Stressed? Pray and Go Birding!

1 Peter 5:7 “Casting all your care upon Him; for He cares for you.” ​

Field Sparrow

Field Sparrow; Walton County, Georgia. February, 2019 http://www.williamwisephoto.com

What do you do when life has you down? Pray and go birding! When your job is stretching your stamina to the breaking point? Pray and go birding! When you need to relax and shake off the nerves? Pray and go birding! When the next little thing will tip your headache to a migraine? Pray and go birding!

There is no need for a scientific study to tell me that getting outdoors is a way to reduce stress. There is no need to write a paper about how getting away from a ringing phone will calm my nerves; how unplugging from email and social media will lower my blood pressure; how fresh air will clear my lungs and refresh my mind. I don’t need a scientific study because I know first-hand!

There isn’t a need for the Mayo Clinic to tell me the supernatural benefits of prayer. There is no need for them to post a blog telling me that having a purpose in life reduces depression; that prayer and meditation produces actual physical benefits to my brain; that focusing outside myself can alleviate worry and fear. I don’t need that blog because I know first-hand!

Try it sometime. Stop reading this blog, close your browser, push back the chair and walk out the door. Talk to God; cast your concerns at His feet; enjoy this world that He created. You just might get addicted. I know because I go there every day. So, pray and go birding!


Hi, I’m wildlife photographer and nature writer William Wise. I was saved under a campus ministry while studying wildlife biology at the University of Georgia. My love of the outdoors quickly turned into a love for the Creator and His works. I’m currently an animal shelter director and live in Athens, Georgia with my wife and two teenage daughters, who are all also actively involved in ministry. Creation Speaks is my teaching ministry that glorifies our Creator and teaches the truth of creation. William Wise Nature Notes is my wildlife and birding photo blog documenting the beauty, design and wonder of God’s creation. I am also a guest author at Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures and The Creation Club. — “What a wildly wonderful world, God! You made it all, with Wisdom at Your side, made earth overflow with your wonderful creations.” Psalms 104, The Message.

Voices that Carry

Joshua 6:20 “…and the people shouted with a great shout, that the wall fell down flat, and they took the city.”

It is political season in the United States. From now until November all the media outlets will be saturated with political ads as every advocate for every cause will be projecting their voices in an effort to be heard. Some days, I just have to pull away from all those voices and go for a birding walk. But as a Christian, should I pull away? Should I remain silent?

As I stepped outdoors to get away, my attention was immediately drawn to a noisy bird circling overhead; his loud voice was carrying on the wind. One of the Killdeer birds that is normally darting around in our parking lot was flying through the air and shouting its name: Kill-deah! Kill-deah!!! The voices of the other plovers are more pleasantly described as ‘a plaintive or musical whistle.’ But not the Killdeer, of which Peterson’s Field Guide gives a one-word description: “noisy”.

Killdeer plover bird flying

Killdeer; Walton County, Georgia. www.williamwisephoto.com

So, just like the political activists, the Killdeer too wanted his voice to be heard! And perhaps I should take a lesson from the Killdeer. As Christians, in the interest of peace and harmony, do we remain quiet as the special interest groups shout aloud in support of their own, often unrighteous, causes? Do we let their voices carry louder than ours? The last time that happened, the outcome wasn’t so good. “And they were instant with loud voices, requiring that he might be crucified. And the voices of them and of the chief priests prevailed” (Luke 23:23).

This Killdeer was exemplifying his boisterous description, and simultaneously living up to his species name: Charadrius vociferous. Vociferous is from the Latin, meaning “to shout, yell.” If you break it down, vox means “voice”, and ferre, meaning “to carry”; therefore, vociferous describes ‘voices that carry’. Aptly describing my little plover flying overhead!

Killdeer plover bird

Killdeer; Walton County, Georgia. www.williamwisephoto.com

As the other voices carry along on the winds of social media, radio and television, our Christian voices in support of righteousness should also be heard! What if William Wilberforce and Abraham Lincoln had remained silent? Instead, they let their voices carry on the wind, like the vociferous Killdeer, and changed our society!

Joshua 6:20 “So the people shouted when the priests blew with the trumpets: and it came to pass, when the people heard the sound of the trumpet, and the people shouted with a great shout, that the wall fell down flat, so that the people went up into the city, every man straight before him, and they took the city.”


Hi, I’m wildlife photographer and nature writer William Wise. I was saved under a campus ministry while studying wildlife biology at the University of Georgia. My love of the outdoors quickly turned into a love for the Creator and His works. I’m currently an animal shelter director and live in Athens, Georgia with my wife and two teenage daughters, who are all also actively involved in ministry. Creation Speaks is my teaching ministry that glorifies our Creator and teaches the truth of creation. William Wise Nature Notes is my wildlife and birding photo blog documenting the beauty, design and wonder of God’s creation. I am also a guest author at Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures and The Creation Club. — “What a wildly wonderful world, God! You made it all, with Wisdom at Your side, made earth overflow with your wonderful creations.” Psalms 104, The Message.

Preparing a Place

Thank God it’s Sunday! Finally, an opportunity between morning and evening church service for an afternoon of backyard birding! I have prepared my spot on the patio for an afternoon of relaxation: coffee, binoculars, camera, more coffee, eBird app, notebook and pen, and fill the feeders. I can relax in this beautiful scene my Creator has designed for me… and also meditate upon the future home He is currently preparing for me!

Eastern Bluebird Nest Boxes

Eastern Bluebird at nest box; Clarke County, Georgia. April, 2017.

After noting the different bird species in the flurry of activity at the freshly filled feeders, my eyes were drawn to the pair of Eastern Bluebirds. The male and female repeatedly crisscrossed the yard, alighting here and there upon the nest boxes, spending a moment in thought, and then moving to the next. Although it is still only February, they are preparing for spring.

When my family moved into our current home in Georgia, after we were comfortably settled, it was time to prepare a backyard bird sanctuary. In addition to the small pond, feeders, fruiting shrubs and honeysuckle vines, I wanted to prepare a home for the Bluebirds and built three nest boxes. To my surprise, the very first season, the bluebirds began preparing a home for their young and have had two clutches per season every year!

Eastern Bluebird at Nest Box

Eastern Bluebird nest box; Clarke County, Georgia. April 2017.

But my joy is not only in preparing a home for the bluebirds, and in watching them prepare a nest for their young, but also in knowing a glorious home is currently being prepared for me! And the home He is preparing is no quickly built bluebird nest box! Our Savior has been preparing for 2,000 years now… what a glorious home it will be!

“In my Father’s house are many mansions: …I go to prepare a place for you.” -John 14:2

And since He so graciously has been preparing a home, we should be preparing our hearts! Luke 12:43-47 “Blessed is that servant, whom his lord when he cometh shall find so doing… And that servant, which knew his lord’s will, and prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes.”


Hi, I’m wildlife photographer and nature writer William Wise. I was saved under a campus ministry while studying wildlife biology at the University of Georgia. My love of the outdoors quickly turned into a love for the Creator and His works. I’m currently an animal shelter director and live in Athens, Georgia with my wife and two teenage daughters, who are all also actively involved in ministry. Creation Speaks is my teaching ministry that glorifies our Creator and teaches the truth of creation. I am also a guest author at Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures  and The Creation Club. — “What a wildly wonderful world, God! You made it all, with Wisdom at Your side, made the earth overflow with Your wonderful creations.” Psalms 104, The Message.

Avian and Attributes – Sword

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) by Michael Woodruff

“Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.” (Matthew 10:34-39 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sword

SWORD, n.
1. An offensive weapon worn at the side, and used by hand either for thrusting or cutting.
2. Figuratively, destruction by war.
I will bring a sword upon you. Lev 26. Isa 51.
3. Vengeance or justice.
She quits the balance, and resigns the sword.
4. Emblem of authority and power.
The ruler–beareth not the sword in vain. Rom 13.
5. War; dissension.
I came not to send peace, but a sword. Mat 10.
6. Emblem of triumph and protection.
The Lord–the sword of thy excellence. Deu 33.

SWORDED, a. Girded with a sword.


Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera)©WikiC

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera)©WikiC

The sword-billed hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) is a neotropical species of hummingbird from the Andean regions of South America. It is the sole member of the genus Ensifera and is characterized by its unusually long bill; it is the only bird to have a beak longer than the rest of its body. E. ensifera uses its bill to drink nectar from flowers with long corollas and has coevolved with the species Passiflora mixta. While most hummingbirds preen using their bills, E. ensifera must use its feet to scratch and preen due to its bill being so long. This uncommon bird is also one of the largest hummingbird species.

Sword-billed hummingbirds are found perched on the mid to upper level branches of neotropical trees. Its length ranges 13 to 14 cm from the tail tip to the base of the bill, with males slightly larger on average than females. The bill can additionally be over 10 cm long. Individuals weigh between 10-15 g making it one of the largest species of hummingbirds. As is characteristic of hummingbirds, is able to fly backwards and hover in the air. It also exhibits higher than average wing-disc loading than other members of its family.

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) Female ©WikiC

E. ensifera displays sexual dimorphism where plumage varies between males and females. Males have a coppery bronze head, bronze green back, bright green underbelly, blackish green throat, and bronze green tail. Females have a similarly colored head and back, a white belly speckled with green, a more olive colored throat, and grayish white edging around the tail.

The defining trait of this species is a beak longer than the rest of its body (excluding the tail). The tongue is also unusually long to span the length of the tube-shaped bill. The beak is black in color and curves slightly upwards. These adaptations help the hummingbird feed on flowers with long corollas that are inaccessible to other species.

[Wikipedia]

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) female (right) with a buff-tailed coronet ©WikiC

“And he had in his right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp twoedged sword: and his countenance was as the sun shineth in his strength. And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last: I am he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of hell and of death.” (Revelation 1:16-18 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Superb

Superb Starling by Lee at Parrot Mountain, TN

I’m delighted to share the signs and miracles that the Most High God has worked in my life.

His signs are superb!
His miracles so powerful!
His kingdom is everlasting.
His rule is for all time.” Daniel 4:2-3 Common English Bible (CEB)

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) Male non-breeding plumage ©WikiC


Avian and Attributes – Superb

SUPERB‘, a. [L. superbus, proud, from super.]
1. Grand; magnificent; as a superb edifice; a superb colonnade.
2. Rich; elegant; as superb furniture or decorations.
4. Rich; splendid; as a superb entertainment.
5. August; stately.


I was surprised that the regular versions of the Bible did not use the word “Superb.” When I think of Our Lord Jesus Christ and God, the word “Superb” comes to mind. The CEB had 3 verses that used “superb,” but Daniel 4 above is the best one.

There are seven “Superb” birds in the latest list of birds, all of them very pretty birds, and have a super look about them. Don’t you agree?

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus)

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus) by Ian Montgomery

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus) by Ian

Superb Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus superbus)

Superb Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus superbus) by Ian

Superb Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus superbus) by Ian

Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) by Ian

Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) by Ian

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii)

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii) by Ian

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii) by Ian

Superb Pitta (Pitta superba)

Superb Pitta ©Surfbirds.com

Superb Pitta ©Surfbirds.com

Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus)

Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus) by Bob-Nan

Superb Sunbird (Cinnyris superbus)

Superb Sunbird (Cinnyris superbus) ©WikiC


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Stone

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

“Jesus saith unto them, Did ye never read in the scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner: this is the Lord’s doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes?” (Matthew 21:42 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Stone

STONE, n. [Gr.]
2. A gem; a precious stone.
Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels.
3. Any thing made of stone; a mirror.
8. A monument erected to preserve the memory of the dead.
Should some relentless eye glance on the stone where our cold relics lie–
9. It is used to express torpidness and insensibility; as a heart of stone.
I have not yet forgot myself to stone.
10. Stone is prefixed to some words to qualify their signification. Thus stone-dead, is perfectly dead, as lifeless as a stone; stone-still, still as a stone, perfectly still; stone-blind, blind as a stone, perfectly blind.
To leave no stone unturned, a proverbial expression which signifies to do every thing that can be done; to use all practicable means to effect an object.
STONE, a. Made of stone, or like stone; as a stone jug.
STONE, v.t.
1. To pelt, beat or kill with stones.
And they stoned Stephen calling on God and saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit. Acts 7.


Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©Flickr Jean

The Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) is a bird of the new world quail family. This largely brown bird, which commonly holds its tail raised, is found in scrubland and lightly wooded habitats, often near rocks, from Kenya and Ethiopia to Gambia (a large part if its range is in the Sudanian Savanna). As traditionally defined, it is the only member of Ptilopachus, but based on genetic evidence this genus also includes the Nahan’s “francolin”

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

The Stone Partridge is exceptional among gamebirds in that the female, to human eyes, is showier than the male. Both sexes are predominantly earthy chocolate brown above, with sparse pale cream-grey spotting. The head, neck and chest are paler brown and have broad cream edging to the feathers that gives the bird a scaled appearance. In males the lower chest and belly are orange-cream; in females, very pale cream. Both sexes raise their crown feathers to form a rudimentary crest but the feathers of females are somewhat longer and hence more obvious when raised.

Eggs are pale pink, fading to cream, juveniles are dark chocolate-brown throughout, moulting into adult plumage at several weeks old. In captivity at least, the male plays a major role in both incubation and rearing of the young, offering young small items of food by picking them up, dropping them and calling to the chicks.


“But ye believe not, because ye are not of my sheep, as I said unto you. My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand. My Father, which gave them me, is greater than all; and no man is able to pluck them out of my Father’s hand. I and my Father are one. Then the Jews took up stones again to stone him. Jesus answered them, Many good works have I shewed you from my Father; for which of those works do ye stone me?” (John 10:26-32 KJV)

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Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Stitch

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) by Tom Tarrant

“A time to tear, And a time to sew; A time to keep silence, And a time to speak;” (Ecclesiastes 3:7 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Stitch

STITCH, v.t. [G. This is another form of stick.]
1. To sew in a particular manner; to sew slightly or loosely; as, to stitch a collar or wristband; to stitch the leaves of a book and form a pamphlet.
2. To form land into ridges. [N. England.]
To stitch up, to mend or unite with a needle and thread; as, to stitch up a rent; to stitch up an artery.
STITCH, v.i. To practice stitching.
STITCH, n.
1. A single pass of a needle in sewing.
2. A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link of yarn; as, to let down a stitch; to take up a stitch.


Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) female ©Flickr Kathrin -Stefan Marks

“Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves coverings.” (Genesis 3:7 NKJV)

The Stitchbird or hihi (Notiomystis cincta) is a rare honeyeater-like bird endemic to the North Island and adjacent offshore islands of New Zealand. It became extirpated everywhere except Little Barrier Island but has been reintroduced to three other island sanctuaries and two locations on the North Island mainland. Its [genealogical] relationships have long puzzled ornithologists, but it is now classed as the only member of its own family, the Notiomystidae.

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) ©Flickr Duncan

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) ©Flickr Duncan

The stitchbird is a small honeyeater-like bird. Males have a dark velvety cap and short white ear-tufts, which can be raised somewhat away from the head. A yellow band across the chest separates the black head from the rest of the body, which is grey. Females and juveniles are duller than males, lacking the black head and yellow chest band. The bill is rather thin and somewhat curved, and the tongue is long with a brush at the end for collecting nectar. Thin whiskers project out and slightly forward from the base of the bill.

Sewing has been around since Adam and Eve sinned in the Garden of Eden. When the fig leaves were sewed together, they must have used stitches.

[The word stitch is not in the Bible, but sewing is there. I took a bit of liberty with the verses.]


More Avian and Attributes

Notiomystidae – Stitchbird

Stitchbird– Wikipedia

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

In Our Place

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Sharp Part II

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) ©WikiC

“Like a club and a sword and a sharp arrow Is a man who bears false witness against his neighbor.” (Proverbs 25:18 NASB)

“Thy tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.” (Psalms 52:2 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sharp Part II

The rest of the SHARP definitions. See Part I

SH’ARP, n.
1. In music, an acute sound.
2. A note artificially raised a semitone; or,
3. The character which directs the note to be thus elevated; opposed to a flat, which depresses a note a semitone.
4. A pointed weapon. [Not in use.]
SH’ARP, v.t.
1. To make keen or acute.
2. To render quick.
3. To mark with a sharp, in musical composition; or to raise a not a semitone.
SH’ARP, v.i. To play tricks in bargaining; to act the sharper.


Sharp-tailed Birds

There are seven Sharp-tailed birds:

Sharp-tailed Grass Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Grass Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae, the only one in the genus Culicivora. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) (previously: Tetrao phasianellus) is a medium-sized prairie grouse. It is also known as the sharptail, and is known as fire grouse or fire bird by Native American Indians[clarification needed] due to their reliance on brush fires to keep their habitat open. The Sharp-Tailed Grouse is the provincial bird of Saskatchewan.

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) ©WikiC

Adults have a relatively short tail with the two central (deck) feathers being square-tipped and somewhat longer than their lighter, outer tail feathers giving the bird its distinctive name. The plumage is mottled dark and light browns against a white background, they are lighter on the underparts with a white belly uniformly covered in faint “V”-shaped markings. These markings distinguish sharp-tailed grouse from lesser and greater prairie chickens which are heavily barred on their underparts(Connelly et al. 1998). Adult males have a yellow comb over their eyes and a violet display patch on their neck. This display patch is another distinguishing characteristic from prairie chickens as male prairie chickens have yellow or orange colored air sacs

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) is a species of ibis native to open wet savannas in parts of northern South America. This ibis is distinguished by its notably long tail, which is the longest among all extant ibis species; measuring 250-301mm in males and 256-272mm in females. The tail projects beyond the tips of the folded wings when the ibis stands; and beyond the trailing legs in flight. The plumage is predominantly black with greenish glossing; and with purplish tinges on the upper back, hind neck, wings and tail. The forehead and cheek region are occasionally greyish brown. Juveniles appear similar to adults, but their plumage lacks a metallic sheen.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) – breeding adults are a rich brown with darker feather centres above, and white underneath apart from a buff breast. They have a light superciliary line above the eye and a chestnut crown. In winter, sharp-tailed sandpipers are grey above. The juveniles are brightly patterned above with rufous coloration and white mantle stripes.

This bird looks a lot like the pectoral sandpiper, within whose Asian range it breeds. It differs from that species in its breast pattern, stronger supercilium and more rufous crown. It has some similarities to the long-toed stint, but is much larger than the stint.

Sharp-tailed Starling (Lamprotornis acuticaudus) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Starling (Lamprotornis acuticaudus), also known as the sharp-tailed glossy-starling, is a species of starling in the family Sturnidae. It inhabits open woodland (namely miombo) in Angola, northern Botswana, the southern DRC, northern Namibia, western Tanzania, and Zambia.

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper (Lochmias nematura) by Dario Sanches

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper (Lochmias nematura) is a passerine bird of South America belonging to the family Furnariidae, the ovenbirds. It is the only member of the genus Lochmias. The species is also known as the streamside streamcreeper.

This bird is about 6 in (15 cm) long, with a short tail and a long, thin, slightly curved bill. The plumage is dark brown, densely spotted white on the underparts. There is a white stripe over the eye and the tail is blackish. The song is an accelerating trill, lasting for about five seconds.


Avian and Attributes – Sharp Part I

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Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Sharp Part I

Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) Female ©WikiC

“For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.” (Hebrews 4:12-13 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sharp

SH’ARP, a.
1. Having a very thin edge or a fine point; keen; acute; not blunt. Thus we may say, a sharp knife, or a sharp needle. A sharp edge easily severs a substance; a sharp point is easily made to penetrate,it.
2. Terminating in a point or edge; not obtuse; as, a hills terminates in a sharp peak, or a sharp ridge.
3. Forming an acute or too small angle at the ridge; as a sharp roof.
4. Acute of mind; quick to discern or distinguish; penetrating; ready at invention; witty; ingenious.

“Thy tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.” (Psalms 52:2 KJV)


Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) ©WikiC

There are many “Sharp” named birds, but for this post, we will mention two of them. The Sharp-beaked Ground Finch and the Sharpbill. There will be more in a second article.

Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) ©Nancy Bell Mangoverde

The Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) is a species of bird in the Tanager family Thraupidae. It is classified as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and it is native to the Galápagos Islands in Ecuador. It has a mass of around 20 grams (0.71 oz) and the males have black plumage, while females have streaked brown plumage. This finch was described by Richard Bowdler Sharpe in 1888.

This relatively small, slender-billed finch is endemic to the Galápagos Islands, where it is found on Fernandina, Santiago, Pinta, Genovesa, Darwin, and Wolf Islands. On the first three islands, it breeds in the humid highlands and disperses afterwards, but on the remaining smaller and lower islands the sharp-beaked ground finch is found in the arid zone year-round. Due to habitat destruction its range has decreased. It was formerly also present in the highlands of several other islands, and it is possible it still occurs on Isabela.

Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) ©WikiC

The Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) is a small passerine bird in the family Tityridae. Its range is from the mountainous areas of tropical South America and southern Central America (Panama and Costa Rica).

It inhabits the canopy of wet forest and feeds on fruit and some invertebrates. It has an orange erectile crest, black-spotted yellowish underparts and scaling on the head and neck. As its name implies, it has a straight, pointed beak, which gives its common name.

Sharpbills are most commonly found in tall dense forests but occasionally venture to the forest edge. Their diet consists of primarily of fruit, but they will also take insects, hanging upside down in from twigs to obtain insect larvae.


Sharp-Beaked Ground Finch – The Bloodsucker..

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Shade

Shade Bush Warbler Drawing ©HBAlive

“The LORD is thy keeper: the LORD is thy shade upon thy right hand.” (Psalms 121:5 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Shade

SHADE, n. [L. scutum, a shield.]
1. Literally, the interception, cutting of or interruption of the rays of light; hence, the obscurity which is caused by such interception. Shad differs from shadow, as it implies no particular form or definite limit. whereas a shadow represents in form the object which intercepts the light. Hence when we say, let us resort to the shade of a tree, we have no reference to its form; but when we speak of measuring a pyramid or other object by its shadow, we have reference to its extent.
2. Darkness; obscurity; as the shades of night.
3. An obscure place, properly in a grove or close wood, which precludes the sun’s rays; an hence, a secluded retreat.
4. A screen; something that intercepts light or heat.
5. Protection; shelter.
6. In painting, the dark part of the picture.
7. Degree or gradation of light.
White, red, yellow, blue, with their several degrees, or shades and mixtures, as green, come only in by the eyes. Locke.
8. A shadow.


Shade Bush Warbler in Middle Drawing by John Anderton

Shade Bush Warbler (Horornis parens) or shade warbler (Horornis parens) is a species of bird in the family Cettiidae. It is found only in Solomon Islands, where it is endemic to the island of Makira (formerly San Cristobal Island). Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests and tropical moist montane forest above 600m. It feeds on insects in the undergrowth and on the ground.

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H B Alive Drawing

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Seaside

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (Dusky-extinct) ©WikiC

“The same day went Jesus out of the house, and sat by the sea side.” (Matthew 13:1 KJV)

“And he began again to teach by the sea side: and there was gathered unto him a great multitude, so that he entered into a ship, and sat in the sea; and the whole multitude was by the sea on the land.” (Mark 4:1 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Seaside

Sea-side
SE’A-SIDE, n. [sea and side.]

The land bordering on the sea; the country adjacent to the sea, or near it.


Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis) (Cape Sabel) ©WikiC

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritima) is a small American sparrow.

Adults have brownish upperparts with gray on the crown and nape, and a grayish-buff-colored breast with dark streaks; they have a dark face with gray cheeks, a white throat, and a short, pointed tail. Birds show a small yellow streak just above the eye.

Their breeding habitat is salt marshes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States from southern New Hampshire to southern Texas. The nest is an open cup usually built in the salt marsh on tidal reeds and spartina grasses. Females lay two to five eggs.

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimusl) ©WikiC

Northern birds most often migrate further south along the eastern coast of the United States. They forage on the ground or in marsh vegetation, sometimes probing in mud. They mainly eat insects, marine invertebrates and seeds. Their feeding areas are often some distance away from the areas they choose to nest.

The song is a raspy buzz that closely resembles a distant red-winged blackbird.


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Screaming

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) ©WikiC

“And when the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were terrified and said, It is a ghost! And they screamed out with fright. But instantly He spoke to them, saying, Take courage! I AM! Stop being afraid!” (Matthew 14:26-27 AMP)

Jesus walked on the sea and they were terrified and might have screamed in fear.


Avian and Attributes – Scream

screamshoutyellshriekhoothollervociferationoutcrybellow, or raising one’s voice is a loud vocalization in which air is passed through the vocal folds with greater force than is used in regular or close-distance vocalization. This can be performed by any creature possessing lungs, including humans. There are slight differences in meaning among them; for example, “scream” and “shriek” generally refer to a higher-pitched, sharp sound, used by some birds and other animals, and a “hoot”, such as emitted by an owl, usually does not involve words.

A scream is often an instinctive or reflex action, with a strong emotional aspect, like fear, pain, surprise, joy, anger, etc. [This would describe what those in the boat most like did.]


Screaming Birds

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris) ©WikiC

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillarisis an obligate brood parasite belonging to the family Icteridae and is found in South America. It is also known commonly as the short billed cowbird.

Within South America, the screaming cowbird is found in north east and central Argentina, south east Bolivia, central Brazil and throughout Paraguay and Uruguay. Its natural habitat is pastureland where it forages amongst grazing animals such as cows, hence the name “cowbird”. Similar to other cowbirds, it forages predominantly on the ground, eating invertebrates that have been disturbed by grazing stock. The distribution of the screaming cowbird has increased significantly in recent decades due to habitat alteration caused by deforestation and by following its hosts into new areas.

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) is a species of passerine bird in the family Cotingidae. It is found in humid forests in the Amazon and tropical parts of the Mata Atlântica in South America. It is adapting well to human settlement areas like gardens and parks.

Both sexes have dull grey plumage (wings and tail often somewhat browner) and a voice that is extraordinary loud. Males often gather in loose leks, where they sing to attract females.

The Cofan people of Ecuador call it the Pwe-pwe Yoh, which is a reference to its voice. Among the Ecuadorian Secoyas, the bird is known as the Kwow-kwee-yo. The sound is frequently used in movies, and also can be heard in the background of the popular game Angry Birds Rio.

[Wikipedia with editing]


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]