Do Not Eat The Gripe Or The Aliet!

PEREGRINE FALCON (National Park Service photo / public domain)

Here are two more birds that are listed on the “Do Not Eat” list. A Gripe and an Aliet.

Leviticus 11:13 These things be of (the) fowls which ye shall not eat, and shall be eschewed of you (and shall be shunned by you); an eagle, and a gripe, [and] an aliet,
Deuteronomy 14:12 (but) eat ye not unclean birds, that is, an eagle, and a gripe, and an aliet,
These verses are in the Wycliffe Bible (WYC) version. “The earliest existing edition is from 1525, but manuscripts of that only have a part of Matthew. Of the whole New Testament, the earliest manuscripts available are from 1526. Old Testament books are from later, 1530’s for some. This means that these two birds mentioned, the Gripe and the Aliet, were the names they were called by back then. Languages change over hundreds of years.

Australian Hobby by Ian Montgomery

Interesting note about how these birds are listed in the “Do Not Eat List” Here is what the Expositor’s Bible Commentary (Abridged Edition): Old Testament says:

13-19 There was no easy rule of thumb for clean birds. A negative list is given that in cases is difficult to translate with certainty. The different modern versions vary in detail. In general carrion-eating and fish-eating birds were forbidden, just as they are not used for food today. Chickens are not mentioned in the OT. The eating of bird eggs and the mother bird together is forbidden in Deuteronomy 22:6, apparently for conservation reasons. If the eggs are taken, the mother bird will lay more; but if the mother bird is taken, there will be no more eggs! Doves, their eggs, and their young were eaten.

After doing some searching on Google, the Gripe doesn’t seem to be a recognizable bird today. When searching for the Aliet, After just about giving up, this interesting article was found:

Hearldry is a displaying of different Coats of Arms. The bird in on this Crest or Coat of Arms is the Aliet:

These verses in other translations indicate some type of birds of prey. That is what is article is saying also. If you can read the “old English”, notice that it mentions “This Fowl hath her Tallons or Pounces inwardly crooked like a hook.” That is a good description of a Hawk, Falcon, or some other type of bird of prey. “and is called in Latine [Latin], Falco (faith Calepine). Falco is the genus for Falcons and includes 15 Kestrels, 22 Falcons and 4 Hobbys.

It also mentions the “Alietus is a little Fowl that preyeth upon small birds…”

American Kestrel by AestheticPhotos

Falcons, Kestrels and Hobbies are part of the Falconidae Family.

 

Woodstock’s Dilemma

Peanuts for Sunday June 9, 2019 – A Dilemma

“A friend loves at all times,…” (Proverbs 17:17a NKJV)

Well, my friends Woodstock and Snoopy were at it again this Sunday. It appears that Woodstock has a Dilemma and patient Snoopy listened, and then offered a solution to the problem. It’s nice to have friends like that as we go through life.

Peanuts for Sunday June 9, 2019 – Split Hairs

“…And the sweetness of a man’s friend gives delight by hearty counsel.” (Proverbs 27:9b NKJV)

Here is some information that helps us understand how birds do get “Split Ends.” Notice the number 3 feather.

“A close look at feather growth reveals how these intricate structures form.

  1. Each new feather grows from a small outgrowth of skin called the papilla.
  2. As feathers mature, their tips get pushed away from the papilla, where the newest parts of the feather form. Like human hair, feathers are youngest at their base.
  3. The feather’s structure develops as proteins are laid down around the surface of this bump of skin. It’s here that the branching patterns form by smaller branches fusing at the base to make thicker ones—barbules fuse into barbs and barbs fuse into a rachis.
  4. As the feather grows, it stays curled in a tubular shape around the papilla until it is pushed away from the growth area.
  5. A protective sheath maintains the feather’s cylindrical shape until it starts to disintegrate near the tip, allowing the mature part of the feather to unfurl.
  6. The sheath falls off and the growth process is complete.”

The feather photo and above information is from: Everything You Need To Know About Feathers

Here is an interesting video that explains quite a bit about moulting. Even though she explains with captive birds, the principles are the same.

Most of us have watched birds preening their feathers. Often, they are working on a new feather that they are fixing up.

Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) Preening at Circle B

Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) Preening at Circle B

What a wonderful Creator of these Avian Wonders. I’ll never believe that feathers and their structures “just evolved.” No, their was, is, and will be a Master Creator at work.

“Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.” (Genesis 1:20 NKJV)

Interesting Things

Save The Parrots

Porphyrion On The “Do Not Eat” List?

Is The Porphyrion On The Do Not Eat List? This is one of the reasons we post a Disclaimer about the different Bible versions. When the Birds of the Bible articles were written several years ago, I used my e-Sword program to search for the names of different species of birds on the “Do Not Eat List.” Now, the BibleGateway Bibles are also available for me to use. Time to check these new resources to see if any other name of bird is in one of their Bible translations.

I started with Leviticus 11:18 and Deuteronomy 14:17 [The beginning of the “Do Not Eat List” of birds] Looking through the list, Porphyrion caught my attention.

When I first started searching this word out on Google, here is what came up: “In Greek mythology, Porphyrion (Ancient Greek: Πορφυρίων) was one of the Gigantes (Giants)…” Whoa! That’s not a bird, but a Greek Mythology character, and not a very nice one. That is the reason for this title.

Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) ©WikiC

Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) ©WikiC

Ah! But further researching found that the Porphyrion is actually another name for the Swamphen. Notice the scientific name in the photo.

Porphyrio porphyrio. That is most likely why the Douay-Rheims 1899 [American edition DRA] translated it that way. They are the only English Bible that translates the bird this way.

They translated the two verses as:

“And the swan, and the bittern, and the porphyrion,” Leviticus 11:18 DRA

“And the cormorant, the porphyrion, and the night crow,” Deuteronomy 14:17 DRA
also
“and a dipper, a porphyrio, and a rearmouse, a cormorant,” WYC [Here’s a verse to check out :) ]

Purple Gallinule at Lake Hollingsworth by Lee

Here is a bit about this Swamphen family:

“Porphyrio is the swamphen or swamp hen bird genus in the rail family. It includes some smaller species which are usually called “purple gallinules”, and which are sometimes separated as genus Porphyrula or united with the gallinules proper (or “moorhens”) in Gallinula. The Porphyrio gallinules are distributed in the warmer regions of the world.

The genus Porphyrio was introduced by the French zoologist Mathurin Jacques Brisson in 1760 with the western swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) as the type species. The genus name Porphyrio is the Latin name for “swamphen”, meaning “purple“. [Wikipedia – Swamphen]

Purple Gallinule by Lee at Lake Parker 1-7-12

Purple Gallinule by Lee at Lake Parker 1-7-12

Searching this blog, there is a previous post written about the porphyrion or Swamphen in 2013. Birds of the Bible – Name Study – Swamphen or Waterhen
Stay tuned for more searches of the Birds of the Bible – Do Not Eat list!
[Yes, I believe in using the main translations of the Bible; like KJV, NKJV, and NASB, but these searches are for just finding different birds to write about. God created all the birds, and I find it interesting to see how these birds are translated.]

Does Global Warming Threaten Bird Habitats?

Tricolored Heron by Dan

Does Global Warming Threaten Bird Habitats?

Written by Dr. James J. S. Johnson in the latest Acts And Facts about birds, especially the Tricolored Heron, being affected by the threats of global warming.

“If you love birds, should you fight petroleum production in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? How you answer depends on whether you believe man-made global warming is threatening Earth’s climate. That crisis scenario is actually based on evolutionary old-earth assumptions,1 and constant media stories feed the fear.

An amateur naturalist recently sounded the global-warming alarm over tricolored herons expanding their range. He reported that about three-quarters of the population lived in Louisiana in 1976, but now many are relocating northward up the Atlantic coast.2 He had little trouble identifying the culprits:

Isolated islands, prime breeding grounds safe from land-based predators, are being lost everywhere to rising sea levels and devastating storms. The tricolor I was watching was apparently trying to adapt to a rapidly warming planet. It had arrived earlier and farther north than its ancestors ever did [sic].…Birds everywhere are being threatened by the climate crisis. The fossil fuel lobby and its enablers in Washington, DC, are handing tricolors and thousands of other species a life-threatening legacy.2

But wait! Are the fossil fuel lobby and the politically powerful petroleum industry really villains that are forcing the poor tricolored herons to migrate—in temperature-troubled desperation—to a Virginia wildlife refuge “farther north” than their ancestors had ever been? No, because the same writer admitted that earlier heron generations had populated eastern America outside of Louisiana….

Does Global Warming Threaten Bird Habitats?

 

Clark’s Nuthatch’s Memory – Creation Moments

Job 38:41

“Who provideth for the raven his food? when his young ones cry unto God, they wander for lack of meat.”

 The shy bird called Clark’s nutcracker collects food during the growing season and stores it for the cold winter months. In one year, a bird will store between 22,000 and 33,000 seeds in as many as 2,500 locations, which can be more than ten miles apart. But does the little bird remember where he put all those seeds?

Biologists tracked the activity of Clark’s nutcrackers in the San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona. A small army of researchers tracked the birds’ seed gathering and storing activities. One of the first things they discovered was that the birds quickly figured out that they were being observed. Some refused to store food when researchers were watching them. Others faked storing seeds when they were watched. Back in the lab, researchers studied the storing activity of Eurasian nutcrackers. After the birds stored seeds in a large sand floor, the birds were removed. Then the seeds they stored were dug up. When the birds were allowed to return, they quickly discovered that their seeds had been stolen, so they refused to store any more seeds. In the end, researchers concluded that the nutcrackers recover as many as two-thirds of their stored seeds within 13 months.

Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

The remarkable memory of these little birds is their gift from God that enables them to be fed all year around.

Prayer: Father, I thank You because You are gracious and generous, not just to the birds, but also to me. Amen.

Ref: Science News, 2/14: 2004, pp. 103-105, Susan Milius, “Where’d I Put That?” Photo: Clark’s nutcracker PD

Copyright © 2019 Creation Moments, Inc. PO Box 839, Foley, MN 56329 800-422-4253  www.creationmoments.com


What an interesting memory. How is your memory doing? Is it as good as these Nutcrackers?

See More From:

Interesting Things

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush and the Lesser

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC at San Diego Zoo

“So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. …” (Genesis 2:20a NKJV)

While posting Emma Foster’s latest tale about birds, the Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) was used. I picked this bird because of the “necklaced” part of its name. Where actually do they live and what can we find out about them?

I have always enjoyed the Laughingthrush every since we saw the ones in Zoo Miami’s Aviary.

Red-tailed Laughingthrush by Dan at Wings of Asia Zoo Miami

The Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush doesn’t have much written about it in Wikipedia. Here is their information:

The Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Pterorhinus pectoralis) is a species of passerine bird in the family Leiothrichidae. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand and Vietnam. It is introduced to the United States. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest.

This species was formerly placed in the genus Garrulax but following the publication of a comprehensive molecular phylogenetic study in 2018, it was moved to the resurrected genus Pterorhinus.

Greater necklaced laughingthrush, Garrulax pectoralis (formerly; Ianthocincla pectoralis ), also known as the necklaced laughingthrush or the black-gorgeted laughingthrush, photographed at Hong Kong, China.

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

The Handbook of Birds of the World gives us a few more facts:

Size is – 26·5–34·5 cm; 105–170 g. Very like G. monileger, but larger, eye dark, necklace often bolder, dark primary coverts. Nominate race has crown…

Voice – Apparent song types include repeated, clear, ringing, slightly descending and diminishing sequence…

Diet – Mostly insects; also some fruits. In Hong Kong study, of ten faecal samples Aug–May, seven contained insects, and all contained fruit…
Breeding – Feb–Aug; multi-brooded. Nest a large, broad, bulky, rather shallow cup or saucer, made of dead bamboo or other leaves, roots, moss,…

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Here is how The Guardian describes this bird:

An adult Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush, (Garrulax pectoralis). This species can be identified by the silvery streaked ear coverts encircled by a black band. This distinguishes it from the similarly-appearing Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (but that species is pale and has none of the ear covert markings).

The Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush is a member of a large family of passerines known as the the Old World babblers (Timaliidae). This family is quite diverse in size and coloration, but are characterised by soft fluffy plumage — a really lame way to classify them, in my opinion, since there’s a LOT of passerines with “soft fluffy plumage” that are not included in this taxonomic family. Ho-hum.

One weird fact: the American wrentit was recently placed into the Old World babblers but that enigmatic species probably doesn’t belong there.

Another weird fact: there are two groups of birds in the world that are known as “babblers”: the timaliids are one and the other is the (unrelated) Australasian babblers of the family, Pomatostomidae. The pomatostomids are now sometimes known as the pseudo-babblers, because they deceived naturalists, ornithologists and birders for so bloody long.

From the The Guardian.com

Video of the Greater Necklaced Laughingthrushes of Bann Song Nok, south of Bangkok. By Wazooland

Just found a great link for the Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush

Okay, so what about these Lesser Necklaced? They look so similar that you really need to look hard to distinguish them. Look real close, and then notice the color of the eyes. Which is which? Lesser has a yellow eye and the greater has a black eye. Oh, and the “necklace” is supposed to be narrower. It is hard to tell that. The “ear covert markings” help, but those eyes are the clincher!

Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax monileger) ©WikiC

Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax …) ©WikiC

Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax …) ©WikiC

“They came, both men and women, as many as had a willing heart, and brought earrings and nose rings, rings and necklaces, all jewelry of gold, that is, every man who made an offering of gold to the LORD.” (Exodus 35:22 NKJV)

Leiothrichidae – Laughingthrushes & allies

Timaliidae – Babblers, Scimitar Babblers

Wordless Birds

The Locket in the Woods by Emma Foster

The Locket in the Woods

By Emma Foster

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Nora lived in the middle of a sunny wood beside a river that flowed under a small bridge. She spent most of her time building her nest, searching for food, and watching people walk across the bridge. Because Nora lived on a forest preserve, she didn’t have to worry about having to find a new home in case people chopped down her tree. Throughout the day, Nora watched groups of people walk along the many trails that were strewn along the forest preserve.

One day Nora was busy collecting some worms near the river as it rushed by. She looked up at the bridge to see a group of girls walking across and taking pictures of the trees. Nora hopped closer and watched them pass by, but when they left, she spotted something shiny in the bushes near her.

Nora rifled through the bushes and eventually found a small necklace with a heart-shaped locket on the end. Picking it up in her beak, Nora immediately started searching for the group of girls.

Locket

Unfortunately, Nora couldn’t find them anywhere. She followed the path, but it became a fork in the road, and she wasn’t sure which way she should go. It would be difficult to fly ahead because so many trees blocked her view. Nora finally decided to go left, hoping she would eventually find them.

Along the path she found an elderly couple who were biking along the trail and a couple of alligators sleeping in the water, but she didn’t find the girls. Nora decided to cut through the trees and head out to the other path.

After flying for a few minutes with the heavy locket in her beak, Nora rested on a tree in the middle of the woods. A small creek flowed near the tree she sat on. The sun shone down on Nora, making her very hot. Because of the heat and the weight, Nora accidentally dropped the locket into the small creek!

Nora raced after the locket, but the locket tumbled away down the river. Eventually, the bushes surrounding the creek became too thick for her to fly through them. Just as she was about to give up, however, a fish swam upstream with the locket in his mouth, and when Nora told him who the locket was for, he explained that he had seen the girls pass by on the other path. Nora thanked him then flew away with the locket.

When Nora finally caught up with the girls, she placed the locket on the path where they could easily see it. The girl who had lost it was glad to have found it, though she had no idea how it had gotten there. Nora, happy that she had accomplished her mission, flew back to her nest and took a well-deserved nap in the shade of her tree by the river.


“For He will deliver the needy when he cries, The poor also, and him who has no helper.” (Psalms 72:12 NKJV)

“…For your Father knows the things you have need of before you ask Him.” (Matthew 6:8b NKJV)

Lee’s Addition:

Since Emma didn’t indicate what type of bird the story is about, I am using my imagination. Besides, this bird wears a Necklace. :)

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Or, it could be a Raven. They like to collect things.

Raven holding key on chain ©Pixabay

Thanks, Emma, for another interesting tale about the birds. Now, we even have a talking fish. I love your stories. Keep on writing them for us.


More of Emma Foster’s Stories

Wordless Birds

Avian and Attributes – Stephen

Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) ©Pinterest

This is a change from the normal Avian and Attributes. Normally, it is the attributes of the Lord Jesus Christ and a similar named bird. This time, I found two birds with the names of Stephan’s Emerald and Stephen’s Lorikeet.

Stephen, was a well respected Christian, who was martyred for his faith in the Lord. Acts 6:8 says that Stephen was “full of faith and power, did great wonders and miracles among the people.” (KJV) He was called before the council in Jerusalem for his beliefs.

When he appeared before them,:

“And they stirred up the people, and the elders, and the scribes, and came upon him, and caught him, and brought him to the council, And set up false witnesses, which said, This man ceaseth not to speak blasphemous words against this holy place, and the law: For we have heard him say, that this Jesus of Nazareth shall destroy this place, and shall change the customs which Moses delivered us. And all that sat in the council, looking stedfastly on him, saw his face as it had been the face of an angel.” (Acts 6:12-15 KJV)

Stephen had many good attributes of a Christian. He was teaching about Jesus, and they didn’t like what he was saying. Acts 6 and 7 tell this story. After he showed them how they were wrong about the Lord Jesus Christ being their Messiah, they became incensed and stoned him.

The two birds, I am sure, were not named after Stephen, but you might enjoy getting to meet them.

Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani)

Stephan's Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) ©Drawing WikiC

Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) Lower bird ©Drawing WikiC

The Stephan’s Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps stephani) is a species of bird in the family Columbidae (Doves). It is found in Sulawesi, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. It is often called Stephan’s Dove. (Wikipedia) It’s call is like a “woooah” sound. They like “humid evergreen forest interior and dry secondary coastal forest in Sulawesi…” HBA

They seem to be ground feeders and eat fruit that has fallen and also like insects. They also seem to act like nomads.

Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni)

Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni) Drawing WikiC

The Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni), also known as the Henderson lorikeet, is a species of parrot in the family Psittaculidae. It is endemic to Henderson Island in the Pitcairn Islands of the South Pacific.

Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni) ©PInteest

Stephen’s Lorikeet (Vini stepheni) ©PInteest

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. (Wikipedia)

More Avian and Attributes

Good News

Penguin Disappearing – Creation Moments

King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) 5 by Ian

King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) by Ian

“And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.” Genesis 1:26

Penguins are disappearing. Don’t worry – it’s not all of them that are disappearing. But the world’s largest colony of king penguins appears to be only 10% the size it was 50 years ago.

The colony, which lives on Île aux Cochons in the southern Indian Ocean, is quite difficult to count. Nevertheless, surveys over the years have shown that it has shrunk dramatically. Reasons given for the decimation include climate change and outbreaks of diseases such as avian cholera.

Penguins are among our favorite animals. Many of us, when we go to the zoo, will make our way quickly to see the penguins. We love to see the endearing, adorable way they walk and then marvel at their grace as they “fly” through the water. Some species of penguins have remarkable habits. One unsubstantiated urban myth about penguins in the Falkland Islands suggests that they watch the overflying planes of the Royal Air Force so intently that they eventually fall over backwards! One comedian complained about the Emperor Penguins, saying that they have the ability to make us feel complete failures as fathers.

Of course, not all penguins are dying out. We are referring to one colony of one species. But does it matter? The answer must be that, yes, we ought to have a concern. We are used to opposing climate change mythology and, therefore, sometimes go to the other extreme, forgetting that God gave us a stewardship to look after this world and protect it.

Prayer: Thank You, Lord, for the stewardship that You gave the human race over creation. We pray for those involved in conservation, that You would raise up those whose work is guided fully by You. Amen.

Ref: CNRS. “Largest king penguin colony has shrunk nearly 90%.” ScienceDaily, 30 July 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180730120408.htm>. Image: CC BY-SA 3.0.

Copyright © 2019 Creation Moments, Inc. PO Box 839, Foley, MN 56329 800-422-4253   http://www.creationmoments.com

Penguins - Gentoo Front-King Middle-Rockhoopers Back

Penguins – Gentoo Front – King Middle – Rockhoopers Back by Lee

Disappearing Penguins – Creation Moments

Penguin Eggs Tragedy by Dr. Johnson

Ian’s Bird of the Week – King Penguin

Bird of the Bible Photos – Hoopoe

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Nikhil Devasar

“The stork, the heron of any variety, the hoopoe, and the bat.” (Deuteronomy 14:18 AMP)

Hoopoe Feeding Young ©©Dvir Lotan from Israel

Hoopoe Feeding Young ©©Dvir Lotan from Israel

“The stork, all kinds of heron, the hoopoe, and the bat.” (Leviticus 11:19 AMP)

This bird is on the “Do Not Eat List.”

Birds of the Bible – Hoopoe

Birds of the Bible

Wordless Birds

Rabbit Chasing Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Cranes in side yard – The Guard Sandhill watching

“I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith:” (2 Timothy 4:7 KJV)

Dan and I have been re-reading “Things I Have Learned” by Dr. Bob Jones, Sr. One of his messages was about “Rabbit Chasers.” It has to do with a “Possum” dog getting sidetracked by a Rabbit. [More about that later.]

The day after reading that part, I was looking out our kitchen window and spotted the four Sandhill Cranes in our side yard. They come by frequently. It is a mom, dad, and two juveniles.

About that time a rabbit appeared close to the house next door. [He was in our front yard on Easter Morning when we back out on the way to church. Yeah! The Easter Bunny!, I told Dan.] The rabbit was minding his own business when the “guard” Sandhill took out after him. Now, I call that Sandhill a “rabbit chaser.”

Sandhill Crane with Wings Spread – Threatening ©Maria Michell Pixabay

This is not the first time we have watched a Sandhill take-off after an animal. Years, ago, we were watching several Sandhill Cranes walking through the travel-trailer park where we were staying. A small kitten, thought he would “take on” one of these tall birds. The Sandhill opened up his wings, making him look “really big” and took two steps toward the small cat. Haven’t seen a cat run that fast in a long time. :)

Back to the book and the “Rabbit Chasers.” To shorten the message, it was about what a good “Possum” dog does, compared to a “Rabbit Chaser.” A good dog will go over hill and dale, through water, etc. and never gets off of the trail until he either trees his opossum, or he loses it. On the other hand, a dog that starts on the scent of his prey, comes across the trail of a rabbit, and changes course to follow the rabbit, is a “Rabbit Chaser.”

This Dog Adopted His Opossum. Back to the drawing board.

Dr. Bob takes that story and tells the students in chapel, to finish what they started. [“Finish The Job” was another of his saying.] The student starts college and then they meet a girl or boy, they start wavering about finishing. There are other things to get us off-track also. [Sound familiar] He mentions other things, but basically, he was challenging the students to stay on course and finish what they started. A very good lesson for all of us. I had hoped to find an online version to share a link to, but it doesn’t seem to be available. The book is still available. Things I Have Learned at the school.

“The Son of God came all the way from heaven to this earth. I am speaking reverently. He got on the trail of His Father’s will. Everything tried to stop Him, but He stayed on the trail.” … “One day He hung on the cross in agony and blood. After awhile He cried, ‘It is finished.’ He stayed on the trail. He never got off. He said, ‘I came to do My Father’s will, and now it is done.’ He died for us. And my Bible says, ‘He shall see the travail of His soul, and shall be satisfied.’ ..”You will never be happy off the trail.” [From Things I Have Learned, p106.]

There is much more I would love to share about that message, but, I’ll leave you to read the book if you would like.

“But none of these things move me, neither count I my life dear unto myself, so that I might finish my course with joy, and the ministry, which I have received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the gospel of the grace of God.” (Acts 20:24 KJV)

Here are some of his many sayings that Dr Bob Jones Sr. shared with students [of which we both were at one time].

  • “It is a sin to do less than your best.”
  • “The door to the room of success swings on the hinges of opposition.”
  • “It is no disgrace to fail; it is a disgrace to do less than your best to keep from failing.”
  • “God will not do for you what He has given you strength to do for yourself.”
  • “Don’t sacrifice the permanent on the altar of the immediate.”

Wholesome Words – Chapel Sayings

Wholesome Words

Sharing The Gospel

 

Avian – Happy Mother’s Day

Today is Mother’s Day here in America. I wonder if the beautiful, hard-working avian mother’s have a special day. Maybe, it is the day the little one fledge and finally have “Flown The Coop.”

Seriously, I would like to wish all of my readers a Happy Mother’s Day with this little tribute.

First, the Momma bird lays her eggs:

“Let your father and your mother be glad, And let her who bore you rejoice.” (Proverbs 23:25 NKJV)

Second, momma has to sit on the eggs for awhile:

“For whoever does the will of My Father in heaven is My brother and sister and mother.” (Matthew 12:50 NKJV)

Third, the little ones start to appear:

“Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.” (Matthew 19:19 KJV)

Fourth, those little birds get hungry:

“Honour thy father and mother; (which is the first commandment with promise;)” (Ephesians 6:2 KJV)

Fifth, they mature (juveniles) and eventually Fly The Coop:

Avian mother’s are finished with that batch. Unlike human mothers whose work has just begun, and will continue through every stage of their children’s lives, even into their grandchildren’s lives.

Happy Mother’s Day!!

“Listen to your father who begot you, And do not despise your mother when she is old.” (Proverbs 23:22 NKJV)

“A wise son makes a father glad, But a foolish man despises his mother.” (Proverbs 15:20 NKJV)