Kingfishers And Kookaburras – From Creation Moments

Genesis 1:20

“And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.”

I remember watching a kingfisher, sitting on the branch of a tree, overlooking the pool beneath one of the waterfalls in Neath Valley in the heart of Wales. Its eyes were transfixed on the movements in the pool below. It was watching and waiting, and it had incredible patience. Then, it flew, diving down into the water, and emerging with a fish in its beak, back to the branch where it had previously been perched. It proceeded to beat the fish against the branch. Then it flew off to I know not where, along with its meal!

White-collared Kingfisher by Dan's Pix

White-collared Kingfisher by Dan’s Pix

This common kingfisher was distinctive – blue upperparts and orange underparts, along with its characteristic long bill. And it was doing what we expect kingfishers to do – catch fish! But not all kingfishers live on fish. One of the largest kingfishers – the kookaburra – lives in Australia and doesn’t tend to eat fish, preferring to eat mice and small reptiles, and even the young of other birds. The most well-known feature of the kookaburra is its characteristic laughing call.

Laughing Kookabura Brevard Zoo

Laughing Kookaburra and Dan at Brevard Zoo by Lee

There are over a hundred species of kingfisher, many of which have bright plumage and are among the most beautiful birds that you will see. So how many kingfishers would God have brought to Noah to take on the Ark, considering there are so many species? The answer is just two. One pair of kingfishers, into which God had placed genetic information for a wide variety of adaptations.

Prayer: Thank You again, Lord, for the beauty of Your creation, and the wisdom and variety that You put into it. Amen.

Author: Paul F. Taylor

Ref: Encylopaedia Britannica, < https://www.britannica.com/animal/kingfisher-bird >, accessed 1/29/2019. Image: CC BY-SA 4.0 International.

Kingfishers and Kookaburras Creation Moments Article

I Love those Kingfishers and Kookaburras. (Lee)

More Creation Moments articles:

Interesting Things

What is the Gospel?

Sometimes We Have A Blank Mind

Wallcreeper (Tichodroma muraria) ©WikiC

My friendships that have developed with many bloggers in enjoyable. Over the years, many of us become friends even though we have never met personally. That has been one of the benefits of posting articles and reading those of others.

One of those friendships has been with Sandra Conner. She has a variety of topics she writes about on various blogs, plus she has authors several books.

From her “Frustration” post, she was at a blank as to what to write. So, she wrote her poem:

“I am a writer.
Yes, I am; I know I am.
So why is it that
I’m so often in this jam?

I start new novels;
Then, alas, the muse runs dry.
Three novels just sit,
And I have no idea why.

I am a writer.
I’ve said it o’er and o’er again.
“I am a writer!”
Pounding, pounding through my brain.

Since writing novels
Doesn’t seem to work just now,
I’ll write a poem.
They’re much prettier anyhow.

I replied with this:

Yep! I know a little bit about that.

I’m a blogger, but can’t seem to blog.
At times, mind is in a fog.
So here I sit on a log.
Wishing I could come up with a blog.

Australian Logrunner (Orthonyx temminckii) by Tom Tarrant

***

I think we all are at times confronted with not knowing what to do about something. Those of us who blog know about that. Even others hit blank walls about what to do about some issue.

Thankfully, God’s Word gives great answers for those times. One passage in particular helps us:

“If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed.” (James 1:5-6 KJV)

Rembrandt, Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee (public domain)

Check out some of Sandra Connor’s Blogs:

Ahyoka Happiness

Sandra Conner’s Main Blog List her blogs, and about most of the things she is involved in.

I’m thankful that on this blog, there are other writers who seem to step in there with an article just when my mind is blank. Yeah! Thanks to Dr. Jim, William Wise, Emily, Golden Eagle, and all the others that have contributed here and on Birds of the Bible for Kids.

 

 

Peeking For Knowledge

Sharing this from my Birds of the Bible for Kids blog.

Now that you students have returned to school after the holidays, it’s time for more articles.

I said "no" Peeking - by Poplively

To be able to learn, we need to “peek” in our books and listen to our teachers so we can gain knowledge. Don’t be afraid to read and study.

“I applied my heart to know, To search and seek out wisdom and the reason of things, To know the wickedness of folly, Even of foolishness and madness.” (Ecclesiastes 7:25 NKJV)

In all your studying, don’t forget to “peek” into your Bible.

A wise man will hear and increase learning, And a man of understanding will attain wise counsel, To understand a proverb and an enigma, The words of the wise and their riddles. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge, But fools despise wisdom and instruction.
(Proverbs 1:5-7 NKJV)

Photo used:

I said “no” Peeking – by Poplively, Peek by Poplively

ABC’s of the Gospel

A Look Back – Christmas at Faith 2016

“Matthew 2:1-12 KJV
(1)  Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,
(2)  Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.
(3)  When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him.
(4)  And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born.
(5)  And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written by the prophet,
(6)  And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule my people Israel.
(7)  Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men, enquired of them diligently what time the star appeared.
(8)  And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go and search diligently for the young child; and when ye have found him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship him also.
(9)  When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was.
(10)  When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.
(11)  And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.
(12)  And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way.

The Gospel Message

Tickle Me Tuesday – Christmas Bird Videos

Just thought you needed a diversion from all the last minute gift wrapping and cooking. Enjoy these birds with a Christmas attitude.

“A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.” (Proverbs 15:13 KJV)

“A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones.” (Proverbs 17:22 KJV)

“Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him, talk ye of all his wondrous works.” (1 Chronicles 16:9 KJV)

What is the Gospel?

Our Christmas Concert 2019 – Adoration

This video is from last Sunday evening. Our church presented a Christmas concert called “Adoration.” I trust you will enjoy the music and the presentation of the various Bible characters.

“Luke 2:8-14 KJV
(8)  And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.
(9)  And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.
(10)  And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.
(11)  For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.
(12)  And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.
(13)  And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,
(14)  Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

You can see more of our services here:

Our Services

Palm Warbler Through Our Window

Beautyberry in backyard

In the last week, we added an American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) to our backyard. Actually, we dug it up from our previous house, before we sold it Monday. (Yeah!) It was in the backyard and ignored since we moved to our new house. Therefore, it is a bit dried up, but will bounce back with some TLC. [Tender Love and Care]

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

This morning while eating our breakfast, the Palm Warbler came and sat in the Beautyberry plant/bush. This time I was ready for him/or her. I had the camera right on the table. Yes!! This warbler and a Phoebe have been checking the plant out. [More about that visit in another post.]

The next three photos show how hard it is to try to focus on the bird with your camera in “program mode”. That is the way I use my camera as I have mentioned before. At least you can see the front, back, and side view.  :) Thankfully the video came out much clearer. [After all, I was sitting at the breakfast table.]

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

“Palm Warblers are small songbirds, but they are on the larger side for a warbler and have a fuller looking belly. Their posture is more upright than a typical warbler and more like a pipit—especially noticeable when they are on the ground. Their tails and legs are longer than most warblers contributing to the pipitlike shape.” [All About Birds]

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

“This is one bird where behavior—this bird’s near-constant tail-wagging—can help confirm its identity. They mainly forage on open ground or in low vegetation, rather than in forest canopy as many warblers do (although they do sing from high perches in trees and shrubs).” [All About Birds]

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

Palm Warbler on Beautyberry

Check out this photo from All About Birds:

Palm Warbler in Non-breeding color

Oops!!! This is not a Palm Warbler on Beautyberry, It is the Eastern Phoebe!! [Edited after Published]

“Who provideth for the raven [or Warbler] his food?… they wander for lack of meat.” (Job 38:41 KJV)

“Another parable put he forth unto them, saying, The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field: Which indeed is the least of all seeds: but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof.” (Matthew 13:31-32 KJV)

In Mark, Luke, and in Matthew, the parable of the mustard seed is told. They all mention the small grain of mustard seed that grows up into a tree that the birds use for rest and shelter. This little warbler has found rest in this plant just as we find rest for our souls when we know the Lord Jesus Christ as our Savior. With the Christmas season here, there are plenty of reminders of His Love and Salvation.

[All About Birds]

Gospel Presentation

Tickle Me Tuesday – Bouncy Woodcock

American Woodcock through door 12-3-19 by Lee

American Woodcock through door 12-3-19 by Lee

Today I am going combine a “Tickle Me Tuesday” with a “Through My Window” avian wonder. In fact, the photos were taken last Tuesday “through my window/sliding door.”

Thanks to my zoom lens on my camera, which I now keep sitting in a chair at the breakfast table, I was able to get my first idea of what kind of bird this was.

American Woodcock through door 12-3-19 by Lee 2

American Woodcock through door 12-3-19 by Lee 2

Once he turned sideways, the identification became clear. It was an American Woodcock.

American Woodcock through door 12-3-19 by Lee 3

American Woodcock through door 12-3-19 by Lee 3

He was doing their “bouncy dance,” but, of course, as I started filming, he stopped. [ignore TV was in background]

Here is a American Woodcock doing an early morning “sky dance”

or how about this one?

“They wander up and down for food, And howl if they are not satisfied.” (Psalms 59:15 NKJV)

I used that verse out of text, but the next two verses are great challenges for us to sing praises to our Lord. Creation of the amazing Woodcocks are reasons to sing of His Creative Power.

“But I will sing of Your power; Yes, I will sing aloud of Your mercy in the morning; For You have been my defense And refuge in the day of my trouble. To You, O my Strength, I will sing praises; For God is my defense, My God of mercy.” (Psalms 59:16-17 NKJV)

“Superbly camouflaged against the leaf litter, the brown-mottled American Woodcock walks slowly along the forest floor, probing the soil with its long bill in search of earthworms. Unlike its coastal relatives, this plump little shorebird lives in young forests and shrubby old fields across eastern North America. Its cryptic plumage and low-profile behavior make it hard to find except in the springtime at dawn or dusk, when the males show off for females by giving loud, nasal peent calls and performing dazzling aerial displays.”

The American Woodcock belongs to the Scolopacidae – Sandpipers, Snipes Family

Cool Facts:

“Wouldn’t it be useful to have eyes in the back of your head? American Woodcocks come close—their large eyes are positioned high and near the back of their skull. This arrangement lets them keep watch for danger in the sky while they have their heads down probing in the soil for food.”

“The American Woodcock probes the soil with its bill to search for earthworms, using its flexible bill tip to capture prey. The bird walks slowly and sometimes rocks its body back and forth, stepping heavily with its front foot. This action may make worms move around in the soil, increasing their detectability.” [All About Birds]

American Woodcock – All About Birds

American Woodcock – A Wonderfully Bizarre Bird

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Laughing Kookaburras

Wages or a Gift

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Andean Condor

When a Bird of the Moment recalls a special day out in the field, I get great pleasure from reliving the experience by preparing and describing the event. Such was our first full day, a Sunday, in Chile on the return journey. The day dawned sunny and unseasonably warm for Santiago in late September, forecast maximum 23ºC/73ºF so we decided to look for Andean Condors, our must-see bird in Chile and we are going to take you along with us.
mirador_lomas_del_viento.gif
Over a leisurely breakfast – tired after the long journey the previous day from Cuiabá in western Brazil via São Paolo on the east coast – we consult our reliable oracle Google to suggest a good place for the search. The one that sounds most promising is near a place not far away called Farellones in the Andes west of the city at an altitude of about 2,400 metres/7,800 feet.. We know that Condors are easiest to find when winds and topography provide suitable updrafts for soaring, so we are a little concerned by the calm conditions as we navigate the steep hairpin bends on the road to our destination. We get there in the early afternoon after a few birding stops along the way.
parque_yerba_loca_6940-ps.jpg
Just before arriving we spot a large raptor, which we think is a immature Condor but we can’t stop as we are sharing the road with hundreds of cyclists heading back towards the city and the many vehicles of spectators blocking the down traffic lane waiting to follow the cyclists. We go round another hairpin bend at Mirador Lomas del Viento (“Lookout, Hills of the wind”) where we see several Condors soaring both above and below us. Throwing caution and fear of disapproval to the wind we stop blocking, the remaining free lane, to take the first photos. Then we drive on a bit further, find a parking spot and walk back to a good vantage point overlooking Cordillera Yerba Loca (“Mountain Range Crazy Plant”).
andean_condor_207207-pp.jpg
If you look at Parque Cordillera Yerba Loca on the map and at the photo you can see that the lookout is at the end of a 20km long steeply-sided valley running approximately north-south. On such a warm day the breeze is from the north and we have fortuitously chosen perfect conditions for Condors at this place and time where the “Hills of the Wind” channel the breeze into a steady updraft. Yerba (or Hierba) Loca refers to a high altitude plant called Astragalus looseri, a legume that looks a bit like a purple Lupin in flower, which can tolerate intense sunlight, freezing temperatures and being buried under snow for months on end. It contains an alkaloid, which the literature coyly describe as toxic – supposedly the reason for the name – but we are not convinced. Naturally one, not the plant, would be loco or loca to eat it, but if you Google “Hierba Loca” you’ll find a reference to Dr Stoner’s Hierba Loca Tequila, which Hercule Poirot suspects is closer to the truth.
andean_condor_207321-pp.jpg
Anyway, back to the Condors. The first Condor photo is of an adult male, the second and third of an immature female. Adult Andean Condors have large white panels on the upper surface of the wing (secondary and tertiary flight feathers), a white ermine ruff, and reddish heads, and males of all ages have crests which grow larger with age. Older males, we’ll see shortly also have wattles or flaps on the side of the head. Juveniles and immature birds have entirely brown plumage which changes gradually to the adult plumage at an age of about seven years.
andean_condor_207355-pp.jpg
The Andean Condor is the only New World Vulture, Cathartidae, in which the sexes are different (they’re the same in the California Condor). The males with a wingspan to 320cm/10ft 6in and weighting up to 15kg/33lbs are larger than the females which weigh up to 11kg/24lbs. Of birds that can fly, only the Wandering Albatross has a greater wingspan (to 351cm) and the males of some bustards such as the African Kori Bustard weight more (up to 19kg), but the male Andean Condor is the largest raptor, just slightly bigger than the California. It is also unusual for male raptors to be larger than females; it’s often the other way round. Female Condor must trust their male partners who share in incubation of the single egg and care of the young.
andean_condor_207230-pp.jpg
Some of the Condors land periodically on a rocky outcrop just below us (fourth Condor photo). It looks to us like the adults are training the immature birds in flight manoeuvres. Both the birds in the photo are males, the adult on the left having a long crest and the immature bird on the right having a very short one, so maybe it’s a father and son pair. Most of the birds we see are males and we wonder why that is so. As the lookout faces north we are facing into the sun so the lighting conditions in the early afternoon are not ideal for photography.
Eventually hunger takes over and we end up in the restaurant of a charming, local ski lodge for a late lunch before returning to the lookout. By now all the cyclists, support vehicles and spectators have left and we have the place almost to ourselves. The number of Condors increases and at some points we can count eleven taking part in this wonderful aerial ballet. The birds are so graceful in the air that it’s hard to grasp how large they are until we see close by the passing shadow of a curious bird, flying overhead to check us out like the ones in the fifth and sixth photos.
It’s now about two hours before sunset and the sun is lower in the west with a softer intensity, much better for photography. The photos are numbered in sequence so you can see that I’ve taken more than two hundred in the interval between the one of the two birds on the rock and the female in the fifth photo. She is about six years old and is in transition to adult plumage. She has only a faint white collar and the lack of a crest indicates her gender.
andean_condor_207513-pp.jpg
The bird in the sixth photo, directly overhead is an old male with a reddish head and long wattles on the cheeks. You can see that in adult birds the distal edge of the underneath of the flight feathers of the white wing panel on the upper surface are also white. If you look carefully at the right wing of the female in the previous photo you can see that the bird is moulting and five secondary flight feathers with white edges are just beginning to grow and will replace the corresponding completely dark feathers.
andean_condor_207426-pp.jpg
I’m now satisfied with the quantity of photos I’ve taken so I’m concentrating on trying to get photos of birds with snowy mountains in the background. This isn’t easy as the mountains are quite far away and the birds are a bit distant when they have the mountains in the background. The seventh Condor photo shows an older male while the eighth is of a younger male with a second bird behind it.
andean_condor_207466-pp.jpg
We’ve had a wonderful afternoon with the Condors, just magic. Eventually we continue up the road to the Vale Nevada (“Snowy Valley”) ski resort at about 3,000 metres/10,000 feet. It consists of a number of tall, starkly modern apartment blocks around a largely deserted central car park, the season being over. We park in the visitor parking area – the rest is severely private – and have a wander round. The air is noticeably thin at this altitude. We don’t find the resort picturesque, an understatement, so here is the view enjoyed by the buildings on the southern side. The south facing slope still has quite a lot of snow and the sun is sinking in the west after a cloudless day.
vale_nevada_6960-ps.jpg
We don’t see any more Condors along this route, but we do see a few other high altitude raptors like an immature Mountain Caracara beside the road and a pair of Variable Hawks perching on one of the power poles supplying the resort. Caracaras are in the same family as Falcons but scavenge like Crows. Time now to go back to Santiago before it gets dark after a wonderful day. It’s misión cumplida in Chile and we have three full days left for relaxed birding. What would you like to see and where would you like to go? Let’s do some wetlands on the coast near Valparaiso for a change: the trip reports on the internet say they’re good.
Greetings
Ian

Lee’s Addition:

“Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars, Stretching his wings toward the south? “Is it at your command that the eagle mounts up And makes his nest on high? “On the cliff he dwells and lodges, Upon the rocky crag, an inaccessible place. “From there he spies out food; His eyes see it from afar.” (Job 39:26-29 NASB)

Great photos and thanks for sharing your adventure to watch and photograph this interesting birds, Ian. The Lord has created so much variety in His Avian Wonders. The birds just seem to find the niche that they were created for. I trust that we find that spot, or niche that the Lord has for us.

I have got to admit, these Condors are not the prettiest birds we have ever seen, but yet, the Creator, in His wisdom, makes no mistakes.

Andean Condor – Lowry Park Zoo (Zoo Tampa) by Dan

See more of Ian’s Bird of the Week, Moments, or whenever:

Ian’s Bird of the Week

Cathartidae – New World Vultures

Who Paints The Leaves

Tickle Me Tuesday – Peekaboo and Einstein

Indian Ring Neck Parakeet

Indian Ring Neck Parakeet

Indian Ringneck Parrot

Occurred on March 12, 2019 / Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand “Oscar the two-year-old Indian Ringneck parrot playing peekaboo with the cat from across the street.”

“And He kept repeating, Do you not yet understand?” (Mark 8:21 AMP)

African Grey

Meet the Knoxville Zoo ‘s avian SUPERSTAR, Einstein. Come visit Einstein the African gray parrot at the Knoxville Zoo’s Bird Show, Knoxville, TN USA. [This was in 2008]

(African) Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus lenne) at Parrot Mountain by Lee

“He that covereth a transgression seeketh love; but he that repeateth a matter separateth very friends.” (Proverbs 17:9 KJV)

“Also when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the corners of the streets, that they may be seen by people. Truly I tell you, they have their reward in full already. But when you pray, go into your [most] private room, and, closing the door, pray to your Father, Who is in secret; and your Father, Who sees in secret, will reward you in the open. And when you pray, do not heap up phrases (multiply words, repeating the same ones over and over) as the Gentiles do, for they think they will be heard for their much speaking. [I Kings 18:25-29.] Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask Him.” (Matthew 6:5-8 AMP)

See other Tickle Me Tuesdays

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Laughing Kookaburras

2015’s Tickle Me Tuesday’s

Sharing The Gospel

Hummingbird from John 10:10 Project

“Few creatures in the animal kingdom can capture the imagination more powerfully than a hummingbird. Their aeronautical abilities are stunning. But the genius of these birds isn’t limited to flight. Each day, they must consume twice their body weight in nectar to fuel their voracious metabolisms. The incredible biological mechanisms that make this possible are masterpieces of engineering and design.”

“The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.” (John 10:10 KJV)

A friend sent me this link. Thanks, Pastor Pete.

Birds of the Bible – Deuteronomy 14:16-18 V (WYC)

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) ©WikiC

“16 a falcon, and a swan, and a ciconia,
17 and a dipper, a porphyrio, and a rearmouse, a cormorant,
18 and a calidris, all in their kind; also a lapwing and a bat.” Deuteronomy 14:16-18 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

As we conclude our investigation of the interesting interpretation of these three verses from Wycliffe’s Bible, another amazing critter is encountered. We have been looking at these verse in these recent blogs:

Normally, these verses would read something similar to this:

Deuteronomy 14:16-18 KJV
(16)  The little owl, and the great owl, and the swan,
(17)  And the pelican, and the gier eagle, and the cormorant,
(18)  And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.

Or maybe the New American Standard’s Version:

Deuteronomy 14:16-18 NASB
(16) the little owl, the great owl, the white owl,
(17) the pelican, the carrion vulture, the cormorant,
(18) the stork, and the heron in their kinds, and the hoopoe and the bat.

Webster Dictionary 1913 says:

(1): (n.) A bare-legged person; — a contemptuous appellation formerly given to the Scotch Highlanders, in allusion to their bare legs.
(2): (n.) The fieldfare.
(3): (n.) A common Old World limicoline bird (Totanus calidris), having the legs and feet pale red. The spotted redshank (T. fuscus) is larger, and has orange-red legs. Called also redshanks, redleg, and clee.

If this older dictionary entry indicates this genus, then it would refer to the Redshank clan.

Common Redshank (Tringa totanus) ©WikiC

Common Redshank (Tringa totanus) ©WikiC

Or maybe the Stork would be referred to:

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

My personal opinion, would be that the stork is not the calidris. But my opinion does not matter, only what the Greek or Hebrew of the original languages means. In this case, I have no clue other than Do Not Eat them. Thanksgiving is next week, and there is no plan to have a stuffed Stork or one of the Redshanks or Calidis clan on the table.

Today, as Christians, we are not “forbidden” to eat any certain birds, BUT, there are some of the Lord’s Avian Wonders that shouldn’t be eaten. They could be very dangerous to our health. COMMON SENSE still makes great sense.

I trust you have found this investigation of the Wycliffe’s Version of these verses interesting and informative. It definitely had me scratching my head at times. It helped me dig into the Bible and the Bird families to try to find answers.

See the Calidris clan here: Calidris

Birds of the Bible

Gospel Message