Tickle Me Tuesday – Laughing Kookaburras

Kookaburra at Brevard Zoo by Dan

Kookaburra at Brevard Zoo by Dan

…God has made me to laugh; all who hear will laugh with me. (Genesis 21:6 AMP – emphasis by me)

He will yet fill your mouth with laughter [Job] and your lips with joyful shouting. (Job 8:21 AMP)

While at the Lowry Park Zoo, we were able to hear and video the Laughing Kookaburras. They will put a smile on your face and a tickle in your heart. We have featured them before, but thought they should be featured again.

For You, O Lord, have made me glad by Your works; at the deeds of Your hands I joyfully sing. (Psalms 92:4 AMP)

Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth; break forth and sing for joy, yes, sing praises! (Psalms 98:4 AMP)

and

Then were our mouths filled with laughter, and our tongues with singing. Then they said among the nations, The Lord has done great things for them. The Lord has done great things for us! We are glad! (Psalms 126:2-3 AMP)

See also:

Unless, I change my mind or someone sends me a link to some birds in a “Tickle Me” action, this will probably be the last one for now. While trying to find some videos to use or photos, I became frustrated while searching for appropriate items for this blog. Either evolution, cuss words, or innuendos were used, that I choose not to share. Call me “old-fashioned” or whatever, but we try to honor the Lord on this site.

Here are the Tickle Me Tuesday that were produced. This post will become a link on the menu under PLUS, so all of them can be found again, if you choose. Typing “Tickle Me” in the search will also bring them all back up.

Other Tickle Me Tuesday’s

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Sunday Inspiration – Whipbirds, Wattle-eyes and Allies

As you have been viewing the Sunday Inspirations lately, we have been going through the Passerines or Passerfiormes Order in taxonomic order. So far, I have shown you 30 families, which makes us almost a forth of the way through the 125 Passerine families.

Today’s families are the Psophodidae – Whipbirds, Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes Family with 16 members and the Platysteiridae – Wattle-eyes, Batises Family with 33 species.

Whipbirds, Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes that make up the Psophodidae family are native to Australia and nearby areas. They occur in forest, generally replacing each other at different altitudes. The painted quail-thrush is also found in the forests of New Guinea.The other quail-thrushes are restricted to Australia where they are found in drier habitats, occurring in open forest, scrub and on stony ground.[8] None of the species are thought to be threatened but one subspecies of the spotted quail-thrush is possibly extinct.

The whipbirds and wedgebills are all found in Australia, occurring in a range of habitats from rainforest to arid scrub. The western whipbird is considered to be near-threatened because of habitat loss and fires while the Papuan whipbird is classed as data deficient..

They are terrestrial birds which fly fairly weakly and prefer to squat or run when disturbed. They forage on the ground feeding mainly on insects and other invertebrates.[9] In the desert, quail-thrushes also eat some seeds. They build a cup-shaped nest among shrubs or on the ground. Two or three eggs are laid.

Eastern Whipbird (Psophodes olivaceus) by Ian

Eastern Whipbird (Psophodes olivaceus) by Ian

Here is the song of the Eastern Whipbird. It sounds like someone snapping a whip.

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) ©WikiC

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) Male ©WikiC

The Platysteiridae Wattle-eyes, Batises Family are a favorite of mine because of their eyes. They are a family of small stout birds living in trees, primarily of the woodlands and forests of sub-Saharan Africa. The family contains the wattle-eyes, batises and shrike-flycatchers. They were previously classed as a subfamily of the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae.

These insect-eating birds are found in usually open forests or bush. They hunt by flycatching, or by taking prey from the ground like a shrike. The nest is a small neat cup low in a tree or bush. The most important component of the diet of all species is insects, although spiders, millipedes and scorpions are also taken, and there are even records of small lizards being consumed.

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For the ways of man are before the eyes of the LORD, And He ponders all his paths. (Proverbs 5:21 NKJV)

My son, give me your heart, And let your eyes observe my ways. (Proverbs 23:26 NKJV)

The humble shall see this and be glad; And you who seek God, your hearts shall live. (Psalms 69:32 NKJV)

Listen to Sean play as you watch these two beautifully created families of birds:

” Be Thou My Vision and Battle Hymn of the Republic” ~ played by Sean Fielder

Sunday Inspirations

Passeriformes Birds so far:

Birds of the World

Cinclosomatidae or Psophodidae Family – Wikipedia

Platysteiridae – Wattle-eye – Wikipedia

Good News

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrocephalus) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Brown Sparrowhawk ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter ~ 4/17/15

I sent the previous post by mistake when I was working on the ebook version of the birds of the week this afternoon. This was actually bird of the week in May 2009, and then I thought it was a Brown Goshawk until a raptor expert recently pointed out the error of my ways with these photos on the website.

I’m making good progress with the ebook. It’s getting quite large, so I’m going to publish it two volumes. The first will be 2002 to 2009. I’ll keep you posted on progress. I think I’m going to call it ‘Diary of a Bird Photographer‘ as it reads like a (weekly) diary.

Anyway, here is the full, corrected posting, six years late!

*Note: this was originally posted as a Brown Goshawk, but the bird is actually a Collared Sparrowhawk. Please accept my apologies.

I’m still sorting through the photos that I took at Gluepot last month. One surprising visitor to the watering point near the hide was a Collared Sparrowhawk that came in to drink and bathe. She (it was rather large) spent nearly half an hour at the tank and bathed several times. Naturally, all the other traffic at the watering point came to a standstill, though I was amused to see a flock of Brown Honeyeaters becoming increasingly restless and approaching much closer than I would have expected. Eventually, she vanished as swiftly as she had appeared and things returned to normal.
Collared Sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrocephalus) by Ian
The Sparrowhawk seemed very wary, particularly when preparing to bathe and looked around repeatedly as if making sure the coast was clear. It was almost as if the Queen of the Forest couldn’t be seen to be doing her toilet in public and she certainly looked very undignified both when bathing, second photo, and when she emerged wet and bedraggled from the water, third photo. I was impressed by how soft and owl-like the feathers were – the original stealth attack aircraft, I suppose.
Collared Sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrocephalus) by Ian
Collared Sparrowhawks are smallish hawks,30-40cm/12-16in long, with a wingspan to 70cm/28in. As with many birds of prey, the females are larger and this is thought to be to protect the nestlings from the males in a weak moment. The Collared Sparrowhawk is widespread in all except the driest areas of Australia and New Guinea and because of its furtive behaviour and confusion with the similar Brown Goshawk, is probably commoner than might be supposed.

Recent updates* to the website include new galleries for the Australo-PapuanTreecreepers (), additional photos of various Honeyeaters, Wedge-tailed Eagle and White-bellied Sea-Eagle.

*recent in 2009, but the links are still valid.

**************************************************
Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737 ian@birdway.com.au
Bird Photos http://www.birdway.com.au/
Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland: iTunesGoogle Play Kobo Books
Recorder Society http://www.nqrs.org.au


Lee’s Addition:

Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south? Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high? She dwelleth and abideth on the rock, upon the crag of the rock, and the strong place. From thence she seeketh the prey, and her eyes behold afar off. (Job 39:26-29 KJV)

Another neat bird he has introduced us to, even though it is apparently six years late. Ian gave his permission and I started doing his newsletter in July of 2009. That Brown Goshawk (was dated in May 2009, so it was never written up) I did go back and catch some of his older newsletters as you can see from the list.

Wow! Has it been 6 years? Ian, thank you for that permission. With his newsletter and photograph usage, Ian has been a large input for this blog.

See:

Ian’s Bird of the Week (list of newsletters)

Ian’s Honeyeaters, Wedge-tailed Eagle and White-bellied Sea-Eagle.

Ian’s Accipitridae Family

Accipitridae – Kites, Hawks, Eagles Family

Collared Sparrowhawk – Wikipedia

Collared Sparrowhawk – Birds in Backyards

Collared Sparrowhawk – Avian Web

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Black-faced Monarch

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Black-faced Monarch ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter ~ 4/15/15

On the way to Orbost in East Gippsland in March on the great owl hunt, we stopped for a break at Fairy Dell Nature Reserve between Bairnsdale and Lakes Entrance. This has a lovely walk through temperate rainforest along a creek with plenty of interesting birds – we saw our first Lyrebird of the weekend here. We also found this Black-faced Monarch showing its black face to great advantage through the fronds of a tree fern.

Black-faced Monarch (Monarcha melanopsis) by Ian

Black-faced Monarchs are usually inconspicuous solitary inhabitants of dense forest and are best located by their calls, the most distinctive of which is a vibrant fluty call, rendered by Pizzey and Knight as ‘Why-you, which-you’. Here they search for insects, sometimes making sallies after flying insects when they are easier to spot. The combination of grey back and wings, black face and rich, rufous underparts is striking, though the rufous breast is best seen in the gloom of the forest using a flash, as in the second photo taken in the highlands of Northeastern Queensland. These two photos encompass most of the breeding range of this species along the east coast of Australia from Melbourne to Cape York.

Black-faced Monarch (Monarcha melanopsis) by Ian

These birds are resident in the highlands of Northeastern Queensland but breeding summer visitors to areas farther south. In winter many migrate to southern and eastern New Guinea, and some immature birds spend their first summer there. In the lowlands of Northeastern Queensland, around Townsville for example, we see them only as passage migrants in March-April and September-October and I saw one last week along Bluewater Creek near the house, reminding me that autumn is here. The bird in the third photo is an immature one photographed on the creek ten years ago. Juvenile lack the black face, have brownish wings and dark bills with a pinkish edge to the base of the lower mandible – which you can just see in this photo.

Black-faced Monarch (Monarcha melanopsis) juvenile by Ian

Black-faced Monarch build beautiful, conical nests wedged into the fork of a shrub or sapling in moist gullies. This is constructed of fibrous plant material, including ferns and moss, glued together using gossamer from spiders’ webs as in the fourth photo.

Black-faced Monarch (Monarcha melanopsis) Nest by Ian

Autumn here means warm, clear sunny days and (relatively) cool nights with low humidity, very welcome after the wet season and my favourite time of the year. The wet usually leaves a legacy of lush green grassland and forest, though this year it has been fairly dry with good rain only in January. The Dollarbirds have left for the winter and the forests and gardens are rather silent without the loud calls of the Koels and Channel-billed Cuckoos, leaving just the Blue-winged Kookaburras and Bar-shouldered Doves to fill the gap.

Greetings
Ian

**************************************************
Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737 ian@birdway.com.au
Bird Photos http://www.birdway.com.au/
Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland:  iTunesGoogle Play Kobo Books
Recorder Society http://www.nqrs.org.au


Lee’s Addition:

“If a bird’s nest happens to be before you along the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, with the mother sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother with the young; you shall surely let the mother go, and take the young for yourself, that it may be well with you and that you may prolong your days”. (Deuteronomy 22:6-7 NKJV)

What a nice looking bird, Ian. That breast color reminds me of our American Robin’s outfit. Thanks again for sharing so many birds with us over the weeks. With over 10,000 of the Lord’s avian creations flying around, you nor I will ever cover them all.

Here is the Black-faced Monarch’s call from xeno-canto:

You can see Ian’s Monarch family photos at Monarch Flycatchers & Allies [Family: Monarchidae]
Monarchidae – Monarchs Family

Black-faced Monarch –  Wikipedia
Black-faced Monarch – Birds in Backyards
Black-faced Monarch – New Zealand Birds Online

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Boat-billed Heron at Lowry Park Zoo

Boat-billed Heron Lowry Park Zoo by Dan

Boat-billed Heron Lowry Park Zoo by Dan

For every beast of the forest is Mine, and the cattle upon a thousand hills or upon the mountains where thousands are. I know and am acquainted with all the birds of the mountains, and the wild animals of the field are Mine and are with Me, in My mind. (Psalms 50:10-11 AMP)

We went to Lowry Park Zoo recently because they opened up early for a special event for the kids. We headed to the aviary to get there while they were feeding the birds. Usually, that happens before the zoo opens. Besides that, most people were at the event and we had the aviary to us and the birds. Yeah!

One of my favorite birds in there is the Boat-billed Heron. I think they are just cute. Two of them like to sit just above or to the side of the walkway. (In fact, one of them managed to plaster Dan and his camera on a previous visit. Yuk!) This time they behaved and was able to shoot a video right up under one of my avian friends. They are adorable, to me.

Here is the video I took of our friendly Boat-bill Heron (of course my mouth was running in amazement) :

We have had other articles on this bird, but just had to share this latest Birdwatching Adventure.

Who Paints The Leaves?

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Tickle Me Tuesday – Squirrels and Bird Feeders

Squirrel at a park in Daytona

Squirrel at a park in Daytona by Lee

Not sure how many have heard of the “Squirrel Proof” bird feeders, but Droll Yankees make a line of them. I am not selling them, but just want you to enjoy some of the antics of squirrels trying to feed from them. Also, there is a video of someone who put Vaseline on a pole and how a determined squirrel tries to get up the pole to the feed.

The Lord sure gave the squirrels a determined spirit. Enjoy and get “tickled”!

A time to weep, and a time to laugh; … (Ecclesiastes 3:4a KJV)

Let me hear joy and gladness;… (Psalms 51:8a ESV)

From Droll Yankee:

Mr Squirrel’s Wild Ride:

Squirrel taking a spin on a Yankee Flipper:

Squirrel and a slippery pole:

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All The Tickle Me Tuesdays

Wordless Birds

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“Flag That Bird!” (Part 2)

“Flag that bird!”  (Part 2)

And Moses built an altar and called the name of it Jehovah-nissi [i.e., the LORD is my banner]. (Exodus 17:15)

In Flag that Bird! (Part 1)”, we considered 4 “banner birds”  –  besides globally popular eagles  –  that appear on national flags:  Belgium’s Wallonian Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus); Portugal’s Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis); Burma’s Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus); and Dominica’s Sisserou Parrot (Amazona imperialis).

As promised, this mini-series will continue with more “flagged birds”, namely, British Antarctic Territory (penguin);  Saint Helena, British crown colony in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean (Saint Helena Plover, a/k/a “wirebird”);  Kiribati (frigatebird);  Papua New Guinea (bird of paradise);  Fiji, as well as the royal standard of Tonga (dove);  Australian state of Western Australia (black swan);  Australian state of South Australia (white piping shrike);  Bolivia (condor);  and Uganda (crested crane).

In this particular installment, 2 more (of those just listed) will be introduced.

So now, consider the penguin – avian icon of the British Antarctic Territory.

 

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

 

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri).  There are a variety of penguins that live in the Antarctic regions, yet it is the Emperor Penguin featured on the official coat-of-arms of the British Antarctic Territory, and that coat-of-arms is what appears on the territory’s official flag, next to the Union Jack (on a white background).

British Antarctic Territory - Union Jack with Emperor Penguin ©PD

British Antarctic Territory – Union Jack with Emperor Penguin ©PD

The British explorers of the Antarctic regions include Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton, who led their research ship RRS Discovery, a symbol of which ship appears on the heraldic crest of that territory’s coat-of-arms.

Captain Scott’s second expedition to explore Antarctica, during January of AD1912, was disappointing for two reasons: (1) Roald Amundsen’s Norwegian exploration party had just “beat” the Brits to the South Pole, on 14 December of AD1911; and (2) Scott’s expedition party died in the wild weather of Antarctica near the end of March that year, on the Ross Ice Shelf, about 150 miles from their base camp.

Of interest to Biblical creationists, Captain Scott collected about 35 pounds of plant fossils in Antarctica, proving that Antarctica was previously forested (obviously under milder climate conditions!).  Regarding the importance of forests in Antarctica, see Buddy Davis’s article “Forest in Antarctica After the Flood?”, citing National Science Foundation Press Release (8-4-2008), “Antarctic Fossils Paint a Picture of a Much Warmer Continent”.

Ironically, the research venture was intended to support Darwin’s theory of evolution, but the evidence refused to cooperate!  This surprise (to the evolutionists) is summarized by a BBC reporter, Megan Lane (in BBC News magazine, 2 November, 2011), as follows: “Of the 2,000 specimens of animals collected by Scott and his team – 400 of which were newly discovered – the jewel in the crown was a trio of Emperor penguin eggs.  It was hoped [by Darwinism supporters] that these would provide long-awaited proof of Darwin’s theory of evolution.  At the time, it was thought [by evolutionists that] an embryo passed through all [“phylogenetic”] stages of its species’ evolution as it developed.  And as the [British evolutionists] assumed the flightless Emperor penguin to be the world’s most primitive bird, they hoped the embryos in these eggs would show the link between dinosaurs and birds.  The birds had been seen before, but never with their eggs.  ‘It was the greatest [sic] biological quest of its day,’ says polar historian David Wilson, whose great-uncle, Edward Wilson, was Scott’s naturalist. ‘Then they collected the eggs, and all the theories turned out to be wrong’.”  [Quoting BBC’s Megan Lane.]  Amazingly, the “dinosaur-morphs-into-modern-birds” fairy tale is still being fabricated today, through science fiction movies (like Jurassic Park) and via dinosaur DNA evidence spoliation.  [Regarding how dinosaur DNA evidence is being censored, in academic/research circles, to avoid spoiling evolutionist mythology, see the multi-authored ICR article posted at www.icr.org/article/4947 .]

The next bird on this list is the Saint Helena Plover, locally nicknamed the “wirebird” (due to its wiry-thin legs).

St. Helena Plover (Charadrius sanctaehelenae) ©WikiC

St. Helena Plover (Charadrius sanctaehelenae) ©WikiC

Saint Helena Plover (Charadrius sanctaehelenae).

The Saint Helena Plover appears on the flag of Saint Helena, as well as on that small nation’s official coat-of-arms.  The plover is Saint Helena’s national bird as well.  Saint Helena is an island territory  —   in the South Atlantic Ocean (about midway between South America’s Brazil and Africa’s Angola) — administered by the United Kingdom, having been formally claimed by Great Britain when Oliver Cromwell (in AD1657) granted a charter to the East India Company, to settle the South Atlantic island.  Politically speaking, Saint Helena is grouped with Ascension and Tristan da Cunha, as a British overseas territory (formerly known as “Saint Helena and Dependencies”).

Flag of Saint Helena with Saint Henea Plover ©PD

Flag of Saint Helena with Saint Henea Plover ©PD

This little plover is a year-round resident, endemic to this island (although it is similar to other plovers).  This endemic invertebrate-consuming landbird is a small “wader”’, i.e., a shorebird capable of wading in coastal tidewaters, yet it mostly habituates other open areas of the island, such as pasture-like grasslands.  Its eggs are mostly light-brown in color, with dark-speckled mottling.  Its populations are declining, according to monitoring (which includes motion-sensor ultraviolet cameras positioned near nesting grounds), apparently due to predation (by rodents or feral cats) or due to other kinds of nest disturbances (such as sheep that step on plover nests). Conservation efforts are underway, in hopes of restoring the population growth of this island’s humble symbol.

Stay tuned!  God willing, the next installment in this mini-series will cover more of these “banner birds”, now that a penguin and a plover – both of which birds live only in the Southern Hemisphere, are properly “flagged” and accounted for.

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“Flag That Bird!”  (Part 1)

More Articles by James J. S. Johnson

Orni-Theology

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Sunday Inspiration – Variety II

We have come to some Passerine Families that only have a few members in them. You will get to see quite a few families in order to have enough birds to make a slideshow. As you know, the Lord loves variety and He gives us each different talents to use for His service. Sometimes many can do the same thing, but there are times when only a few can do a certain task. So it is with our Avian Friends today. They each have their niches to fill.

 Australian Logrunner (Orthonyx temminckii) by Tom Tarrant

Australian Logrunner (Orthonyx temminckii) by Tom Tarrant

Orthonychidae – Logrunners – The logrunners (Orthonyx) are a clade of birds which comprises three species of passerine birds endemic to Australia and New Guinea. Some authorities consider the Australian family Cinclosomatidae to be part of the Orthonychidae. The three species use their stiffened tails to brace themselves when feeding.

Crested Satinbird ©Jerry Oldenettel

Crested Satinbird ©Jerry Oldenettel

Cnemophilidae – Satinbirds – The satinbirds or Cnemophilines, Cnemophilidae are a group of passerine birds which consists of three species found in the mountain forests of New Guinea. They were originally thought to be part of the birds of paradise family Paradisaeidae until genetic research suggested that the birds are not closely related to birds of paradise at all and are perhaps closer to Melanocharitidae. The current evidence suggests that their closest relatives may be the cuckoo-shrikes [Campephagidae

Obscure Berrypecker (Melanocharis arfakiana) CC maholyoak

Obscure Berrypecker (Melanocharis arfakiana) CC maholyoak

Melanocharitidae – Berrypeckers, longbills The Melanocharitidae, the berrypeckers and longbills, is a small bird family restricted to the forests of New Guinea. The family contains ten species in four (sometimes three) genera. They are small songbirds with generally dull plumage but a range of body shapes.

Crested Berrypecker (Paramythia montium) ©WikiC

Crested Berrypecker (Paramythia montium) ©WikiC

Paramythiidae – Painted Berrypeckers – The painted berrypeckers, Paramythiidae, are a very small bird family restricted to the mountain forests of New Guinea. The family comprises two species in two genera: the Tit Berrypecker (Oreocharis arfaki) and the Crested Berrypecker (Paramythia montium).

South Island Kokako (Callaeas cinereus) ©Wiki

South Island Kokako (Callaeas cinereus) ©Wiki

Callaeidae – New Zealand Wattlebirds – The small bird family Callaeidae (also named in some sources as Callaeatidae) is endemic to New Zealand. It contains three monotypic genera; of the three species in the family, only two survive and both of them, the Kokako and the Saddleback, are endangered species, threatened primarily by the predations of introduced mammalian species such as rats, mustelids and possums. A third, the Huia became extinct early in the 20th century.

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) by Tom Tarrant

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) by Tom Tarrant

Notiomystidae – Stitchbird – The Stitchbird or Hihi (Notiomystis cincta) is a rare honeyeater-like bird endemic to the North Island and adjacent offshore islands of New Zealand. It became extirpated everywhere except Little Barrier Island but has been reintroduced to three other island sanctuaries and two locations on the North Island mainland. Their relationships have long puzzled ornithologists, but it is now classed as the only member of its own family, the Notiomystidae.

(Family notes from Wikipedia, with editing)
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“Just A Little Talk With Jesus” – Vegter Six – Together for Vi’s 90th Birthday (This was sung by some of Vi’s children and grandchildren. They had 11 children and lots and lots of grandchildren and greats, almost all of them active in church.)

Now it came to pass, as He was praying in a certain place, when He ceased, that one of His disciples said to Him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples.” (Luke 11:1 NKJV)

For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open unto their prayers: but the face of the Lord is against them that do evil.
(1 Peter 3:12 KJV)

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(Personal note – As many of you know I spent a week in the hospital recently, for which I am thankful for your prayers for me. On that Sunday afternoon, after Dan had left, I used my Kindle or Ipad to go to my blog. I brought up the page for the all the Sunday Inspirations. I started going through them watching the bird slideshows while listening to the music. Oh, what a blessing I had watching the Lord’s Creations and listening to music about Him. I never knew when those were put together, that they in turn would be such a blessing and peaceful to me. My prayer is that when you are in need of some encouragement or just a blessing, that those blogs will bless you as much as they did me. Our Lord loves to give us peace in the midst of our problems.)

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Sunday Inspirations

Birds of the World

Good News

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Videos From Gatorland

Great Egret by Dan at Gatorland (3)Below is a combination of ten short videos from Gatorland. There are several of the Great Egrets on the nest, and one Great Egret displaying. There were three Snowy Egrets youngsters in a nest and other happenings along the boardwalk.

There is also a video of the Flamingo and Parrot areas. Then you will see two gators that I was watching that kept trying to get into position to see each other “eye to eye.” They seem to be sweet on each other. (my interpretation)

You alone are the LORD; You have made heaven, The heaven of heavens, with all their host, The earth and everything on it, The seas and all that is in them, And You preserve them all. The host of heaven worships You. (Nehemiah 9:6 NKJV)

Here are also some of the photos taken by Dan that Day:

We trust you enjoy the photos and video. This is just a few of the photos taken.

See:

Wordless Birds

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Baby Snowy Egrets at Gatorland

Snowy Egret in Nest by Lee

Snowy Egret in Nest by Lee

While walking around the rookery at Gatorland, we were able to view some Snowy Egrets at their nest. Dad was watching from above while mom was tending to the two baby “Snowies”.

Snowy Egret Dat at Nest by Lee

Snowy Egret Dat at Nest by Lee

Mom was keeping an eye on the little ones. (This is from my perspective – I could just see the tops of their heads)

Snowy Egret in Nest with babies by Lee

Snowy Egret in Nest with babies by Lee

Dan came along and I handed him my camera (to get a better view-he’s taller) Here is one of the babies on his camera:

Snowy Egret Baby by Dan

Snowy Egret Baby by Dan

and these are the ones we took with my camera and those with his:

As you view the chicks you will notice there is still an egg in there. That makes me think that these little “snowies” are maybe one or two days old at maximum.

Snowy Egrets are Birds of the Bible in the Heron family Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns  and are on the “do not eat” list. Who would want to eat these cuties?

the stork, the heron after its kind, the hoopoe, and the bat. (Leviticus 11:19 NKJV)

the stork, the heron after its kind, and the hoopoe and the bat. (Deuteronomy 14:18 NKJV)

We also shot some video to share with you. The first part is by me and a photographer was beside me shooting in “burst” mode. Then Dan shot the second part and you can see in the nest better. – I’m short :)

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Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns

Birds of the Bible – Herons

Gatorland, FL

Sharing The Gospel

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Tickle Me Tuesday Bonus- 4/7/15

Two more videos caught my funny bone. Did not want to wait until next Tuesday.

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. (Philippians 4:8 KJV)

Today’s regular “Tickle”
Tickle Me Tuesday – American Woodcock

All The Tickle Me Tuesdays

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Tickle Me Tuesday – American Woodcock

American Woodcock (Scolopax minor) ©WikiC

American Woodcock (Scolopax minor) ©WikiC

From my friend on Facebook:

“Ok Lee, help me out on this one, is this for real? Is there a bird that really walks like that?
The music they put to this video is perfect, but it’s distracting because I can’t decide if there’s a bird that really does this or not!
Either way, This is a very cute video!”

The answer is Yes! That is an American Woodcock They do that to help make worms move around so they can probe with their beak to find them.

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Here’s another video of a Woodcock Display using a sound they make:

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And yet two more videos of one doing the dance minus the music.

So, what is an American Woodcock? They are members of the Scolopacidae – Sandpipers, Snipes Family.

An interesting fact from All About Birds – “The American Woodcock probes the soil with its bill to search for earthworms, using its flexible bill tip to capture prey. The bird walks slowly and sometimes rocks its body back and forth, stepping heavily with its front foot. This action may make worms move around in the soil, increasing their detectablity.

A very wise creator gave these birds good coloration, courtship displays and a very practical “heavy-footed” walk.

Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? (Matthew 6:26 NKJV)

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All About Birds – American Woodcock

American Woodcock – Wikipedia

Scolopacidae – Sandpipers, Snipes Family

Articles here about the American Woodcock:

Tickle Me Tuesday – Nesting Falcon

All The Tickle Me Tuesdays

Wordless Birds

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