Pardalotidae – Pardalotes

Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus) by Ian

Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus) by Ian

I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine. (Psalms 50:11 ESV)


CLASS – AVES, Order – PASSERIFORMES, Family – Pardalotidae – Pardalotes


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Latest I.O.C. Version
Species (4)

Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus)
Forty-spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus quadragintus)
Red-browed Pardalote (Pardalotus rubricatus)
Striated Pardalote (Pardalotus striatus)

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On the photos or slides, a “by” indicates one of the photographers or videographers, who have given their permission, with links on our sidebar. Please visit their site to see many more fantastic shots, a “©©” copyright symbol indicates a photo from Creative Commons and ©WikiC is a Creative Commons photo from Wikipedia.

Photographers or Videographers used on this page from our sidebar, Photography, are:
Ian Montgomery’s Birdway
Nick Talbot – Videographer


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Pardalotes or peep-wrens are a family, Pardalotidae, of very small, brightly coloured birds native to Australia, with short tails, strong legs, and stubby blunt beaks. This family is composed of four species in one genus, Pardalotus, and several subspecies. The name derives from a Greek word meaning “spotted”. The family once contained several other species now split into the family Acanthizidae.

Pardalotes spend most of their time high in the outer foliage of trees, feeding on insects, spiders, and above all lerps (a type of sap sucking insect). Their role in controlling lerp infestations in the eucalyptus forests of Australia may be significant. They generally live in pairs or small family groups but sometimes come together into flocks after breeding.

Pardalotes are seasonal breeders in temperate areas of Australia but may breed year round in warmer areas. They are monogamous breeders, and both partners share nest construction, incubation and chick rearing duties.

All four species nest in deep horizontal tunnels drilled into banks of earth. Externally about the size of a mouse-hole, they can be very deep, at a metre or more. Some species also nest in tree hollows. (Wikipedia with editing)

Some of the Family – Photos are Alphabetical down the columns:

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