Birds Heading South – We Are Heading North

Myrtle (Yellow-rumped) Warbler (Setophaga coronata) breeding ©WikiC

Looking forward to our northern birds to begin heading down for the winter. Actually, there have been reports already of migrating birds in various places around Florida. Unfortunately, some of them currently in Florida may be grounded for awhile until Tropical Storm Gordon blows out of the state.

“I would hasten my escape from the windy storm and tempest.” (Psalms 55:8 KJV)

Hurricane season gets active about the same time the fall migration gets underway. The Lord has given most of the birds the instinct to take cover during these disturbances.

We are currently headed the opposite direction. We are going North for a few days. Hope there will be a few birds left up there to enjoy while we are there. Dan has a High School reunion [60th] to attend. I will be visiting with a niece that I haven’t seen in years. When we get back home, maybe we will have some winter bird visitors already in Florida setting up their lawn chairs for the winter. That will give us some birding photos to take. Summer time is pretty slim on birding.

I am trusting the Lord to help me heal from my back surgery so we can get out and about with the birds again. So far, I am getting better, but still taking it easy. Also hope to get a few photos taken while on trip. Stay tuned!

Bill It To The White Stork

White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) by Bob-Nan

“Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times; and the turtle and the crane and the swallow observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 KJV)

This migrating stork was tagged with a tracking device and ended up running up quite a phone bill. Here are excerpts from two different articles about Kajtek, the White Stork.

“A migrating, tagged, male white stork—known to the Polish environmentalists who were tracking him as “Kajtek”—blipped out of contact on 26 April.

That, however, did not stop him from making good use of the SIM card in his GPS tracker, with which the bird—or somebody who found the GPS device and picked it apart in order to get at the card—racked up a $2,700 phone bill.” [SIM card in bird’s GPS tracker]

White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) by Ian

“In a Facebook post, the group explains that “for unknown reasons” Kajtek stayed in the area for over two months, “travelling 25 kms in different directions during the day”.

Last month, EkoLogiczna was surprised with a phone bill linked to the SIM card installed in the Kajtek’s GPS tracker for a total amount of 10,000 PLN (€2,278).

“Someone quite simply removed the card from the tracker, put it in a phone and used it for 20 hours of communication,” the group said in the Facebook post.

According to the EuroNatur Foundation, Poland is a major centre of distribution for the white stork, accounting for 40% of the bird’s world population.”

“Let him that stole steal no more: but rather let him labour, working with his hands the thing which is good, that he may have to give to him that needeth.” (Ephesians 4:28 KJV)

Here are the stories about this:

SIM card in bird’s GPS tracker used to rack up $2,700 phone bill …

Roaming stork lands Polish charity with huge phone bill

USA Today

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Masked Finch

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Masked Finch by Ian Montgomery

Surprise, surprise: a Bird of the Moment! I’ve been on a couple of camping trips in the last few months, so I have a few birds to share with you. The first trip was prompted by some birding friends who had found some Red-browed Pardalotes at a place called Cumberland Dam about half way between the Gulf of Carpentaria and both Cairns and Townsville. See the map below from the ebook Where to Find Birds in North-east Queensland.
At the time I was doing a major revision of the book and needed photos of both Cumberland Dam and Red-browed Pardalote, so I downed tools and set of with a couple of friends. The photo of the Dam proved easy enough (below) but the Pardalotes were more difficult. Cumberland was a gold mining town in the fourth quarter of the nineteenth century and at its peak in 1886 nearly 400 mine workers and their families lived there. Now all that is left is this square brick chimney and the dam, both built to serve the boilers that powered the batteries for crushing the gold-containing ore. See http://www.travelling-australia.info/Journal2011/22JulPtB.html.
Cumberland Dam is a well known birding spot. The area has a average annual rainfall of about 800mm/31in but 80% of that falls in the northern wet season from October to April so any persistent bodies of water in the dry season attract many birds. In addition, the region is on the western slopes of the Great Dividing Range – the Torresian Barrier of Schodde and Mason (1980) – so one can expect to find some species and races of birds different from those of coastal northeastern Queensland.
A striking example of these is the Cape York race of the Masked Finch, sometimes called the White-eared Finch. Cumberland is at the very southern tip of its range, shown below from The Directory of Australian Birds by Schodde and Mason (1999). The nominate race ranges from far northwestern Queensland to Broome in northern Western Australia and the ranges of the two races are disjoint.
When looking for the elusive Red-browed Pardalote, I found this pair of Masked Finches near the dam very busy gathering nesting material.
Their favourite material seemed to be what looked like thistle down but they also brought in feathers.
I assumed the nest was in a nearby clump of trees but on the second day they were still working away and I saw them taking the material into this clump of thick dried grass beside a barbed wire fence near where I’d first spotted them.
Here, incidentally is the nominate, western race of the Masked Finch so you can see why the Cape York race is called the White-eared Finch.
Pardalotes are easy to hear but hard to see as, unless you are lucky enough to find them at a nesting hollow on the ground, they spend their time in the outer foliage of trees. The Red-browed Pardalote has a distinctive call of about six notes, starting slow and low in pitch and then accelerating and rising. We heard three at Cumberland Dam and I went on a couple of wild-goose chases through forest and grazing country but got no more than a glimpse of one flying away and no photos. The Red-browed Pardalote quest ultimately succeeded on another camping trip: to be continued!

It has been some time since Ian Montgomery has produced on of his great articles. I trust you enjoy this latest one. Ian went from a Bird of the Week, to Bird of the Month, and now to the Bird of the Moment. Hew has been struggling with his health. We are always glad when he is able to produce a blog.
Ian, you are in our prayers that things are improving.

Ian’s searching for that Red-browed Paratote reminds me of the verse about seeking and searching with all your heart. In this case, it is a bird that is being searched for, yet we are to seek the Lord. He is the Creator of all these birds. He wants us to find Him and accept His gift of Salvation.

“And you will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart.” (Jeremiah 29:13 NKJV)

Ian’s Bird of the Week

Wages or a Gift

Osprey Feeding On His Catch of the Day

Osprey at Viera looking to the Creator and hopefully he is thanking Him for the fish.

“Who provideth for the raven [and Ospreys] his food? when his young ones cry unto God, they wander for lack of meat.” (Job 38:41 KJV)

Dan took a couple of really nice photos of the hungry Osprey.

Now for Dan’s great photos.

Time to strip the innards! Yuck!

When we were last at Viera Wetlands, we caught an Osprey eating a fish. Apparently he doesn’t like the “guts.” We watched it pull them out and then drop them. Did that several times, and then started eating the fish.

“But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds.” (1 Corinthians 15:38-39 KJV)

I am thankful that the Lord let me be born as a human. I am also very thankful that He provided salvation for our fallen sinful human nature.

What will you do with Jesus?

Other Photos by Dan

Take A Note

Secretarybird look straight at the lens – ©Pinterest – Rudi Luyten

You would like me to take a note?

Secretarybird -Notice the eyelashes – ©Pinterest

Looking down to start writing! [Notice the eyelashes]

Just because these are neat birds, decided to share these Secretarybird photos from Pinterest.

“Let not mercy and truth forsake you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart,” (Proverbs 3:3 NKJV)

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Secretary Bird – The Walker

Indecisive Black-bellied Whistling-Duck

Shall I Go To The This Way?

Shall I Go To That Way?

And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions? if the LORD be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him. And the people answered him not a word. (1 Kings 18:21 KJV)

Still Undecided As To Which Way To Go by Lee

Elijah went there and stood in front of the people. He said, “How long will it take you to make up your minds? If the LORD is the one and only God, follow him. But if Baal is the one and only God, follow him.” The people didn’t say anything. (1 Kings 18:21 NIrV)

Just About Decided

Elijah challenged the people: “How long are you going to sit on the fence? If GOD is the real God, follow him; if it’s Baal, follow him. Make up your minds!” Nobody said a word; nobody made a move. (1 Kings 18:21 MSG)

This Black-bellied Whistling-Duck was undecided about where to go. There were quite a few Whistling Ducks at Viera Wetlands, and they were playing “musical palm tree stubs.” They kept landing on these tree tops and chasing the other off. Yet, this verse comes to mind.

I trust all of us are decided about WHO we are going to follow.

Now for a picture of a Black-bellied Whistling-Duck by Dan [the much better photographer]

Black-bellied Whistling Duck by Dan

The Black-bellied Whistling-Duck is a large, gooselike duck with a long neck, long legs, and short tail. In flight, look for their broad wings, long neck, and hunched back.

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are dark overall: a chestnut breast and black belly are set off by a bright-pink bill and legs, grayish face, and broad white wing stripe, also visible in flight. Immatures are duller than adults, with a dark bill, pale breast, and mottled black belly. [Info from All About Birds]*

Atlantic Puffins on the Isle of Mull, Scotland

Atlantic Puffins by Bill Boothe, MD in the Isle of Mull Scotland

These Atlantic Puffin’s photo was taken by Bill Boothe, MD, in the Isle of Mull, Scotland. Dr. Boothe is a long time friend of Dr. James Johnson. It would have been nice to have been there also.

This puffin (Atlantic Puffin) has a black crown and back, pale grey cheek patches and white underparts. Its broad, boldly marked red and black beak and orange legs contrast with its plumage. It moults while at sea in the winter and some of the bright-colored facial characteristics are lost, with color returning again during the spring. The external appearance of the adult male and female are identical though the male is usually slightly larger. The juvenile has similar plumage but its cheek patches are dark grey. The juvenile does not have brightly colored head ornamentation, its bill is narrower and is dark-grey with a yellowish-brown tip, and its legs and feet are also dark. Puffins from northern populations are typically larger than in the south and it is generally considered that these populations are different subspecies.

Puffin Beaks – Breeding L and non-breeding R – 1905 PubDom Drawing

Spending the autumn and winter in the open ocean of the cold northern seas, the Atlantic puffin returns to coastal areas at the start of the breeding season in late spring. It nests in clifftop colonies, digging a burrow in which a single white egg is laid. The chick mostly feeds on whole fish and grows rapidly. After about six weeks it is fully fledged and makes its way at night to the sea. It swims away from the shore and does not return to land for several years. [Wikipedia with editing]

This photo was take in Mull, Scotland. “Mull (Scottish Gaelic: Muile, pronounced [ˈmulʲə]) is the second largest island of the Inner Hebrides (after Skye), off the west coast of Scotland in the council area of Argyll and Bute.

Argyll and Bute UK relief location map

With an area of 875.35 square kilometres (337.97 sq mi) Mull is the fourth largest Scottish island and the fourth largest island surrounding Great Britain (excluding Ireland). In the 2011 census the usual resident population of Mull was 2,800; a slight increase on the 2001 figure of 2,667; in the summer this is supplemented by many tourists. Much of the population lives in Tobermory, the only burgh on the island until 1973, and its capital.”

Lighter side verses: [yet very true]

“Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up;” (1 Corinthians 13:4 NKJV)

“We know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffs up, but love edifies.” (1 Corinthians 8:1 NKJV)

Hummingbirds in Ultra Slow Motion

Dr. Jim, [aka J.J.S.Johnson] found this super video about Hummingbirds. It has amazing facts and nice music. Please watch. You will glad you did.

This is on Nature’s Invitation YouTube Channel. ‘Over 20 amazing Facts about Hummingbirds. Slow motion footage of the hummingbird in Full HD. Great for school nature projects. Watch hummingbirds fly in ULTRA slow motion. Watch the humming bird hover and fly backwards in slow motion. Videos of hummingbird babies (chicks) being fed and much more.”

“But where can wisdom be found? And where is the place of understanding? Man does not know its value, Nor is it found in the land of the living. The deep says, ‘It is not in me’; And the sea says, ‘It is not with me.’ It cannot be purchased for gold, Nor can silver be weighed for its price. (Job 28:12-15)

“From where then does wisdom come? And where is the place of understanding? It is hidden from the eyes of all living, And concealed from the birds of the air. (Job 28:20-21)

God understands its way, And He knows its place. For He looks to the ends of the earth, And sees under the whole heavens, To establish a weight for the wind, And apportion the waters by measure. When He made a law for the rain, And a path for the thunderbolt, Then He saw wisdom and declared it; He prepared it, indeed, He searched it out. And to man He said, ‘Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom, And to depart from evil is understanding.’ ” (Job 28:23-28 NKJV)

When I Am Grown

Young Gallinule at Viera Wetlands

On the Fourth of July, yesterday, we were at Viera Wetlands, Viera, Florida and spotted this young Common Gallinule, depending on what they are calling it. Look at its feet. He/she has some growing to do to fit those feet.

Below is how it will look when it matures.

Common Gallinule (Gallinula chloropus) by Reinier Munguia

“I have been young, and now am old; yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread.” (Psalms 37:25 KJV)

Another promise our Savior and Creator has given us. Lord’s Blessings.

Common Gallinule – All About Birds

Shield of Thy Salvation

Cardinals Watching Out For Fallen Baby

Cardinal Brevard Zoo

At the Brevard Zoo today, we saw some Northern Cardinals flying really close to where I was standing.

Cardinal Brevard Zoo 7-3-18

I was enjoying getting some photos, when we noticed that they were feeding a youngster who had fallen out of the nest. It had landed on a palm leaf right above the walkway where I was standing.

Cardinal Baby Brevard Zoo 7-3-18

That is when I realized the Momma Cardinal was also keeping an eye on the situation.

Momma Cardinal Brevard Zoo 7-3-1

We were quite concerned that it might fall into the walkway and someone would step on it accidentally. At the next exhibit, we told the keeper. He asked if it was the one in the palm tree. Yes. Well, he had just put it back in the nest about 10 minutes before. Said he would go back and put it back in again.

We sure hope it makes it and quits getting out of the nest. It is too small to survive on its own and can’t fly yet. He also told us that there were no other little ones in the nest. I am sure that those concerned Cardinals will do their best.

“I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.” (Psalms 50:11 KJV)

I know the Lord, who Created Cardinals, knows all about the situation. If He cares about the littlest baby Cardinal, rest assured, He cares about you and I.

Photos aren’t the best, but I am writing this on my laptop and away from the editing program.

An Amazing Osprey Out Fishing!

Received this from an email and needs to be shared! Enjoy!

Osprey with his catch!

But these are they of which ye shall not eat: the eagle, and the ossifrage, and the osprey, (Deuteronomy 14:12 KJV)
BOTH THE BIRD AND THE PHOTOGRAPHY
Hard to believe this Osprey got 5-6 fish at a time,  then got a ‘flounder’ under 3 feet of water and finally made off with what looks to be a 5+ lbs steel head.
Have you ever seen a bird shake water off like a dog does?
Wouldn’t want to get in its way when its eyes are locked onto you and talons in the “load” position! It’s talons are amazing!
There are 3 sequences in this one video:
1st sequence – catches half a dozen fish in one strike.
2nd sequence – plunges talons into deep water to grab the prey.
3rd sequence – captures a big old fish that looks as if it weighs more than he does!
This is incredible to watch!

CLICK: OSPREY

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I.O.C. World Bird List Version 8.2 – Updated

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Gray Jay now Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

I finally finished updating the Birds of the World pages to reflect the newest version, 8.2. of the IOC’s bird list. The family pages and the indexes have been modified. Since the photos on the site were hacked last year, the family pages were changed. Now the photos are at the bottom of the pages instead of with each name.

With this version, I added the Genera in with Green. Many of the new changes are in red and a few in blue. The red are spelling or Genera changes. Blue seems to represent reshuffled positions within a family. [I think – this is from their Excel spreadsheet]

White-crested Helmetshrike (Prionops plumatus) ©WikiC

Two families were moved into the Vangidae – Vanga and Allies family.

Here is the over update:

The IOC World Bird List 8.2 contains 10,711 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  246 Families (plus 1 Incertae Sedis) and 2,313 Genera.  The list also includes 20,055 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Changes include:

SPECIES ADDED:                15 

SPECIES DELETED:             3

ENGLISH NAMES:               18

TAXONOMY:                         18 incl revisions of  Campephagidae, Phylloscopidae and Locustellidae, and expansion of Vangidae to include helmetshrikes, woodshrikes, and shrike-flycatchers

Large woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis) ©WikiC

The three articles listed in the Time For Another Update From The I.O.C. explain the changes and saves me rewriting the same information.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

2018 checklist changes include few splits

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

The Indexes, Alphabetical Pages and Family Pages are all current here on the site:

Birds of the World

Alphabetical List of the Birds.

ORDER

Family

Families – Alphabetical (Scientific)

Families – Alphabetical (English)

Families – Taxonomic (Scientific – English)

Families – Taxonomic (English – Scientific)

Species Index