Birds in Hymns – Carol of the Birds – Again

Five years ago, this Birds in Hymns was re-posted, now the re-post has had some broken links fixed. I also, added the Video for the music. Now that Thanksgiving is winding down, it’s time to start thinking about Carols again. Enjoy the revised revision. :)

American Yellow Warbler (Dendroica aestiva) singing by J Fenton

American Yellow Warbler (Dendroica aestiva) singing by J Fenton

And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. (Luke 2:10-11)

Written as – El Cant Dels Ocells – Traditional Catalonian Carol

Translator Unknown

Birds in Christmas Hymns

Carol of the Birds

1. Upon this holy night,

When God’s great star appears,
And floods the earth with brightness
Birds’ voices rise in song
And warbling all night long
Express their glad heart’s lightness
Birds’ voices rise in song
And warbling all night long
Express their glad heart’s lightness

Black-headed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

Black-headed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

2. The Nightingale is first
To bring his song of cheer,
And tell us of His glad – ness:
Jesus, our Lord, is born
To free us from all sin
And banish ev’ry sadness!
Jesus, our Lord is born
To free us from all sin
And banish ev’ry sadness!

Savannah Sparrow singing by Ray

Savannah Sparrow singing by Ray

3. The answ’ring Sparrow cries:
“God comes to earth this day
Amid the angels flying.”
Trilling in sweetest tones,
The Finch his Lord now owns:
“To Him be all thanksgiving.”
Trilling in sweetest tones,
The Finch his Lord now owns:
“To Him be all thanksgiving.”

Barbary Partridge (Alectoris barbara koenigi) Pixdaus

Barbary Partridge (Alectoris barbara koenigi) Pixdaus

4. The Partridge adds his note:
“To Bethlehem I’ll fly,
Where in the stall He’s lying.
There, near the manger blest,
I’ll build myself a nest,
And sing my love undying.
There, near the manger blest,
I’ll build myself a nest,
And sing my love undying.

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Found another version of the Carol of the Birds and it appears to be Australian Birds.

The Carol of the Birds
(Wheeler/James)

Brolga (Grus rubicunda) by Ian

Brolga (Grus rubicunda) by Ian

Out on the plains the brolgas are dancing
Lifting their feet like warhorses prancing
Up to the sun the woodlarks go winging
Faint in the dawn light echoes their singing
Crana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day.

Crested Bellbird (Oreoica gutturalis) by Ian

Crested Bellbird (Oreoica gutturalis) by Ian

Down where the tree ferns grow by the river
There where the waters sparkle and quiver
Deep in the gullies bell-birds are chiming
Softly and sweetly their lyric notes rhyming
Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day.

Silver-crowned Friarbird (Philemon argenticeps) by Ian

Silver-crowned Friarbird (Philemon argenticeps) by Ian

Friar birds sip the nectar of flowers
Currawongs chant in wattle tree bowers
In the blue ranges lorikeets calling
Carols of bush birds rising and falling
Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day.
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More Birds in Hymns

See ~ Share The Gospel

Most information from The Hymns and Carols of Christmas – Name of Hymn with Link to it

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Gatorland’s Greedy Snowy Egret

Happy Thanksgiving to you all.

May you have a great day enjoying family, friends, and fine food. But please, do not bite off more than you should! [This video of a Snowy Egret was taken at Gatorland this week.]

“A Psalm of Thanksgiving. Make a joyful shout to the LORD, all you lands! Serve the LORD with gladness; Come before His presence with singing. Know that the LORD, He is God; It is He who has made us, and not we ourselves; We are His people and the sheep of His pasture. Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, And into His courts with praise. Be thankful to Him, and bless His name. For the LORD is good; His mercy is everlasting, And His truth endures to all generations.” (Psalms 100:1-5 NKJV)

Family: Building a Home God’s Way

More Gatorland Adventures

Gatorland in Orlando, Florida

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Gatorland Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbill landing at Gatorland by Lee 11-21-17

Yesterday, I shared the Boat-tailed Grackle female. Today, here are a few photos of two Roseate Spoonbills that landed on one of the trees at Gatorland. [Plus a bonus at the end]

Didn’t realize that she was already there.

The Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) is a gregarious wading bird of the ibis and spoonbill family, Threskiornithidae. It is a resident breeder in South America mostly east of the Andes, and in coastal regions of the Caribbean, Central America, Mexico, the Gulf Coast of the United States, and on central Florida’s Atlantic coast at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, adjoined with NASA Kennedy Space Center. They are also found here in Central Florida. These were at Gatorland in Orlando on 11/21/17.

Zoomed in even on this photo. The first ones were also cropped.

The roseate spoonbill is 71–86 cm (28–34 in) long, with a 120–133 cm (47–52 in) wingspan. The tarsus measures 9.7–12.4 cm (3.8–4.9 in), the culmen measures 14.5–18 cm (5.7–7.1 in) and the wing measures 32.3–37.5 cm (12.7–14.8 in) and thus the legs, bill, neck and spatulate bill all appear elongated. Adults have a bare greenish head (“golden buff” when breeding) and a white neck, back and breast (with a tuft of pink feathers in the center when breeding), and are otherwise a deep pink. The bill is grey.

Roseate Spoonbilsl landing at Gatorland by Lee 11-21-17

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Like the American flamingo, their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. Another carotenoid, astaxanthin, can also be found deposited in flight and body feathers. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age, whether breeding or not, and location. Unlike herons, spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. They alternate groups of stiff, shallow wingbeats with glides.

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Yawning

This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. In the United States, a popular place to observe roseate spoonbills is “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Roseate spoonbills must compete for food with snowy egrets, great egrets, tricolored herons and American white pelicans. [Wikipedia, with editing]
Threskiornithidae – Ibises, Spoonbills Family
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“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name.” (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

Bonus:
I found this Great Egret along the edge and an alligator nearby with quite a look on its face. They really weren’t that close, but thought you would enjoy this series of photos. [Click to enlarge]

More Gatorland Adventures

Gatorland in Orlando, Florida

Gatorland Grackle

Boat-tailed Grackle at Gatorland by Lee

“To the end that my glory may sing praise to thee, and not be silent. O LORD my God, I will give thanks unto thee for ever.” (Psalms 30:12 KJV)

We drove over to Gatorland today to get in a bit of birdwatching. Those adventures have been rare lately, and today was not the best for photos. It was overcast and it began to rain less than an hour after arriving. Today, a female caught my attention and I was able to get a few fairly decent photos of her. I am always thankful for any bird that poses for me.

Were we discouraged? No way! We love watching birds and “trying” to take their photo, no matter what the weather. The Lord should give us pleasure in seeing His Creation, whether it is raining or not. Right?

“Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ;” (Ephesians 5:20 KJV)

Boat-tailed Grackle Female at Gatorland

The Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) is a passerine bird of the family Icteridae found as a permanent resident on the coasts of the southeastern United States. It is found in coastal saltwater marshes, and, in Florida, also on inland waters. The nest is a well-concealed cup in trees or shrubs near water; three to five eggs are laid.

Boat-tailed Grackle Female at Gatorland

The male boat-tailed grackle is 37–43 cm (15–17 in) long and weighs 165–250 g (5.8–8.8 oz). Adult males have entirely iridescent black plumage, a long dark bill, a pale yellowish or brown iris and a long keel-shaped tail. The adult female is much smaller at 26–33 cm (10–13 in) long and a weight of 90–115 g (3.2–4.1 oz). She is also distinguished by her shorter tail and tawny-brown coloration, which covers the body apart from the darker wings and tail. The wingspan in adult birds is 39–50 cm (15–20 in).

Boat-tailed Grackle Female at Gatorland near the Parrots

These birds forage on the ground, in shallow water, or in shrubs; they will steal food from other birds. They are omnivorous, eating insects, minnows, frogs, eggs, berries, seeds, and grain, even small birds. Boat-tailed grackles have established significant populations in several United States Gulf Coast cities and towns where they can be found foraging in trash bins, dumpsters, and parking lots. They also mooch off the food thrown to the gators and other critters that the visitors feed.

Boat-tailed Grackle Female at Gatorland near the Parrots

This bird’s song is a harsh jeeb, and it has a variety of typically grackle-like chatters and squeaks.
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Bonus Yesterday:

Coopers Hawk at Bird Bath 112017 by Lee

I glanced out the kitchen window yesterday and this Cooper’s Hawk was sitting on the bird bath. I hurried to get the camera before he flew off. This is through the window and the screen. The day before that, this Hawk was sitting in our carport on the water hose winder. We have feeders and the bird was probably waiting for lunch. No camera then. This is a life bird for our yard. Yeah!

Stay tuned! There are more photos to work on from this latest adventure. We always enjoy our trips over to Orlando to visit Gatorland.

More adventures from:

Reginald The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm

Reginald the Turkey Commander: the Great Snowstorm, by Emma Foster

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Thanksgiving was beginning to draw near and Reginald knew it was time for the turkeys to trek through the forest to their fortress, which they had built years before to keep safe from hunters. The turkeys were hoping to travel in a few days, but something about the weather began to concern Reginald. He decided it was best to check to see what the weather would be like when they would be travelling.

Reginald had to walk to a nearby farmer’s house to see the weather because the farmer that lived there always had the weather on the television early every morning because he was always concerned about the weather. Sometimes Reginald would leave the turkeys and go watch the weather so he would know if bad weather was headed to the forest. Reluctantly, Reginald let Oliver come along so that Oliver wouldn’t get into any mischief.

Wild Turkeys ©Pixabay

Reginald and Oliver hurried through the forest and across a field to where a lonely house stood. Reginald warned Oliver to be as quiet as he could when they reached the farm because there was a chance the farmer wouldn’t mind having them for Thanksgiving dinner like the other hunters. Oliver cautiously followed Reginald to a chicken coop, which stood near the window of the living room. Reginald climbed into the coop through the chicken wire by cutting part of the wire with a sharp piece of wood he had brought and was pulling it back to make a hole. Oliver attempted to crawl through, but some of his feathers got caught. Reginald told him to calm down and to stop gobbling so the farmer wouldn’t hear him. After pulling him out, Reginald quickly blended in with the chickens, hurried to the window, then peered inside to see what the weather was like. The television was on, and the weather report stated that a record amount of heavy snowfall would be coming before Thanksgiving.

Turkey looking in window. ©Julia@Home on 129Acres

Reginald knew they would have to hurry to make it to the fortress so he turned around to tell Oliver to run back and warn the turkeys. When he looked back Oliver had gotten his head stuck in the chicken coop and the chickens had gathered around him and had started clucking while Oliver’s army helmet (worn to protect them from hunters) clanged against the walls of the coop. Reginald shook his head and dragged him out, telling him to tell the turkeys about the snowfall and that they needed to build sleds out of pieces of wood from trees that they could pull with roots to their fortress.

Oliver raced back to the turkeys while Reginald stayed behind to watch the weather. Eventually, the farmer turned the news off and Reginald had to hurry back to the turkeys. When he got back, the turkeys had already begun building their sleds, which would be used to carry the elderly and baby turkeys through the snow that was already falling. All of the turkeys were present except Oliver.

Turkey looking in window. ©Pinterest

When Reginald asked about Oliver, the turkeys said he had gone back for him. Reginald shook his head and impatiently walked all the way back through the snow to the farmhouse. Oliver was standing by the window, watching a gameshow on the television. Reginald shook his head again and told Oliver to come back with him to the turkeys.

The turkeys had finished building the sleds when Reginald and Oliver returned, and lots of snow was now on the ground. Using the sleds, the turkeys were able to arrive at their fortress before the snowbanks grew too high and the winds were too strong. They were able to spend their Thanksgiving nice and warm underground, while yet again the hunters had to hunt for turkeys in other woods.


“…but that the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.” (1 Corinthians 12:25b-26 KJV)

Looks like Reginald and Oliver have returned in time for another Thanksgiving adventure. Thanks again, Emma, for providing an entertaining tale, for a favorite holiday.

Emma’s Stories

Especially:

 

Harriet, The Osprey

Osprey Harriet’s transmitter is safely attached ©Craig Koppie USFWS

James J. S. Johnson, [Dr. Jim, to me] sent a very interesting article to share with you all. It is about an Osprey, named Harriet, who lives up in the Baltimore, Maryland [USA] area. Recently they, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, mounted a satellite tracker on her. Wait, here is the article:

“…On July 10, Harriet was captured and fitted with a satellite transmitter to track her movements. The transmitter, which has a visible antenna, was comfortably and securely attached by a harness onto Harriet’s back.

Like so many other birds we see around the Chesapeake in spring and summer, ospreys begin to migrate to South America in September for the winter. Most of our Chesapeake osprey spend the colder months there, ranging from Venezuela, to as far south as Paraguay and even Argentina.”

Continue to the article, Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek, by CLICKING HERE

Harriot’s trip so far – Satelite ©USFWS


“Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south? Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high?” (Job 39:26-27 KJV)

We have also written articles along this line about tracking our migrating avian wonders from the Lord:

What is that Sound?

American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga aestiva) singing by J Fenton

American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga aestiva) singing by J Fenton

“LORD, thou hast heard the desire of the humble: thou wilt prepare their heart, thou wilt cause thine ear to hear:” (Psalms 10:17 KJV)

I am still in the process of fixing broken links, missing bird photos, etc. I am actually enjoying digging around in the older post. Had forgotten all about this series, and thought you might enjoy a challenge to your birdwatching.

In May of 2007, Start Birdwatching Today: What is that Sound? was published. Thought you might enjoy re-visiting this page. [After fixing a broken link on it.]

Birds are very vocal at times and they give us a great clue as to what bird it is. Eventually, as you become better in your birdwatching adventures, it will help to learn some of their sounds and noises.

As you are observing birds that are singing or calling, you can learn to associate that sound to that bird. That is the beginning and it is almost automatic. When you hear a bird, but do not see it, then you will either recall one you have seen and be able to ID it, or you can start studying the sounds so the next time you can know what the unseen bird is.

There are several methods that birders use. Audio CDs and computer programs have Bird sounds along with photos of the bird to assist your learning.

The Internet has places like the WhatBird, All About Birds, Birding by Ear Basics,

Here is an interesting video about blind people birding by ear. Very interesting.

Here are some of the birds you may already know. These are local birds here, but also seen around other parts of the country. Also a very nice verse to remember while “birding by sound.” I used this verse when taking my General Amateur License test that was all Morse Code. It helped calm my heart even though it refers to the Lord hearing us, but it helped me to hear those dots and dashes. (Only 8 of 115 of us passed the test that day.)

LORD, thou hast heard the desire of the humble: thou wilt prepare their heart, thou wilt cause thine ear to hear: (Psalms 10:17 KJV)

All of these sounds are coming from the Xeno-canto.org website.

Blue Jay in tree at Hampton Pines

Blue Jay in tree at Hampton Pines

Blue Jay

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) by Daves BirdingPix

Northern Cardinal

Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) at Lake Howard, Winter Haven, Florida By Dan’sPix

Boat-tailed Grackle

Red-winged Blackbird at Bok Sanctuary

Red-winged Blackbird at Bok Sanctuary

Red-winged Blackbird

Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus) by BirdsInFocus

Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus) by BirdsInFocus

Eastern Whip-poor-will

Great Horned Owl – Lowry Pk Zoo by Lee

Great Horned Owl

How many did you all ready know?
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Some like to put words to their sounds like these from Birding By Ear — Bird Song Identification
Listen here to a few bird songs and calls that have good mnemonic phrases:
Eastern Towhee — “Drink your tea-ea-ea”

Whip-poor-will — The name says it all.

Black-capped chickadee — Some music and talk first, then the “Chick-a-dee-dee-dee”

White throated sparrow — “Poor Sam Peabody, Peabody, Peabody

Black-throated green warbler — “Zee zee zee zoo zee”

Barred Owl — “Who cooks for you, who cooks for you all

Links:
WhatBird
All About Birds
Birding by Ear Basics
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Start Birdwatching Today Series

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Avian And Attributes – Busy

Buzzing Flowerpecker (Dicaeum hypoleucum) ©Drawing WikiC

“My help cometh from the LORD, which made heaven and earth. He will not suffer thy foot to be moved: he that keepeth thee will not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep.” (Psalms 121:2-4 KJV)

“But I am poor and needy; yet the Lord thinketh upon me: thou art my help and my deliverer; make no tarrying, O my God.” (Psalms 40:17 KJV)

“For he shall deliver the needy when he crieth; the poor also, and him that hath no helper.” (Psalms 72:12 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Busy

BUSY, a. biz’zy.
1. Employed with constant attention; engaged about something that renders interruption inconvenient; as, a man is busy in posting his books.
My mistress is busy and cannot come.
2. Actively employed; occupied without cessation; constantly in motion; as a busy bee.
4. Much occupied with employment; as a busy day.
BUSY, v.t. biz’zy. To employ with constant attention; to keep engaged; to make or keep busy;


Buzzing Flowerpecker (Dicaeum hypoleucum) by ©Flickr Francesco Veronesi

Buzzing Flowerpecker

The Buzzing Flowerpecker (Dicaeum hypoleucum) or white-bellied flowerpecker is a species of bird in the Dicaeidae – Flowerpeckers family. It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

[I chose this bird because “Buzzing” could also mean “Busy” as in our Lord God always watching out for our souls.]


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name start with “B”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Bush (Hosted God)

Avian And Attributes – Bush (Hosted God)

Bush Blackcap (Lioptilus nigricapillus) ©WikiC

“And the angel of the LORD appeared unto him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush: and he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the bush was not consumed. And Moses said, I will now turn aside, and see this great sight, why the bush is not burnt. And when the LORD saw that he turned aside to see, God called unto him out of the midst of the bush, and said, Moses, Moses. And he said, Here am I.” (Exodus 3:2-4 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Bush (Hosted God)

Bush

Bush. The Hebrew word, seneh, occurs only in those passages which refer to Jehovah’s appearance to Moses, “in the flame of fire in the bush.” Exo_3:2-4; Exo_33:16. It is quite impossible to say what kind of thorn bush is intended; but it was probably the acacia, a small variety of the shittim tree, found in the Sinai region. (Smith Bible Dictionary)

“And for the precious things of the earth and fulness thereof, and for the good will of him that dwelt in the bush: let the blessing come upon the head of Joseph, and upon the top of the head of him that was separated from his brethren.” (Deuteronomy 33:16 KJV)


Bush Blackcap (Lioptilus nigricapillus) immature ©WikiC

Bush Blackcap (Lioptilus nigricapillus)

The Bush Blackcap (Lioptilus nigricapillus) is a species of bird in the family Sylviidae. It is monotypic within the genus Lioptilus.[2] It is found in South Africa and Swaziland. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss. (Bush Blackcap – Wikipedia) (Sylviidae – Sylviid Babblers Family)

Bush Blackcap (Lioptilus nigricapillus) ©WikiC


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose [first or last] name start with “B”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian and Attributes – Blood

Blood Pheasant (Ithaginis cruentus) ©Arthur Grosset

Blood Pheasant (Ithaginis cruentus) ©Arthur Grosset

“And he said unto them, This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many.” (Mark 14:24 KJV)

“Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock, over the which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood.” (Acts 20:28 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Blood

BLOOD, n.
1. The fluid which circulates through the arteries and veins of the human body, and of other animals, which is essential to the preservation of life. This fluid is generally red. If the blood of an animal is not red, such animal is called exsanguious, or white-blooded; the blood being white, or white tinged with blue.

2. Kindred; relation by natural descent from a common ancestor; consanguinity.
God hath made of one blood, all nations of the earth. Acts 17.

3. Royal lineage; blood royal; as a prince of the blood.

5. Life.

10. A sacramental symbol of the blood of Christ.
For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.” (Matthew 26:28 KJV)

11. The death and sufferings of Christ.
“Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.” (Romans 5:9 KJV)


Blood Pheasant (Ithaginis cruentus) ©WikiC

The Blood Pheasant (Ithaginis cruentus) is the only species in genus Ithaginis of the pheasant family. This relatively small, short-tailed pheasant is widespread and fairly common in eastern Himalayas, ranging across India, Nepal, Bhutan and China.

Blood pheasants have the size of a small fowl, about 17 in (43 cm) in length with a short convex, very strong black bill, feathered between bill and eye, and a small crest of various coloured feathers. The colour of the plumage above is dark ash, with white shafts, the coverts of the wings various tinged with green, with broad strokes of white through the length of each feather, the feathers of the chin deep crimson; on the breast, belly and sides feathers are lance-shaped, of various length, the tips green with crimson margins, collectively resembling dashes of blood scattered on the breast and belly. The tail consists of twelve sub-equal feathers, shafts white, rounded, the ends whitish, the coverts a rich crimson red.

Both males and females have red feet and a distinct ring of bare skin around the eye that typically is crimson colored, but is orange in a few subspecies. Member of the Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies Family

Blood-breasted Flowerpecker (Dicaeum sanguinolentum) ©WikiC

Blood-breasted Flowerpecker (Dicaeum sanguinolentum) ©WikiC

Here are links to all the “Blood” avian wonders:

Blond-crested Woodpecker (Celeus flavescens)
Blood Pheasant (Ithaginis cruentus)
Blood-breasted Flowerpecker (Dicaeum sanguinolentum)
Blood-colored Woodpecker (Veniliornis sanguineus)
Blood-eared Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoematotis)


More Avian and Attributes Articles

Birds whose first name start with “A”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

 


 

Avian And Attributes – Bishop

Bishop's Oo (Moho bishopi) WikiC

Bishop’s Oo (Moho bishopi) WikiC

“For ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls.” (1 Peter 2:25 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Bishop

BISH’OP, n. [L. episcopus; Gr. of, over, and inspector, or visitor; to view, or inspect; whence, to visit; also, to view. This Greek and Latin word accompanied the introduction of christianity into the west and north of Europe.]

1. An overseer; a spiritual superintendent, ruler or director; applied to Christ.
Ye were as sheep going astray, but are now returned to the shepherd and bishop of your souls. 1. Pet.2.

2. In the primitive church, a spiritual overseer; an elder or presbyter; one who had the pastoral care of a church.


Bishop’s Oo (Moho bishopi) Specimen ©WikiC

Bishop’s Oo

The Bishop’s ‘ō‘ō or Molokai ‘ō‘ō (Moho bishopi) is a member of the extinct genus of the ‘ō‘ōs (Moho) within the extinct family Mohoidae. It was previously regarded as member of the Australo-Pacific honeyeaters (Meliphagidae). Lionel Walter Rothschild named it after Charles Reed Bishop, the founder of the Bishop Museum.

It was discovered in 1892 by Henry C. Palmer, a bird collector for Lord Rothschild. Its length was about 29 centimeters. The tail had reached a length of 10 centimeters. The plumage was general glossy black with yellow feather tufts on the maxillaries, beneath the wings and the undertail coverts. Their songs were simple two notes, took-took, which could be heard for miles.

Member of the Mohoidae – Oos Family


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name start with “B”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian and Attributes – Apostle’s Teacher

Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea) by Ian

“And the apostles said unto the Lord, Increase our faith. And the Lord said, If ye had faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye might say unto this sycamine tree, Be thou plucked up by the root, and be thou planted in the sea; and it should obey you.” (Luke 17:5-6 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Apostle’s Teacher

APOS’TLE, n. [L. apostalus; Gr. to send away, to sent.]

A person deputed to execute some important business; but appropriately, a disciple of Christ commissioned to preach the gospel. Twelve persons were selected by Christ for this purpose; and Judas, one of the number, proving an apostate, his place was supplied by Matthias. Acts 1.

The title of apostle is applied to Christ himself, Heb 3. In the primitive ages of the church, other ministers were called apostles, Rom 16; as were persons sent to carry alms from one church to another, Phil 2. This title was also given to persons who first planted the Christian faith. Thus Dionysius of Corinth is called the apostle of France; and the Jesuit Missionaries are called apostles.

“Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling, consider the Apostle and High Priest of our profession, Christ Jesus;” (Hebrews 3:1 KJV)


Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea) by Ian

Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea) by Ian

Apostlebird

The Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea), also known as the grey jumperlousy jack or cwa bird is a quick-moving, gray or black bird about 13 inches (33 centimetres) long. It is a native to Australia where it roams woodlands, eating insects and seeds at, or near, ground level. Apostlebirds often travel in groups of about 12; for this reason they were named after the Biblical apostles, the twelve chief followers of Jesus Christ.

Measuring around 33 cm (13 in) in length, the apostlebird is a predominantly dark grey bird with a long black tail tinted greenish in sunlight. The grey feathers on the head, neck and breast are brushed with paler grey-white and the wings are brownish. The legs and bill are black and the eyes brown or white. They are members of the Corcoracidae – Australian Mudnesters Family.

“Until the day in which he was taken up, after that he through the Holy Ghost had given commandments unto the apostles whom he had chosen: To whom also he shewed himself alive after his passion by many infallible proofs, being seen of them forty days, and speaking of the things pertaining to the kingdom of God: And, being assembled together with them, commanded them that they should not depart from Jerusalem, but wait for the promise of the Father, which, saith he, ye have heard of me.” (Acts 1:2-4 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name start with “A”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]