Lee’s One Word Monday – 2/8/16

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CONSIDER

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Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds? (Luke 12:24 NKJV)

Little Raven (Corvus mellori) Juvenile Calling to be fed the grub its mother just caught ©WikiC

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Sandra’s New Kooky Challenge

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Lee’s Seven Word Sunday – 2/7/16

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Brown-headed Barbet (Psilopogon zeylanica) by Nikhil Devasar

 

STRENGTHEN YOUR TIRED HANDS

AND WEAKENED KNEES

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Therefore strengthen your tired hands and weakened knees, and make straight paths for your feet, …(Hebrews 12:12-13a HCSB)

Brown-headed Barbet (Psilopogon zeylanica) by Nikhil Devasar

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Sandra’s New Kooky Challenge

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Sunday Inspiration – Waxbills and Allies I

Black-crowned Waxbill (Estrilda nonnula) ©WikiC

Black-crowned Waxbill (Estrilda nonnula) ©WikiC

The works of the LORD are great, sought out of all them that have pleasure therein. (Psalms 111:2 KJV)

This Sunday, the Lord has created some very beautiful birds after their kind. The Lord’s Creative Hand and Colors is very obvious. This is the Estrildidae Family which includes 141 species. Their names are numerous; they are the Antpecker, Nigrita, Oliveback, Pytillia, Finch, Twinspot, Crimsonwing, Seedcracker, Bluebill, Firefinch, Waxbill, Cordon-bleu, Grenadier, Avadavat and Quailfinch. I started to do them all, but there were too many photos. The last 70+ birds in the family will be in Part II.

The estrildid finches are small passerine birds of the Old World tropics and Australasia. They can be classified as the family Estrildidae (weaver-finch), or as a subfamily within the family Passeridae, which strictly defined comprises the Old World sparrows. Most are sensitive to cold and require warm, usually tropical, habitats, although a few have adapted to the cooler climates of southern Australia.

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu (Uraeginthus bengalus) ©WikiC

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu (Uraeginthus bengalus) ©WikiC

They are gregarious and often colonial seed-eaters with short, thick, but pointed bills. They are all similar in structure and habits, but vary widely in plumage colours and patterns.

All the estrildids build large, domed nests and lay 5–10 white eggs. Many species build roost nests. Some of the fire-finches and pytilias are hosts to the brood-parasitic indigobirds and whydahs, respectively.

Shelley's Oliveback (Nesocharis shelleyi) ©Ron Knight

Shelley’s Oliveback (Nesocharis shelleyi) ©Ron Knight

The smallest species of the family is the Shelley’s Oliveback (Nesocharis shelleyi) at a mere 3.3 in (8.3 centimetres), although the lightest species is the Black-rumped Waxbill (Estrilda troglodytes) at 0.21 oz (6 g). The largest species is the Java Sparrow (Padda oryzivora), at 6.7 in (17 cm) and 0.88 oz (25 g). (Wikipedia with editing)

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“Declare His glory among the nations, His marvelous works among all the peoples.” (Psalms 96:3 AMP)

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“My Jesus I Love Thee” ~ by Meagan Fee at Faith Baptist

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More Sunday Inspirations

Estrildidae – Waxbills, Munias and allies

Assurance: The Certainty of Salvation

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Lee’s Five Word Friday – 2/5/16

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Black-capped Petrel (Pterodroma hasitata) ©WikiC

 

THE BIRDS OF THE AIR

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The birds of the air, And the fish of the sea That pass through the paths of the seas. O LORD, our Lord, How excellent is Your name in all the earth! (Psalms 8:8-9 NKJV)

Black-capped Petrel (Pterodroma hasitata) ©WikiC

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Sandra’s New Kooky Challenge

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Birds of the Bible – Thrush Songs

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) ©USFWS

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) ©USFWS

Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD. (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

Discovered a very nice YouTube Channel, and thought you might enjoy watching and listening to three Thrushes. They are from the Turdidae Family. The Channel belongs to Lang Elliott’s Nature Channel. These songs are blessings from their Creator who put songs in their heart for us to enjoy.

Thrushes are plump, soft-plumaged, small to medium-sized birds, inhabiting wooded areas, and often feed on the ground. The smallest thrush may be the forest rock thrush, at 21 g (0.74 oz) and 14.5 cm (5.7 in). However, the shortwings, which have ambiguous alliances with both thrushes and Old World flycatchers, can be even smaller. The lesser shortwing averages 12 cm (4.7 in). The largest thrush is the blue whistling thrush, at 178 g (6.3 oz) and 33 cm (13 in). The great thrush is similar in length, but less heavily built. Most species are grey or brown in colour, often with speckled underparts.

The LORD is my strength and my shield; My heart trusted in Him, and I am helped; Therefore my heart greatly rejoices, And with my song I will praise Him. (Psalms 28:7 NKJV)

They are insectivorous, but most species also eat worms, land snails, and fruit. Many species are permanently resident in warm climates, while others migrate to higher latitudes during summer, often over considerable distances.

I will sing to the LORD, Because He has dealt bountifully with me. (Psalms 13:6 NKJV)

Thrushes build cup-shaped nests, sometimes lining them with mud. They lay two to five speckled eggs, sometimes laying two or more clutches per year. Both parents help in raising the young.

The LORD is my strength and my shield; My heart trusted in Him, and I am helped; Therefore my heart greatly rejoices, And with my song I will praise Him. (Psalms 28:7 NKJV)

The songs of some species, including members of the genera Catharus, Myadestes, Sialia and Turdus, are considered to be among the most beautiful in the avian world. (Wikipedia with editing)

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Wordless Birds

Lee’s Four Word Thursday – 2/4/16

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GIVE ME TO DRINK

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There cometh a woman of Samaria to draw water: Jesus saith unto her, Give me to drink. (John 4:7 KJV)

Jesus answered and said unto her, If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink; thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water. (John 4:10 KJV)

Lilian’s Lovebird (Agapornis lilianae) by Africaddict

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Sandra’s New Kooky Challenge

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Azure Kingfisher

Azure Kingfisher (Ceyx azurea) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Azure Kingfisher ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter – 2/2/2016

Although the second boat trip at Daintree didn’t produce any more Black Bitterns, it did produce a few gems including this Azure Kingfisher. This has featured as bird of the week before, but that was almost exactly nine years ago so I imagine you’ll forgive another one. They’re small (17-19cm/6.5-7.5in) usually quite shy and often hard to spot perched in dense riverine forest but these ones on the Daintree seem to be used to boats full of birders. Anyone this one let us get very close. Incidentally, I meant to provide a link to Ian Worcester’s website last week but forgot, so here it is: Daintree River Wild Watch.

The one in the first photo is an adult, probably a male from the bright colours. The second photo is on another one on the Daintree from an earlier visit. This one is a juvenile, I think, with scalloping on the crown and blacker wings. Azure Kingfisher normally perch on a branch over water and dive for their prey, returning to the same perch to administer the coup de grace. They feed mainly on small fish, but also on crustaceans and other invertebrates and occur on both fresh and tidal rivers.

Azure Kingfisher (Ceyx azurea) by Ian

Azure Kingfisher occur in New Guinea and northern and eastern Australia and in Tasmania. Three Australian races are recognised. The bluer nominate race occurs in eastern Australia, while the smaller, more violet northern race ruficollaris, third photo, occurs from NW Western Australia eastwards as far as Cooktown in Far North Queensland. The northern race has more blue extending much farther down the flanks than in the nominate race. Cooktown is only about 100km north of the Daintree as the Kingfisher flies, so the birds here are probably intermediate between these two races.

Azure Kingfisher (Ceyx azurea) by Ian

I’ve included the bird of the week from February 2007 for comparison, fourth photo. this was in the Sydney area and belongs to the nominate race. The third race diemensensis occurs only in western Tasmania and is classified as endangered by the Tasmanian Government. It is larger, has a smaller bill and a dark crown.

Azure Kingfisher (Ceyx azurea) by Ian

Work progress on the website. I’ve finished updating nearly all the galleries of the Australasian non-passerines (58 families) with only the members of the Cuckoo family to do. Then I’ll start on the Australasian Passerines (46 families).

On Saturday 13 February I’m giving at talk at the BirdLife Townsville AGM (see Activities for details and location) on the birds of New Caledonia. I’m calling it “New Caledonian birds: from strangely familiar to very strange” with reference to the Australasian origin of most of the species. If you’re in the Townsville district, it would be great to see you there. Greetings
Ian

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Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Tel 0411 602 737 ian@birdway.com.au
Bird Photos http://www.birdway.com.au/
Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland:  iTunesGoogle Play Kobo Books
Recorder Society http://www.nqrs.org.au


Lee’s Addition:

Let them praise the name of the LORD: for he commanded, and they were created. (Psalms 148:5 KJV)

What a cute little bird! Love those kingfishers anyway, but this one seems special. It is in the river kingfisher part of the family.

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Ian’s Bird of the Week

Ian’s Birdway – Kingfishers

Alcedinidae – Kingfishers Family

Good News

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Lee’s Two Word Tuesday – 2/2/16

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Feeding White Ibises at Lake Morton

 

FEED ME

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Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches; feed me with food convenient for me: (Proverbs 30:8 KJV)

Feeding White Ibises at Lake Morton (L to R – Dan, Golden Eagle, and James J S Johnson)

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Sandra’s New Kooky Challenge

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Wow! ~ 1.5 Million

Thank You with Blue Bird

Wow! Last night at about 9:14 PM our time (EST), the counter clicked over to 1,500,000 visitors. Thank you all for your many visits over the years. Whoever came in from the Cuba, Missouri area, is the one who turned it. I recently put the Live Traffic Feed in the left margin and just happened to notice the counter and the feed. It stayed at 4,999,999 for a while.

1-5 million photo

Every visit by all of you is appreciated. Some of you have been following this blog for years and for that, Many Thanks. Most of all, those of us who write desire to honor the Lord through sharing His Word and His Avian Creations. Thank you from all of us.

This month the blog turns eight years old, but the counter started when the blog was moved here to WordPress. That was seven and a half years ago.

(I should have taken this photo last night, but this is this morning’s.)

I thank my God upon every remembrance of you, (Philippians 1:3 KJV)

I thank my God, making mention of thee always in my prayers, (Philemon 1:4 KJV)

Lee’s Seven Word Sunday – 1/31/16

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American Yellow Warbler (Dendroica aestiva) singing by J Fenton

A SONG OF PRAISE TO OUR GOD

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He put a new song in my mouth, a song of praise to our God; Many will see and fear And will trust in the LORD. (Psalms 40:3 NASB)

American Yellow Warbler (Dendroica aestiva) singing by Jim Fenton

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Sandra’s New Kooky Challenge

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