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Fawn-breasted Bowerbird by Dan ZM

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird by Dan ZM

One of the neatest thing to watch on this last trip to the Wings of Asia Aviary at Zoo Miami was the Fawn-breasted Bowerbird working on his bower. “The bower itself is that of “avenue-type” with two sides of wall of sticks and usually decorated with green-colored berries.” In his case, he had green leaves laid out in front.

The Fawn-breasted Bowerbird (Chlamydera cerviniventris) is a medium-sized, up to 13 in (32 cm) long, bowerbird with a greyish brown spotted white plumage, a black bill, dark brown iris, yellow mouth and an orange buff below. Both sexes are similar. The female is slightly smaller than the male.

The Fawn-breasted Bowerbird is distributed in New Guinea and northern Australia, where it inhabits the tropical forests, mangroves, savanna woodlands and forest edges. Its diet consists mainly of figs, fruits and insects. The nest is a loose cup made of small sticks up in a tree. The bower itself is that of “avenue-type” with two sides of wall of sticks and usually decorated with green-colored berries. (Wikipedia with editing)

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird by Dan ZM

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird by Dan ZM

The Bowerbirds are in the Ptilonorhynchidae-Bowerbird Family. There are twenty species in the family, of which, 16 are Bowerbirds.

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Here are two video clips of him working on the bower. Notice how he goes in and out the other end of the bower. Unfortunately we were only able to view it from the side. One shot he is actually placing the stick upright in the ground. (I recorded him for a bit and then Dan came along. As I was explaining it to him, I got tickled, so ignore the snorts.) I was absolutely amazed watching this bird, which the Lord created, knowing how to make his bower chamber.

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Did you notice the birds chirping and singing in the background. It is so peaceful in that aviary. The birds have so much room and places to hang out. You actually “bird watch” there.

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird (Chlamydera cerviniventris) Sign Zoo Miami by Lee

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird (Chlamydera cerviniventris) Sign Zoo Miami by Lee

Bring out with you every living thing of all flesh that is with you: birds and cattle and every creeping thing that creeps on the earth, so that they may abound on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 8:17 NKJV)

This is the sign telling about the Bowerbird and their name for it; a “Seduction Chamber.” We know that the Lord commanded the birds to reproduce and this bird is only following instructions. He builds his bower to entice a female to be his mate.

We were discussing this and several verses came to our minds:

My son, if sinners entice you, Do not consent. (Proverbs 1:10 NKJV)

And you shall stone him with stones until he dies, because he sought to entice you away from the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage. (Deuteronomy 13:10 NKJV)

And then if any man shall say to you, Lo, here is Christ; or, lo, he is there; believe him not: For false Christs and false prophets shall rise, and shall shew signs and wonders, to seduce, if it were possible, even the elect. (Mark 13:21-22 KJV)

And this is the promise that he hath promised us, even eternal life. These things have I written unto you concerning them that seduce you. (1 John 2:25-26 KJV)

The Fawn-breasted is fine in what he is doing, but we can learn by watching and taking heed for ourselves.

But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee; and the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee: (Job 12:7 KJV)

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Zoo Miami - Fun Page

Ptilonorhynchidae-Bowerbird Family

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird - Wikipedia

Bowerbirds - Wikipedia

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Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) ©Drawing WikiC

Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) formerly Spotted Wren-Babbler ©Drawing WikiC

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day. (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

It has been time again for the International Ornithologists’ Union to update their IOC World Bird List. Version 4.2 was released last week and this site has been updated.

We are now up to 10,530 living species, 20,964 subspecies, in 40 Orders, 233 Families (plus 5 uncertain families) and 2273 Genera flying or swimming around the globe. They are still doing as commanded by the Lord to reproduce and keeping the ornithologist busy naming, renaming, and rearranging them.

This time they renamed one and moved it to a new family just for it. The Spotted Wren-Babbler (Spelaeornis formosus) was in the Timaliidae Family. It has been renamed the Spotted Elachura (Elachura formosa) and placed in its own Elachuridae Family. (I do not have permission yet to post a photo.)

Version 4.2 also took the Lark Family and tossed it up in the air and rearranged it. See the Alaudidae – Larks Family. The DNA researches are keeping them busy keeping up with how the birds bred. Some of the scientifc names were changed:

Madagascan Lark (Mirafra hova) now (Eremopterix hova)
White-winged Lark  (Melanocorypha leucoptera ) now (Alauda leucoptera)
Sand Lark (Calandrella raytal) now (Alaudala raytal)
Lesser Short-toed Lark (Calandrella rufescens) now (Alaudala rufescens)
Somali Short-toed Lark (Calandrella somalica) now (Alaudala somalica)
Athi Short-toed Lark (Calandrella athensis) now (Alaudala athensis)
Short-tailed Lark (Pseudalaemon fremantlii) now (Spizocorys fremantlii)

Version 4.2 made some minor spelling changes and added 13 species and deleted one.

Timneh Parrot (Psittacus timneh) ADD
Blue-bearded Helmetcrest (Oxypogon cyanolaemus) ADD
White-bearded Helmetcrest (Oxypogon lindenii) ADD
Buffy Helmetcrest (Oxypogon stuebelii) ADD
Acre Tody-Tyrant (Hemitriccus cohnhafti) ADD NEW
White-rumped Sirystes (Sirystes albocinereus) ADD
Todd’s Sirystes (Sirystes subcanescens) ADD
Negro Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla pyrrhonota) ADD
Madeira Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ADD
Snethlage’s Antpitta (Hylopezus paraensis) ADD
Alta Floresta Antpitta (Hylopezus whittakeri) ADD
Dusky Leaftosser (Sclerurus obscurior) ADD
Sidamo Lark (Heteromirafra sidamoensis) DEL
Tropeiro Seedeater (Sporophila beltoni) ADD

We now have 10,530 named of the Lord’s avian creations to enjoy and try to catch a glimpse of, and capture with a camera or video.

See:

Go out and have a great birdwatching adventure!

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White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus)  at Zoo Miami - Lee

White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus) at Zoo Miami – Lee

Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD. (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

The White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus) is a small passerine bird of the family Muscicapidae. Native to densely vegetated habitats in the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia, its popularity as a cage-bird and songster has led to it being introduced elsewhere.

It was formerly classified as a member of the thrush family, Turdidae, causing it to be commonly known as the White-rumped Shama Thrush or simply Shama Thrush.

They typically weigh between 28 and 34 g (1.0 and 1.2 oz) and are around 23–28 cm (9–11 in) in length. Males are glossy black with a chestnut belly and white feathers on the rump and outer tail. Females are more greyish-brown, and are typically shorter than males. Both sexes have a black bill and pink feet. Juveniles have a greyish-brown colouration, similar to that of the females, with a blotchy or spotted chest.

The voice of this species is rich and melodious which made them popular as cage birds in South Asia with the tradition continuing in parts of Southeast Asia. It is loud and clear, with a variety of phrases, and often mimics other birds. They also make a ‘Tck’ call in alarm or when foraging. One of the first recordings of a bird song that was ever made was of this species. This recording was made in 1889 from a captive individual using an Edison wax cylinder by Ludwig Koch in Germany. (Wikipedia)

Here is a video of the Shama singing the second day we were at the Wings of Asia aviary at the Zoo. The pair have a nest and I think the chicks have hatched. (Senior moment-I don’t remember what they told me.)

The LORD is my strength and my shield; my heart trusted in him, and I am helped: therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; and with my song will I praise him. (Psalms 28:7 KJV)

I am kicking up dust again behind the scenes. The new IOC 4.2 list came out while we were at the zoo. So far I have 237 pages updated, all but the Lark family. They added a new family and are scrambling the Larks around. I am now preparing to do the indexes.  The new 4.2 count is 10,530 species in the world. Stay tuned.

Birds of the World – Families – done

Birds of the Bible – Thrush

White-rumped Shama – Wikipedia

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Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Lee

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Lee

For they will be a graceful ornament on your head, And chains about your neck. (Proverbs 1:9 NKJV)

Here is one of my favorites at Zoo Miami’s Wings of Asia Aviary. They have 87 species and they are all my favorites, but this one is further up the scale. This is a Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female and believe it is the only Yellownape there at present.

Dan and I went back down to Zoo Miami this week and spent two days just in the Aviary. When we were there earlier this year, most of my photos did not come out well. After some adjustments to my Panasonic Lumix FZ47 point-n-shoot (which I shoot in “program mode”), things didn’t do much better at first the first day. More adjustments and these came out better. Tuesday night in the motel, Dan made some more fixes. Yesterday, I finally got some really nice photos which I will share later.

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

My son, keep your father’s command, And do not forsake the law of your mother. Bind them continually upon your heart; Tie them around your neck. (Proverbs 6:20-21 NKJV)

For those of you into photography, the problem is that the Aviary is well landscaped with lots of trees and is covered with its wire mesh. My ISO and lens speed were to low to compensate for the environment. My camera normally does well when I am “outdoors” and not in an aviary. (As for ISOs and F-stops, I don’t know much them. I would rather study about the birds and let Dan worry about the camera.)

Back to our Yellownape. This is another neat creation from its Creator. They belong to the Woodpecker – Picidae Family. At the aviary, they call it the Greater Yellow Naped Woodpecker.

List of birds at Wings of Asia - Greater Yellow Nape

List of birds at Wings of Asia – Greater Yellownape

From a copy of their list, you can tell it is a female and the only one. The list has the number of males first, then number of females and then the third number is unknown sex. Every day they check on the birds and try to find each one. If after 3 days a bird isn’t spotted, then a real search begins. By following the counters around, who were very friendly and willing to help with names of birds, many of the birds come out and into view. Could it be because the counters have food with them? In fact some of the birds make themself right at home on the cart.

Counters with friends

Counters with friends

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Counters with friends making themselves at home

Counters with friends making themselves at home

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Counters with friends making themselves at home

Counters with friends making themselves at home

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Actually the Yellownape came in close the second day, but I failed to get her photo, but Dan captured her in the second photo as she was eating worms from the hole in the tree. The worker had just placed some worms there to bring the birds in closer so they could be counted.

The Greater Yellownape is a large, olive-green woodpecker with prominent yellow-crested nape and throat. Dark olive-green with grey underparts. Crown brownish and flight feathers chestnut barred with black. Bill often looks whitish. “Nape” is the back or base of the neck area. See Birdwatching Term – Nape

It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Wikipedia)

Included in the photos below is a photo of a male from Wikipedia. Notice his line on his chin is more yellow than the female. Here is more of a rusty color.

Here are the photos of the Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha).

“And he arose and came to his father. But when he was still a great way off, his father saw him and had compassion, and ran and fell on his neck and kissed him. …It was right that we should make merry and be glad, for your brother was dead and is alive again, and was lost and is found.’ ” (Luke 15:20, 32 NKJV)

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