Meet Another New Photographer – William Wise

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) ©williamwisephoto.com

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) ©williamwisephoto.com

Thankfully, we have another new photographer who has given permission to use his photos. William Wise has been taking photos of quite a variety of topics for some time. And he also is a Christian.

You can check out the main page at William Wise Photography. He has five sections to view his various subjects:

Home

“O LORD, how manifold are your works! In wisdom have you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures.”  Psalm 104:24 

Shelter Photography

Shelter Puppy ©WilliamWisePhoto.com

Nature Photography

Downy Woodpeckerr ©WilliamWise.com

Creation Speaks

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

CREATION SPEAKS
Creation Speaks is a Biblical creation teaching ministry that uses writing and photography to teach the truth of our origin and other spiritual truths from the Bible. The lessons from God’s creation are also taught in multi-media presentations designed for Christian schools, youth and adult groups, and church Sunday School groups utilizing slideshows, videos, mounted and live animals.

Blogs

Like you, I will be busy looking through these many photos and articles for ideas for this blog. His theme in the Creation Speaks section is similar to what we try to do here. This is from his Creation Speaks section:

Here is a photo from one of his blogs: Fighting The Reflection…

Tufted Titmouse Picture

“For if you listen to the word and don’t obey, it is like glancing at your face in a mirror. You see yourself, walk away, and forget what you look like.” James 1:23-24 New Living Translation

Thank you William for this new permission. Lord’s Blessing on on your do. Keep up the good photography, I might need them here. :)

 

IOC Version 9.2- Indexes Up To Date – Part IV

Blue-naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) at Cincinnati Zoo) by Lee

Blue-naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) at Cincinnati Zoo) by Lee

Thanks for patience as the Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures blog is being updated to the new I.O.C. Version 9.2. Along with cataract eye surgery this week, brain freeze [Couldn’t get my Excel to build my links. Oh, no! Could it be old age?], and a holiday, I think most of it is finished.

“But now finish doing it also, so that just as there was the readiness to desire it, so there may be also the completion of it by your ability. For if the readiness is present, it is acceptable according to what a person has, not according to what he does not have.” (2 Corinthians 8:11-12 NASB)

These links are all working:

I am still updating these new Family pages. They added six new families, but one of them was the old Incertae Sedis Family (now Hyliidae-Hylias). It was a holding place for birds they didn’t know where to place. With all the DNA testing going on, they keep finding surprises. In the future, they will most like shuffle some more families and species around.

Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) ©Flickr Nic Borrows

New Families Added with Version 9.2
Calyptomenidae – African and Green Broadbills (9.2)
Cinclosomatidae – Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes (9.2)
Falcunculidae – Shriketit (9.2)
Hyliidae – Hylias, Pholidornis (9.2)
Coliidae – Mousebirds (9.2)
Philepittidae – Asities (9.2)

An interesting link from Birdwatching Daily about this new update.
North American Bird Checklist 2019

Order Pages are Updated

Good News

IOC Version 9.2- Name Changes – Part III

IOC Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019) Name Changes

The nice thing about these name changes is that the Scientific Name normally stays with the bird. Many countries refer to birds by various names, but the scientific name helps everyone know which avian wonder is being referred to.

PREVIOUS IOC LISTS – SCIENTIFIC NAME – New Name IOC LIST V9.2

Sumatran Frogmouth ((Batrachostomus poliolophus) Female ©WikiC

Short-tailed Frogmouth – Batrachostomus poliolophus – Sumatran Frogmouth

Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla haematonota ©Oiseaux_net

Napo Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla haematonota – Stipple-throated Antwren

PAS-Tham Rio Madeira Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ©Flickr Claudio Dias Timm

Rio Madeira Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ©Flickr Claudio Dias Timm

Madeira Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla amazonica – Rio Madeira Antwren

Wayanad Laughingthrush (Pterorhinus delesserti) ©WikiC

Wynaad Laughingthrush – Pterorhinus delesserti – Wayanad Laughingthrush

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Grey Jay – Perisoreus canadensis – Canada Jay

Biak Whistler (Pachycephala megarhyncha)

Biak Whistler (Pachycephala megarhyncha) ©Flickr Graham Winterflood

Biak [Little] Shrikethrush – Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha – Biak Whistler

Arafura Shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) ©WikiC

Arafura Shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) ©WikiC

Little Shrikethrush – Colluricincla megarhyncha – Arafura Shrikethrush

Javan Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis banyumas) ©©Flickr

Hill Blue Flycatcher – Cyornis banyumas – Javan Blue Flycatcher

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Ray

Veracruz Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Ray

Rufous-naped Wren – Campylorhynchus rufinucha – Veracruz Wren

These were the name changes that I have found so far with this update. For those of us who have photos, it also required changing names of photos on the hard drive.

But names have been changing for years:

“Now among them from the sons of Judah were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah. Then the commander of the officials assigned new names to them; and to Daniel he assigned the name Belteshazzar, to Hananiah Shadrach, to Mishael Meshach and to Azariah Abed-nego.” (Daniel 1:6-7 NASB)

Now for the rest of the updates. Stay Tuned!

The Amazing Butterfly

World Birds I.O.C. Version 9.2 Part II

Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) ©Sci-news

Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) ©Sci-news

The post yesterday, I.O.C. 9.2 Update A Few Days Ago, was to inform you off the latest update. New birds aren’t usually discovered as much as the DNA studies they are providing better insight into how the birds are related. So, they like to shuffle things around, like the 5 new Families. The new species added are many times from subspecies being elevated to full species status.

Today, we will try to figure out who the new species are. As I type this, I have no clue until some investigation begins. So, Let’s Begin!

Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019)

The IOC World Bird List 9.2 contains 10,758 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  250 Families and 2,320 Genera.  The list also includes 20,034 subspecies, their ranges and  authors.

Updates include:

SPECIES ADDED:                25 

SPECIES DELETED:             5

ENGLISH NAMES:              9

TAXONOMY:                         37 including  sequence of Orders,  five new Families, and genera of  Petroicidae
Add Species

I know some of this below is confusing for some, but is beneficial for many birdwatchers.

Added Species:

Stejneger’s Scoter (Melanitta stejnegeri) – Split of Stejneger’s Scoter M. stejnegeri from White-winged Scoter M. deglandi
Australian Tern (Gelochelidon macrotarsa) – Split of G. macrotarsa is based on morphological differences
Malagasy Palm Swift (Cypsiurus gracilis) – from African Palm Swift Cypsiurus parvus split
Green-headed Hillstar (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar (Oreotrochilus estella stolzmanni)
Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar O. (estella) stolzmanni
Indochinese Roller (Coracias affinis) – Morphologically distinct Indochinese Roller is sister to Purple-winged Roller (C. temmincki) not to Indian Roller despite narrow hybrid zone
Small-headed Elaenia (Elaenia sordida) – Elaenia sordida is split (9.2) from Highland Elaenia based on mtDNA genetics and vocal
Ceara? Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) – Split of monotypic Ceara? Woodcreeper is based on genetic, morphological and vocal distinctions
Biak Whistler (Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha) – The endemic Biak Little ‘Shrikethrush’ C. m. melanorhyncha is a whistler, sister to Pachycephala phaionota. Elevated from ssp Colluricincla to species of Pachycephala. Rename

Little Shrikethrush spp Colluricincla spp – The following splits (9.2) of subspecies groups of the [Arafura] Little Shrikethrush species complex are based on genetics and morphology (Marki et al. 2018, Schodde pers. comm).
Variable Shrikethrush (Colluricincla fortis) – Arafura [Little] Shrikethrush C. megarhyncha Split (9.2) of Variable Shrikethrush includes ssp trobriandi and despecta (with neos and superflua)
Waigeo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla affinis) – Variable Shrikethrush C. fortis Split Waigeo Shrikethrush is monotypic
Mamberamo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla obscura) – Waigeo Shrikethrush C. affinis Split (9.2) of Mamberamo Shrikethrush includes ssp hybridus
Tagula Shrikethrush (Colluricincla discolor) – Split (9.2) monotypic Tagula Shrikethrush
Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush (Colluricincla tappenbecki) -Split (9.2) of Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush C. tappenbecki includes ssp madaraszi and maeandrina.
Rufous Shrikethrush (Colluricincla rufogaster) – Split (9.2) of Rufous Shrikethrush includes ssp griseata and goodsoni. Ssp aelptes and normani are included in goodsoni; gouldii and synaptica are included in nominate rufogaster.
Stejneger’s Scoter (Melanitta stejnegeri) – Split (9.2) of Stejneger’s Scoter M. stejnegeri from White-winged Scoter M. deglandi based on lack of hybridization and on morphological characters that include the black rather than brown flanks (deglandi also has brown tinged scapulars), a more obvious hook “nose” on stejnegeri, a longer white post-ocular mark on stejnegeri, and different bill coloration.
Australian Tern (Gelochelidon macrotarsa) – Split of G. macrotarsa is based on morphological differences (Rogers et al. 2005, HBW, Schodde pers. comm).
Malagasy Palm Swift (Cypsiurus gracilis) – Split of Malagasy Palm Swift from African Palm Swift (C. parvus) based on vocalizations and plumage coloration. Includes griveaudi on Comoro Is.
Green-headed Hillstar (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni) – Green-headed Hillstar is split from O. estella based on plumage differences and mtDNA relationship to O. melanogaster.
Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar O. (estella) stolzmanni.. Genomic analysis of estella species complex desired. New Hummingbird Species Discovered in Ecuador
Indochinese Roller (Coracias affinis) – Morphologically distinct Indochinese Roller is sister to Purple-winged Roller (C. temmincki) not to Indian Roller despite narrow hybrid zone.
Small-headed Elaenia (Elaenia sordida) – Elaenia sordida is split (9.2) from Highland Elaenia based on mtDNA genetics and vocals (Rheindt et al. 2008, Minns 2017, HBW, SACC 806). ENG Small-headed Elaenia follows SACC.

Ceara Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) ©HBW

Ceara? Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) –  Split of monotypic Ceara? Woodcreeper is based on genetic, morphological and vocal distinctions. ENG: Ceara?
Biak Whistler (Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha) – The endemic Biak Little ‘Shrikethrush’ C. m. melanorhyncha is a whistler, sister to Pachycephala phaionota. Elevated from ssp Colluricincla to species of Pachycephala. Rename
Little Shrikethrush spp (Colluricincla) spp – The following splits (9.2) of subspecies groups of the [Arafura] Little Shrikethrush species complex are based on genetics and morphology, Schodde pers. comm).
Variable Shrikethrush (Colluricincla fortis) – Split (9.2) of Variable Shrikethrush includes ssp trobriandi and despecta (with neos and superflua)
Waigeo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla affinis) – Split Waigeo Shrikethrush is monotypic
Mamberamo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla obscura) – Split (9.2) of Mamberamo Shrikethrush includes ssp hybridus
Tagula Shrikethrush (Colluricincla discolor) – Split (9.2) monotypic Tagula Shrikethrush
Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush (Colluricincla tappenbecki) – Split (9.2) of Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush C. tappenbecki includes ssp madaraszi and maeandrina.
Rufous Shrikethrush (Colluricincla rufogaster) – Split (9.2) of Rufous Shrikethrush includes ssp griseata and goodsoni. Ssp aelptes and normani are included in goodsoni; gouldii and synaptica are included in nominate rufogaster.
Hill Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis whitei) – C. whitei is split (9.2) from C. banyumas based on genetics and vocalizations. Includes subspecies lekhakuni, deignani, coerulifrons. Note transfer of established English name Hill Blue Flycatcher to C. whitei.
Indochinese Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis sumatrensis) – Widespread Indochinese Blue Flycatcher is split (9.2) from Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher based on morphology and vocalizations. Includes sumatrensis, indochina, lamprus.
Morotai White-eye (Zosterops dehaani) – Split of Morotai White-eye Z. dehaani from Cream-throated White-eye is based on distinct plumage, exceptional dawn song and submontane/montane ecology
Wakatobi White-eye (Zosterops flavissimus) – Split of Wakatobi White-eye is based on morphology, genetics, and vocalizations (O’Connell et al. 2019)
Campina Thrush (Turdus arthuri) – Split (9.2) of Campina Thrush T. arthuri from Black-billed Thrush T. ignobilis is based on sympatry without intergradation at two Colombian localities.
Pantepui Thrush (Turdus murinus) – Pantepui Thrush is split (9.2) from Black-billed Thrush T. ignobilis based on genetic divergence
Yucatan Gnatcatcher (Polioptila albiventri) – Split (9.2) of Yucatan Gnatcatcher P. albiventris from White-lored Gnatcatcher is based on genetic and vocal distinctions
Nicholson’s Pipit (Anthus nicholsoni) – Split (9.2) of South African pops of Long-billed Pipit is based on their allopatric distributions (southern and East African populations separated by ca. 1 800 km), their non-migratory nature and their high cyt b sequence divergence values. Includes palliditinctus, leucocraspedon, petricolus, and primarius.

***

Barbery Falcon now Perregrine Falcon ©Drew Avery

Barbary Falcon now Perregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus pelegrinoides) ssp©Drew Avery

Deleted Species (I can only find 4)
Schouteden’s Swift (Schoutedenapus schoutedeni) DEL AL Scarce Swift S. myioptilus Deemed to be darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts subspecies chapini (Fishpool 2019)
Barbary Falcon (Falco pelegrinoides)SSP of Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus Barbary Falcon (including subspecies babylonicus) is genetically similar to other subspecies of Peregrine Falcon and treated thus. Demoted back to SSP
Negro Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla pyrrhonota)SSP Negro Stipple-throated Antwren was split from [Napo] Stipple-throated Antwren, but vocalizations are identical and morphological differences slight. Demoted back to SSP
Yasuni Antwren (Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai) – SSP Yasuni Stipple-throated Antwren was split from [Napo] Stipple-throated Antwren, but vocalizations are identical and morphological differences slight. Demoted back to SSP

“He determines and counts the number of the stars; He calls them all by their names. Great is our Lord and of great power; His understanding is inexhaustible and boundless.” (Psalms 147:4-5 AMP)

If the Lord knows the names of all the stars, I wonder what names He calls the Birds by?

Still need to rework the Indexes – Stay Tuned

I.O.C. 9.2 Update A Few Days Ago

Chestnut Quail-thrush (Cinclosoma castanotum) ©Flickr David Cook

“So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:21-22 NKJV)

Just realized the new I.O.C. 9.2 Update was released a few days ago. Glad they changed to only two updates a year, but that means more birds to UPDATE. [Updates are of new species and proposed splits, taxonomic revisions, and changes of names.]

Here are the new counts for this update:

  • 10,758 extant species and 158 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 9.2), with subspecies (20,034)
  • Classification of 40 Orders, 250 Families), 2320 Genera

Last update, 9.1, was: [Beginning of 2019]

  • 10,738 extant species and 158 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 9.1), with subspecies (20,046)
  • Classification of 40 Orders, 245 Families (plus 1 Incertae sedis), 2313 Genera (World Bird Names)

I can see that I have some work ahead of me. Notice there are 20 new species [10,758 vs 10,738]. Also, there are five new Families – Wow! [250 vs 245] That is going to take making new pages, etc. to update this site. They also increased the genera by 7.

Here are the new Families Pages: [This is required new pages and shuffling of birds from other families to these new ones.]

Spotted Jewel-babbler (Ptilorrhoa leucosticta) ©Flickr Ross Tsai

Cinclosomatidae – Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes

Crested Shriketit (Falcunculus frontatus) by Ian

Falcunculidae – Shriketit

Green Broadbill (Calyptomena viridis) by Lee at ZM

Green Broadbill (Calyptomena viridis) by Lee at ZM

Calyptomenidae – African and Green Broadbills

Tit Hylia (Pholidornis rushiae ussheri) ©WikiC

Hyliidae – Hylia, Pholidornis

Yellow-bellied Sunbird-Asity (Neodrepanis hypoxantha) ©Flickr

Philepittidae – Asities

More updates will be posted as soon as possible.

 

Do Not Eat The Gripe Or The Aliet!

PEREGRINE FALCON (National Park Service photo / public domain)

Here are two more birds that are listed on the “Do Not Eat” list. A Gripe and an Aliet.

Leviticus 11:13 These things be of (the) fowls which ye shall not eat, and shall be eschewed of you (and shall be shunned by you); an eagle, and a gripe, [and] an aliet,
Deuteronomy 14:12 (but) eat ye not unclean birds, that is, an eagle, and a gripe, and an aliet,
These verses are in the Wycliffe Bible (WYC) version. “The earliest existing edition is from 1525, but manuscripts of that only have a part of Matthew. Of the whole New Testament, the earliest manuscripts available are from 1526. Old Testament books are from later, 1530’s for some. This means that these two birds mentioned, the Gripe and the Aliet, were the names they were called by back then. Languages change over hundreds of years.

Australian Hobby by Ian Montgomery

Interesting note about how these birds are listed in the “Do Not Eat List” Here is what the Expositor’s Bible Commentary (Abridged Edition): Old Testament says:

13-19 There was no easy rule of thumb for clean birds. A negative list is given that in cases is difficult to translate with certainty. The different modern versions vary in detail. In general carrion-eating and fish-eating birds were forbidden, just as they are not used for food today. Chickens are not mentioned in the OT. The eating of bird eggs and the mother bird together is forbidden in Deuteronomy 22:6, apparently for conservation reasons. If the eggs are taken, the mother bird will lay more; but if the mother bird is taken, there will be no more eggs! Doves, their eggs, and their young were eaten.

After doing some searching on Google, the Gripe doesn’t seem to be a recognizable bird today. When searching for the Aliet, After just about giving up, this interesting article was found:

Hearldry is a displaying of different Coats of Arms. The bird in on this Crest or Coat of Arms is the Aliet:

These verses in other translations indicate some type of birds of prey. That is what is article is saying also. If you can read the “old English”, notice that it mentions “This Fowl hath her Tallons or Pounces inwardly crooked like a hook.” That is a good description of a Hawk, Falcon, or some other type of bird of prey. “and is called in Latine [Latin], Falco (faith Calepine). Falco is the genus for Falcons and includes 15 Kestrels, 22 Falcons and 4 Hobbys.

It also mentions the “Alietus is a little Fowl that preyeth upon small birds…”

American Kestrel by AestheticPhotos

Falcons, Kestrels and Hobbies are part of the Falconidae Family.

 

Unique Feeding Of The Spoonbills

African Spoonbill Zoo Tampa by Lee

The Spoonbill family has a unique or uncommon way of feeding. They swing their beak back and forth in the water to find food. The inside of the “spoon” is very sensitive. When they feel a “goodie,” their beak snaps shut. They then swallow their food.

I have been trying to capture this action on video for some time, and finally, watched this African Spoonbill catch his food. This was taken at Zoo Tampa (Lowry Park Zoo) in their aviary.

“For who makes you differ from another? And what do you have that you did not receive? Now if you did indeed receive it, why do you boast as if you had not received it?” (1 Corinthians 4:7 NKJV)

Just as the Spoonbills eat differently from other species of birds, it was the Creator that made them this way. You were created different than anyone else. Enjoy your uniqueness, because God made you the way your are. You were given different talents and abilities than someone else. What are you going to do with what the Lord has given?

African Spoonbill Zoo Tampa by Lee

The Spoonbills are using their uniqueness very well!

Spoonbill – Wikipedia

Clark’s Nuthatch’s Memory – Creation Moments

Job 38:41

“Who provideth for the raven his food? when his young ones cry unto God, they wander for lack of meat.”

 The shy bird called Clark’s nutcracker collects food during the growing season and stores it for the cold winter months. In one year, a bird will store between 22,000 and 33,000 seeds in as many as 2,500 locations, which can be more than ten miles apart. But does the little bird remember where he put all those seeds?

Biologists tracked the activity of Clark’s nutcrackers in the San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona. A small army of researchers tracked the birds’ seed gathering and storing activities. One of the first things they discovered was that the birds quickly figured out that they were being observed. Some refused to store food when researchers were watching them. Others faked storing seeds when they were watched. Back in the lab, researchers studied the storing activity of Eurasian nutcrackers. After the birds stored seeds in a large sand floor, the birds were removed. Then the seeds they stored were dug up. When the birds were allowed to return, they quickly discovered that their seeds had been stolen, so they refused to store any more seeds. In the end, researchers concluded that the nutcrackers recover as many as two-thirds of their stored seeds within 13 months.

Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

The remarkable memory of these little birds is their gift from God that enables them to be fed all year around.

Prayer: Father, I thank You because You are gracious and generous, not just to the birds, but also to me. Amen.

Ref: Science News, 2/14: 2004, pp. 103-105, Susan Milius, “Where’d I Put That?” Photo: Clark’s nutcracker PD

Copyright © 2019 Creation Moments, Inc. PO Box 839, Foley, MN 56329 800-422-4253  www.creationmoments.com


What an interesting memory. How is your memory doing? Is it as good as these Nutcrackers?

See More From:

Interesting Things

Seek Me, And Find Me

Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) ©Flickr Wayne Butterworth

And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart.” (Jeremiah 29:13)

As many bird watchers are aware, we spend considerable time searching for a bird that we know is near. That can be so frustrating at times. Other times you see a glimpse of the bird, and then when the camera is aimed, it’s not there. Oh, the joys and frustration of looking for God’s Avian Wonders.

One of the most challenging bird I ever searched for was the Tawny Frogmouth. We were at the Aviary in Zoo Miami and were told he was there. We searched high and low with no luck. When we asked the keeper, he pointed him out to us. We had walked right by the bird. It was in plain sight.

Caught Dan on the Boardwalk trying to find a bird

Caught Dan on the Boardwalk trying to find a bird

The Tawny, one of my favorite birds to have to hunt for, is not the only bird that can get away from you. Some of those little jobs are so fast that they are hard to get a photo of also.

Downy Woodpecker by Lee LPP

Downy Woodpecker by Lee LPP

The little woodpeckers can move quite speedily while chasing bugs.

Cactus Wren by Dan at Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Wrens can also cause you to search and seek. But, I still think these Frogmouths and Potoos were designed by the Creator to blend in with their surroundings. Therefore, giving birdwatchers and photographers a challenge.

Common Potoo (Nyctibius griseus) ©Jullan Iondono

*

Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) at Wings of Asia

Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) at Wings of Asia by Lee

With all this searching and finding, there is a good principle here for us to follow. The Lord gave a promise to the Israelites, and that applies to us today.

For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end.”
Then shall ye call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you.”
And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart.”
And I will be found of you, saith the Lord:...” (Jeremiah 29:11-14a)


Similar post about this:

Hidden Wisdom

Hide Thou Me

Here I Am

Gideon

Green-tailed Sunbird – Wordless Bird

Green-tailed Sunbird (Aethopyga nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

The green-tailed sunbird (Aethopyga nipalensis) or Nepal yellow-backed sunbird is a species of bird in the family Nectariniidae.

It is found in the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, stretching eastwards into parts of Southeast Asia.

Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. In southeast Szechwan and Yunnan, it lives in open mountain woods with moss-covered trees, from 1825 to 3350 meters elevation.

When viewing this bird, the Wordless Book/Wordless Birds came to mind. Let’s see if we can find all the colors need.

There is definitely Gold/yellow on this beautifully created Sunbird from our Creator.

Green-tailed Sunbird (Aethopyga nipalensis) ©WikiC male

“This GOLD bird reminds us of Heaven. The Bible tells us Heaven has a street of gold! But the best part about Heaven is that God, who created you and me, lives there. The Bible, God’s Word, says: “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” — John 3:16 Jesus, God the Son, is in Heaven preparing a place for all who put their trust in Him. (John 14:2-3) God is holy and perfect. He cannot allow anything in Heaven that is less than perfect, so there’s one thing that can never be in Heaven. Can you think of what that might be?”

Black/Dark is the next color in the Wordless Book/Birds

Green-tailed Sunbird (Aethopyga nipalensis) ©WikiC male

It is sin! That is what this DARK bird reminds us of. Sin is anything you think, say, or do that does not please God, like lying, cheating, being selfish, or hurting others. The Bible says: “All have sinned and come short of the glory of God.” — Romans 3:23 That means everyone, big or little, young or old! No matter where you live or who you are, you have sinned. Everyone is born with a “want to” to do wrong. God says that sin must be punished (Romans 6:23), and the punishment for sin is to be separated from God forever in a place of suffering….a place called Hell. But God has a wonderful plan so that you will not have to be punished for your sin!

Red is next which stands for Sin

Green-tailed Sunbird (Aethopyga nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

God sent Jesus Christ, His perfect Son, to be born as a little baby. Jesus lived a perfect life….He never sinned. When He was grown, wicked men nailed Him to a cross. This bird is RED reminding us of Jesus’ blood. The Bible says that without the giving of blood there can be no forgiveness of sin (Hebrews 9:22). So Jesus Christ willingly died to take your sin punishment. “…Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures; and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day, according to the Scriptures.“— 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 Now, because of what Jesus has done for you, you can have your sins forgiven. Read on to see how!

White is a little harder to find on the Green-backed Sunbird, but this Lovely Sunbird has plenty of white. It is in the same family.

Lovely Sunbird (Aethopyga shelleyi) ©WikiC

The Bible says: “As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believed on His name.” — John 1:12 The WHITE bird reminds us of a CLEAN heart. How can you have a clean heart? A = Admit to God you are a sinner and want to turn away from those sins. B = Believe in Jesus Christ, that He is God’s perfect Son who died for your sin, was buried, and rose again. C = Call on Him to save you from your sin. Would you like to do that right now? He has promised to hear, and once you are His child, He will never leave you (Hebrews 13:5). Take a moment and talk to God right now. It will change your life forever. Only one more color! What can it mean?

Green is for Growth after you accept the Lord as your personal Savior.

Green-tailed Sunbird (Aethopyga nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

The GREEN bird stands for things that grow. When you ask God to forgive you and save you, you become His child. God wants you to get to know Him better and to grow to become more like Him. These four things will help you grow:

1. PRAY (talk to God every day)
2. READ & OBEY THE BIBLE (to know what He says, then do it)
3. TELL OTHERS ABOUT JESUS
4. GO TO A BIBLE-BELIEVING CHURCH (where you can learn more about pleasing Him)

As a child of God, if you should sin again, stop and tell Him about it. He promises in His Word… “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” — 1 John 1:9 Ask God to help you live a life to please Him! Share the Good News of this story with someone else.


The Wordless Book has been used for many years by CEF (Child Evangelism Fellowship). These words are from CEF.

See more Wordless Birds

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush and the Lesser

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC at San Diego Zoo

“So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. …” (Genesis 2:20a NKJV)

While posting Emma Foster’s latest tale about birds, the Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) was used. I picked this bird because of the “necklaced” part of its name. Where actually do they live and what can we find out about them?

I have always enjoyed the Laughingthrush every since we saw the ones in Zoo Miami’s Aviary.

Red-tailed Laughingthrush by Dan at Wings of Asia Zoo Miami

The Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush doesn’t have much written about it in Wikipedia. Here is their information:

The Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Pterorhinus pectoralis) is a species of passerine bird in the family Leiothrichidae. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand and Vietnam. It is introduced to the United States. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest.

This species was formerly placed in the genus Garrulax but following the publication of a comprehensive molecular phylogenetic study in 2018, it was moved to the resurrected genus Pterorhinus.

Greater necklaced laughingthrush, Garrulax pectoralis (formerly; Ianthocincla pectoralis ), also known as the necklaced laughingthrush or the black-gorgeted laughingthrush, photographed at Hong Kong, China.

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

The Handbook of Birds of the World gives us a few more facts:

Size is – 26·5–34·5 cm; 105–170 g. Very like G. monileger, but larger, eye dark, necklace often bolder, dark primary coverts. Nominate race has crown…

Voice – Apparent song types include repeated, clear, ringing, slightly descending and diminishing sequence…

Diet – Mostly insects; also some fruits. In Hong Kong study, of ten faecal samples Aug–May, seven contained insects, and all contained fruit…
Breeding – Feb–Aug; multi-brooded. Nest a large, broad, bulky, rather shallow cup or saucer, made of dead bamboo or other leaves, roots, moss,…

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Here is how The Guardian describes this bird:

An adult Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush, (Garrulax pectoralis). This species can be identified by the silvery streaked ear coverts encircled by a black band. This distinguishes it from the similarly-appearing Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (but that species is pale and has none of the ear covert markings).

The Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush is a member of a large family of passerines known as the the Old World babblers (Timaliidae). This family is quite diverse in size and coloration, but are characterised by soft fluffy plumage — a really lame way to classify them, in my opinion, since there’s a LOT of passerines with “soft fluffy plumage” that are not included in this taxonomic family. Ho-hum.

One weird fact: the American wrentit was recently placed into the Old World babblers but that enigmatic species probably doesn’t belong there.

Another weird fact: there are two groups of birds in the world that are known as “babblers”: the timaliids are one and the other is the (unrelated) Australasian babblers of the family, Pomatostomidae. The pomatostomids are now sometimes known as the pseudo-babblers, because they deceived naturalists, ornithologists and birders for so bloody long.

From the The Guardian.com

Video of the Greater Necklaced Laughingthrushes of Bann Song Nok, south of Bangkok. By Wazooland

Just found a great link for the Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush

Okay, so what about these Lesser Necklaced? They look so similar that you really need to look hard to distinguish them. Look real close, and then notice the color of the eyes. Which is which? Lesser has a yellow eye and the greater has a black eye. Oh, and the “necklace” is supposed to be narrower. It is hard to tell that. The “ear covert markings” help, but those eyes are the clincher!

Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax monileger) ©WikiC

Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax …) ©WikiC

Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax …) ©WikiC

“They came, both men and women, as many as had a willing heart, and brought earrings and nose rings, rings and necklaces, all jewelry of gold, that is, every man who made an offering of gold to the LORD.” (Exodus 35:22 NKJV)

Leiothrichidae – Laughingthrushes & allies

Timaliidae – Babblers, Scimitar Babblers

Wordless Birds

Avian and Attributes – Stephen

Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) ©Pinterest

This is a change from the normal Avian and Attributes. Normally, it is the attributes of the Lord Jesus Christ and a similar named bird. This time, I found two birds with the names of Stephan’s Emerald and Stephen’s Lorikeet.

Stephen, was a well respected Christian, who was martyred for his faith in the Lord. Acts 6:8 says that Stephen was “full of faith and power, did great wonders and miracles among the people.” (KJV) He was called before the council in Jerusalem for his beliefs.

When he appeared before them,:

“And they stirred up the people, and the elders, and the scribes, and came upon him, and caught him, and brought him to the council, And set up false witnesses, which said, This man ceaseth not to speak blasphemous words against this holy place, and the law: For we have heard him say, that this Jesus of Nazareth shall destroy this place, and shall change the customs which Moses delivered us. And all that sat in the council, looking stedfastly on him, saw his face as it had been the face of an angel.” (Acts 6:12-15 KJV)

Stephen had many good attributes of a Christian. He was teaching about Jesus, and they didn’t like what he was saying. Acts 6 and 7 tell this story. After he showed them how they were wrong about the Lord Jesus Christ being their Messiah, they became incensed and stoned him.

The two birds, I am sure, were not named after Stephen, but you might enjoy getting to meet them.

Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani)

Stephan's Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) ©Drawing WikiC

Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) Lower bird ©Drawing WikiC

The Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) is a species of bird in the family Columbidae (Doves). It is found in Sulawesi, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. It is often called Stephan’s Dove. (Wikipedia) It’s call is like a “woooah” sound. They like “humid evergreen forest interior and dry secondary coastal forest in Sulawesi…” HBA

They seem to be ground feeders and eat fruit that has fallen and also like insects. They also seem to act like nomads.

Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni)

Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni) Drawing WikiC

The Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni), also known as the Henderson lorikeet, is a species of parrot in the family Psittaculidae. It is endemic to Henderson Island in the Pitcairn Islands of the South Pacific.

Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni) ©PInteest

Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni) ©PInteest

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. (Wikipedia)

More Avian and Attributes

Good News