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) ©WikiC Drawing

Macgregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) ©WikiC Drawing

MacGregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) – changed to Macgregor’s Honeyeater

Macgregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) IBC

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Southern Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) – changed to Golden Grosbeak  (previously Golden-bellied Grosbeak)

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Mexican Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus) ©WikiC

Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus) ©WikiC

Mexican Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus)  – changed to Yellow Grosbeak

Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus) ©WikiC

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The new IOC 4.3 Version now has 10,534 extant (living) species and 150 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 4.3), with subspecies (20,999) and annotations. They have added several new families and deleted one. Plus they have rearranged several families. Stay tuned as I work on it behind the scenes.

(WordPress is still not back to where it was, which is making it difficult to work on this update.)

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Bible Birds – Peacocks Page Updated

Indian Peafowl (Pavocristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavocristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich?  (Job 39:13)

Peacocks belong to the  Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies Family.

Click to See the updated page with a Slideshow and the article

These are over on the Birds of the Bible For Kids blog.

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Sunday Inspiration – Smiling

Gators at Gatorland - Great Egrets catching a ride

Gators at Gatorland – Great Egrets catching a ride

The LORD looks from heaven; He sees all the sons of men; (Psa 33:13)

The LORD looks down from heaven upon the children of men, To see if there are any who understand, who seek God. (Psa 14:2 NKJV)

Today’s Inspiration is just a collection of photos that have been used before. Most are on the lighter side. Some to make you smile, others just to help us enjoy the Lord’s critters. I especially enjoy the three ladies singing “Smile On Me Gracious Lord.”

I trust we all want the Lord to smile on us. Knowing the Lord as your personal Savior and accepting Him will definitely put a smile on His Face.

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“Smile On Me Gracious Lord” – Special by Amy, Dakota and Christina

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More Sunday Inspirations

Wordless Birds

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(WordPress is having a problem at this time and adding new photos is too frustrating to bother with.)

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