Sunday Inspiration – Passerines

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) by Michael Woodruff

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) by Michael Woodruff

By them the birds of the heavens have their home; They sing among the branches. He waters the hills from His upper chambers; The earth is satisfied with the fruit of Your works. He causes the grass to grow for the cattle, And vegetation for the service of man, That he may bring forth food from the earth, (Psalms 104:12-14 NKJV)

A passerine is any bird of the order Passeriformes, which includes more than half of all bird species. A notable feature of passerines is the arrangement of their toes (three pointing forward and one back) which facilitates perching. Sometimes known as perching birds or, less accurately, as songbirds, the passerines form one of the most diverse terrestrial vertebrate orders, with over 5,000 identified species. It has roughly twice as many species as the largest of the mammal orders, the Rodentia. It contains more than 110 families, the second-most of any order of tetrapods (after Squamata, the scaled reptiles).

The names “passerines” and “Passeriformes” are derived from Passer domesticus, the scientific name of the eponymous species (the house sparrow) and ultimately from the Latin term passer for Passer sparrows and similar small birds.

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“Sweet Hour of Prayer” by Sean Fielder (Faith Baptist)

Enjoy God’s creation as you watch and listen to Sean play. May we all pray and thank the Lord for all He has given from His Hand.

The LORD will command His lovingkindness in the daytime, And in the night His song shall be with me— A prayer to the God of my life. (Psalms 42:8 NKJV)

Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; (Philippians 4:6 NKJV)

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Sunday Inspiration

PASSERIFORMES – Passerines

Sharing The Gospel

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Peterson’s Field Guide Videos Updated

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) by Ray

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) by Ray

Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9 KJV)

Peterson Field Guide-Videos

Finished updating the missing videos for the Peterson Field Guide videos. The Vodpod company stopped supporting its videos, which was unknown to me. All of these videos were on YouTube and are now working properly again.

They are very interesting and if you haven’t seen them or at least for a while, they are worth checking out. Here are some of the titles:

How-to Videos:

Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9 KJV)

How to Identify Birds
Topography (Parts of the Bird)
Bird Songs and Sounds
Range Maps

Bird Families:

Common Loon
Atlantic Puffin
Ducks, Geese, Swans
Wood Duck
Shorebirds Overview
Shorebirds ID
Gulls and Terns
Heron, Egrets, Bitterns – Updated
Wild Turkey
Raptors Overview
Raptors ID
Bald Eagle
Peregrine Falcon
Owls
Greater Roadrunner
Hummingbirds
Woodpeckers
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Flycatchers
Northern Mockingbird
Thrushes
American Robin
Warblers
Meadowlarks
Finches
Northern Cardinal
Sparrows

Enjoy! Dust is still flying as I’m still searching for other broken Vodpod videos.

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Flying Dust

Clipart-Construction-Worker-Smiley-Tipping-His-Hard-Hat-Royalty-Free-Vector-Illustration

Update: (8/29) 10:00pm – Vodpods fixed, now I am trying to adjust the new Sunspot Theme. The dust is really getting thick! Hope you like it, it will get better, I HOPE!

Update: (8/29) All the videos with Vodpod are broken and Peterson’s Bird Series – The dust is getting thick!

I am in the process of preparing this site for a theme change. There are some preparations that are being done behind the scenes. There are over 2,000 post and pages that are being checked.

Missing photos and videos have already been discovered and some broken links are crying for help. So ignore the dust again.

If you want to check out what the new theme will look like, check out the Birds of the Bible for Kids. It will be similar. Click a blog and you will see how the columns change. If you would like to leave a comment or like to let me know if you like it or not, it would be appreciated.

Interesting Things – A Noisy, Bird Brained Harem

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea)  ©WikiC

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) ©WikiC

A NOISY, BIRD BRAINED HAREM

“Whence then cometh wisdom? and where is the place of understanding? Seeing it is hid from the eyes of all living, and kept close from the fowls of the air.” (Job 28:20-21)

SmileyCentral.comScripture frequently makes reference to the fact that birds are not very smart compared to human beings. The tropical wetland bird called the jacana shows that you don’t have to be very smart to be deceptive. The jacana is noteworthy for several reasons. It is one of only 20 species of birds in the world where the female Comb-crested jacana, sometimes referred to as Jesus birdsleaves the care of the young to the males. One flock in southern India was made up of about 50 birds. The males staked out their territory on floating vegetation, often getting into violent fights with other males. Then the females, which are about 60 percent larger than the males, fought with each other for exclusive rights to up to four male territories. Once territories were established, the females would visit each of the males in her territory, mating with each.

Once the eggs are laid in each male’s nest, the female shows no more interest in her offspring. The male will care for the eggs and youngsters once they hatch, until the time they are ready to leave home. But the smaller males have their own strategy for dealing with their situation. They yell. Researchers say a yelling male is really blackmailing the larger female into giving him some attention. A yelling male attracts the attention of other nearby females who might want to take him into her own harem, so his mate comes running to pay attention to him. Sometimes males will even fake an emergency which brings his mate in a hurry. God is the source of all wisdom, and He gave each of His creatures enough wisdom to conduct their lives.

Prayer:
Father, I thank You for Your wisdom in Holy Scripture. Grant me understanding as I read Your Word. Amen.

Notes:
S. Milius, Science News, March 6, 1999, v. 155, p. 149. Photo: Comb-crested jacana, sometimes referred to as Jesus birds. Courtesy of John Hill. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Used with permission: ©Creation Moments 2014


Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian

Lee’s Addition:

Now in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went to them, walking on the sea. And when the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out for fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them, saying, “Be of good cheer! It is I; do not be afraid.” (Matthew 14:25-27 NKJV)

What an interesting behavior from these Jacanas. Never cease to be amazed at how the Lord created His critters and their way of doing things. Did you notice how their feet were designed to support their weight? That habit of “walking on water” is why some call them the “Jesus” Bird.

The Comb-crested Jacanas are members of the Jacanidae – Jacanas Family.

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian's Birdway

Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea) by Ian’s Birdway

More Interesting Things

Creation Moments

Jacanidae – Jacanas Family

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Comb-crested Jacana

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Pale-headed Rosella

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Pale-headed Rosella ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter – 8/24/14

The bird of the week is the Pale-headed Rosella, which I’ll get to in a second, but this is a Special Edition as Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland is at last being published. That is to say, it has been published on Google Play but not yet on the Apple iBook store. That will take a little longer as there are bureaucratic obstacles to be over come. These involve registering Birdway Pty Ltd with the US Inland Revenue and then Apple confirming the registration with the IRS. The first part was easy but the second seems harder as it takes a while for the registration to soak through and finally emerge in the IRS online databases. Anyway, I’ll let you know, loudly, when that happens. In the meantime, you can find it on Google at https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=CblRBAAAQBAJ.

Where To Find Birds in Northern Queensland by Ian

Where To Find Birds in Northern Queensland

End of commercial!

The Pale-headed Rosella, is the widespread and familiar Rosella of Queensland, though it range does extend as far as northern New South Wales. There, and in southeastern Queensland, its range overlaps with the closely related Eastern Rosella and they sometimes interbreed.

The ones in the first two photos were taken outside my house. The first bird is feeding on the seeds of weeds, plenty of those here, and the second is feeding on the fruit of wild passionfruit, another weed, also called stinking passionfruit (Passiflora foetida) as the foliage emits a strong odour when crushed. They’re lovely birds, rather unobtrusive though their soft twittering calls reveal their presence, and I’ll always get pleasure from seeing them. They’re usually in pairs of family parties. The plumage is variable: the bird in the first photo has a much intense blue breast than the second one, but the field guides are tight-lipped about whether the plumage of the sexes differs.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

They’re more forthcoming about the plumage of juveniles, as these often show traces of red or darker feathers on the head, like the one coming down for a drink in the third photo.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

There are two races of the Pale-headed Rosella, a northern paler one on Cape York and south to about Cairns, and a southern darker one south of Townsville with a 300km/200mile band of intergrading between Cairns and Townsville. Originally these were described as two different species, the northern one being the Blue-cheeked Rosella, Platycercus adscitus, the southern one the Pale-headed Rosella, P. palliceps. When they were lumped together, the earlier name adscitus took priority, so the northern race is the nominate one and the southern darker one is race palliceps – unfortunately, given that it is the more intensely coloured. Adscitus means ‘approved’ or ‘accepted’, though exactly what was approved or accepted, I don’t know.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

The Townsville birds in the first three photos belong to palliceps. The two, photographed together at Lake Eacham southwest of Cairns, are much closer the nominate race. The yellow is much paler overall, particularly on the back and the upper breast is mainly pale yellow, rather than blue, but there is a blue patch on the lower cheek. The bird in the fifth photo has clear traces of red on the forehead and is a juvenile; the one in the fourth photo has pinkish traces and may be a young bird too.

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) by Ian

The taxonomy of Rosellas in general has been controversial and is still unsettled. Some authorities maintain that the Pale-headed, the Eastern Rosella and the Northern Rosella all belong to a single species even though they look quite different. Whatever, they’re lovely birds, and the good news is that the Pale-headed Rosella has benefitted from European settlement and the clearing of dense forests – they prefer more open areas.

Links:
Pale-headed Rosella 
Eastern Rosella 
Northern Rosella 

Greetings
Ian

**************************************************
Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737 ian@birdway.com.au
Bird Photos http://www.birdway.com.au/
Recorder Society http://www.nqrs.org.au


Lee’s Addition:

Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book! (Job 19:23 KJV)

I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith: (2 Timothy 4:7 KJV)

Glad they finally have their book published. I know that Ian has been working on this for some time. It is always a great feeling when a project is completed.

Also, the Pale-headed Rosella is a beautiful bird. Another great creation from their Creator. I especially like that first photo.

Rosellas are members of the Psittacidae – Parrots Family. You can see Ian’s photos of this family by clicking here.

See:

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Sunday Inspiration – Batis and Wattle-eye

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) ©WikiC

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) Male ©WikiC

 

Behold, the eye of the LORD is upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in his mercy; (Psalms 33:18 KJV)

Open thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things out of thy law. (Psalms 119:18 KJV)

The eyes of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good. (Proverbs 15:3 KJV)

Lift up your eyes on high, and behold who hath created these things, that bringeth out their host by number: he calleth them all by names by the greatness of his might, for that he is strong in power; not one faileth. (Isaiah 40:26 KJV)

The Platysteiridae Family has these neat little Wattle-eyes and Batis, plus two Shrike-flycatchers and a Shrike. The family has a total of 33 species. I spotted these while working on the update and decided to share them. Their eyes are what draws your attention to them. They are cute little birds that show again the Creator’s variety.

The Platysteiridae are small to medium sized passerines. They have short legs and an upright stance while perched. The tail length is variable, with the Dyaphorophyia wattle-eyes and batises having short tails and the Platysteria wattle-eyes and shrike-flycatchers possessing longish tails. The bill is flat and hooked at the end, and generally wide with well-developed rictal bristles. With the exception of a few batises the plumage of the family is sexually dimorphic. Overall the family has white undersides and dark, speckled upperparts, with many species sporting a band across the chest. A few wattle-eyes depart from this pattern and possess brightly coloured plumage. The plumage on the back of some genera are erectile, giving the family the alternative name of puffback flycatchers. The iris of the batises and the black-and-white shrike-flycatcher is brightly coloured and used in communication, becoming more brightly coloured when the adults are excited. In the wattle-eyes the supra-orbital wattles above the eyes, which give them their name, are used for communication. In addition the family is highly vocal, giving a range of whistles, harsh calls and duets. (Wikipedia)

 

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“There Shall Be Showers of Blessing”. Hymn – at Faith Baptist Church

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Platysteiridae – Wattle-eyes, Batises

Sunday Inspiration

Birds of the World – Families

4 Things God Wants You to Know

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Dusky’s and In Love With Words

Burrowing Owl from Dusky's Wonders

Burrowing Owl from Dusky’s Wonders

And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these. (Mark 12:30-31 KJV)

Wanted to share with you two blogs I follow.

Sandra Conner’s, In Love With Words, had a neat post about a truck that  was crying. It is worth reading.

In Love With Words - Crying Truck and Virginia Creeper

In Love With Words – Crying Truck and Virginia Creeper

Virginia Creeper wasn’t beautiful and was generally considered a nuisance wherever she grew. But she had a kind heart, and when she heard sobbing out by the alley, she crawled over to investigate. She found Barney, the discarded garbage truck, soaking the ground with his tears……..

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS – 8/22/14 — ‘LOVE GROWS ON YOU’

I love it! Hope you do also.

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Owl from Dusky's Wonders

Owl from Dusky’s Wonders

Also Dusky’s Wonders released a new set of neat bird photos again today. Check those out.

I am still working on the IOC Version 4.3 Update. All the pages are completed and now I am working on the Indexes. Majority of the work is done. Stay tuned.

Birds of the World

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Working On IOC 4.3 Version – Name Changes

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

It is a good thing to give thanks unto the LORD, and to sing praises unto thy name, O most High: To shew forth thy lovingkindness in the morning, and thy faithfulness every night,
(Psalms 92:1-2 KJV)

I realized that while we were on our recent trip, that the IOC 4.3 Version was released just before we left. So, I am busy working on updating the Birds of the World pages. Not finished, but here are the – Name Changes.

 

Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) ©©Bing-Tapac

Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) ©©Bing-Tapac

Upper Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) – changed to Magdalena Tapaculo

Magdalena Tapaculo (Scytalopus rodriguezi) IBC

Macgregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) ©Bing SuperStock

Macgregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) ©Bing SuperStock

MacGregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) – changed to Macgregor’s Bowerbird 

Macgregor’s Bowerbird (Amblyornis macgregoriae) IBC

Macgregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) ©WikiC Drawing

Macgregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) ©WikiC Drawing

MacGregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) – changed to Macgregor’s Honeyeater

Macgregor’s Honeyeater (Macgregoria pulchra) IBC

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Southern Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) – changed to Golden Grosbeak  (previously Golden-bellied Grosbeak)

Golden Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysogaster) by Ian

Mexican Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus) ©WikiC

Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus) ©WikiC

Mexican Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus)  – changed to Yellow Grosbeak

Yellow Grosbeak (Pheucticus chrysopeplus) ©WikiC

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The new IOC 4.3 Version now has 10,534 extant (living) species and 150 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 4.3), with subspecies (20,999) and annotations. They have added several new families and deleted one. Plus they have rearranged several families. Stay tuned as I work on it behind the scenes.

(WordPress is still not back to where it was, which is making it difficult to work on this update.)

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Bible Birds – Peacocks Page Updated

Indian Peafowl (Pavocristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavocristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich?  (Job 39:13)

Peacocks belong to the  Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies Family.

Click to See the updated page with a Slideshow and the article

These are over on the Birds of the Bible For Kids blog.

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Masked Woodswallow

Masked Woodswallow (Artamus personatus) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Masked Woodswallow ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter – 8/14/14

When I was taking location photos along the inland route to Paluma several weeks ago, I came across a mixed flock of a couple of hundred Masked and White-browed Woodswallows. The White-browed featured as bird of the week in 2005, but the Masked hasn’t so here it is. The males in particular, first photo, are very elegant with a sharply defined, very black mask, soft grey back, almost white underparts and a white crescent between the mask and the back of the head.

The females, second photo, are similar to the males with less contrasting plumage, only a subtle crescent, and a buff wash to the upper breast. The yellow specks on the mask and breast of this female are pollen – these primarily insectivorous birds also feed on nectar, particularly in northern Australia in winter.

Masked Woodswallow (Artamus personatus) by Ian
The female in the second photo and the juvenile in the third photo were in a mixed flock of Masked and White-browed that spent a week or so feeding on the locally common Fern-leaved Grevillea near where I live in 2005. The juveniles are similar to the females, but with browner plumage with pale spots and streaks.

Masked Woodswallow (Artamus personatus) by Ian

The ‘swallow’ part of the name comes from their buoyant, gliding flight and not because they are related to real swallows (family Hirundinidae). Rather, they are related to the Australian Magpie, Butcherbirds and Currawongs, usually combined in the one family, the Artamidae. There is an obvious similarity to the Magpie and Butcherbirds in their general form and bi-coloured bills and they are also quite aggressive, Woodswallows being quick to mob raptors in flight. The ‘personatus’ part of the scientific name comes from the Latin persona, meaning mask, a derivation that amused me when I though of show business ‘personalities’.

The White-browed and Masked Woodswallows are very closely related species, even though their respective plumages are quite distinct. They are both very nomadic and occur throughout mainland Australia, though not Tasmania. They often occur together in large mixed flocks. In eastern Australia, the White-browed predominates; in Western Australia, the Masked is more numerous and may occur alone. The two species will even nest together in small mixed colonies and occasionally interbreed.

Links:
Artamidae
Masked Woodswallow
White-browed Woodswallow

Greetings
Ian

**************************************************
Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737 ian@birdway.com.au
Bird Photos http://www.birdway.com.au/
Recorder Society http://www.nqrs.org.au


Lee’s Addition:

“Even the stork in the heavens Knows her appointed times; And the turtledove, the swift, and the swallow Observe the time of their coming. But My people do not know the judgment of the LORD. (Jeremiah 8:7 NKJV)

What a neat looking bird. I especially like the clean line around his “mask”. We have seen Woodswallows in a zoo, but not this kind and not in the wild. That last photo is a super photo. Thanks, Ian, for sharing with us.

Swallows and Woodswallows are in two different families. Woodswallows are in the Artamidae – Woodswallows Family while the Hirundinidae Family has the Swallows and Martins.

Here is a photo of  White-breasted Woodswallows that we saw at Zoo Miami:

White-breasted Woodswallow (Artamus leucorynchus amydrus) by Lee ZM

White-breasted Woodswallow (Artamus leucorynchus amydrus) by Lee ZM

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Birds of the Bible – Peacocks in South Carolina

Peacocks at entrance to Magnolia Plantation

Peacocks at entrance to Magnolia Plantation

 

For the king had at sea a navy of Tharshish with the navy of Hiram: once in three years came the navy of Tharshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks. (1 Kings 10:22)

We have just arrived home from a shortened vacation due to a health issue. We got as far as Charleston, S. C. before turning around and drifting back home.

We were able to visit a few places, the Magnolia Plantation, for one, in Charleston. We were greeted at the entrance by at least 6 or 7 Peacocks. Also at the Petting Zoo, they had two female Peafowl with very young peachicks. As far as I could tell, these were Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus). Peacocks are actually Peafowl and belong to the Pheasant & Allies Phasianidae Family.

I have never seen peachicks before and thought it cute that they have the little tufts on their heads that will eventually grow those top feathers.

Peachicks at Magnolia Gardens by Lee

Peachicks at Magnolia Gardens by Lee

“First, the “Peacocks” are the males. The females are called “Peahens” and their chicks are called “Peachicks.”  Collectively the birds are called Peafowl. They all belong to the Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies Family.” (From Birds of the Bible – Peacocks II


Dan photographing one of the Peacocks

Dan photographing one of the Peacocks

To find out more about Peacocks (Peafowl):

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PS. Sorry about the quickly edited photos. I’ve had the blog on “auto-pilot” for over a week, but ran out of pre-scheduled blogs.

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Sunday Inspiration – Sunbirds

Crimson Sunbird (Aethopyga siparaja) by Peter Ericsson

Crimson Sunbird (Aethopyga siparaja) by Peter Ericsson

For the LORD God is a sun and shield; The LORD will give grace and glory; No good thing will He withhold From those who walk uprightly. (Psalms 84:11 NKJV)

From the rising of the sun to its going down The LORD’s name is to be praised. (Psalms 113:3 NKJV)

Sunbirds are another of the beautifully created birds from the Lord’s Hand. They are members of the Nectariniidae – Sunbirds family. This family has 143 members including the Sunbirds and Spiderhunters.

These are very small passerine birds. Most sunbirds feed largely on nectar, but also take insects and spiders, especially when feeding young. Flower tubes that bar access to nectar because of their shape, are simply punctured at the base near the nectaries. Fruit is also part of the diet of some species. Their flight is fast and direct on their short wings.

The family is distributed throughout Africa, the Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia and just reaches northern Australia.

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“Temporary Home” – Flute played by Courtney Love (artist Carrie Underwood)

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If you would like to see the words to this song:

Little boy, six years old
A little too used to being alone
Another new mom and dad
Another school, another house that’ll never be a home

When people ask him how he likes this place
He looks up and says with a smile upon his face

“This is my temporary home, it’s not where I belong
Windows and rooms that I’m passing through
This is just a stop on the way to where I’m going
I’m not afraid because I know this is my temporary home”
Hmmmm………
Young mom on her own
She needs a little help, got nowhere to go
She’s looking for a job, looking for a way out
‘Cause a halfway house will never be a home

At night she whispers to her baby girl
“Someday we’ll find our place here in this world”

“This is our temporary home, it’s not where we belong
Windows and rooms that we’re passing through
This is just a stop on the way to where we’re going
I’m not afraid because I know this is our temporary home”
Hmmmm………
Old man, hospital bed
The room is filled with people he loves
And he whispers “Don’t cry for me, I’ll see you all someday”
He looks up and says “I can see God’s face”

“This is my temporary home, it’s not where I belong
Windows and rooms that I’m passing through
This was just a stop on the way to where I’m going
I’m not afraid because I know this was my temporary home”
This is our temporary home
This is our temporary home.

(Published – FAIR USE)

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who according to His abundant mercy has begotten us again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance incorruptible and undefiled and that does not fade away, reserved in heaven for you, who are kept by the power of God through faith for salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. (1 Peter 1:3-5 NKJV)

More

Sunday Inspiration

Nectariniidae – Sunbirds Family

Sunbird – Wikipedia

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