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Archive for the ‘Birds of the Bible’ Category

Peacocks at entrance to Magnolia Plantation

Peacocks at entrance to Magnolia Plantation


For the king had at sea a navy of Tharshish with the navy of Hiram: once in three years came the navy of Tharshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks. (1 Kings 10:22)

We have just arrived home from a shortened vacation due to a health issue. We got as far as Charleston, S. C. before turning around and drifting back home.

We were able to visit a few places, the Magnolia Plantation, for one, in Charleston. We were greeted at the entrance by at least 6 or 7 Peacocks. Also at the Petting Zoo, they had two female Peafowl with very young peachicks. As far as I could tell, these were Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus). Peacocks are actually Peafowl and belong to the Pheasant & Allies Phasianidae Family.

I have never seen peachicks before and thought it cute that they have the little tufts on their heads that will eventually grow those top feathers.

Peachicks at Magnolia Gardens by Lee

Peachicks at Magnolia Gardens by Lee

“First, the “Peacocks” are the males. The females are called “Peahens” and their chicks are called “Peachicks.”  Collectively the birds are called Peafowl. They all belong to the Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies Family.” (From Birds of the Bible – Peacocks II


Dan photographing one of the Peacocks

Dan photographing one of the Peacocks

To find out more about Peacocks (Peafowl):

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PS. Sorry about the quickly edited photos. I’ve had the blog on “auto-pilot” for over a week, but ran out of pre-scheduled blogs.

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The same day went Jesus out of the house, and sat by the sea side. And great multitudes were gathered together unto him, so that he went into a ship, and sat; and the whole multitude stood on the shore. And he spake many things unto them in parables, saying, Behold, a sower went forth to sow; (Matthew 13:1-3 KJV)

We recently took a short visit to Honeymoon Island State Park in Dunedin, Florida. (See – Another Birdwatching TripGrey Kingbird at Honeymoon Island SP)

These are some of the photos taken that day. It was hot, summer and not many birds available to watch unfortunately. It was enjoyable just the same and we plan on going back again when the fall birds start migrating through or stopping for the winter.

 

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And flocks shall lie down in the midst of her, all the beasts of the nations: both the cormorant and the bittern shall lodge in the upper lintels of it; their voice shall sing in the windows; desolation shall be in the thresholds: for he shall uncover the cedar work. (Zephaniah 2:14 KJV)

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Wood Stork at Lake Morton by Lee

Wood Stork at Lake Morton by Lee

I know all the birds of the mountains (and Lake Morton) , And the wild beasts of the field are Mine. (Psalms 50:11 NKJV)

We finally had a chance to take a short birdwatching adventure to Lake Morton over in Lakeland. I have been battling a cold and cough for the last three weeks. Our trips to Lake Morton don’t require much walking and it is one of the few places that people feed the birds.

When someone parks their car, before they can get across the street, the birds start walking towards them. Needless to say, the birds are expecting something.

Wood Stork up close by Lee at Lake Morton

Wood Stork up close by Lee at Lake Morton

As I was walking across the street, here they came; Wood Stork in the lead because of its long legs, White Ibises next, followed by the waddling shorter legged birds – Mute Swans, Mallards, Muscovy Duck and then the fly-ins – Boat-tailed Grackles and the Gulls. The Wood Stork met me at the curb.

Of course when you have a treat for them, you become the “Pied Piper.” Apparently, someone must have recently fed them, because they were gathered loosely together. Once I got to the table and sat down, the group gathered around. I was enjoying them so much, I didn’t take many photos then.

White Ibis on Table by Lee

American White Ibis on Table by Lee

Once the food gave out, of which I didn’t have much to begin with, they moseyed off to rest in the shade until the next visitor with a bag of goodies came. One White Ibis hopped upon the table behind me, but too late because the bag was empty. Took its photo, but it was almost too close.

Woodstork & Lee by Dan at Lake Morton

Woodstork & Lee by Dan at Lake Morton

One of the resident Wood Storks walked up in front of me and stood there. I reassured him that I had nothing else, but he (or she) just stayed there. I started talking to it, motioned to come closer, and it did. I could have reached out and touched the Wood Stork, but chose not to with that long beak. Have you ever heard a Wood Stork’s beak “snap” when it grabs food? It is loud. No, I like my fingers!

Wood Stork close-up by Lee at Lake Morton

Wood Stork close-up by Lee at Lake Morton

We sat face to face for about 4 minutes of so; me talking and him just standing there looking at me.

Even though they are “ugly,” they are really neat. Have you ever seen a Wood Stork in the air? They are so beautiful and graceful, but up this close? I assured him that the Lord had created him and that He makes no mistakes.

Great is our Lord, and mighty in power; His understanding is infinite. (Psalms 147:5 NKJV)

Wood Stork flying over Lake Morton by Lee 2009

Wood Stork flying over Lake Morton by Lee 2009

 The wings of the ostrich wave proudly, But are her wings and pinions like the kindly stork’s? (Job 39:13 NKJV)

Wood Storks belong to the Ciconiidae – Storks Family and are also one of our Birds of the Bible.

Oh, I almost forgot. Since the Wood Stork was so close, I took a close up of its feet.

Wood Stork's Feet by Lee

Wood Stork’s Feet by Lee

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White-crowned Lapwing (Vanellus albiceps) at NA

White-crowned Lapwing (Vanellus albiceps) at NA

And the stork, the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat. (Leviticus 11:19 KJV)

The White-crowned Lapwing above was my first Lapwing encountered. They were at the National Aviary in Pittsburg, PA. They are from the tropical regions of Africa and have a diet of insects and other small invertebrates. (Fun Fact from Aviary) ~ White-headed Wattled Lapwings will bravely defend their territories against all comers, even hippos!

Now almost every zoo we visit has at least one species of Lapwing present. We see the Masked Lapwing most frequently. The reason Lapwings are mentioned in the Bible is because it is on the “Do Not Eat” list.

Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles) Brevard Zoo by Lee

And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat. (Deuteronomy 14:18 KJV)

The Masked Lapwings are interesting to watch as they walk around on their long legs and as the “wattle” wiggles.

Vanellinae are any of various crested plovers, family Charadriidae, noted for its slow, irregular wingbeat in flight and a shrill, wailing cry. Its length is 10-16 inches. They are a subfamily of medium-sized wading birds which also includes the plovers and dotterels. The Vanellinae are collectively called lapwings but also contain the ancient Red-kneed Dotterel. A lapwing can be thought of as a larger plover.

The traditional terms “plover”, “lapwing” and “dotterel” were coined long before modern understandings of the relationships between different groups of birds emerged: in consequence, several of the Vanellinae are still often called “plovers”, and the reverse also applies, albeit more rarely, to some Charadriinae (the “true” plovers and dotterels).

In Europe, “lapwing” often refers specifically to the Northern Lapwing, the only member of this group to occur in most of the continent. (Wikipedia)

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Here are some photos of Lapwings in the Vanellinae genera.

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National Aviary – Pittsburgh, PA

Charadriidae – Plovers Family

Birds of the Bible – Lapwing

Birds of the Bible

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