Avian And Attributes – Diamond

Diamond Dove (Geopelia cuneata) by Ian 1

“Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the sardius, topaz, and the diamond, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the emerald, and the carbuncle, and gold: the workmanship of thy tabrets and of thy pipes was prepared in thee in the day that thou wast created.” (Ezekiel 28:13 KJV)

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.” (John 1:1-3 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Diamond

Diamond, n. Dimond. [L., Gr. See Adamant.]
1. A mineral, gem or precious stone, of the most valuable kind, remarkable for its hardness, as it scratches all other minerals. When pure, the diamond is usually clear and transparent, but it is sometimes colored. In its rough state, it is commonly in the form of a roundish pebble, or of octahedral crystals. It consists of carbon, and when heated to 14 degrees Wedgewood, and exposed to a current of air, it is gradually, but completely combustible. When pure and transparent, it is said to be of the first water.
2. A very small printing letter.
3. A figure, otherwise called a rhombus.
DIAMOND, a. Resembling a diamond, as a diamond color; or consisting of diamonds, as a diamond chain.


Diamond Dove (Geopelia cuneata) by Ian

Diamond Dove (Geopelia cuneata) by Ian

The Diamond Dove (Geopelia cuneata) is a resident bird in Australia. The dove predominantly exists in areas near water but which are lightly arid or semi-arid in nature, being Central, West and Northern Australia. They are one of Australia’s smallest pigeons along with the peaceful dove. They have been spotted occasionally in Southern Australia in parks and gardens when the centre of Australia is very dry.

Diamond Firetail (Stagonopleura guttata) by Ian

The Diamond Firetail (Stagonopleura guttata) is a species of estrildid finch that is endemic to Australia. The diamond firetail is a finch that has a fiery red bill, eyes, and rump. Just below the throat, it has a thick black band that extends horizontally until it reaches the lower part of the wings which are also black with white spots. There is also a black eye band that starts at the beak and ends right at the eye. The bird’s tail is also black. The rest of the wings are a slightly tan, light brown colour. Its head and back is light grey and its belly and chin are white. The colour of the egg is also white. This bird is considered one of the smallest of the finches.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name start with “D”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Backyard Birdwatching, Enhanced by Mini-Habitat Planning, with an Application of Romans 13:7

Backyard Birdwatching, Enhanced by Mini-Habitat Planning,

with an Application of Romans 13:7

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

Render therefore to all their dues:

tribute to whom tribute is due; custom to whom custom;

fear to whom fear; honor to whom honor.   (Romans 13:7)

Christian birdwatchers have a wonderful freedom (and responsibility), due to the principle of Romans 13:7 – the duty to give credit where credit is due – and one application of that principle is that, as Biblical creationists, we can appreciate the valuable accomplishments contributed by ornithologists, even if those ornithologists are Bible-rejecting evolutionists, such as Roger Tory Peterson and George H. Harrison.  Simply stated, Romans 13:7 requires us to give credit where credit is due. George-Harrison-with-binoculars.Birds-and-Blooms

George H. Harrison with binoculars (BIRD AND BLOOMS)

Looking at an issue of BIRDS AND BLOOMS reminded me of how I have repeatedly appreciated the birdwatching expertise of George H. Harrison, an American ornithologist, whose valuable contribution to the world far exceeds that of any guitarist-lyricist-mystic who formerly used that same name.

In fact, ornithologist George Harrison teamed up with another birdwatching titan, Roger Tory Peterson, in a videotape that I formally used (when I taught “Ornithology and Avian Conservation” at Dallas Christian College), called “George Harrison’s Birds of the Backyard: Winter Into Spring” (Window on the World Video, 1989).

Birds-of-the-Backyard.Harrison-videotape

Perhaps two of the best-known names in American birdwatching are Roger Tory Peterson, author (and sometimes co-author) of the “Peterson Field Guides” series (published by Houghton Mifflin) and George H. Harrison (whom I first encountered as a subscriber to BIRDS AND BLOOMS magazine).

One of the most practical birdwatching books that I have ever read is George Harrison’s classic, THE BACKYARD BIRD WATCHER: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE FOR ENJOYING WILD BIRDS AT YOUR BACK DOOR (Simon & Schuster 1979).

TheBackyardBirdWatcher.Harrison-book

Recently I found a blog interview of Harrison, on the National Wildlife Federation’s blog [ http://blog.nwf.org ], reporting how that book came to be written.

GEORGE H. HARRISON knew he was on to something. While serving as managing editor of National Wildlife in 1972, he heard about two U.S. Forest Service researchers in Massachusetts who were studying ways to convert suburban yards into mini-habitats for birds and other wild creatures. “Their study showed that the same basic principles wildlife managers had been using for decades—providing food, water, cover and places to raise young—worked beautifully on a smaller scale in backyards,” says Harrison.

He convinced the two researchers, Richard DeGraaf and Jack Ward Thomas, to write an article describing the steps homeowners could take to create such habitats. That article, “Invite Wildlife to Your Backyard” in the April/May 1973 issue of National Wildlife, helped provide the basis for NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitat® program, which celebrates its 38th anniversary [in AD2011, so the Certified Wildlife Habitatprogram is 44 years old as of AD2017].

Kelly: John Strohm, then editor of National Wildlife, called the article “one of the most significant articles we’ve ever published.” Why do you think the article was important?

George: The whole concept that suburbanites and urbanites could have a backyard filled with birds and other wildlife awakened people’s need to be closer to nature. It was a timely article because in the 1970s the American public had realized that our planet was in trouble (the first Earth Day, etc.) and that nature was no longer a part of their world. “Invite Wildlife to Your Backyard” opened a whole new opportunity for people, especially families, to interact with wildlife at close range, just outside their windows. For most people, it was—and still is—the one and only way to see nature and relate to wildlife.

Kelly: How did the article change the way you garden?

George: Though I had been feeding birds in my backyard since I was a child (we were a nature family), the concepts of increasing the kinds and volume of birds and animals in my environment by providing food, cover and water caused me to design my own model backyard wildlife habitat. I am Certified Wildlife Habitat® #604. I have since designed backyard habitats in private and institutional locations.

Kelly: You’re the author of The Backyard Bird Watcher and other books for wildlife enthusiasts. When you meet people new to wildlife gardening, wondering how to get started, what advice or encouragement do you give them?

George: The easiest way to get started learning and appreciating wildlife is to establish your own backyard wildlife habitat. You can start small with a couple of bird feeders, a bird bath and some potted evergreens. If you group those three items outside a favorite window in your house, birds and other wildlife will come, I promise you.

Kelly: Why do you think the Certified Wildlife Habitat® program remains relevant today?

George: With each passing year, young people are removed farther and farther from the natural world. In Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv documents how children are living lives that are more distant from nature than ever before in our history. Involving kids in the process of creating habitat is a way to reverse this trend.

George H. Harrison is an award-winning nature writer and photographer whose accomplishments include authoring 13 books, hosting six PBS television specials and helping to start Birds & Blooms magazine. While working at National Wildlife Federation, he served as both managing editor and field editor of National Wildlife.

[Quoting from Kelly Senser, “Habitat Chat with George H. Harrison”, NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION’S BLOG, posted at http://blog.nwf.org/2011/01/habitat-chat-with-george-h-harrison/ .]

Backyard-Wildlife-Habitat.NWF-sign
National Wildlife Federation BACKYARD WILDLIFE HABITAT sign / Nancy Ondra

Interestingly, I recall having set up a wildlife mini-habitat, during the AD1990s (when I lived in a different part of Denton County, Texas), based on the Certified Wildlife Habitat program, which I learned about as a subscriber to NATIONAL WILDLIFE magazine.

sunflower-by-fence

It was during that timeframe that I provided sunflower seeds (and other kinds of birdfeed) to my backyard birds, as illustrated by this poem:

BACKYARD BIRDS AND SUNFLOWER SEEDS

( © AD1997 James J. S. Johnson, used by permission )

Seeing hungry backyard birds I filled a tray with seeds;

Sparrows, juncos dined in “herds”, and jays arrived to feed;

Even cardinals, flashing red: they came, they saw, they fed.

Bills gulped! seed-hulls popped!

Some seeds spilled! some seeds dropped!

Overhead, as some bird flew, sunflower seeds did fall;

From green vines, they later grew, seedlings, green and small.

Then out popped golden faces Coloring grassy spaces;

Like baby suns of yellow, Grinning — saying “hello”!

On green stalks they climb, aiming to greet the sky;

Seed-packed in their prime, picked by birds, going by.

Thus reaps my yard what jays did sow,

New seeds, from old, sunflowers grow.

Watch I, and think on what God made

How He designed such “mutual aid”…

In my backyard, I must surmise:

The Lord, Who did this, He is wise!

[Quoting from “Here’s Seed for Thought”, including poem entitled “Backyard Birds and Sunflower Seeds”, posted at https://leesbird.com/2015/07/04/heres-seed-for-thought/ .]

Now that I live elsewhere, in a different part of Denton County (Texas), I still host a backyard bird habitat, although this one has never been registered with the National Wildlife Federation’s program (maybe I should do that?).

Since our more-than-an-acre homestead includes part of a pond (which we share with neighbors), we have the requisite water to attract ducks, geese, egrets, herons, and other wildfowl.

Our trees and bushes supply food, shelter, and nesting sites to a mix of passerines including year-round resident cardinals, blue jays, and mockingbirds, as well as mourning doves (just to name a few).

Cedar-Waxwings.WinterTexas-perching-Schwartzman

Flock of perching “winter Texan” Cedar Waxwings   (Steven Schwartzman photo)

Stopover migrants, such as Cedar Waxwings, also make use of trees (and berries, such as cedar berries) in our yard, as they pass through our part of Texas, twice a year. [See “Cedar Waxwings:  Winter Texas Snack on Bugs and Berries”, posted at  https://leesbird.com/2017/04/05/cedar-waxwings-winter-texans-snack-on-bugs-and-berries/ .]

TrumpetVine-wall

Trumpet Vine “wall” (acultivatednest.com image)

Furthermore, these habitat features are supplemented by our fence-line’s flowering trumpet vine “thicket” (e.g., see “Busy Spectators, Oblivious to Hummingbirds”, posted at https://leesbird.com/2016/09/14/busy-spectators-oblivious-to-hummingbirds/ ).  In fact, local lizards and other wild critters constitute enough food to attract an occasional roadrunner, hawk, or kestrel, so our homeplace really is a “backyard (and front-yard, and side-yard) habitat” for wild birds, both residents and migrants.

Hummingbird-at-TrumpetVine-MikeLentz

Hummingbird at Trumpet Vine blossom   (Mike Lentz image)

So there you (or, I should say, the local birds), have it: “food, water, cover, and places to raise young” –  the key ingredients needed for attracting wild birds to settle in and around our formerly-rural-but-now-more-suburban homeplace.

It’s good that I recently planted another juniper tree – some birds should benefit.

Of course, when we consider our obligation (under Romans 13:7, in conjunction with Romans chapter 1) to give credit where it is due, our ultimate duty – as birdwatchers, and as human creatures – is to give God credit for making (and providing habitat for) all of creation, including ourselves, as well as all birds and other creatures.

That even applies to giving God credit for what He has put into our avian neighbors, such as Mourning Doves (see “The Ghost Army”, illustratively citing Romans 13:7 & Isaiah 38:14, posted at  http://www.icr.org/article/ghost-army ).

Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power:

for Thou hast created all things,

and for Thy pleasure they are and were created.

(Revelation 4:11) 

<> JJSJ profjjsj@aol.com  


 

 

Whinchat, Redstart, & Redchat: Debunking the “Speciation” Myth Again

Whinchat-perching.Parrotletsuk-photo

WHINCHAT photo credit: Parrotletsuk.typepad.com

 Whinchat, Redstart, and Redchat:  Debunking the “Speciation” Myth Again

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

Are not two sparrows [στρουθια] sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.  Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows [στρουθιων].   (Matthew 10:29-31)

Are not five sparrows [στρουθια] sold for two farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before God?  But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: ye are of more value than many sparrows [στρουθιων].   (Luke 12:6-7)

It’s good to know that we are worth far more, to God Himself, than many “sparrows”.  However, the term “sparrows” (as quoted above) is an English translation of the New Testament Greek noun strouthion, a fairly general word for “small bird’ that can include many varieties of perching songbirds, in general, including yet not limited to the birds we label “sparrows”(1) —  including the Whinchat, a sometimes inconspicuous little songbird that resembles a thrush, wheatear, or a flycatcher.  (Or maybe a redstart?)

Whinchat-male.ScottishOrnithologistsClub

WHINCHAT Scottish Ornithologists’ Club

It was my privilege, on July 13th of AD2006, to view a Whinchat (Saxicola rubetra) among some roadside weeds, while in the fine company of my wonderful wife (Sherry) and Dr. Bill Cooper, England’s top-tier gentleman and scholar.

The bird-book that I was using, that day (as Laird Bill drove us along a motorway between Harwich and London), described the common Whinchat as follows:

Restless, short-tailed chat that perches openly on bush-tops, tall weeds and fences, flicking its wings and tail. Males in summer distinctive.  Females and autumn birds can be confused with the female Stonechat, but Whinchat’s conspicuous creamy eyebrows, boldly streaked rump and white wedges at base of tail (often noticed as birds flick tail to balance in the wind) are reliable fieldmarks.

[Quoting Chris Knightley & Steve Madge, POCKET GUIDE TO THE BIRDS OF BRITAIN AND NORTH-WEST EUROPE (Yale Univ. Press, 1998), page 212.]  The Whinchat is a summer migrant, visiting (and nesting in) Great Britain and much of western Europe during the spring and summer months, migrating south to northwestern Africa for the winter months.  Its habits are typical of many other insect-eating passerines:

Nests on heaths, grassy moors, rough fields, damp rushy meadows and young coniferous plantations. Like Stonechat, pounces to the ground for insects, returning to same slightly elevated perch or flying quickly to another sprig nearby.  Broken song mixes short musical phrases with dry churrs and distinct pauses.  Call an agitated tu-tek, tu-tek-tek. Widespread on migration, often in some numbers in coastal bushes and fields.

[Again quoting Chris Knightley & Steve Madge, POCKET GUIDE TO THE BIRDS OF BRITAIN AND NORTH-WEST EUROPE (Yale Univ. Press, 1998), page 212.]

The Whinchat has other names, including Paapje (Dutch), Braunkehlchen (German), Traquet tarier (French), and Buskskvätta (Swedish: “bush chat”).  [See Roger Tory Peterson, Guy Mountfort, & P.A.D. Hollom, BIRDS OF BRITAIN AND EUROPE (Houghton Mifflin / Peterson Field Guides, 5th rev. ed., 1993), pages 175-176.]  Moreover, to the chagrin of taxonomic “splitters”, the Whinchat is known to hybridize with the Siberian Stonechat and the Common (European) Stonechat of western (and southern) Europe.  [See Eugene McCarthy, HANDBOOK OF AVIAN HYBRIDS OF HE WORLD (Oxford, 2006), page 238.] – proving that those 3 chats descend form a common ancestor pair that survived the worldwide Flood aboard Noah’s Ark.

More surprising, to the birding community, is the capture and DNA verification (by the Lista Bird Observatory in Vest-Agder, Norway, during September AD2013) of a hybrid parented by male Common Redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) and a female Whinchat (Saxicola rubetra), published in the Journal of Ornithology.(2)

Redchat-Redstart-Whinchat-hybrid.Norway-JonasLangbraten-photo

Common Redstart x   Whinchat HYBRID

Photograph by Jonas Langbråten

(18 Sept. AD2013, Lista Bird Observatory, Vest-Agder, Norway)

The male Redstart-Whinchat hybrid was captured by bird-banding volunteers, near the southern tip of Norway’s peninsula.

“We have a standardized bird banding project where we mark migratory birds in the spring and autumn. We have volunteer bird watchers going every hour to catch birds in mist nets to band them,” says Jan Erik Røer from the Norwegian Ornithological Society.

[Quoting Ingrid Spilde’s “Mysterious Bird was Unique Cross of Two Unrelated [sic] Species”, Science Nordic, (3-11-AD2015), at http://sciencenordic.com/mysterious-bird-was-unique-cross-two-unrelated-species . ]

The hybrid’s unofficial name is rødskvett (“redchat”), blending parts of the Norwegian words (Buskskvett and Rødstjert) for its two parents.

Needless to say, this little “redchat” has caused a lot of confusion and controversy among evolutionists at the Natural History Museum in Oslo, where the “speciation” mythology (of supposed biogenetic divergence, “13.3 million years” ago) is popularly taught, as if there was real “science” (empirical or forensic) to support that imaginary scenario.(3)

Once again the “speciation” myth of “natural selection”-advocating evolutionists, both theistic and atheistic, is debunked by the real-world evidence.


References

  1. When the Lord Jesus referred to God’s watchcare over “sparrows” (English translation for Greek strouthion], He used a Greek word that is more general in its categorical coverage than is our English term “sparrow”. The Greek noun strouthion denotes a bird in the wild, possibly any small perching songbird, including but not limited to what we call “sparrows”. (In fact, the Septuagint translators used strouthion to translate the Hebrew noun tsippôr, in Psalm 84:3a [84:4a BH], which is usually translated simply as “bird” (e.g., Genesis 7:14; Deuteronomy 14:11 & 22:6; Psalm 104:1; Ezekiel 39:4) or “fowl” (e.g., Deuteronomy 4:17; Nehemiah 5:18; Ezekiel 17:23 & 39:17). The Septuagint translators also used strouthion to translate the Hebrew double-noun qe’ath-midbâr in Psalm 102:7b, a construct phrase that refers to some bird or birds that habituate open desert or semi-desert areas.)
  2. See Silje Hogner, Albert Burgas Riera, Margrethe Wold, Jan T. Lifjeld, & Arild Johnsen, “Intergeneric Hybridization Between Common Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus and Whinchat Saxicola rubetra Revealed by Molecular Analyses”, JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY, 156(3):829-836 (2015), cited in Dave Appleton’s “Common Redstart x Whinchat”, BIRD HYBRIDS (1-13-AD2016), posted at http://birdhybrids.blogspot.com/2016/01/common-redstart-x-whinchat.html . This unexpected hybrid is discussed in Ingrid Spilde’s “Mysterious Bird was Unique Cross of Two Unrelated [sic] Species”, Science Nordic (3-11-AD2015), posted at http://sciencenordic.com/mysterious-bird-was-unique-cross-two-unrelated-species .
  3. See 1st Timothy 6:20, regarding the folly of “’science’ falsely so-called”.  See also, accord, John 3:12.

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen – Part I

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

There is a Page on this blog called Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen. It has needed to be updated, plus with all the broken links that I have been repairing, this is going to be the main emphasis for a while. The Avian and Attributes articles will continue to be produced also. As the links are fixed and updated, the Parts will grow longer.

There is a reason for using the Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen, because it has the Families of the Birds of the World in Taxonomic order. As I find the birds we have seen, I will also be fixing the broken links on the Family pages. [So far, almost 1/3 to 1/2 of the family member page has broken links. It is becoming more obvious that the site WAS hacked.] This helps to fix each Family page in order, without jumping around.

Most of the page is self-explanatory. This is a list of ALL birds we, Dan and I, have SEEN. With photos where possible, because we did not take a picture of EVERY bird. Whether out in the wild, or in a zoo or similar place, THEY COUNT as far as this list is concerned. [Most bird counts are only for wild/free birds.]

**************** Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen ************

White-eared Catbird (Ailuroedus buccoides) Houston Zoo by Lee

“And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.” (Genesis 2:3 KJV)

Under Construction – Still Finding Our Pictures to put with the Birds

[The best photos are at Dan’s Photo Site USNDANSPIX or just Dan’s Pix]

I’ve decided to not only include wild birds we have seen, but also birds we have seen in zoos also. Most lists don’t let you include them, but still, I have seen them in person, so, they count to me. Going to put these in Taxonomic order and use the IOC names.

The ones we have seen in the wild (264 species[edit]) have a “*”  and the ones we saw at zoos are marked with the following code. A name in parenthesis is what they call them. The two numbers in brackets [ total birds in family –  our count ]

Zoo Abbreviations (BZ=Brevard Zoo, CZ=Cincinnati Zoo, HZ=Houston Zoo, LPZ=Lowry Park Zoo, JZ=Jacksonville Zoo, NA=National Aviary, NZ=National Zoo, MZ=Memphis Zoo, PB=Palm Beach Zoo, RZ=Riverbanks Zoo (SC), SAZ=San Antonio Zoo, SDZ=San Diego Zoo, TBF=Titusville Birding Festival, WA=Wings of Asia (at MetroZoo before Hurricane Andrew and new Wings of Asia at Zoo Miami or ZM=Zoo Miami),

Names with an extra name in (parenthesis) are what the Zoos calls them. Listed by Families:

Ostriches – Struthionidae [2-2]
Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) MZ RZ
Somali Ostrich (Struthio molybdophanes) SDZ

Rheas – Rheidae [2-0 ]

Kiwis – Apterygidae [5-0]

Cassowaries, Emus – Casuariidae [4- ]
Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) BZ by Lee HZ
Emu Photos (Dromaius novaehollandiae) LPZ by Lee, BZ by Dan

Tinamous – Tinamidae [47-1]
Elegant Crested Tinamou (Eudromia elegans) ZM by Dan, by Lee,  HZ by Lee

Screamers – Anhimidae [3-1]

Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) San Diego Zoo by Lee

Magpie Goose – Anseranatidae [1-1]

Magpie Goose (Anseranas semipalmata) by Lee LPZ

Magpie Goose (Anseranas semipalmata) by Lee Lowry Park Zoo

************ To Be Continued ***********

Ducks, Geese and Swans – Anatidae [173- ]

Megapodes (Family Megapodiidae)  [21- ]
Australian Brushturkey (Alectura lathami) NA
Wattled Brushturkey (Aepypodius arfakianus) WA

To see the rest of this page, Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen

Avian And Attributes – Diademed

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover (Phegornis mitchellii) ©Drawing WikiC

“Thou shalt also be a crown of glory in the hand of the LORD, and a royal diadem in the hand of thy God.” (Isaiah 62:3 KJV)

“You shall also be [so beautiful and prosperous as to be thought of as] a crown of glory and honor in the hand of the Lord, and a royal diadem [exceedingly beautiful] in the hand of your God.” (Isaiah 62:3 AMP)


Avian and Attributes – Diademed

Diademed
DIADEMED, a. Adorned with a diadem; crowned; ornamented.

“Diadem. What the “diadem” of the Jews was, we know not. That of other nations of antiquity was a fillet of silk, two inches broad, bound round the head and tied behind. Its invention is attributed to Liber. Its color was generally white, sometimes, however, it was of blue, like that of Darius; and it was sown with pearls or other gems, Zec_9:16, and enriched with gold. Rev_9:7.
It was peculiarly the mark of Oriental sovereigns. In Est_1:11; Est_2:17, we have cether for the turban worn by the Persian king, queen or other eminent persons to whom it was conceded as a special favor. The diadem of the king differed from that of others in having an erect triangular peak. The words in Eze_23:15 mean long and flowing turbans of gorgeous colors. See Crown.” [Smith’s Bible Dictionary]

See also: Avian and Attributes – Diadem


Diademed Amazon (Amazona diadema)

Diademed Amazon (Amazona diadema) ©WikiC

Diademed Amazon (Amazona diadema) is a parrot in the Psittacidae – African and New World Parrot Family, formerly considered conspecific with the Red-lored Amazon (Amazona autumnalia).

“Both adults in general green, with black edging to feathers of crown to mantle and breast; green crown to nape, hindneck green margined with mauve; red feathered cere and forehead; yellow/green with less yellow upper cheeks to ear coverts; secondaries 1-5 red at bases, the remainder green; green tail. Eye ring pale yellow, eye orange. Bill dark grey.” (World Parrot Trust)

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover (Phegornis mitchellii)

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover (Phegornis mitchellii) ©WikiC

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover (Phegornis mitchelliior diademed plover (Phegornis mitchellii) is a species of bird in the plover family Charadriidae. It is monotypic within the genus Phegornis. The relationship of this species to other plovers is uncertain, a 2010 study suggested it may be related to the Australian dottrells.

The species is found in the Puna grassland ecozone of the Andes Mountains from Argentina and Chile, through Bolivia to Peru. In this habitat it prefers mossy tundra, high-altitude grassland, bogs and swamps. It is an altitudinal migrant, breeding between 3,500–5,000 m (11,500–16,400 ft) above sea-level, but wintering at 2,000 m (6,600 ft)

The diademed sand-piper-plover is a small compact plover, 16.5–19 cm (6.5–7.5 in) in length and weighing 28–46 g (0.99–1.62 oz). It has a black head with a white stripe above the eye meeting at the crown, a chestnut neck, a white throat and chest barred in black, and grey upperparts. The wings are short and the flight undulating. The sexes are alike and the juvenile has a grey head, less distinct barring on the front and brown upperparts.

They breed in the summer months, laying two eggs, olive-grey with black spots, in a circular nest of grasses. The downy chicks are dark brown, marbled with black above and lighter below. Member of the Charadriidae – Plovers Family

Diademed Tapaculo (Scytalopus schulenbergi)

Diademed Tapaculo (Scytalopus schulenbergi) ©Neotropical Birds

Diademed Tapaculo (Scytalopus schulenbergi) is a species of bird in the Rhinocryptidae – Tapaculos Family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Fairly newly named species, therefore information scant. See – Neotropical Birds article.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name start with “D”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – David’s

David’s Fulvetta (Alcippe davidi) ©Planet of Birds

“The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.” (Matthew 1:1 KJV)

“While the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them, Saying, What think ye of Christ? whose son is he? They say unto him, The Son of David. He saith unto them, How then doth David in spirit call him Lord, saying, The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool? If David then call him Lord, how is he his son? And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions.” (Matthew 22:41-46 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – David’s

Ruth 4:22 (c) He is a type of the Christian and of CHRIST who lives for GOD in his youth, is persecuted and rejected by his brethren, is tempted in the wilderness, but finally is exalted on the throne. [Wilson’s Dictionary of Bible Types]


David’s Fulvetta (Alcippe davidi) ©Planetscott.com

David’s Fulvetta (Alcippe davidi) is a species of bird in the Pellorneidae – Fulvettas, Ground Babblers Family. It is endemic to southern China and northern Vietnam. This species was recently raised from a subspecies of the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta.

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. Broadleaf evergreen forest, secondary forest, bamboo and scrub. Oriental Region : Southcentral, South China to Northwest Vietnam

Breeding season from March to July in China, April to August in Taiwan, February to July in SE Asia. The nest is a compact strong cup made of bark, leaf skeletons, moss and spider web. It’s placed in a low bush and lays 2 – 4 eggs. Multibrooded.

Feeds on small insects, seeds and berries. Often in noisy groups, sometimes in mixed flocks together with other species. Often mobs raptors and owls. [Wikipedia and Planet of Birds]


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Crowned II

(Violet-) Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica) ©WikiC

“And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews!” (Matthew 27:29 KJV)

“And they clothed him with purple, and platted a crown of thorns, and put it about his head,” (Mark 15:17 KJV)

“And the soldiers platted a crown of thorns, and put it on his head, and they put on him a purple robe, And said, Hail, King of the Jews! and they smote him with their hands.” (John 19:2-3 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Crowned/Crown

Crowned Continued:

Crowned
(1): (p. p. & a.) Great; excessive; supreme.
(2): (p. p. & a.) Having or wearing a crown; surmounted, invested, or adorned, with a crown, wreath, garland, etc.; honored; rewarded; completed; consummated; perfected.
(3): (imp. & p. p.) of Crown

[From Webster 1913 Dictionary]

“Behold, I come quickly: hold that fast which thou hast, that no man take thy crown.” (Revelation 3:11 KJV)


Crowned II’s birds – Today we finish up with the last four “Crowned” birds:

Crowned Lapwing (Vanellus coronatus)

Crowned Lapwing (Vanellus coronatus) ©WikiC

 

The Crowned Lapwing (Vanellus coronatus),, or crowned plover, is a bird of the lapwing subfamily that occurs contiguously from the Red Sea coast of Somalia to southern and southwestern Africa. It is an adaptable and numerous species, with bold and noisy habits. It is related to the more localized black-winged and Senegal lapwings, with which it shares some plumage characteristics.

Crowned lapwings prefer short, dry grassland which may be overgrazed or burnt, but avoid mountains. In higher-rainfall areas such as parts of Zambia and Zimbabwe, they occur mainly as dry-season visitors. In dry regions of northern Botswana, however, they are attracted in large numbers when good rainfall occurs. In southern Africa their highest concentrations are to be found in the dry central Kalahari region. They are members of the Charadriidae – Plovers Family

Crowned Sandgrouse (Pterocles coronatus)

Crowned Sandgrouse (Pterocles coronatus) ©WikiC

 

The Crowned Sandgrouse (Pterocles coronatus) occurs in North Africa and south Asia and is found from Mauritania in the west through the Middle East to Pakistan. A fairly small sandgrouse which appears rather uniformy coloured from a distance except for darker flight feathers, the wholly dark flight fetahers being the best feature to identify Crowned Sandgrouse from the similar Spotted Sandgrouse. The dark flight feathers contrast with the sandy upper wing coverts and the creamy underwing coverts.

The crowned sandgrouse is a bird of deserts, preferring stony deserts rather than sandy ones. In North Africa breeds among dark red sandstone which matches its plumage colour. Avoids areas with too much vegetation. They are members of the Pteroclidae – Sandgrouse Family.

Crowned Slaty Flycatcher (Griseotyrannus aurantioatrocristatus)

Crowned Slaty Flycatcher (Griseotyrannus aurantioatrocristatus) ©WikiC

The Crowned Slaty Flycatcher (Griseotyrannus aurantioatrocristatus) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae, the tyrant flycatchers. It was formerly united in the genus Empidonomus with the variegated flycatcher, but is now considered the only species of Griseotyrannus. The name Griseotyrannus aurantioatrocristatus means “orange-black crested gray Tyrannus”. Its binomial is the longest of any bird species, fifteen syllables when spoken aloud.

It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

The crowned slaty flycatcher migrates into the mostly western and central Amazon basin as a non-breeding resident, except in the southeast bordering the Cerrado and Pantanal, where it is resident in much of the western cerrado and southwards; the migration occurs during the austral winter. Members of the Tyrannidae – Tyrant Flycatchers Family.

Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica)

Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica) by RScanlon

Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica) by RScanlon

Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica)

The Crowned Woodnymph is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae – Hummingbirds Family. It is found in Belize and Guatemala to northern Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.

Taxonomically, the species is confusing. The AOU currently lumps the violet-crowned woodnymph and the green-crowned woodnymph together here. It also includes the taxon hypochlora (emerald-bellied woodnymph) from south-western Ecuador and adjacent Peru here. All are sometimes considered distinct by other taxonomists.

It also formerly included the Mexican woodnymph as subspecies.

See Part I – Avian and Attributes – Crowned I

Also: Sunday Inspiration – Crown Birds


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus. (with editing)]

Avian And Attributes – Crowned I

Crowned Chat-Tyrant (Silvicultrix frontalis) ©WikiC

“For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing that is not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.” (Hebrews 2:5-9 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Crowned

CROWNED, pp. Invested with a crown, or with regal power and dignity; honored; dignified; rewarded with a crown, wreath, garland or distinction; recompensed; terminated; completed; perfected.

CROWN, v.t.
1. To invest with a crown or regal ornament. Hence, to invest with regal dignity and power.
2. To cover, as with a crown; to cover the top.
3. To honor; to dignify; to adorn.
Thou hast crowned him with glory and honor. Psa 8.
4. To reward; to bestow an honorary reward or distinction on; as the victor crowned with laurel.
5. To reward; to recompense.
6. To terminate or finish; to complete; to perfect.
7. To terminate and reward; as, our efforts were crowned with success.


Crowned Birds – There are eight bird species whose names start with “Crowned.” There are many others who are “-crowned” and these may be used later. Today, you are introduced to four Crowned birds. Tomorrow, Lord willing, you will find the other four.

Crowned Chat-Tyrant (Silvicultrix frontalis)

Crowned Chat-Tyrant (Silvicultrix frontalis) ©WikiC

The Crowned Chat-Tyrant (Silvicultrix frontalis) is a species of bird in the tyrant flycatcher family. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. Tyrannidae – Tyrant Flycatchers Family member. 

Crowned Cormorant (Microcarbo coronatus)

Crowned Cormorant (Microcarbo coronatus) ©WikiC

The Crowned Cormorant (Microcarbo coronatus) is a small cormorant that is endemic to the waters of the cold Benguela Current of southern Africa. It is an exclusively coastal species and is not found more than 10 km (6 mi) away from land. This species is related to the reed cormorant, and was formerly considered to the same species. Phalacrocoracidae – Cormorants, Shags Family member.

Crowned Eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus)

Crowned Eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus) ©Wiki

The Crowned Eagle, also known as the African crowned eagle or the crowned hawk-eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus) is a large bird of prey found in sub-Saharan Africa; in Southern Africa it is restricted to eastern areas. Its preferred habitats are principally riparian woodlands and various forests. The crowned eagle is the only extant member of the genus Stephanoaetus. A second species, the Malagasy crowned eagle (Stephanoaetus mahery) became extinct after humans settled on Madagascar. Accipitridae – Kites, Hawks and Eagles Family member.

Crowned Hornbill (Lophoceros alboterminatus)

Crowned Hornbill (Lophoceros alboterminatus) ©WikiC

The Crowned Hornbill is an African hornbillIt is a medium-sized bird, 50–54 centimetres (20–21 in) in length, and is characterized by its white belly and black back and wings. The tips of the long tail feathers are white. The eyes are yellow; the beak is red and presents a stocky casque on the upper mandible. In females, the casque is smaller. The crowned hornbill can be distinguished from the similar Bradfield’s hornbill by its shorter beak.

The crowned hornbill is a common resident of the coastal and riverine forests of southern (only the eastern coast) to northeastern Africa. Bucerotidae – Hornbills Family member.

Crowned II’s birds – Crowned Lapwing (Vanellus coronatus), Crowned Sandgrouse (Pterocles coronatus), Crowned Slaty Flycatcher (Griseotyrannus aurantioatrocristatus), Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica)

Part II – Avian and Attributes – Crowned II

Also: Sunday Inspiration – Crown Birds


** Are you enjoying learning about these Avian and Attributes? Please leave a comment. Sometimes I push it a bit, but it is desired that you are finding these articles interesting and a blessing. **

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Cook

Cook’s Petrel (Pterodroma cookii) ©WikiC

“As soon then as they were come to land, they saw a fire of coals there, and fish laid thereon, and bread. (John 21:9 KJV)

“Jesus saith unto them, Come and dine. And none of the disciples durst ask him, Who art thou? knowing that it was the Lord. Jesus then cometh, and taketh bread, and giveth them, and fish likewise. This is now the third time that Jesus shewed himself to his disciples, after that he was risen from the dead.” (John 21:12-14 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Cook

From the above verses, it appears our Lord was also a good Cook.

Cook
(1): (v. i.) To prepare food for the table.
(3): (v. t.) To prepare, as food, by boiling, roasting, baking, broiling, etc.; to make suitable for eating, by the agency of fire or heat.
(6): (n.) One whose occupation is to prepare food for the table; one who dresses or cooks meat or vegetables for eating.
(7): (v. t.) To throw.


Cook Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus kerearako) ©IGoTerra

Cook Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus kerearako)

The Cook Reed Warbler or Cook Islands reed warbler (Acrocephalus kerearako) is a species of Old World warbler in the Acrocephalidae Family. It is found only in the Cook Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, swamps, and rural gardens. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Cook’s Petrel (Pterodroma cookii) ©Flickr Duncan

Cook’s Petrel (Pterodroma cookii)

The Cook’s petrel (blue-footed petrel) (Pterodroma cookii), is a Procellariform seabird. It is a member of the gadfly petrels and part of the subgroup known as Cookilaria petrels, which includes the very similar Stejneger’s petrel. One of the smallest petrels, Cook’s petrel is typically 25–30 cm (9.8–11.8 in) in length with a 65–66 cm (26–26 in) wingspan and a weight of around 200 g (7.1 oz). Its colouration is typical of gadfly petrels: pale grey upperparts with a dark grey “M” on the wings and white underparts.

The bill is long and black with tubular nostrils on both sides. As in all members of the order Procellariiformes, this nostril configuration enables an exceptionally acute sense of smell, which the birds use to locate food and nest sites in the dark. In the  Procellariidae – Petrels, Shearwaters Family.

Cook’s petrel breeds only in New Zealand on three small islands: Little Barrier Island, Great Barrier Island, and Codfish Island. The breeding season is the southern summer, October–May. It nests in burrows and rock crevices, preferring sites on thickly forested ridges.

Cook’s Swift (Apus cooki) ©Peter Ericsson

Cook’s Swift (Apus cooki)

The Cook’s Swift (Apus cooki), is a small bird, superficially similar to a house martin. It is, however, completely unrelated to those passerine species, since swifts are in the order Apodiformes. These birds have very short legs which they use only for clinging to vertical surfaces. The scientific name comes from the Greek απους, apous, meaning “without feet”. They never settle voluntarily on the ground. Blyth’s swifts spend most of their lives in the air, living on the insects they catch in their beaks.

Cook’s swifts breed in limestone caves of Thailand, Myanmar and Indochina. The species has a green iridescence, a shallow tail fork and is a short distance migrant. In the Apodidae – Swift Family


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus. With Editing]

Avian And Attributes – Cloud

Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium nubicola) ©WikiC

“And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.” (Luke 21:27-28 KJV)

“And the cloud of the LORD was upon them by day, when they went out of the camp.” (Numbers 10:34 KJV)

Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? declare, if thou hast understanding.” When I made the cloud the garment thereof, and thick darkness a swaddlingband for it,” (Job 38:4, 9 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Cloud

Cloud
(1): (n.) A dark vein or spot on a lighter material, as in marble; hence, a blemish or defect; as, a cloud upon one’s reputation; a cloud on a title.
(2): (v. i.) To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; — often used with up.
(3): (n.) That which has a dark, lowering, or threatening aspect; that which temporarily overshadows, obscures, or depresses; as, a cloud of sorrow; a cloud of war; a cloud upon the intellect.
(6): (v. t.) To overspread or hide with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded.

“And the LORD went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way; and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light; to go by day and night:” (Exodus 13:21 KJV)

(8): (n.) A collection of visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the upper atmosphere.
(9): (n.) A mass or volume of smoke, or flying dust, resembling vapor.
(10): (v. t.) To blacken; to sully; to stain; to tarnish; to damage; — esp. used of reputation or character.
(11): (n.) A great crowd or multitude; a vast collection.

“Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.” (Hebrews 12:1-2 KJV)


Cloud Birds – Cloud Cisticola, Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl, Cloud-forest Screech Owl

Cloud Cisticola (Cisticola textrix) ©WikiC

The Cloud Cisticola or tink-tink cisticola (Cisticola textrix) is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae – Cisticolas and allies Family. It is found in Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, and Zambia, and its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland.

Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium nubicola) ©WikiC

The Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium nubicola) is a short, muscular, small-sized species of owl found throughout the Andes of western Colombia and north-western Ecuador, being confined to cloud forests between 900–2000 m a.s.l. Below this altitudinal range the Central American pygmy owl (Glaucidium griseiceps) occurs; above the Andean pygmy owl (Glaucidium jardinii) occurs. It is in the Strigidae – Owls Family.

Its epithet nubicola means in Latin “cloud inhabiting”, because this species is restricted to very humid cloud forests.

Cloud-forest Screech-Owl (Megascops marshalli)©Neotropical Birds Online

The Cloud-forest Screech Owl (Megascops marshalli) is a species of owl in the Strigidae – Owls Family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Clay (Molder or Potter)

Clay-colored Thrush (Turdus grayi) ©WikiC

“But now, O LORD, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand.” (Isaiah 64:8 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Clay (Molder or Potter)

Clay
(1): (n.) A soft earth, which is plastic, or may be molded with the hands, consisting of hydrous silicate of aluminium. It is the result of the wearing down and decomposition, in part, of rocks containing aluminous minerals, as granite. Lime, magnesia, oxide of iron, and other ingredients, are often present as impurities.
(2): (n.) Earth in general, as representing the elementary particles of the human body; hence, the human body as formed from such particles.
(4): (v. t.) To clarify by filtering through clay, as sugar. [edited]

“Then I went down to the potter’s house, and, behold, he wrought a work on the wheels. And the vessel that he made of clay was marred in the hand of the potter: so he made it again another vessel, as seemed good to the potter to make it.” (Jeremiah 18:3-4 KJV)


Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) ©WikiC

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida)  or clay-coloured sparrow (Spizella pallida) is a small sparrow of North America.

Adults have light brown upperparts and pale underparts, with darker streaks on the back. They have a pale crown stripe on a dark brown crown, a white line over the eyes, a dark line through the eyes, a light brown cheek patch and brown wings with wing bars. The short bill is pale with a dark tip and the back of the neck is grey; they have a long tail. Non-breeding adults and immature resemble chipping sparrows and Brewer’s sparrows; they often form flocks with these birds outside the nesting season.

The male sings from an open perch to indicate his ownership of the nesting territory. The song is a Bzzzz bzzzz za za.

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Clay-colored Thrush (Turdus grayi) by Margaret Sloan – Anticipation pose

Clay-colored Thrush (Turdus grayi) is a common Middle American bird of the thrush family (Turdidae). It is the national bird of Costa Rica, where it is well-known as the yigüirro. Other common names include clay-colored robin.

It ranges from South Texas (where it is rapidly expanding its range) to northern Colombia; west and north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. It is limited to the Atlantic slope, except for a population around Oaxaca City, Mexico that probably originates from escaped cage birds.

In general appearance and habits it resembles other Turdus thrushes such as the American robin. It is about the same length or slightly smaller. The plumage is brownish, somewhat lighter below than above, lightest on the flanks. Birds from humid regions are darker than those from dry regions. The throat is faintly streaked. Immature birds have faint mottling on the back and underparts. The bill is greenish-yellow with a dark base, the legs are pinkish or flesh-colored, and the irises are reddish—all useful identification points.

The song, rather low-pitched and with a slow steady tempo, consists of many slurred musical phrases which are often repeated irregularly. The tock flight call is like the American robin’s but harsher.

“Thou wilt say then unto me, Why doth he yet find fault? For who hath resisted his will? Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus? Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?” (Romans 9:19-21 KJV)


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus. Both With Editing]

Avian And Attributes – Cheer

Cheer Pheasant (Catreus wallichii) ©©

Cheer Pheasant (Catreus wallichii) ©©

“And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, It is a spirit; and they cried out for fear. But straightway Jesus spake unto them, saying, Be of good cheer; it is I; be not afraid.” (Matthew 14:26-27 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Cheer

CHEER, v.t.
1. To salute with shouts of joy, or cheers.
2. To dispel gloom, sorrow, silence or apathy; to cause to rejoice; to gladden; to make cheerful; as, to cheer a lonely desert; the cheering rays of the sun; good news cheers the heart.
3. To infuse life; spirit, animation; to incite; to encourage; as, to cheer the hounds.
CHEER, v.i. To grow cheerful; to become gladsome, or joyous.

CHEER, n.
1. A shout of joy; as, they gave three cheers.
2. A state of gladness or joy; a state of animation, above gloom and depression of spirits, but below mirth, gayety and jollity.
Son, be of good cheer, thy sins are forgiven thee. Mat 9.

And, behold, they brought to him a man sick of the palsy, lying on a bed: and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy; Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.” (Matthew 9:2 KJV)

Then were they all of good cheer, and they also took some meat. Acts 27.
6. Air of countenance, noting a greater or less degree of cheerfulness. [edited]


Cheer Pheasant (Catreus wallichii) ©WikiC

Cheer Pheasant (Catreus wallichii)

The Cheer Pheasant, (Catreus wallichii), also known as Wallich’s pheasant is a vulnerable species of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. It is the only member in monotypic genus Catreus. The scientific name commemorates the Danish botanist Nathaniel Wallich.

These birds lack the color and brilliance of most pheasants, with buffy gray plumage and long gray crests. Its long tail has 18 feathers and the central tail feathers are much longer and the colour is mainly gray and brown. The female is slightly smaller in overall size.

Males are monogamous. They breed on steep cliffs during summer with a clutch of 10 to 11 eggs. The cheer pheasant is distributed in the highlands and scrublands of the Himalayas region of India, Nepal, Kashmir and Pakistan.

Cheer Pheasant (Catreus wallichii) ©WikiC


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]