Sunday Inspiration – Mockingbirds and Thrashers

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) By Dan'sPix

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) By Dan (Dan’sPix)

“Do not curse the king, even in your thought; Do not curse the rich, even in your bedroom; For a bird of the air may carry your voice, And a bird in flight may tell the matter.” (Ecclesiastes 10:20 NKJV)

Mockingbirds have been one of my favorite birds. They used to nest in a bush outside our bedroom when we lived in Fort Lauderdale, FL. He used to sing, sing, and sing when they had their young. Only problem was sometimes he sang at 2 or 3 in the morning (outside our bedroom). Those are the times when you wished birds observed “quite hours.”

When the doors are shut in the streets, And the sound of grinding is low; When one rises up at the sound of a bird, And all the daughters of music are brought low. (Ecclesiastes 12:4 NKJV)

Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) By Dan'sPix

Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) By Dan’sPix

That said, let’s look at our bird family this week. The Mimidae are the New World family of passerine birds that includes thrashers, mockingbirds, tremblers, and the New World catbirds. As their name (Latin for “mimic”) suggests, these birds are notable for their vocalization, especially some species’ remarkable ability to mimic a wide variety of birds and other sounds heard outdoors.

Brown Trembler (Cinclocerthia ruficauda) ©WikiC

Brown Trembler (Cinclocerthia ruficauda) ©WikiC

There are 34 birds in this family which includes thrashers, mockingbirds, tremblers, and the New World catbirds. They tend towards dull grays and browns in their appearance, though a few are black or blue-gray, and many have red, yellow, or white irises. Many mimids have a rather thrush-like pattern: brown above, pale with dark streaks or spots below. They tend to have longer tails than thrushes (or the bigger wrens, which they also resemble) and longer bills that in many species curve downward.

Grey Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) by Raymond Barlow

Grey Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) by Raymond Barlow

They have long, strong legs (for passerines) with which many species hop through undergrowth searching for arthropods and fruits to eat. Their habitat varies from forest undergrowth to scrub, high-altitude grasslands, and deserts. The two tremblers live in the atypical habitat of rain forests in the Lesser Antilles, and the Brown Trembler has the particularly atypical behavior of foraging while clinging to tree trunks. (With information from Wikipedia)

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At that day ye shall know that I am in my Father, and ye in me, and I in you. He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him. (John 14:20-21 KJV)

“I Am Loved” ~ Faith Baptist Orchestra

More Sunday Inspirations

Mimidae – Mockingbirds, Thrashers

Sharing The Gospel


Enter Into His Gates With Thanksgiving

Enter into His gates with thanksgiving

James J. S. Johnson

Serve Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all ye lands.  Serve the Lord with gladness; come before His presence with singing.  Know ye that the Lord he is God; it is He Who hath made us, and not we ourselves; we are His people, and the sheep of His pasture.  Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with praise; be thankful unto Him, and bless His name.  For the Lord is good; His mercy is everlasting; and His truth endureth to all generations.  (Psalm 100)

Sometimes what you expect to find, is not what you find.  This is true of Grenada’s official bird, if you assume it matches Grenada’s official coat of arms.  This is also true if you imagine tha the Thanksgiving holiday, as it is celebrated in Grenada, is like the Thanksgiving holiday as it is celebrated in America.

Fair Use credit:

Grenada’s official coat of arms includes an Armadillo and a Grenada Dove (Leptotila wells  —  a/k/a Well’s dove or pea dove), positioned above the motto “Ever conscious of God, we aspire, build, and advance as one people.”   The Grenada Dove is endemic to Grenada – i.e., only on the island of Grenada is the Grenada Dove found in the wild, and even there it is critically “endangered” (i.e., close to extinction).   The dove’s coloring, as depicted on the Grenada coat of arms, however, does not closely match the actual coloring of the real bird.

(Grenada coat of arms – public domain)

(Grenada coat of arms – public domain)

The dove’s coloring, as depicted on the Grenada coat of arms, however, does not closely match the actual coloring of the real bird.  The actual Grenada Dove has little blue to it (depending on the lighting used to view it)  –  rather, brown and buff dominate its overall coloring.  One wonders why, therefore, the heraldic depiction shows indigo-blue and azure, with yellow highlighting.  Consider the more realistic depictions before, as shown by photographic and postage images.

Fair use credit:  grenada national archives (from the website of the National Archives of Grenada)

(Grenada postage stamp issued in February of AD1974 – public domain)

Consider also these special World Wildlife Fund-logo Grenada postage stamps,  showing Grenada Doves.

Grenada stamps 1

Grenada stamps 2

(Grenda postage stamps issued in January AD1995 – public domain)

The lesson here, apparently, is that heraldic coat-of-arms depictions of birds can (sometimes) be quite unrealistic – or else the artist might be depicting the wrong bird!

But Grenada’s coat of arms is not the only surprise in its national symbols.

Consider the holiday of Thanksgiving.

In the United States of America, for a contrasting example, the holiday of “Thanksgiving” (celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November) commemorates the gratitude of Plymouth Pilgrims, as pioneer survivors, who thanked God at harvest time in AD1621, for His providence — see “Strangers and Pilgrims (and the American Turkey)”, posted at .  The Pilgrims’ survival and early successes, due to God’s providence, are also celebrated in the Netherlands, in Leiden, to commemorate how the Pilgrims lived in Holland during AD1609-AD1620.  A special Thanksgiving worship service is conducted, there, on the morning of America’s Thanksgiving, in Pieterskerk [“Peter’s church”], a Gothic church that was originally Roman Catholic (from its architectural beginning in AD1390), yet became Protestant during the Dutch Reformation, and became the burial site for John Robinson, pastor of the Pilgrims prior to their migratory journey to America.

Canadians observe a similar holiday, called l’Action de grâce in French, on the second Monday in October.

Norfolk Island, an external territory of Australia, celebrated Thanksgiving on the last Wednesday of November, so that Norfolk Island’s celebration of Thanksgiving occcurs either the day before, or six days after, the day when Americans celebrate Thanksgiving.

Saint Lucia, an island nation on the eastern edge of the Caribbean Sea, celebrates Thanksgiving on the first Monday in October.

Christians in Germany have a similar harvest-thanksgiving holiday, Erntedankfest, in early October, at about the same time that its Bavarians are celebrating Oktoberfest.

Although gratitude to God – for harvest blessings — was the original reason for most harvest festival-oriented “thanksgiving” holidays, historically, many Thanksgiving parades (e.g., Macy’s, IKEA, McDonald’s) and other festive celebrations is secularized feast days, in  slang called “Turkey Day”.

But how is Thanksgiving celebrated in Grenada, and why ?

First, consider where Grenada is located – Grenada is an island nation situated slightly east of South America, north of Venezuela.  Politically speaking, the nation of Grenada actually includes the main island (called “Grenada”) plus a few smaller islands, some but not all of “the Grenadines”, which are situated north of the Martinique Channel – with several of the other Grenadine islands (located south of the Martinique Channel) jurisdictionally belonging to the Caribbean nation called “St. Vincent and the Grenadines”.

grenada map

In AD1498 the main island of Grenada was visited by Christopher Columbus, who named it “Concepcion”.

Grenada was later visited by Britons, then French ; it was eventually settled by French colonists. Later, as part of the Treaty of Paris (in AD1763), Grenada became a British colony.  Grenada shed its colonial status, however, in AD1974, as it then became officially independent of the United Kingdom, although it remained an affiliate of the British Commonwealth.

So far so good, it seemed, until AD1983, when a Communist military takeover occurred on the island, led by General Hudson Austin (who was politically backed by Cuba, and aided by Cuban soldiers), which actually seized control from a prior Communist takeover (i.e., one Communist regime killed off the leadership of a prior Communist dictatorship).  American students were put in jeopardy so President Ronald Reagan authorized a rescue operation, which included defeating the “New Jewel Movement” (i.e., the second Communist dictatorship).

Thus, beginning on October 25th of AD1983, the “New Jewel Movement” Communists who seized the country were soon opposed by a coalition of rescue forces, comprised of the United States and several Caribbean allies (from six Caribbean nations, including Jamaica and Barbados), in a complicated military effort called “Operation Urgent Fury” – which included U.S. Army Rangers, U.S. Marines, Delta Force, 82nd Airborne paratroopers, and U.S. Navy SEALs.  Because the rescue operation was so successful – and peace was restored to Grenada (with the Cuban soldiers being expelled) a holiday of gratitude was established – October 25th became Thanksgiving Day for Grenada.

Operation Urgent Fury photograph

Operation Urgent Fury photograph (public domain, AD1983) M102 howitzers (320th Field Artillery Regiment) firing on Grenada island.

Because the America-led rescue operation was so successful – and peace was restored to Grenada (with the Cuban soldiers ebign expelled) a holiday of gratitude was established – October 25th became Thanksgiving Day for Grenada.

Bottom line:   we all  –  whether American or Grenadians or anyone else for whom Christ died  —  have a lot to be thankful for, on whatever day that we celebrate Thanksgiving (and on every other day of the year!).

In accord with Psalm 100 we should, daily, “enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with praise; be thankful unto Him, and bless His name”.

Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2 Updated

We will continue with the Foundation from the Word of God (the Bible) about the creation of birds.

If you have not read “Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1 Updated Click Here

By the end of Genesis Chapter 1 the birds (fowls of the air):

Fischers Lovebird by Phil Kwong

Fischers Lovebird by Phil Kwong

  • Created by the Lord on Day 5
  • Each according to its kind
  • Told to multiply and fill the earth
  • Were given every green herb for food (vegetarians)
  • Placed under the dominion of man
  • “God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good.”

In Chapter 2, the birds are named by Adam. (v 19-20)

At this point, we know that the birds were at their best, they were eating fruits, seeds, herbs and not each other.  The birds had been named according to their kinds by Adam, who was created on Day 6. Their colors and features were at their grandest showing the Glory of God’s wisdom and omnipotence. They must have been fantastic to behold.


When the serpent tempted Eve and caused her to question the Word of God, she not only questioned, but added to the Word of God.

Now the serpent was more subtle than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made. And he said unto the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden? And the woman said unto the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden: But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. (Genesis 3:1-3 KJV

Most of you know the rest of what happened:

  • Eve ate of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and gave Adam some also.
  • They were caught and tried to pass the blame.
  • The serpent was cursed. Adam and Eve become sinners and pass sin on to their offspring (us).
  • All God’s creation was cursed (Genesis 3:15-19)
  • Death (spiritual and physical) is now present, which had not been before.
  • Because of Adam’s sin, an animal had to die to make “coats of skins, and clothed them”, “God clothes them with a garment which covers their nakedness, a garment which had its origin in death (the death of another), which had come in, but which hid the effects of the sin that had introduced it.” (Darby’s Synopsis)
  • Sacrifices of the blood of animals and birds for man’s sin is begun. Not until the Lord Jesus Christ became the perfect sacrifice (Hebrews 9:12-14) did the need for those sacrifices end.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds should be reproved. But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God. (John 3:16-21)

Somewhere between the Fall of Adam and Eve and the cursing of them and all of creation, the birds, animals,  earth, man, etc. all begin to have changes in their behavior from God’s proclaiming that all was “very good.” By the time of the Flood (Foundation #3), that, “very good” is no longer true.

African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) ©WikiC

African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) ©WikiC

Several very interesting articles:

Different Kinds of Flesh, by Paul A. Bartz

Even Strange Animals Fit into Kinds, by Paul A. Bartz

Why Does God’s Creation Include Death & Suffering?, by Tommy Mitchell, January 31, 2008, From “The New Answers Book”, Answers in Genesis

How Did Defense/Attack Structures Come About?, by Andy McIntosh & Bodie Hodge, December 27, 2007, From “The New Answers Book”, Answers in Genesis

Why Did God Create Such Terrible Teeth? by Brian Thomas, M.S., Institute for Creation Research

Did Lions Roam the Garden of Eden? by Nathaniel T. Jeanson, Ph.D., Institute for Creation Research




Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1 – Updated

If you read my blog, Impact of the Answers in Genesis Conference, I stated that the Foundation of the Word of God needs to be emphasized. For the last year, the different Birds of the Bible have been introduced. Where did the birds come from? The byline of this blog is “Birdwatching from a Christian Perspective.”  What does God’s Word say about the bird’s Creation?

Scrub Jay by Mike Bader

Scrub Jay by Mike Bader

Most birdwatchers know that when they pick up a Bird Guide or Book, one of the first thing we read is:

“Having attained the power of flight more than 150 million years ago, birds might be …” (Smithsonian Handbooks, Birds of North America, Eastern Region, page 6)

“Feathered Dinosaurs?
For years biologists have half-jokingly referred to birds as “feathered reptiles.” In part, it is a ploy to annoy bird lovers with the thought that the objects of their fancy are just singing lizards wrapped in stretched-out scales called “feathers.” Yet the phrase reflects an important biological reality: birds are undeniably the modified descendants of reptiles, as their body structure and habit of laying eggs out of water clearly show.”
Archaeopteryx makes an ideal “missing link,” showing characteristics intermediate between reptiles and birds…..One view, still held by many paleontologists, suggests that about 200 million years ago its ancestral line split off from a group of reptiles, the thecodonts.” (The Birder’s Handbook, p. 31-33)

“The Implications of Flight / The central theme of bird evolution is flight. Most avian features can be related back to this fundamental adaptation. The avian forelimbs are dedicated almost entirely to aerial flight, for instance. To meet the diverse demands of survival without hands, birds have been subject to a fascinating evolutionary makeover.”  … “Birds have evolved compact….” (p. 15)  Section called Origins, Evolution, and Classification states – “Bird Are Reptiles – Before the discovery of Archaeopteryx” (“about 150 million years”),” taxonomists had already suggested a close relationship between birds and reptiles because of the large number of anatomical features shared by the two classes of animals.” Goes on to mention “missing link” (p. 39, The Sibley Guide to Bird Life & Behavior)

On and on it goes. They state as “undeniable facts” many things that come from a “theory.”

But the Word of God, our Bible says differently.

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. (Genesis 1:1)

Continuing through Chapter 1, you find that God, who is the “self-existent”, “three-in-one”, known as “I AM“, did the creation through the Lord Jesus Christ.

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. (John 1:1-3)

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by Lee

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by Lee

Day 1 – Light (Day) and darkness (Night)
Day 2 – Firmament (Heaven) in midst of the waters and divided them
Day 3 – Waters (Seas) gathered together and the dry land (Earth) appeared with grass, herbs and fruit after his kind
Day 4 – Sun, Moon, and Stars
Day 5 – Great whales and all water creatures after his kind and the winged fowls (birds) after his kind

And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven. And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth. And the evening and the morning were the fifth day. (Genesis 1:20-23)

Day 6 – Land animals, cattle, and creeping things after their kind

And God said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so. And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good. And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. (Genesis 1:24-26 )

So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. (Genesis 1:27-29)

And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so. And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:30-31)

Day 7 – God rested and blessed and sanctified all His work

Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made. And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made. (Genesis 2:1-3)

In Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2, I will bring out some more from the Word of God and articles written about the creation of birds. For now, let me make this observation. If the birds were created on Day 5 and the reptiles were created on Day 6, how did birds evolve from reptiles?


A friend suggested that, since she is a new follower, I should re-post/update some of the original Birds of the Bible articles. This series was posted back in 2009. I am updating some of the photos and material as needed.

Birds of the Bible

Original Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1

Original Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2

Wordless Birds

Sunday Inspiration – Nuthatches and Creepers

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) ©WikiC

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) ©WikiC

Every animal, every creeping thing, every bird, and whatever creeps on the earth, according to their families, went out of the ark. (Genesis 8:19 NKJV)

The Lord has created more little avian wonders in these three next families:

Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) by Daves BirdingPix

Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) by Daves BirdingPix

The 28 Nuthatches constitute a genus, Sitta, of small passerine birds belonging to the family Sittidae. Characterised by large heads, short tails, and powerful bills and feet, nuthatches advertise their territory using loud, simple songs. Most species exhibit grey or bluish upperparts and a black eye stripe.

Most nuthatches breed in the temperate or montane woodlands of the Northern Hemisphere, although two species have adapted to rocky habitats in the warmer and drier regions of Eurasia. However, the greatest diversity is in Southern Asia, and similarities between the species have made it difficult to identify distinct species. All members of this genus nest in holes or crevices. Most species are non-migratory and live in their habitat year-round, although the North American Red-breasted Nuthatch migrates to warmer regions during the winter.

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) by Nikhil Devasar

The Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) is a small passerine bird found throughout the high mountains of Eurasia. It is the only member of the genus Tichodroma. (Wikipedia)

PAS-Clim Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus) ©WikiC 3

Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus) ©WikiC

The 11 Treecreepers are a family, Certhiidae, of small passerine birds, widespread in wooded regions of the Northern Hemisphere and sub-Saharan Africa. The family contains ten species in two genera, Certhia and Salpornis. Their plumage is dull-coloured, and as their name implies, they climb over the surface of trees in search of food.

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Also, to every beast of the earth, to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, in which there is life, I have given every green herb for food”; and it was so. Then God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good. So the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:30-31 NKJV)

“How Deep Is Your Love?” – Played by Jill Foster (Faith Baptist)

More Sunday Inspirations

Sittidae – Nuthatches

Tichodromidae – Wallcreeper

Certhiidae – Treecreepers

Sharing The Gospel



Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Nikhil

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Nikhil


“But these are they of which ye shall not eat: the eagle, and the ossifrage, and the ospray … And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.” (Deuteronomy 14:12, 18)

Don’t mess with the hoopoe – especially the female! Their Creator blessed this bird with an oil gland that produces a really foul-smelling liquid. When rubbed into their plumage, it smells like rotting meat and deters not only predators but parasites as well. In fact, it also acts as an antibacterial agent.

Hoopoe Feeding Young ©©Dvir Lotan from Israel

Hoopoe Feeding Young ©©Dvir Lotan from Israel

Thanks to this nasty-smelling liquid, most predators stay far away from the hoopoe’s nest. But even when a predator ignores the stench and comes looking for a meal while mama hoopoe is away, the nestlings are not defenseless. Even when they are just six days old, they can produce the same liquid and shoot it accurately into the face of predators.

With such an awful smell, perhaps it was a great blessing that God placed the hoopoe on His list of animals that were not to be eaten by His people. By the way, the King James version of the Bible refers to the hoopoe as the lapwing but we’re still talking about the hoopoe. Since this bird is listed in Deuteronomy as an unclean animal, isn’t it rather odd that the modern state of Israel would choose the hoopoe as their national bird?

Like the hoopoe, every person ever born is unclean in God’s sight. This is why Jesus Christ, the sinless lamb of God, submitted Himself to die on the cross as our substitute. He will make you clean in God’s sight when you repent of your sins and put your trust in Jesus!

Heavenly Father, I know that there’s nothing I can do to make myself clean and righteous. Thank You for sending Your Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross to make me acceptable in Your sight. Amen.

©Creation Moments 2015

Lee’s Addition:

the stork, the heron after its kind, and the hoopoe and the bat. (Deu 14:18)

Our Creator has again shown His perfect design and protection for another of His avian wonders. This time with the Hoopoe. They are a Bird of the Bible and have been features several times her on this blog.

Good News Tracts


THE UMBRELLA BIRD from Creation Moments

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

THE UMBRELLA BIRD from Creation Moments – Re-post

“Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness.” (1 Thessalonians 5:5)

The best fishermen not only know where the fish are biting, but exactly what type of bait or lure is needed to catch the big ones. That’s why I say that the best fisherman of all is not a man but a bird.

The black heron knows exactly where and when the fish are biting. He goes fishing for his food by wading into shallow lakes and ponds. But there’s a problem. Fish avoid the water’s surface to avoid the bright rays of the sun. Even if a fish does come close to the surface, the black heron is unable to see it because he is blinded by the sun’s reflection.

But like I said, this bird is a master fisherman. What he does is shape his wings into a large black umbrella. He then crouches down until his wings are almost touching the water, effectively turning daylight into darkness, and attracting fish to the shade. Under cover of his umbrella, the black heron pokes his head into the water and comes out with a squirming fish in his beak.

This kind of fishing is known as canopy feeding. How did the black heron learn to fish like this? Creationists know, but evolutionists have no reasonable answer. They only have a term. Yes, evolutionists are good at coming up with terms like “canopy feeding”, but when it comes to explaining how such a thing originated in the first place, they are still very much in the dark.

Heavenly Father, I ask You to make me a good fisherman – not of fish but of men. Use me to share the gospel so that my friends and family will turn to You for salvation. Amen.
Notes: Photo: Black heron comes out of its feathered canopy after catching a fish. Courtesy of Steve Garvie. (CC-BY-SA 2.0 GENERIC)

©Creation Moments 2015

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ©WikiC

Lee’s Addition:

What an amazing behavior that the Lord gave these Black Herons! Just as the Lord promised the Ravens, this verse is also true for the Black Herons:

Who provides food for the raven (or Black Herons), When its young ones cry to God, And wander about for lack of food? (Job 38:41 NKJV)


Sorry I have not been as quick to answer your comments this last week, but we have had company. My sister and her husband, from the Denver area, are with us and are staying in the room that has my computer. :) We had the memorial service this last weekend for my other sister who went on to Glory several months ago. See:

No Post Today – But 20/20 Vision

Hope to be back to a more normal schedule soon. Yet, I wish they could stay longer. Heaven will be great when we can visit eternally with our whole Spiritual Family, which includes many of you, but most of all with our Savior, Eternal Brother, God the Father.

Creation Moments Umbrella Bird

Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns Family

Black Heron – Wikipedia


Sunday Inspiration – Wrens

Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) by Lee

God, who made the world and everything in it, since He is Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands. (Acts 17:24 NKJV)

The Troglodytidae – Wrens Family was the one skipped over in the Sunday Inspiration last week. There are 84 species in the family, so they deserve their own blog. The family name Troglodytidae is derived from troglodyte, which means “cave-dweller”, and the wrens get their scientific name from the tendency of some species to forage in dark crevices.

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Raymond Barlow

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Raymond Barlow

Wrens are medium-small to very small birds. The Eurasian wren is among the smallest birds in its range, while the smaller species from the Americas are among the smallest passerines in that part of the world. They range in size from the white-bellied wren, which averages under 10 cm (3.9 in) and 9 g (0.32 oz), to the giant wren, which averages about 22 cm (8.7 in) and weighs almost 50 g (1.8 oz). The dominating colors of their plumage are generally drab, composed of gray, brown, black, and white, and most species show some barring, especially to tail and/or wings. No sexual dimorphism is seen in the plumage of wrens, and little difference exists between young birds and adults. All have fairly long, straight to marginally decurved bills.

Bewick's Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) by Daves BirdingPix

Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) by Daves BirdingPix

Wrens have loud and often complex songs, sometimes given in duet by a pair. The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.

Then God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good. So the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:31 NKJV)

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“He is Everything To Me” – Men’s Ensemble – Faith Baptist


More Sunday Inspirations

Sermons From My Pastor


Sunday Inspiration – Seven Small Families

As we continue through our Passerines, we come to seven families that have very few members in them. Just because their numbers are few, their Creator has not failed to give each a niche to fill and the ability and design to do so. They are all small birds, like the song, “His Eye Is On The Sparrow,” these bird are no less ignored by the Lord.

Dapple-throat (Arcanator orostruthus) ©WikiC

Dapple-throat (Arcanator orostruthus) ©WikiC

I am weary with my crying; My throat is dry; My eyes fail while I wait for my God. (Psalms 69:3 NKJV)

The Dapple-throat and allies – Arcanatoridae family only has three species; Spot-throatt, Dapple-throat and the Grey-chested Babbler. Internet says they are from Africa and that its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. That is about the only information given.

Cape Sugarbird (Promerops cafer) ©WikiC

Cape Sugarbird (Promerops cafer) ©WikiC

More to be desired are they than gold, Yea, than much fine gold; Sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb. (Psalms 19:10 NKJV)

The Sugarbirds make up a small family, Promeropidae, of passerine birds which are restricted to southern Africa. The two species of sugarbird make up one of only two bird families restricted entirely to southern Africa, the other being the rock-jumpers Chaetopidae. In general appearance as well as habits they resemble large long-tailed sunbirds, but are possibly more closely related to the Australian honeyeaters. They have brownish plumage, the long downcurved bill typical of passerine nectar feeders, and long tail feathers.

Asian Fairy-bluebird (Irena puella) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

Asian Fairy-bluebird (Irena puella) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

“You shall make the robe of the ephod all of blue.” (Exodus 28:31 NKJV)

The two Fairy-bluebirds are small passerine bird species found in forests and plantations in tropical southern Asia and the Philippines. They are the sole members of the genus Irena and family Irenidae, and are related to the ioras and leafbirds.

These are bulbul-like birds of open forest or thorn scrub, but whereas that group tends to be drab in colouration, fairy-bluebirds are sexually dimorphic, with the males being dark blue in plumage, and the females duller green.

Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) by Ian

Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) by Ian

And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold, and make thereto a crown of gold round about. (Exodus 25:24 KJV)

Regulidae – Goldcrests, kinglets family has only six members. The kinglets or crests are a small group of birds sometimes included in the Old World warblers, but are frequently given family status because they also resemble the titmice. The scientific name Regulidae is derived from the Latin word regulus for “petty king” or prince, and comes from the coloured crowns of adult birds. This family has representatives in North America and Eurasia.

Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) ©Ramki Sreenivasan

Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) ©Ramki Sreenivasan

The Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa (Elachuridae) is the only bird in its family they discovered recently through DNA studies. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. This species is found in undergrowth and dense thickets of this type of forest, with a preference for thick fern ground cover, mossy rocks and decaying trunks of fallen trees and brushwood (often near stream or creek) long grass and scrub.

Violet-baked Hyliota (Hyliota violacea) ©WikiC

Violet-baked Hyliota (Hyliota violacea) ©WikiC

Hyliotidae – Hyliota found in Angola, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath; for the heavens shall be dissolved and vanish away like smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they that dwell therein shall die in like manner [like gnats]. But My salvation shall be forever, and My rightness and justice [and faithfully fulfilled promise] shall not be abolished. [Matt. 24:35; Heb. 1:11; II Pet. 3:10.] (Isaiah 51:6 AMP)

(Wrens skipped until next week ) Our last group of very small birds are from the Polioptilidae – Gnatcatchers. The 18 species of small passerine birds in the gnatcatcher family occur in North and South America (except far south and high Andean regions). Most species of this mainly tropical and subtropical group are resident, but the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher of the USA and southern Canada migrates south in winter. They are close relatives of the wrens. (Wikipedia)

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Parrot Mountain’s Origin and Mission

Origin of Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden

Parrot Mountain is a result of a vision the owner had in July 1995. He left Mississippi with his family and came to the mountains of Tennessee and was led to the land that is called Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden.

The vision was to build a garden landscaped with flowers, plants, birds and most importantly with scriptures from the word. The scriptures are planted throughout like seeds through the gardens to be a testimonial that there is a Great God who reigns eternal in the heavens and that all things are made were made by Him and without Him was not anything made that was made that is to say in the beginning God created all things. As you stroll through the gardens not the beautiful color of the birds and flowers how their colors give Him glory and we believe that we, as His creation, should give him glory.

And so seven years after moving to the mountains the gardens were opened on August 28, 2002.

Our Mission here at Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden.

  1. Is to be a witness and declare His name that The Lord God is the Creator of the heavens and the earth. That all things were made by Him and without Him was not anything made that was made. For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ.
  2. To provide a shelter for abused or neglected birds and a home for birds that need a place for whatever reason.
  3. For the propagation of endangered or threaten species. To increase the numbers so that they do not become extinct like the Passenger Pigeon and Carolina Parakeet once native to the United States. To educate the public about these magnificent creatures and keeping in harmony with the beauty and serenity of the mountains.

We were thoroughly blessed and enjoyed our time we spent at Parrot Mountain. I have already shared a couple of post with you about our visit. The Origin and Mission above was copied from a handout given when you enter. I trust they do not mind me recopying it here. Pictures were added by me. If you ever are up in the Pigeon Forge, Tennessee area, it will be well worth your effort to visit them.


These pages from them have some nice photos:

Articles written here:



“Deceit is in the heart of them that imagine evil: but to the counsellors of peace is joy.” (Proverbs 12:20)

Interesting Things from Smiley CentralA few years ago, a news release revealed the result of a poll on what Americans prefer to have taught in public schools about origins. The poll was done for an organization that favors a dogmatic teaching of evolution. The news release stated only that a huge majority of Americans, 83 percent, favor the teaching of evolution in the public schools. We at Creation Moments were led to investigate this poll more closely since this poll result runs contrary to other recent polls.

Typical classroom.

The professional polling organization polled 1,500 people about whether creation or evolution should be taught in the public schools. Indeed, 83 percent said they believe that the theory of evolution should be taught in the public schools. However, what was not included in the popular reporting of the poll was that 79 percent of those polled said that creation should also be taught in the schools. Only 20 percent of those polled felt that evolution only should be taught. Clearly, Americans prefer both creation and evolution presented to the students so that they can make up their own minds. Equally notable is that almost half of those polled agreed with the statement that evolution is “far from being proven to be scientific.”

While the statement that 83 percent of those polled favor evolution being taught is true, it leaves out the most important part of the poll’s findings. Clearly, ordinary people want to hear about God’s creation.

Dear Father, help us never to be deceived by the forces of darkness. Amen.
Christian News, 4/3/00, p. 2. Photo: Typical classroom. Courtesy of © Malate269.

Interesting Things

Creation Moments

Is There a God?


Skinny As A Rail? Not Me!

Clapper Rail (Rallus crepitans) ©WikiC

Clapper Rail (Rallus crepitans) ©WikiC

Skinny as a rail? Not me!

~ James J. S. Johnson

“But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have respect in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee.”    (Luke 14:10)

Luzon Bleeding-heart by Dan


Is it really advantageous to be frequently noticed?  Is having a “low profile” a prudent practice?  Surely when someone gets a reputation, for being a “show-off”, the spotlight becomes a disadvantage.

When I was a teenager I was called “skinny as a rail”.  Once I arrived at age 20, however, for some reason I stopped hearing that description.  Of course, I blame my weight gain on getting married to a wonderful cook (who, for 3-dozen-plus years, has made eating an ongoing adventure!)!  Actually, I am not too far from being double the weight that I had, 121 pounds, when I got married!

Hmmm – maybe exercise has something to do with it, too.  It’s been a long time since someone said (of me), “he’s so skinny, if he turned sideways we couldn’t see him!”  It is the literal truth that my wife has been with me “through thick and thin”.

But this is supposed to be about birds.

Railway ©WikiC

Railway ©WikiC

So now we should consider something that Robert and Alice Lippson, both ecologists, have to say about being “skinny as a rail”.

“’As thin as a rail’—is it the narrow steel ribbon of a railroad track or the slim boards that make up a fence?  Just where did that old saw come from, anyway?  It pertains to certain members of the Rallidae family, the rails, which also includes coots and gallinules.  The rails have thin, compressed bodies that allow them to thread their way through seemingly impenetrable thickets and literally to disappear into the marsh. … Rails are usually brown and patterned or mottled with white [feathers], while coots are slate or soot colored.  Rails are found in the [Chesapeake] Bay wetlands year-round.”

[Quoting Alice Jane Lippson & Robert L. Lippson, LIFE IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY:   An Illustrated Guide to the Fishes, Invertebrates, Plants, Birds, and Other Inhabitants of the Bays and Inlets from Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras, 3rd Edition (Baltimore:  The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), page 232.]

Perhaps the most prominent rail in the Chesapeake Bay region is the Marsh Hen, also called the “Clapper Rail” (Rallus crepitans, a/k/a Rallus longirostris), known for its harsh-sounding clattering vocalizations [klek-klek-klek-klek-klek] that almost sounds like rattling or rapid clapping.

The Clapper Rail is routinely found in salt marshes and some freshwater marshes on America’s East Coast, from Massachusetts to Florida, plus in wetlands bordering California’s inland Salton Sea, and even along the banks of the lower parts of the Colorado River.  [See John Bull & John Farrand, Jr., NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY FIELD GUIDE TO NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS, EASTERN REGION, revised edition (New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1994), page 455.]

Have I ever seen one?  Probably not.  But that’s not unusual, according to Lippson & Lippson, who say that hearing one is more likely than seeing one, especially due to their habit of being more active at night.  [Lippson & Lippson, page 232.]  But, if you do see a Clapper Rail, it might not realize you are watching!

Clapper Rail (Rallus crepitans) ©WikiC

Clapper Rail (Rallus crepitans) ©WikiC

“Clapper rails are secretive birds and are usually not seen unless forced off the reed floor by high tides.  Then they are frequently seen along the edge of the marsh and even along nearby roads.  Even though they are in the open and quite visible, clapper rails apparently think they are still in the marsh, unseen and safe.  Like the least bittern, they are reluctant fliers and when flushed will make brief [airborne] sorties, legs dangling, then drop and disappear into the marsh vegetation.  Curiously enough, rails are capable of making long migratory flights.  The best way to ‘see’ a rail is with your ears:  listen for the clattering “kek-kek-kek”, especially in the early evening and at dawn.  The clapper rail is widely distributed throughout the [Chesapeake] Bay.”  [Quoting Lippson & Lippson, page 232.]

So much for keeping a low profile, especially when perils are near!  If you can be inconspicuous, it’s usually to your advantage, — but, if not, it’s good to have a Plan B (like the Clapper Rail’s getaway response) if you need one.

Meanwhile, don’t forget the lesson of Luke 14:10.  Routinely assume that you should take a “low profile”.  If you are directed “up” (i.e., promoted to a “higher” responsibility), so be it,  —  trusting God to guide you, use the “high profile” opportunity to honor God.  Yet don’t forget: the Clapper Rail strategy has its merits  –  if you are inconspicuous you are less likely to become somebody’s target!


Rallidae – Rails, Crakes and Coots


James J. S. Johnson

Good News

Clapper Rail by Lee at Merritt Island NWR