Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2 Updated

We will continue with the Foundation from the Word of God (the Bible) about the creation of birds.

If you have not read “Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1 Updated Click Here

By the end of Genesis Chapter 1 the birds (fowls of the air):

Fischers Lovebird by Phil Kwong

Fischers Lovebird by Phil Kwong

  • Created by the Lord on Day 5
  • Each according to its kind
  • Told to multiply and fill the earth
  • Were given every green herb for food (vegetarians)
  • Placed under the dominion of man
  • “God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good.”

In Chapter 2, the birds are named by Adam. (v 19-20)

At this point, we know that the birds were at their best, they were eating fruits, seeds, herbs and not each other.  The birds had been named according to their kinds by Adam, who was created on Day 6. Their colors and features were at their grandest showing the Glory of God’s wisdom and omnipotence. They must have been fantastic to behold.


When the serpent tempted Eve and caused her to question the Word of God, she not only questioned, but added to the Word of God.

Now the serpent was more subtle than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made. And he said unto the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden? And the woman said unto the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden: But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. (Genesis 3:1-3 KJV

Most of you know the rest of what happened:

  • Eve ate of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and gave Adam some also.
  • They were caught and tried to pass the blame.
  • The serpent was cursed. Adam and Eve become sinners and pass sin on to their offspring (us).
  • All God’s creation was cursed (Genesis 3:15-19)
  • Death (spiritual and physical) is now present, which had not been before.
  • Because of Adam’s sin, an animal had to die to make “coats of skins, and clothed them”, “God clothes them with a garment which covers their nakedness, a garment which had its origin in death (the death of another), which had come in, but which hid the effects of the sin that had introduced it.” (Darby’s Synopsis)
  • Sacrifices of the blood of animals and birds for man’s sin is begun. Not until the Lord Jesus Christ became the perfect sacrifice (Hebrews 9:12-14) did the need for those sacrifices end.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds should be reproved. But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God. (John 3:16-21)

Somewhere between the Fall of Adam and Eve and the cursing of them and all of creation, the birds, animals,  earth, man, etc. all begin to have changes in their behavior from God’s proclaiming that all was “very good.” By the time of the Flood (Foundation #3), that, “very good” is no longer true.

African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) ©WikiC

African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) ©WikiC

Several very interesting articles:

Different Kinds of Flesh, by Paul A. Bartz

Even Strange Animals Fit into Kinds, by Paul A. Bartz

Why Does God’s Creation Include Death & Suffering?, by Tommy Mitchell, January 31, 2008, From “The New Answers Book”, Answers in Genesis

How Did Defense/Attack Structures Come About?, by Andy McIntosh & Bodie Hodge, December 27, 2007, From “The New Answers Book”, Answers in Genesis

Why Did God Create Such Terrible Teeth? by Brian Thomas, M.S., Institute for Creation Research

Did Lions Roam the Garden of Eden? by Nathaniel T. Jeanson, Ph.D., Institute for Creation Research




I.O.C. Version 5.4 Updated on Blog

Amur Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone incei) ©WikiC

Amur Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone incei) ©WikiC

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. But for Adam there was not found a helper comparable to him…. (Genesis 2:19-20 NKJV)

A couple of days ago this blog’s Birds of the World indexes were finally updated. With company, a memorial, travel, health, housework, etc., etc. it is finally up to date. In New Kingfisher Species, you were notified of the new 21 Kingfishers in the I.O.C. Version 5.4 update.

This Version now lists 10,612 extant species and 153 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 5.4), with subspecies (20,757) and annotations. There are 40 Orders, 239 Families (plus 2 Incertae sedis), 2282 Genera. The overall count was 33 new species added, including the 21 Kingfishers.

Here are the other 12 new Species added: (none were deleted this time)

Taiwan Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola sonorivox) ©WikiC

Taiwan Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola sonorivox) ©WikiC

“As a partridge that broods but does not hatch, So is he who gets riches, but not by right; It will leave him in the midst of his days, And at his end he will be a fool.” (Jeremiah 17:11 NKJV)

Taiwan Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola sonorivox)
Subantarctic Shearwater (Puffinus elegans)
Desert Owl (Strix hadorami)
Roosevelt Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla dentei)
Perija Tapaculo (Scytalopus perijanus)
Cryptic Treehunter (Cichlocolaptes mazarbarnetti)
Amur Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone incei)
‘Blyth’s/Oriental’ Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone affinis)
Papuan Scrub Robin (Drymodes beccarii)
North Island Robin (Petroica longipes)
Norfolk Robin (Petroica multicolor)
Highland Rush Warbler (Bradypterus centralis)

They also changed the English names of these birds:

Indian Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi) by Nikhil Devasar

For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, “HE CATCHES THE WISE IN THEIR OWN CRAFTINESS”; and again, “THE LORD KNOWS THE THOUGHTS OF THE WISE, THAT THEY ARE FUTILE.” (1 Corinthians 3:19-20 NKJV)

Rough-faced Shag (Leucocarbo carunculatus) – to – New Zealand King Shag
Bronze Shag (Leucocarbo chalconotus) – to – Stewart Shag
Paradise Parakeet (Psephotellus pulcherrimus) – to – Paradise Parrot
Hume’s Owl (Strix butleri) – to – Omani Owl
Tuamoto Kingfisher (Todiramphus gambieri) – to – Mangareva Kingfisher
Micronesian Kingfisher (Todiramphus cinnamominus) – to – Guam Kingfisher
Variable Dwarf Kingfisher (Ceyx lepidus) – to – Moluccan Dwarf Kingfisher
Silvery Kingfisher (Ceyx argentatus) – to – Southern Silvery Kingfisher
Asian Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi) – to – Indian Paradise Flycatcher
New Zealand Robin (Petroica australis) – to – South Island Robin

They also made these species taxonomy changes:

Wedge-tailed Shearwater (Puffinus pacificus_Ardenna pacifica) by Ian

Wedge-tailed Shearwater (Puffinus pacificus to Ardenna pacifica) by Ian

“And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:22 NKJV)

(Puffinus pacificus) to Wedge-tailed Shearwater (Ardenna pacifica)
(Puffinus bulleri) to Buller’s Shearwater (Ardenna bulleri)
(Puffinus griseus) to Sooty Shearwater (Ardenna grisea)
(Puffinus tenuirostris) to Short-tailed Shearwater (Ardenna tenuirostris)
(Puffinus creatopus) to Pink-footed Shearwater (Ardenna creatopus)
(Puffinus carneipes) to Flesh-footed Shearwater (Ardenna carneipes)
(Puffinus gravis) to Great Shearwater (Ardenna gravis)
(Petroica multicolor) to Pacific Robin (Petroica pusilla)
(Leucosticte sillemi) to Sillem’s Mountain Finch (Carpodacus sillemi)


Birds of the World



Species Index

New Kingfisher Species – I.O.C. Version 5.4

I.O.C. Update 5.4 Version

Good News


Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1 – Updated

If you read my blog, Impact of the Answers in Genesis Conference, I stated that the Foundation of the Word of God needs to be emphasized. For the last year, the different Birds of the Bible have been introduced. Where did the birds come from? The byline of this blog is “Birdwatching from a Christian Perspective.”  What does God’s Word say about the bird’s Creation?

Scrub Jay by Mike Bader

Scrub Jay by Mike Bader

Most birdwatchers know that when they pick up a Bird Guide or Book, one of the first thing we read is:

“Having attained the power of flight more than 150 million years ago, birds might be …” (Smithsonian Handbooks, Birds of North America, Eastern Region, page 6)

“Feathered Dinosaurs?
For years biologists have half-jokingly referred to birds as “feathered reptiles.” In part, it is a ploy to annoy bird lovers with the thought that the objects of their fancy are just singing lizards wrapped in stretched-out scales called “feathers.” Yet the phrase reflects an important biological reality: birds are undeniably the modified descendants of reptiles, as their body structure and habit of laying eggs out of water clearly show.”
Archaeopteryx makes an ideal “missing link,” showing characteristics intermediate between reptiles and birds…..One view, still held by many paleontologists, suggests that about 200 million years ago its ancestral line split off from a group of reptiles, the thecodonts.” (The Birder’s Handbook, p. 31-33)

“The Implications of Flight / The central theme of bird evolution is flight. Most avian features can be related back to this fundamental adaptation. The avian forelimbs are dedicated almost entirely to aerial flight, for instance. To meet the diverse demands of survival without hands, birds have been subject to a fascinating evolutionary makeover.”  … “Birds have evolved compact….” (p. 15)  Section called Origins, Evolution, and Classification states – “Bird Are Reptiles – Before the discovery of Archaeopteryx” (“about 150 million years”),” taxonomists had already suggested a close relationship between birds and reptiles because of the large number of anatomical features shared by the two classes of animals.” Goes on to mention “missing link” (p. 39, The Sibley Guide to Bird Life & Behavior)

On and on it goes. They state as “undeniable facts” many things that come from a “theory.”

But the Word of God, our Bible says differently.

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. (Genesis 1:1)

Continuing through Chapter 1, you find that God, who is the “self-existent”, “three-in-one”, known as “I AM“, did the creation through the Lord Jesus Christ.

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. (John 1:1-3)

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by Lee

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by Lee

Day 1 – Light (Day) and darkness (Night)
Day 2 – Firmament (Heaven) in midst of the waters and divided them
Day 3 – Waters (Seas) gathered together and the dry land (Earth) appeared with grass, herbs and fruit after his kind
Day 4 – Sun, Moon, and Stars
Day 5 – Great whales and all water creatures after his kind and the winged fowls (birds) after his kind

And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven. And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth. And the evening and the morning were the fifth day. (Genesis 1:20-23)

Day 6 – Land animals, cattle, and creeping things after their kind

And God said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so. And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good. And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. (Genesis 1:24-26 )

So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. (Genesis 1:27-29)

And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so. And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:30-31)

Day 7 – God rested and blessed and sanctified all His work

Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made. And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made. (Genesis 2:1-3)

In Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2, I will bring out some more from the Word of God and articles written about the creation of birds. For now, let me make this observation. If the birds were created on Day 5 and the reptiles were created on Day 6, how did birds evolve from reptiles?


A friend suggested that, since she is a new follower, I should re-post/update some of the original Birds of the Bible articles. This series was posted back in 2009. I am updating some of the photos and material as needed.

Birds of the Bible

Original Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1

Original Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2

Wordless Birds

Sunday Inspiration – Nuthatches and Creepers

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) ©WikiC

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) ©WikiC

Every animal, every creeping thing, every bird, and whatever creeps on the earth, according to their families, went out of the ark. (Genesis 8:19 NKJV)

The Lord has created more little avian wonders in these three next families:

Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) by Daves BirdingPix

Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) by Daves BirdingPix

The 28 Nuthatches constitute a genus, Sitta, of small passerine birds belonging to the family Sittidae. Characterised by large heads, short tails, and powerful bills and feet, nuthatches advertise their territory using loud, simple songs. Most species exhibit grey or bluish upperparts and a black eye stripe.

Most nuthatches breed in the temperate or montane woodlands of the Northern Hemisphere, although two species have adapted to rocky habitats in the warmer and drier regions of Eurasia. However, the greatest diversity is in Southern Asia, and similarities between the species have made it difficult to identify distinct species. All members of this genus nest in holes or crevices. Most species are non-migratory and live in their habitat year-round, although the North American Red-breasted Nuthatch migrates to warmer regions during the winter.

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) by Nikhil Devasar

The Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) is a small passerine bird found throughout the high mountains of Eurasia. It is the only member of the genus Tichodroma. (Wikipedia)

PAS-Clim Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus) ©WikiC 3

Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus) ©WikiC

The 11 Treecreepers are a family, Certhiidae, of small passerine birds, widespread in wooded regions of the Northern Hemisphere and sub-Saharan Africa. The family contains ten species in two genera, Certhia and Salpornis. Their plumage is dull-coloured, and as their name implies, they climb over the surface of trees in search of food.

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Also, to every beast of the earth, to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, in which there is life, I have given every green herb for food”; and it was so. Then God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good. So the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:30-31 NKJV)

“How Deep Is Your Love?” – Played by Jill Foster (Faith Baptist)

More Sunday Inspirations

Sittidae – Nuthatches

Tichodromidae – Wallcreeper

Certhiidae – Treecreepers

Sharing The Gospel



Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Nikhil

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Nikhil


“But these are they of which ye shall not eat: the eagle, and the ossifrage, and the ospray … And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.” (Deuteronomy 14:12, 18)

Don’t mess with the hoopoe – especially the female! Their Creator blessed this bird with an oil gland that produces a really foul-smelling liquid. When rubbed into their plumage, it smells like rotting meat and deters not only predators but parasites as well. In fact, it also acts as an antibacterial agent.

Hoopoe Feeding Young ©©Dvir Lotan from Israel

Hoopoe Feeding Young ©©Dvir Lotan from Israel

Thanks to this nasty-smelling liquid, most predators stay far away from the hoopoe’s nest. But even when a predator ignores the stench and comes looking for a meal while mama hoopoe is away, the nestlings are not defenseless. Even when they are just six days old, they can produce the same liquid and shoot it accurately into the face of predators.

With such an awful smell, perhaps it was a great blessing that God placed the hoopoe on His list of animals that were not to be eaten by His people. By the way, the King James version of the Bible refers to the hoopoe as the lapwing but we’re still talking about the hoopoe. Since this bird is listed in Deuteronomy as an unclean animal, isn’t it rather odd that the modern state of Israel would choose the hoopoe as their national bird?

Like the hoopoe, every person ever born is unclean in God’s sight. This is why Jesus Christ, the sinless lamb of God, submitted Himself to die on the cross as our substitute. He will make you clean in God’s sight when you repent of your sins and put your trust in Jesus!

Heavenly Father, I know that there’s nothing I can do to make myself clean and righteous. Thank You for sending Your Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross to make me acceptable in Your sight. Amen.

©Creation Moments 2015

Lee’s Addition:

the stork, the heron after its kind, and the hoopoe and the bat. (Deu 14:18)

Our Creator has again shown His perfect design and protection for another of His avian wonders. This time with the Hoopoe. They are a Bird of the Bible and have been features several times her on this blog.

Good News Tracts


More Photos To Enjoy!

My friend, Jeanie, who wrote the poem, Hummingbird, sent me these photos. Enjoy!

The photography is amazing, but the captions are priceless !!!!!

I hate it when he plays "Mount Everest ..."

I hate it when he plays “Mount Everest …”

Who the is "Sugar Lips"?

Who is “Sugar Lips”?

Those brownies were Far Out!!

Those brownies were Far Out!!

NO! We Don't want any Magazine Subscriptions!

NO! We Don’t want any Magazine Subscriptions!

There's a ringer competing in the Hogtown Olympics.

There’s a ringer competing in the Hogtown Olympics.

I'm not Over-Weight, I'm Under-Height!!

I’m not Over-Weight, I’m Under-Height!!

You do have an odd perspective on things.

You do have an odd perspective on things.

Lunchtime at the Corncob Cafe

Lunchtime at the Corncob Cafe

Okay, I caught him, now what do I do with him?

Okay, I caught him, now what do I do with him?

I hate this game.

I hate this game.

Flight 'Hum-One' coming in for a landing.

Flight ‘Hum-One’ coming in for a landing.

Just act natural and blend in.

Just act natural and blend in.

Where's my Coffee?

Where’s my Coffee?

Whooo loves ya, Baby?

Whooo loves ya, Baby?

But above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfection. And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.
(Colossians 3:14-17 NKJV)

THE UMBRELLA BIRD from Creation Moments

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

THE UMBRELLA BIRD from Creation Moments – Re-post

“Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness.” (1 Thessalonians 5:5)

The best fishermen not only know where the fish are biting, but exactly what type of bait or lure is needed to catch the big ones. That’s why I say that the best fisherman of all is not a man but a bird.

The black heron knows exactly where and when the fish are biting. He goes fishing for his food by wading into shallow lakes and ponds. But there’s a problem. Fish avoid the water’s surface to avoid the bright rays of the sun. Even if a fish does come close to the surface, the black heron is unable to see it because he is blinded by the sun’s reflection.

But like I said, this bird is a master fisherman. What he does is shape his wings into a large black umbrella. He then crouches down until his wings are almost touching the water, effectively turning daylight into darkness, and attracting fish to the shade. Under cover of his umbrella, the black heron pokes his head into the water and comes out with a squirming fish in his beak.

This kind of fishing is known as canopy feeding. How did the black heron learn to fish like this? Creationists know, but evolutionists have no reasonable answer. They only have a term. Yes, evolutionists are good at coming up with terms like “canopy feeding”, but when it comes to explaining how such a thing originated in the first place, they are still very much in the dark.

Heavenly Father, I ask You to make me a good fisherman – not of fish but of men. Use me to share the gospel so that my friends and family will turn to You for salvation. Amen.
Notes: Photo: Black heron comes out of its feathered canopy after catching a fish. Courtesy of Steve Garvie. (CC-BY-SA 2.0 GENERIC)

©Creation Moments 2015

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

Lee’s Addition:

What an amazing behavior that the Lord gave these Black Herons! Just as the Lord promised the Ravens, this verse is also true for the Black Herons:

Who provides food for the raven (or Black Herons), When its young ones cry to God, And wander about for lack of food? (Job 38:41 NKJV)


Sorry I have not been as quick to answer your comments this last week, but we have had company. My sister and her husband, from the Denver area, are with us and are staying in the room that has my computer. :) We had the memorial service this last weekend for my other sister who went on to Glory several months ago. See:

No Post Today – But 20/20 Vision

Hope to be back to a more normal schedule soon. Yet, I wish they could stay longer. Heaven will be great when we can visit eternally with our whole Spiritual Family, which includes many of you, but most of all with our Savior, Eternal Brother, God the Father.

Creation Moments Umbrella Bird

Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns Family

Black Heron – Wikipedia


Sunday Inspiration – Wrens

Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) by Lee

God, who made the world and everything in it, since He is Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands. (Acts 17:24 NKJV)

The Troglodytidae – Wrens Family was the one skipped over in the Sunday Inspiration last week. There are 84 species in the family, so they deserve their own blog. The family name Troglodytidae is derived from troglodyte, which means “cave-dweller”, and the wrens get their scientific name from the tendency of some species to forage in dark crevices.

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Raymond Barlow

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Raymond Barlow

Wrens are medium-small to very small birds. The Eurasian wren is among the smallest birds in its range, while the smaller species from the Americas are among the smallest passerines in that part of the world. They range in size from the white-bellied wren, which averages under 10 cm (3.9 in) and 9 g (0.32 oz), to the giant wren, which averages about 22 cm (8.7 in) and weighs almost 50 g (1.8 oz). The dominating colors of their plumage are generally drab, composed of gray, brown, black, and white, and most species show some barring, especially to tail and/or wings. No sexual dimorphism is seen in the plumage of wrens, and little difference exists between young birds and adults. All have fairly long, straight to marginally decurved bills.

Bewick's Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) by Daves BirdingPix

Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) by Daves BirdingPix

Wrens have loud and often complex songs, sometimes given in duet by a pair. The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.

Then God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good. So the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:31 NKJV)

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“He is Everything To Me” – Men’s Ensemble – Faith Baptist


More Sunday Inspirations

Sermons From My Pastor


BLT at Noah’s ARK

Interesting Things from Smiley CentralFrom another e-mail received, this one is about a Bear, Lion and a Tiger. They are affectionately known as “BLT” and housed at the Noah’s Ark Sanctuary in Georgia.

This is Leo the African Lion, Baloo the Black Bear, and Shere Khan the Bengal Tiger.


The threesome were rescued as babies from the basement of an Atlanta drug dealer’s home when it was raided by authorities.


They were starving, traumatized and had bacterial infections.


Since then, they were brought to Noah’s Ark Animal Sanctuary


… where they’ve lived in the same habitat together for 13 years.


The only time the three were separated was when Baloo was sent to surgery. [While at the drug dealer’s home, Baloo had been mistreated so profoundly that the harness that was put on him had grown into his skin.]


The two cats were distraught and cried for the bear’s return when he was at the vet’s. Since then no one has separated the group.


They clearly bonded during their earliest memories and never wanted to be apart.


Now they live together as if they were brothers of the same species.

BLT 10

They play together, nuzzle one another and are extremely affectionate.

BLT 11

The threesome are the only lion, tiger and bear living together in the world.

BLT 12

They’re just that exceptional.

BLT 13

Humans could really learn from the bond that these three have.

BLT 14

No one ever told them they couldn’t love one another, so they did just that.

BLT 15

And now, even all these years later, they continue to do so.

BLT 16

The trio are affectionately referred to as BLT, standing for bear, lion, and tiger. They might just be the most adorable sandwich ever!

That is the end of the e-mail I received. Their behavior reminds us that when the Lord returns, sets up His kingdom on earth and Isaiah is fulfilled:

“The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, The leopard shall lie down with the young goat, The calf and the young lion and the fatling together; And a little child shall lead them. The cow and the bear shall graze; Their young ones shall lie down together; And the lion shall eat straw like the ox. The nursing child shall play by the cobra’s hole, And the weaned child shall put his hand in the viper’s den. They shall not hurt nor destroy in all My holy mountain, For the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the LORD As the waters cover the sea.” (Isaiah 11:6-9 NKJV)

Here are two videos found on the internet about them.



Noah’s Ark Sanctuary in Georgia

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Oriental Pratincole

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Oriental Pratincole ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter ~ 11/12/156

This post is a bit late, so you get two species by way of amends!

I was at the opening of an excellent exhibition of North Queensland ‘breeding birds and their dream homes’ called Nestled at the Museum of Tropical Queensland in Townsville on Tuesday and got talking to one of the local members of BirdLife Townsville about the bird of the week. He requested something unusual of local interest that might occur here at this time of the year and mentioned Oriental Cuckoo and Oriental Plover. Oriental Cuckoo was bird of the week in December 2007 and I don’t have any good photos of Oriental Plover. I’ve only ever seen it in airports (Lockhart River and Norfolk Island) and I’ve never risked the wrath of airport security to get close to the birds. So the best I could come up with, Bill, is Oriental Pratincole photographed at the Townsville Town Common where a flock appeared nine years ago. I can’t get more local than that!

Oriental Pratincole (Glareola maldivarum) by Ian
Oriental Pratincoles breed in Asia with a patchy distribution from India to eastern Siberia, Mongolia and NE China. In the northern winter they migrate to Indonesia, Malaysia, New Guinea and northern Australia with perhaps 50,000 reaching our shores. They are late migrants arriving in the Top End of the Northern Territory during the build-up to the wet season (November) and their main Australian range is from the Gulf of Carpentaria in NW Queensland west to the north coast of Western Australia. They show a preference for dry inland plains with available water and feed mainly on insects such as grasshoppers. 2006 was, like this one, a very dry year in Townsville and these photos were taken on the dry bed of one of the wildlife observation ‘wetlands’ at the Common. They also turn up sometimes on the Atherton Tableland.

Oriental Pratincole (Glareola maldivarum) by Ian

Pratincoles are unusual birds somewhere between plovers and terns in appearance and morphology. They belong to a small family, the Glareolidae, which consists of 8 species of pratincoles in Eurasia, Africa and Australia and 9 species of mainly African Coursers. The odd name pratincole means ‘inhabitant of meadows’ with the ‘prat’ bit having the same root as ‘pratensis’ in the European Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis). The family name comes from the Latin for gravel, and that’s actually closer to the mark when it comes to preferred habitat.

Oriental Pratincole (Glareola maldivarum) by Ian

The Oriental Pratincole is distinguishable from the Australian Pratincole by its dumpier, shorter-tailed appearance, greyish-olive rather than buffish-brown plumage and by a black margin to the throat giving the appearance of a necklace. The Oriental Pratincole is normally in non-breeding plumage when in Australia, but both species have black-tipped bills with red bases when breeding. The Australian Pratincole has chestnut flanks and belly when breeding and the dark flanks are retained in non-breeding plumage.

AustralianPratincole (Stiltia isabella) by Ian

Pratincoles look very tern-like in flight with their long pointed wings. Both the local species have white rumps and black-tipped tails, but the tail of the Australian Pratincole is square, while that of the Oriental is forked.

Oriental Pratincole (Glareola maldivarum) by Ian

If you belonged to the bird of the week club a year ago, you may remember that the Cream-coloured Courser was, after the Crab Plover was my second most wanted bird in Dubai. Courser means ‘runner’, something they do very well and it was very appropriate to find them at the Polo Club and at the Al Asifa Endurance Stables. Incidentally, the bird of the week club currently has 981 members and you know I like milestones. Please encourage your friends to join so we can reach 1,000 either by signing up on the bird of the week page (recently redesigned for mobile devices) or by emailing me at

Cream-colored Courser (Cursorius cursor) by Ian

Cream-colored Courser (Cursorius cursor) by Ian

Christmas is looming ever closer, so this wouldn’t be complete without the obligatory commercial. What do you give to the digitally-competent birder or nature-lover who has everything? An electronic book of course and both Apple and Kobo have facilities in their ebook stores for giving gifts. I’ve included a Giving Gifts section on the Publications page with help on how these stores let you give gifts. Google has facilities only for giving the equivalent of a gift token and not specific items. These book images are linked to their web pages:

And don’t forget Nestled at the Museum of Tropical Queensland if you are in, near or visiting Townsville.

Where To Find Birds - Ian

Ian's Book 2


Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737
Bird Photos
Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland: iTunesGoogle Play Kobo Books
Recorder Society

Lee’s Addition:

Bread gained by deceit is sweet to a man, But afterward his mouth will be filled with gravel. (Proverbs 20:17 NKJV)

Thanks, Ian, for another interesting bird to introduce us to. Also glad you help distinguish several apart. Most of us that have never seen these birds could mix them up. Thanks for sharing these neat birds with us.

Now that Ian is a published writer, his book might well be a prized gift for yourself or others.


Ian’s Bird of the Week

Glareolidae – Coursers, Pratincoles

Cream-coloured Courser ~ 9-27-14

Crab Plover ~ 9-22-14

Who Paints The Leaves?


Who Says God Doesn’t Have A Sense of Humor!

Received this in an e-mail and thought you also would enjoy it. Not sure who to give the credit to for the photos, but I know Who to give the credit to for creating them. Thank You, Lord.

All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. (John 1:3 KJV)

What a wonderful world!
“May God grant you always…
A sunbeam to warm you,
a moonbeam to charm you,
a sheltering Angel so nothing can harm you,
Laughter to cheer you.
Faithful friends near you.
And whenever you pray, Heaven to hear you.” —
An Irish Blessing

Contentment is not the fulfillment of what you want, but the realization of how much you already have.

Lee’s Addition:

The Bible says it this way, “But godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out. And having food and raiment let us be therewith content. (1 Timothy 6:6-8 KJV)

Sunday Inspiration – Seven Small Families

As we continue through our Passerines, we come to seven families that have very few members in them. Just because their numbers are few, their Creator has not failed to give each a niche to fill and the ability and design to do so. They are all small birds, like the song, “His Eye Is On The Sparrow,” these bird are no less ignored by the Lord.

Dapple-throat (Arcanator orostruthus) ©WikiC

Dapple-throat (Arcanator orostruthus) ©WikiC

I am weary with my crying; My throat is dry; My eyes fail while I wait for my God. (Psalms 69:3 NKJV)

The Dapple-throat and allies – Arcanatoridae family only has three species; Spot-throatt, Dapple-throat and the Grey-chested Babbler. Internet says they are from Africa and that its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. That is about the only information given.

Cape Sugarbird (Promerops cafer) ©WikiC

Cape Sugarbird (Promerops cafer) ©WikiC

More to be desired are they than gold, Yea, than much fine gold; Sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb. (Psalms 19:10 NKJV)

The Sugarbirds make up a small family, Promeropidae, of passerine birds which are restricted to southern Africa. The two species of sugarbird make up one of only two bird families restricted entirely to southern Africa, the other being the rock-jumpers Chaetopidae. In general appearance as well as habits they resemble large long-tailed sunbirds, but are possibly more closely related to the Australian honeyeaters. They have brownish plumage, the long downcurved bill typical of passerine nectar feeders, and long tail feathers.

Asian Fairy-bluebird (Irena puella) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

Asian Fairy-bluebird (Irena puella) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

“You shall make the robe of the ephod all of blue.” (Exodus 28:31 NKJV)

The two Fairy-bluebirds are small passerine bird species found in forests and plantations in tropical southern Asia and the Philippines. They are the sole members of the genus Irena and family Irenidae, and are related to the ioras and leafbirds.

These are bulbul-like birds of open forest or thorn scrub, but whereas that group tends to be drab in colouration, fairy-bluebirds are sexually dimorphic, with the males being dark blue in plumage, and the females duller green.

Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) by Ian

Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) by Ian

And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold, and make thereto a crown of gold round about. (Exodus 25:24 KJV)

Regulidae – Goldcrests, kinglets family has only six members. The kinglets or crests are a small group of birds sometimes included in the Old World warblers, but are frequently given family status because they also resemble the titmice. The scientific name Regulidae is derived from the Latin word regulus for “petty king” or prince, and comes from the coloured crowns of adult birds. This family has representatives in North America and Eurasia.

Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) ©Ramki Sreenivasan

Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) ©Ramki Sreenivasan

The Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa (Elachuridae) is the only bird in its family they discovered recently through DNA studies. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. This species is found in undergrowth and dense thickets of this type of forest, with a preference for thick fern ground cover, mossy rocks and decaying trunks of fallen trees and brushwood (often near stream or creek) long grass and scrub.

Violet-baked Hyliota (Hyliota violacea) ©WikiC

Violet-baked Hyliota (Hyliota violacea) ©WikiC

Hyliotidae – Hyliota found in Angola, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath; for the heavens shall be dissolved and vanish away like smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they that dwell therein shall die in like manner [like gnats]. But My salvation shall be forever, and My rightness and justice [and faithfully fulfilled promise] shall not be abolished. [Matt. 24:35; Heb. 1:11; II Pet. 3:10.] (Isaiah 51:6 AMP)

(Wrens skipped until next week ) Our last group of very small birds are from the Polioptilidae – Gnatcatchers. The 18 species of small passerine birds in the gnatcatcher family occur in North and South America (except far south and high Andean regions). Most species of this mainly tropical and subtropical group are resident, but the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher of the USA and southern Canada migrates south in winter. They are close relatives of the wrens. (Wikipedia)

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