A Pleasant Surprise At The BJU Homecoming

BJU Homecoming

Dan and I rode up to Greenville, South Carolina to attend the 2018 BJU Homecoming. We had two main events that we attended. When we parked quite a way from the place we were to be, I sort of grumbled because of the long walk with my walker [The campus is on hills]. Yet, the Lord always seems to turn our upside down grumps into upright delights.

BJU Science Building

We parked down by the Science building, where Dan had taught years ago. I decided to take some photos. Thankfully, the building was open, and so began my delight. Inside we found a display of BIRDS! A lot of birds, which were from a collection of specimens that was completed before 1910. It was donated by Mr. Charles E. Waterman.

Waterman Bird Collection BJU 2018 Plaque

There were display cases filled with a Bird specimen collection that had been donated by Mr. Charles E Waterman. The collection is well over 100 years old. The birds have been well preserved, considering the age of ithe collection. My camera received a nice workout. [So did my back]

BJU BUg Collection 2018

BJU BUg Collection 2018

BJU BUg Collection 2018

Today, I want to show you the Bug and Squirrel displays, as the bird photos are still being adjusted. Photos of the display case is to give you an idea of how big those bugs really were. Sure wouldn’t want any of them of me.

BJU Squirrel Collection 2018

The squirrels look as if they were practicing for a football game. :)

God’s Creative Hand is definitely seen in all of these created critters.

“Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,” (Romans 1:19-22 KJV)

You Got To Be Kidding!!!

You really need to watch this video. You will not believe this Great Blue Heron.

YouTube Video by stonecabinphotos – “A Great Blue Heron spears and swallows a huge carp at Bosque del Apache NWR on 29 Oct 2013. The process took 11 minutes.”

I have seen them do this, but never with a fish this large. Watched this Great Blue catch a catfish at Circle B Reserve, but it was small compared to the one above.

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee - cropped

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee – cropped

Here is a photo by ©USFWS, but even it is smaller than the video above.

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) ©USFWS

I can’t think of a verse that says that “you shouldn’t bite off more than you can chew.” There are verses that the Lord promises food for all his creation:

Who giveth food to all flesh: for his mercy endureth for ever. O give thanks unto the God of heaven: for his mercy endureth for ever.” (Psalms 136:25-26 KJV)

“Which executeth judgment for the oppressed: which giveth food to the hungry.” (Psalms 146:7a KJV)

“He giveth to the beast his food, and to the young ravens which cry.” (Psalms 147:9 KJV)

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And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.” (1 Timothy 6:8 KJV)

This last verse reminds the Great Blue Heron that his catch and his beautiful feathers should help him be content. Though, not sure that the Heron may have a sore throat and an upset stomach.

Enjoy!

Bolding and italics in verse added for emphasis.

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Black-breasted Buzzard

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Black-breasted Buzzard

by Ian Montgomery

You may remember in the last Bird of the Moment, in April I went to Cumberland Dam near Georgetown in Northern Queensland in the hope of photographing Red-browed Pardalotes but came away instead with photos of nesting Masked Finches. In May I set off on another, longer trip to Mt Isa with several species in my sights, in addition to the Pardalote.

The distance from Townsville to Mt Isa is about 900km/560miles, so I split the journey by staying for a couple of nights at Kooroorinya Reserve, a little gorge 50km/30miles south of Prairie. Kooroorinya’s main claim to fame is that it hosts the annual Oakley amateur horse race and they were preparing for the race during my stay. The satellite image below shows the race track, the Prairie-Muttaburra Road and the oasis created by the gorge in very dry country, which holds water for months in the dry season after the creek has stopped flowing.

A Townsville birder had found nesting Little Eagle and Black-breasted Buzzard there. The Little Eagle is uncommon in North Queensland, and the Black-breasted Buzzard is uncommon generally. So I search diligently along both sides of the creek looking for the nest of raptors. I found several unoccupied nests but these could have been built by Whistling Kites, which were common in the area, and I didn’t initially see any sign of Little Eagles or Black-breasted Buzzards.

It wasn’t until I returned to the campsite near the race track that I saw this Black-breasted Buzzard in the distance perched in a dead tree on the far side of the creek. I went back round to get a closer look at it and when I approached it flew down into a tree with lots of foliage and a nest, just visible in the lower left hand corner of the second photo of the Buzzard. In this photo you can see the characteristic black breast that gives the bird its name, and the short unbarred tail, not as long as the folded wings, which you can see behind the tail.

I left the bird in peace in case it was actually nesting, though laying doesn’t usually start until June. Later that afternoon as I was birding along the creek – there were various birds including Budgerigars – I saw it, or maybe its mate, soaring past in its characteristic hunting mode and exhibiting the striking under-wing pattern with the large white panels at the base of the primary flight feathers.

Black-breasted Buzzards are versatile feeders and will eat mammals, birds, reptiles, carrion and even large insects. I suppose in the arid interior, you eat what you can find. They show a preference for young rabbits, nestlings, lizards and eggs. They will tackle the large eggs of Emus, breaking them either by pounding them with the bill or dropping stones on them. Have a look at this http://www.arkive.org/black-breasted-buzzard/hamirostra-melanosternon/image-G138753.html if you don’t believe me (or even if you do, it’s a great photo of a juvenile BB Buzzard caught red-handed!).

Black-breasted Buzzards are large. They can have a wing-span of up to 1.56m/61in and can weight more than 1,400g/3.1lbs , making them the third heaviest Australian raptor after Wedge-tailed and White-bellied Sea-Eagles. The species in an Australian endemic, the sole member of the genus Hamirostra (‘monotypic’) and apparently related to the Square-tailed Kite, also the sole member of its genus Lophoictinia. Its range includes most of mainland Australia except the higher rainfall areas of eastern and southern Australia and is more common in the north.
I didn’t find any Red-browed Pardalotes (or Little Eagles) at Kooroorinya, so the search continued.
Greetings,

Ian


Lee’s Addition:

It is amazing when we search for a particular bird, at times we do not find what we sought, but many times another bird presents itself so that we still have be productive in our birdwatching adventure. This is the case with Ian. He has gone off on searches for birds and has ended up sharing a different avian wonder with us.

I couldn’t help but remember two verses which have to do with searching. In Ian’s case, he was searching for the Red-browed Pardalotes. Yet, this verse has to do with searching for the Lord and finding Him.

“Then you will call upon Me and go and pray to Me, and I will listen to you. And you will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart.” (Jeremiah 29:12-13 NKJV)

See more of Ian’s Articles:

Ian’s Bird of the Week

Night Birds

Four Billion Birds Flying

Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis hyemalis) female WikiC


“To everything there is a season, A time for every purpose under heaven:” (Ecclesiastes 3:1 NKJV)

Here are some interesting statements from an article on All About Birds. The research that Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientists are discovering with weather radar data is assisting the ornithologist. They are learning more about the 4 Billion birds that migrate during this time of the year.

“An average of 4 billion birds passed from Canada across the northern border of the U.S. in autumn, with 2.6 billion birds returning across the Canada–U.S. border in spring. Activity across the southern border was on an even grander scale: an average of 4.7 billion birds left the U.S. for Mexico and other points south each autumn, with 3.5 billion birds heading north across the U.S. southern border each spring.”

Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) male by Kent Nickell

Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) male by Kent Nickell


That is quite a few birds heading south, with fewer returning in the spring. It appears the birds that go further south have a better survival rate than the ones that winter here in the United States. 

” For birds crossing the U.S. northern border—which includes many short-distance migrants such as sparrows, Snow Buntings, and Dark-eyed Juncos that fly from Canada to spend winter in the Lower 48 states—the average rate of return was 64 percent. But for birds crossing the U.S. southern border—which includes more of the long-distance migrants such as warblers, tanagers, and orioles that travel to Central and South America, three to four times farther than the short-distance migrants—the average rate of return was 76 percent.”

Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) at Lake Howard, Winter Haven, Florida By Dan'sPix

Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) at Lake Howard, Winter Haven, Florida By Dan’sPix


My first thoughts were why are so many not surviving here in North America. Yet, those traveling further south, seem to fare better. I knew from previous articles I’ve read that many birds die from impact with tall buildings and glass windows. Here is what they had to say:

One explanation for the higher mortality among birds that overwinter in the U.S. may be a higher number of hazards. “All birds need to stay safe from predators, find enough food, and not get hit by a car,” says Ken Rosenberg, research coauthor and conservation scientist at the Cornell Lab. “Birds wintering in the U.S. may have more habitat disturbances and more buildings to crash into, and they might not be adapted for that.” 

They also discuss in this article the differences in different breeding strategy between short distant and long distant migrants.

“And He changes the times and the seasons;” (Daniel 2:21 NKJV)

Sandhill Cranes in our side yard


Here in Florida, I have begun seeing more of the migrants that spend time near here. The Boat-tailed Grackles are invading my feeders already. I have also spotted more Bald Eagles, and the Heron, Egrets, and Sandhill Cranes seem to be more populous. Yeah, for the Winter Visitors!!


4 Billion Birds Will Fly Through American Airspace This Fall by Carley Eschiman, All About Birds, Sept 17,2018

Unbelievable Migrations from Creation Moments

Bird Migration Mistakes

Birds of the Bible – Migration September 2009

Interesting Things – Amazing Bird Migration

 

 

Birdwatching, Bugs, and Woodstock

Family Circus Bug And Birdwatching ©ArcMax

When you go birdwatching, do you get side-tracked by other critters? It is easy to do. Since the Creator, the Lord Jesus Christ created all of them, they are all amazing and enjoyable to examine up close.

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:21-22 NKJV)

Ladybug ©WikiC

Or maybe he was watching one of these:

Brevard Zoo Butterflies 4-3-2018 by Lee

Or could this be what he was looking at through his magnifying glass?

Caterpillar of the Old World Swallowtail – Size 42mm ©WikiC

“Then God said, ‘Let the earth bring forth the living creature according to its kind: cattle and creeping thing and beast of the earth, each according to its kind’; and it was so. And God made the beast of the earth according to its kind, cattle according to its kind, and everything that creeps on the earth according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.” (Genesis 1:24-25 NKJV)

Red-billed Oxpecker on equid “neighbor” (zebra), inspecting ear for bugs ©ibc.lynxeds

If you were to watch Woodstock, he would definitely entertain you.

Woodstock playing Elevator ©Arcamax

Then again, maybe Woodstock is trying to copy the behavior of the Widowbirds:

Trust you enjoy your day. A little humor helps our days be brighter.

 

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Night Birds

Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Night Birds by Ian Montgomery

If you can remember that far back, the last bird of the moment was Eastern Grass Owl [http://www.birdway.com.au/botw/botw_584.php] found during a spot-lighting trip to the Townsville Town Common led by local night-bird expert and pillar of BirdLife Townsville Ian Boyd.

At the time, Ian was refusing to be discouraged by pancreatic cancer, an attitude that we all admired until his death on 23rd of February. Typically undaunted he gave a presentation on his favourite topic, Night Birds at the BirdLife Townsville AGM on the 10th of February although he had less than a couple of weeks to live. Isolated by flood waters in Bluewater, I couldn’t attend the funeral on 1st March so here is a photographic tribute to him instead.

I got to know him well during his last year or and am left with some precious memories of searching for night birds with him. So let’s go birding together while I share three special occasions with you.

The first was when a birding friend and photographer from Mt Isa was visiting Townsville and wanted to photograph a Rufous Owl. I contacted Ian Boyd and he took us to an active nesting site on a hot afternoon at the end of October. There he showed us the two adults which we photographed (one of them is in the first photo) and our visitor from Mt Isa returned to the site later and got a photo of a fledgling peering out of the tree hollow.

The second was the occasion when we found the female Eastern Grass Owl at the Townsville Town Common which featured as the last Bird of the Moment. At the time our goal was to search for Spotted Nightjars which are supposed to occur occasionally along the Freshwater Track that goes across the grassy, saltbush flats between Bald Rock and the Freshwater hide (see this map:). We drove across the Town Common arriving at Shelley Beach on the northern side at sunset and then drove slowly back in darkness checking for night birds as we went along.

The first stretch of riverine forest on the Shelley Beach Trail produced a remarkable five Owlet Nightjars (second photo) and a single male Tawny Frogmouth (third photo). Male Tawny Frogmouths have silvery grey, strongly marbled plumage. We had only just started along the Freshwater Track when the cry went up ‘Barn Owl’ but we quickly realised that the Tyto Owl beside the track was a female Eastern Grass Owl (fourth photo).

There was no sign of any Spotted Nightjars – we suspect that they are more like to be found in the dry winter months – but at the start of the Freshwater Lagoon Road south of the Freshwater hide, we found a Large-tailed Nightjar (fifth photo). This species is the commonest Nightjar around Townsville and is well known for its persistent, loud ‘chop chop’ call that gives it the colloquial name of Carpenter or Axe Bird.

Finally, along the track between Payet’s Tower and the Forest Walk, a Barking Owl (sixth photo) represented the only remaining Australian night bird family for the evening – Aegothelidae (Owlet NIghtjars), Podargidae (Frogmouths), Tytonidae (Barn Owls), Caprimulgidae (Nightjars) and Strigidae (Hawk Owls). I’m following the IOC and BirdLife International in lumping the Nightjars and Eared-Nightjars into a single family.

We repeated the spotlighting at the Town Common a week later. This time we found one or two Owlet Nightjars along the Shelley Beach Trail, but Tawny Frogmouths were out in force. The seventh photo shows a female; females are often rufous like this one but always have plainer less marked plumage than the males. The eight photo shows a remarkably approachable male Tawny Frogmouth.

This time there was no sign of the Eastern Grass Owl (or Spotted NIghtjars) and the surprise of the night was a Barn Owl perched in a tree along the stretch where we’d found the Barking Owl the previous week (ninth photo). This bird seemed unbothered by our spot- and flash-lights and when it did leave it did so to plunge into the undergrowth after some prey.
That was the last time I went birding with Ian Boyd. He is greatly missed by his wife Robyn, the rest of his family and all us bird watchers who appreciated his generosity, warmth, leadership and enthusiasm. I’ll treasure these great memories of birding with him during his last few months with us. Thank you, Ian Boyd.
Greetings, Ian


What a nice tribute to a good friend and fellow birder. What courage for Ian Boyd to continue on under very adverse conditions. Thanks Ian for the neat birds and a memorial to one of your friends.

“A friend loves at all times, And a brother is born for adversity.” (Proverbs 17:17 NKJV)

“A man who has friends must himself be friendly, But there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.” (Proverbs 18:24 NKJV)

See more of Ian’s Posts:

Ian’s Bird of the Week

Black Sicklebill – Thin Blue Line

Here is an interesting video about a Black Sicklebill displaying.

Black Sicklebill: The Thin Blue Line by Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Black Sicklebills are elegant, slender birds with long bills and tails. But that all changes when a female comes by. The male transforms into a horizontal comet shape on his display perch. He doesn’t use his wings to do this; he uses flank feathers. The comet shape is accentuated by a narrow blue band of iridescence created when those flank feathers line up precisely. Filmed and photographed by Tim Laman and Eric Liner. [YouTube]

“The black sicklebill (Epimachus fastosus) is a large bird-of-paradise of midmountain forests of New Guinea.

The sicklebill’s diet consists mainly of fruits and arthropods. The male of the species performs a horizontal courtship display with the pectoral plumes raised around its head.

The male has black plumage with iridescent green, blue and purple scale-like feathers, red irises, bright yellow mouth, long curved black bill, huge sabre-shaped tail and large erectile fan-like plumes on the sides of its breast. The female is smaller than the male, with reddish brown plumage, brown irises, and buff below. Reaching up to 110 cm in length, the male black sicklebill is the longest member of Paradisaeidae, though the curl-crested manucode has a larger body.” [Wikipedia with editing]

‘Call to Me, and I will answer you, and show you great and mighty things, which you do not know.’ (Jeremiah 33:3 NKJV)


 

A Family of Ducks by Emma Foster

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) By Dan'sPix

Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) By Dan’sPix

A Family of Ducks by Emma Foster

Once there was a small family of mallard ducks that lived on a large lake in the country. The mother duck had just had three ducklings, and as Autumn was nearing, the ducklings were learning how to swim.

The lake the family lived on was surrounded by a college campus. There were several buildings near the lake, but it was still quiet and peaceful, and the family was never bothered by anyone. Many of the students at the college had seen the ducks before, and they were happy to see that the mother and father duck now had ducklings.

Momma Mallard and 2 Babies at Lake Morton

The mother duck spent most of her days teaching her ducklings how to search for food in the shallow water. The ducklings loved being in the water because of how hot it was outside and how cool the water was, even though it was almost October. Eventually, however, the wind began to pick up and grow colder.

The ducks started to hear rumors of a storm that was coming. Several flocks of birds had flown in from farther north to avoid the storm. As the winds became worse, the family of ducks decided to stay under the bridge on the lake for a while with the other ducks and birds. Small waves began to form on the lake, which scared the ducklings. Most of the birds decided to hide in the trees, leaving the family of ducks alone under the bridge.

“I would hasten my escape from the windy storm and tempest.” (Psalms 55:8 KJV)

Mallard in Storm ©Flickr Steve Baker

Rain began pouring down into the lake. After a few minutes, the ducklings got used to the sound of the rain. Even though the storm wasn’t as bad as the ducks thought it would be, the weather was getting colder. Soon they would have to fly south for the winter because it was getting colder, but right now they couldn’t leave the lake.

The father duck peeked out from under the bridge and noticed that several students were rushing into a nearby building. The father duck waited for the rain to lighten before he, the mother duck, and the ducklings hurried up the bridge onto the sidewalk. The mother duck and the ducklings followed the father duck toward the front entrance to the building.

Duck at Door ©Flickr Ann Fisher

At one point a group of college students rushed to the door to get out of the rain. The family of ducks quickly followed behind them and stood in the building to dry off and get warm. Eventually the ducklings settled down to take a nap while the stormed died down. Several students watched the family of ducks and took some pictures until one of them opened the door to let them out when the storm passed. When they made it back outside, they all returned to the lake and settled back down on the grass. Eventually the ducklings grew to the point where they were able to fly south for the winter, and the entire family was safe and happy.

Mallards by Lee at Lake Morton


Another interesting bird tale from Emma. This story makes me wonder if there was a storm up where she is now attending college. Maybe she opened the door to let the family in. Makes me Wonder!! Nice story, Emma.

See More of Emma’s Stories

 

Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill – Cincinnati Zoo

Trying to get through the fence/cage
Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) Cincinnati Zoo 2016

If you followed the posts while we were on our trip, you are aware that we skipped going to the Cincinnati Zoo because of weather.

Home Again After 2,000 Mile Trip

And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; And patience, experience; and experience, hope: (Romans 5:3-4 KJV)

Since we have been there twice already, I decided to see if there were some birds that were not written about from those trips. Actually, there are quite a few.

This Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill’s photo caught my attention. It is so hard to get a photo through the cages of the zoos. This Avian Wonder was just as hard to capture. After several tries, the Hornbill came into focus and I still remember my excitement. Patience is hard at times, but it does pay off.

Yeah! I got through!
Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) Cincinnati Zoo 2016

“But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it.” (Romans 8:25 KJV)

Here are some more articles written about our visits to the Cincinnati Zoo:

Here is a video by another visitor to the Hornbills:

Weavers At Work

Lesser Masked Weaver (Ploceus intermedius) by Bob-Nan

My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle,… (Job 7:6a KJV)

“Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work.” (Exodus 35:35 KJV) [This has to do with the Tabernacle bulders, but the wisdom of heart applies here also.]

A friend shared a video with me of the Weaver Birds on Facebook while we were traveling. I thought I would share some of the fantastic weaving ability given these birds by their Creator.

These are just a few of the videos of Weavers at Work

Here’s another video on YouTube taken at the San Diego Zoo

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Previous Articles about the Weaver Birds:

Sunday Inspiration – Weavers and Allies
Wonga Dove and Taveta Weavers at Houston Zoo
Nuggets Plus – The Weaver, The Caller (Ready)
Interesting Things – The Weaver Bird
Baya Weaver – The Model Church

Who Paints The Leaves?

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Avian And Attributes – Sharp Part II

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) ©WikiC

“Like a club and a sword and a sharp arrow Is a man who bears false witness against his neighbor.” (Proverbs 25:18 NASB)

“Thy tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.” (Psalms 52:2 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sharp Part II

The rest of the SHARP definitions. See Part I

SH’ARP, n.
1. In music, an acute sound.
2. A note artificially raised a semitone; or,
3. The character which directs the note to be thus elevated; opposed to a flat, which depresses a note a semitone.
4. A pointed weapon. [Not in use.]
SH’ARP, v.t.
1. To make keen or acute.
2. To render quick.
3. To mark with a sharp, in musical composition; or to raise a not a semitone.
SH’ARP, v.i. To play tricks in bargaining; to act the sharper.


Sharp-tailed Birds

There are seven Sharp-tailed birds:

Sharp-tailed Grass Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Grass Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae, the only one in the genus Culicivora. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) (previously: Tetrao phasianellus) is a medium-sized prairie grouse. It is also known as the sharptail, and is known as fire grouse or fire bird by Native American Indians[clarification needed] due to their reliance on brush fires to keep their habitat open. The Sharp-Tailed Grouse is the provincial bird of Saskatchewan.

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) ©WikiC

Adults have a relatively short tail with the two central (deck) feathers being square-tipped and somewhat longer than their lighter, outer tail feathers giving the bird its distinctive name. The plumage is mottled dark and light browns against a white background, they are lighter on the underparts with a white belly uniformly covered in faint “V”-shaped markings. These markings distinguish sharp-tailed grouse from lesser and greater prairie chickens which are heavily barred on their underparts(Connelly et al. 1998). Adult males have a yellow comb over their eyes and a violet display patch on their neck. This display patch is another distinguishing characteristic from prairie chickens as male prairie chickens have yellow or orange colored air sacs

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) is a species of ibis native to open wet savannas in parts of northern South America. This ibis is distinguished by its notably long tail, which is the longest among all extant ibis species; measuring 250-301mm in males and 256-272mm in females. The tail projects beyond the tips of the folded wings when the ibis stands; and beyond the trailing legs in flight. The plumage is predominantly black with greenish glossing; and with purplish tinges on the upper back, hind neck, wings and tail. The forehead and cheek region are occasionally greyish brown. Juveniles appear similar to adults, but their plumage lacks a metallic sheen.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) – breeding adults are a rich brown with darker feather centres above, and white underneath apart from a buff breast. They have a light superciliary line above the eye and a chestnut crown. In winter, sharp-tailed sandpipers are grey above. The juveniles are brightly patterned above with rufous coloration and white mantle stripes.

This bird looks a lot like the pectoral sandpiper, within whose Asian range it breeds. It differs from that species in its breast pattern, stronger supercilium and more rufous crown. It has some similarities to the long-toed stint, but is much larger than the stint.

Sharp-tailed Starling (Lamprotornis acuticaudus) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Starling (Lamprotornis acuticaudus), also known as the sharp-tailed glossy-starling, is a species of starling in the family Sturnidae. It inhabits open woodland (namely miombo) in Angola, northern Botswana, the southern DRC, northern Namibia, western Tanzania, and Zambia.

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper (Lochmias nematura) by Dario Sanches

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper (Lochmias nematura) is a passerine bird of South America belonging to the family Furnariidae, the ovenbirds. It is the only member of the genus Lochmias. The species is also known as the streamside streamcreeper.

This bird is about 6 in (15 cm) long, with a short tail and a long, thin, slightly curved bill. The plumage is dark brown, densely spotted white on the underparts. There is a white stripe over the eye and the tail is blackish. The song is an accelerating trill, lasting for about five seconds.


Avian and Attributes – Sharp Part I

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Home Again After 2,000 Mile Trip

Home Again After 2,000 Mile Trip

We arrived home yesterday and are working on getting back in the routine of being home. The suitcases are unpacked and put away. We enjoyed sleeping in our own bed last night. If you have traveled, even overnight, you know the feeling of a night’s rest in your own bed.

American Wigeon flocks

We offered some of the migrating birds a ride south, but they declined our offer. [NOT!] Actually, we didn’t see sunshine for six days while we were north. Therefore, we wouldn’t have seen the birds anyway to offer them any assistance in their journey south.

“Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

Osprey Road by Dan - (Old Bartow Road)

Osprey Road by Dan – (Old Bartow Road)

We have a line of power poles on a road that goes to Bartow, Florida that is lined with platforms for bird nest. The Osprey come back every winter and rebuild their nest. I wonder if they feel like we did when we got to sleep in our own bed?

Because of the rain, overcast skies, and the approaching Hurricane Florence, we made the decision to come home several days early. We skipped the visit to the Cincinnati Zoo unfortunately. No bird photos to share from this trip.

Bird Fossil at Creation Museum

We did get to go through the Creation Museum in Kentucky though. It has changed since we were there 8 or 9 years ago. Improved quite a bit, but they removed the bird [Finch] exhibits. I only found one fossil exhibit of a bird.

Because of a storm outside with lots of lightning, I think I will end this for now and post again tomorrow, Lord willing.

Stay Tuned!