Lee’s Two Word Tuesday – 1/24/17

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Egrets, Ibises, Spoonbills, etc ©Ericripma Photo

WILL SCATTER

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“Remember, I pray, the word that You commanded Your servant Moses, saying, ‘If you are unfaithful, I will scatter you among the nations; but if you return to Me, and keep My commandments and do them, though some of you were cast out to the farthest part of the heavens, yet I will gather them from there, and bring them to the place which I have chosen as a dwelling for My name.’ ” (Nehemiah 1:8-9 NKJV)

Egrets, Ibises, Spoonbills, etc ©Ericripma Photo

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Lee’s One Word Monday – 1/23/17

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Cauca Guan (Penelope perspicax) chick ©BirdPhotos.com

TRAIN

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Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” (Proverbs 22:6 KJV)

Cauca Guan (Penelope perspicax) chick ©BirdPhotos.com

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Lee’s Many Word Sunday – African Fish Eagle Revisited

African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) by Africaddict

African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) by Africaddict

“Ye have seen what I did unto the Egyptians, and how I bare you on eagles’ wings, and brought you unto myself.” (Exodus 19:4 KJV)

One of the first videos shown on the blog was of the African Fish Eagle. That was back when this blog first started up. I have repeatedly shown it over the years.

First my favorite one with the music:

“For thus saith the LORD; Behold, he shall fly as an eagle, and shall spread his wings over Moab.” (Jeremiah 48:40 KJV)

Now here is a great one to show in slow motion.

 

“They are passed away as the swift ships: as the eagle that hasteth to the prey.” (Job 9:26 KJV)

What a CREATOR!!

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Birds of the Bible – Eagles (February 17, 2008)

Birds of the Bible – Favorites (July 3, 2009)

Just a little change of pace for today’s Devotional.

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Sunday Inspiration – Guans

Cauca Guan (Penelope perspicax) chick ©BirdPhotos.com

Here is the second group of birds in the Cracidae Family. Last weeks Chachalacas were rather plain, but an interesting group. Today’s second set of species has 20 Guans and 4 Piping Guans.  You will notice a little more variety and coloring in these Guans, yet the overall shapes are similiar to the Chachalacas. “The guans are a number of bird genera which make up the largest group in the family Cracidae. They are found mainly in northern South America, southern Central America, and a few adjacent Caribbean islands. There is also the peculiar horned guan (Oreophasis derbianus) which is not a true guan, but a very distinct and ancient cracid with no close living relatives (Pereira et al. 2002).”

Rusty-margined Guan (Penelope superciliaris) ©BirdPhotos.com

Rusty-margined Guan (Penelope superciliaris) ©BirdPhotos.com

These are distributed through 6 genera. These are the birds in the Penelope genera; Band-tailed Guan, Bearded Guan, Baudo Guan, Andean Guan, Marail Guan, Rusty-margined Guan, Red-faced Guan, Crested Guan, Cauca Guan, White-winged Guan, Spix’s Guan, Dusky-legged Guan, White-crested Guan, Chestnut-bellied Guan, and White-browed Guan

Black-fronted Piping Guan (Pipile jacutinga) ©BirdPhotos.com

Black-fronted Piping Guan (Pipile jacutinga) ©BirdPhotos.com

There are 4 in the Pipile genera; Trinidad Piping Guan, Blue-throated Piping Guan, Red-throated Piping Guan, and the Black-fronted Piping Guan

Horned Guan (Oreophasis derbianus) ©©Flickr JoshMore

Horned Guan (Oreophasis derbianus) ©©Flickr JoshMore

Wattled Guan is in Aburria, Black Guan and Sickle-winged Guan are in the Chamaepetes genus, Highland Guan in the Penelopina and the Horned Guan in the Oreophasis generas.

I found this additional remark in Wikipedia rather amazing. “This indicates that the guans’ origin is in the northern Andes region, in the general area of Colombia or perhaps Ecuador; the date of their initial radiation is not well resolved due to the lack of fossil evidence but can be very roughly placed around 40–25 mya (Oligocene, perhaps some time earlier). The two basal lineages diverged during the Burdigalian, around 20–15 mya.(Pereira et al. 2002)” They have no proof or fossil evidence, yet they came up with these millions of years. Their initial radiation was the day they came off of the ark., which was not millions of years ago.

“Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, of all flesh, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth; that they may breed abundantly in the earth, and be fruitful, and multiply upon the earth. And Noah went forth, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons’ wives with him: Every beast, every creeping thing, and every fowl, and whatsoever creepeth upon the earth, after their kinds, went forth out of the ark.” (Genesis 8:17-19 KJV)

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“For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his pavilion: in the secret of his tabernacle shall he hide me; he shall set me up upon a rock.” (Psalms 27:5 KJV)


“Hide Thou Me” ~ ©The Hyssongs (with permission)

Verse and song picked because of how well these created birds are able to blend in and hide from their enemies..
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More Sunday Inspirations
Cracadaie Family – Wikipedia
Many Photos by BirdPhotos.com

In Our Place
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Lee’s Six Word Saturday – 1/21/17

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Western Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma californica) ©WikiC

LAYING UP IN STORE FOR THEMSELVES

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Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life.” (1 Timothy 6:19 KJV)

Western Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma californica) ©WikiC

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Lee’s Five Word Friday – 1/20/17

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East Brazilian Chachalaca (Ortalis araucuan) ©WikiC

WATCHING DAILY AT MY GATES

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“Blessed is the man that heareth me, watching daily at my gates, waiting at the posts of my doors.” (Proverbs 8:34 KJV)

East Brazilian Chachalaca (Ortalis araucuan) ©WikiC

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Lee’s Four Word Thursday – 1/19/17

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Chestnut-winged Chachalaca (Ortalis garrula) ©WikiC

MY FRUIT IS BETTER

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My fruit is better than gold, yea, than fine gold; and my revenue than choice silver.” (Proverbs 8:19 KJV)

Chestnut-winged Chachalaca (Ortalis garrula) ©WikiC

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Lee’s Three Word Wednesday – 1/18/17

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Little Chachalaca (Ortalis motmot) ©BirdPhotos.com

DESPISE YOUR YOUTH

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“Let no one despise your youth, but be an example to the believers in word, in conduct, in love, in spirit, in faith, in purity.” (1 Timothy 4:12 NKJV)

Little Chachalaca (Ortalis motmot) ©BirdPhotos.com

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – (Eurasian) Three-toed Woodpecker

Ian’s Bird of the Week – (Eurasian) Three-toed Woodpecker ~ Ian Montgomery

[Actually his first on of the new year.]

First of all my best wishes for a contented and healthy New Year. There is one important change for birdway customers with the new year. I’m planning to officially deregister the birdway company at the end of the Australian financial year (30 June) so in preparation for that birdway stopped trading on 31 December. I’ve registered as a sole trader, so any future invoices will be made out by me rather in the name of the company and will not include GST.

I’ve also removed the books Diary of a Bird Photographer and Where to Find Birds in Northern Queensland from the Apple Store, Google Play and Kobo Books. If you want to buy them, contact me directly, ian@birdway.com.au or ianbirdway@gmail.com. I’ve put instructions on the website: Diary of a Bird Photographer and Where to Find Birds on Northern Queensland. Having removed the middlemen and GST, I can now offer them at reduced prices of $5 and $15 respectively (Australian dollars or equivalent; foreign currencies preferably through PayPal). I’ll investigate direct purchase through the website, but for the moment I’ll email them to customers in the required format (ePub for Apple, Windows and Android computers, tablets and smart phones; Kindle for Amazon readers).

Back to the New Year: here’s the last photo that I took in 2016, a two day old new moon just after sunset on 31st December.

pic-pici-eurasian-three-toed-woodpecker-picoides-dorsalis-by-ian-1

New Year is often represented symbolically by a chubby baby wearing not much more than a top hat and a banner with the new year number on it. Here, perhaps more appropriately for us, is a new year baby Dollarbird taken from my house last Friday, 3 days after it left the nest. Junior is on the right looking relaxed, while an alert and anxious-looking parent is on the right.

pas-dollarbirdA pair of Dollarbirds nest regularly in a termite-ridden poplar gum near the house, which has plenty of nesting hollows thanks to the termites. The same tree is also the headquarters of the local band of Blue-winged Kookaburras, but the two species seem to co-habit quite peacefully, if not quietly. The dollarbird nest is at a great height, perhaps 25m/80ft, so the first introduction of the young birds to the outside world is a perilous decent to the ground that doesn’t always end well.

 

This year, the young bird landed in my neighbour’s garden on the 10th January. He has both a dog and a ride-on lawn mower that is his favourite toy and I warned him about the bird. The parents made lots of noise over the next three days, presumably in defence of the newcomer. Consequently, I assumed all was well but I was of course relieved to see it safely up in the tree.

That’s by way of a new year aside. I’ve chosen another hollow-nesting bird as the subject of this posting, the Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker from the trip to Slovakia last June. Those of you who have been on the list for a while probably know that Woodpeckers are among my favourite birds, even though or perhaps because I’ve most lived in Woodpecker-deprived countries – Ireland and then Australia, though eastern Ireland has recently been colonised successfully by the Great Spotted Woodpecker.

Woodpeckers were among my target birds in Slovakia. Although we saw several species, the only one that I got good photos of was this one. A very closely related three-toed woodpecker also occurs in North America. There is disagreement as to whether they should be treated as the same or separate species, so it’s qualified here with ‘Eurasian’. The nesting hollow was close to the ground so I was able to set up the camera and tripod at a convenient distance (see second last photo) and wait for the adults to visit carrying food.

The males are distinguishable by having some yellow streaks on the crown. The yellow varies in intensity and was very pale in this male – first of the Woodpecker photos. He made only one visit during the hour or so I was there, so the female either did most of the work or had more success in finding food. This species is supposedly shy, but this pair didn’t take much notice of me, though the female sometimes perched on a tree closer to the camera and looked in my direction (photo directly above).

A little later, our guides found an active hollow of a Great Spotted Woodpecker with noisy young nearby. These adults were much shyer and wouldn’t approach the nest while I was in the vicinity, so I left them in peace after a little while. Unlike Dollarbirds, Woodpeckers can’t rely on termites to do all the work of burrowing for them and have to do it themselves. You can see on these photos that there were a few false starts chipping through the bark. Eurasian Three-toed Woodpeckers usually nest in Spruce.

pic-pici-eurasian-three-toed-woodpecker-picoides-dorsalis-by-ian-5

I was pleased with the photos that I got of the Slovakian Three-toed Woodpeckers. It was only later that I found that I had already photographed another nesting site in Finland, four years before (last photo). On this photo you can see that the bird has only three toes. All – I believe – other Woodpeckers have four toes and usually cling onto trees with two toes pointing forwards and two braced backwards. I find it hard to imagine what competitive advantage there would lead to the three-toed losing one of its toes.

Greetings
Ian


Lee’s Addition:

“…that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!” (Habakkuk 2:9b KJV)

What an interesting Woodpecker and what a distance that camera is from the little avian wonder. Wow!

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More of Ian’s Bird of the Week articles:

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Lee’s Two Word Tuesday – 1/17/17

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Grey-headed Chachalaca (Ortalis cinereiceps) ©WikiC

PUFFED UP

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“…that ye might learn in us not to think of men above that which is written, that no one of you be puffed up for one against another.” (1 Corinthians 4:6b KJV)

Grey-headed Chachalaca (Ortalis cinereiceps) ©WikiC

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Huge Alligator at Circle B Bar Reserve on TV

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee taken in 2014

“And I will walk at liberty:…” (Psalms 119:45a KJV)

I thought you might enjoy seeing the huge alligator that strolled across the path at our favorite local place we go birdwatching. In fact, this was on the national news this evening. We have seen many gators out there, but glad this this one didn’t surprise us in the past.

Alligator about 8 ft by Lee at Circle B

Alligator about 8 ft by Lee at Circle B 2013

On the news they thought he was between 12-14 feet long and was just wanting to cross the path. Not bothering anyone.

“Then shalt thou walk in thy way safely, and thy foot shall not stumble.” (Proverbs 3:23 KJV)

No, we were not out there when this happened. [broken computer, back problems and almost bronchitis] No, this fellow had to do this without our watching him.  :)

Our previous adventures at Circle B

Other Birdwatching Adventures

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Lee’s One Word Monday – 1/16/17

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Chestnut-winged Chachalaca (Ortalis garrula) close-up ©BirdPhotos.com

WATCH

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Watch, stand fast in the faith, be brave, be strong.” (1 Corinthians 16:13 NKJV)

Chestnut-winged Chachalaca (Ortalis garrula) close-up ©BirdPhotos.com

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