Burhinidae – Stone-curlews, Thick-knees

Eurasian Stone-curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus) by Ian at Birdway

Eurasian Stone-curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus) by Ian at Birdway

that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, and of those on earth, and of those under the earth, (Philippians 2:10 NKJV)


CLASS – AVES, Order – CHARADRIIFORMES, Family – Burhinidae – Stone-curlews, Thick-knees


*100 Percent of Photos
Latest I.O.C. Version
Species (10)

Eurasian Stone-curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus)
Indian Stone-curlew (Burhinus indicus)
Senegal Thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis)
Water Thick-knee (Burhinus vermiculatus)
Spotted Thick-knee (Burhinus capensis)
Double-striped Thick-knee (Burhinus bistriatus)
Peruvian Thick-knee (Burhinus superciliaris)
Bush Stone-curlew (Burhinus grallarius)
Great Stone-curlew (Esacus recurvirostris)
Beach Stone-curlew (Esacus magnirostris)

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On the photos or slides, a “by” indicates one of the photographers or videographers, who have given their permission, with links on our sidebar. Please visit their sight to see many more fantastic shots, a “©©” copyright symbol indicates a photo from Creative Commons and ©WikiC is a Creative Commons photo from Wikipedia.

Photographers or Videographers used on this page from our sidebar, Photography, are:
Ian Montgomery’s Birdway
Nick Talbot – Videographer
Nikhil Devasar’s Gallery
Reinier’s Wildstock Photos Gallery
Robert Scanlon’s Gallery


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The Stone-curlews, also known as Dikkops or Thick-knees, consist of nine species within the family Burhinidae, and are found throughout the tropical and temperate parts of the world, with two species found in Australia. Despite the group being classified as waders, most species have a preference for arid or semi-arid habitats.

They are medium to large birds with strong black or yellow black bills, large yellow eyes—which give them a reptilian appearance—and cryptic plumage. The names Thick-knee and Stone-curlew are both in common use, the preference among authorities for one term or the other varying from year to year. The term Stone-curlew owes its origin to the broad similarities with true curlews (which are not closely related). Thick-knee refers to the prominent joints in the long yellow or greenish legs and apparently originated with a name coined in 1776 for B. oedicnemus, the Thick-kneed Bustard. (Wikipedia with editing)

Some of the Family – Photos are Alphabetical down the columns:

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