Sunday Inspiration – Pheasants and Allies II

Grey Francolin (Francolinus pondicerianus) by Nikhil Devasar

Grey Francolin (Francolinus pondicerianus) by Nikhil Devasar

“Now therefore, let not my blood fall to the earth before the face of the LORD: for the king of Israel is come out to seek a flea, as when one doth hunt a partridge in the mountains.” (1 Samuel 26:20 KJV)

Last week the introduction to the avian wonders of the Phasianidae – Pheasants and Allies Family I began. The first twenty-one (21) species were presented. With a 183 in this family, we will stay with this family for a few Sundays.

Today there are 2 Monal-Partridge (Tetraophasis) , 5 Snowcock (Tetraogallus), 10 Partridges in 3 genera (Lerwa) (Alectoris) and (Ammoperdix), and 17 Francolin in 4 genera (Francolinus), (Peliperdix), (Scleroptila) and (Dendroperdix). The Pternistis genus will be covered next time. It consistes of Francolins and Spurfowls.

Verreaux’s Monal-Partridge (Tetraophasis obscurus) ©gbwf.org

(Tetraophasis obscurus) is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found only in central China. Its natural habitat is boreal forests. The common name commemorates the French naturalist Jules Verreaux. The Szechenyi’s Monal-Partridge or buff-throated partridge (Tetraophasis szechenyii) is a species of bird in the family Phasianidae. It is found in China and India. Its natural habitat is boreal forests.

Tibetan Snowcock (Tetraogallus tibetanus) ©WikiC

Tibetan Snowcock (Tetraogallus tibetanus) ©WikiC

The Snowcocks are a group of bird species in the genus Tetraogallus of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are ground-nesting birds that breed in the mountain ranges of southern Eurasia from the Caucasus to the Himalayas and western China. Some of the species have been introduced into the United States. Snowcocks feed mainly on plant material. Snowcocks are bulky, long-necked, long-bodied partridge-like birds. Males and females are generally similar in appearance but females tend to be slightly smaller and rather duller in colouration than males. Their plumage is thick with a downy base to the feathers which helps them to withstand severe winter temperatures that may fall to −40 °C (−40 °F).

Rock Partridge (Alectoris graeca) ©Pixabay

Rock Partridge (Alectoris graeca) ©Pixabay

The genus Alectoris is a well-defined group of partridge species allied with coturnix and snowcocks and also related to partridge-francolins (Pternistes) and junglebush quail (Perdicula ). They are known collectively as rock partridges. The genus name is from Ancient Greek alektoris a farmyard chicken.

GAL-Phas Sand Partridge (Ammoperdix heyi) ©WikiC

Sand Partridge (Ammoperdix heyi) ©WikiC

The See-see partridge occurs in southwest Asia, and the Sand partridge in Egypt and the Middle East. Both are resident breeders in dry, open country, often in hill areas. Both partridges in this genus are 22–25 cm long, rotund birds. They are mainly sandy brown, with wavy white and brown stripes on their flanks.

Black Francolin (Francolinus francolinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Black Francolin (Francolinus francolinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Francolinus is a genus of birds in the francolin group of the partridge subfamily of the pheasant family. Its five species range from western and central Asia through to southern and south-eastern Asia.

Coqui Francolin(Peliperdix coqui) by Dave's BirdingPix

Coqui Francolin(Peliperdix coqui) by Dave’s BirdingPix

Peliperdix – Its four species range through tropical Sub-Saharan Africa.

Shelley’s Francolin (Scleroptila shelleyi) ©WikiC

Shelley’s Francolin (Scleroptila shelleyi) ©WikiC

Scleroptila – Its seven species range through Sub-Saharan Africa.

Crested Francolin (Dendroperdix sephaena) ©WikiC

Crested Francolin (Dendroperdix sephaena) ©WikiC

The Crested Francolin (Dendroperdix sephaena) – It is found in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

(Wikipedia, with editing)

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“As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not; so he that getteth riches, and not by right, shall leave them in the midst of his days, and at his end shall be a fool.” (Jeremiah 17:11 KJV)

“In the Garden” ~ Flute Solo Lauren D – Orchestra Concert

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Sunday Inspirations

Pheasants and allies – Phasianidae

Birds of the Bible – Partridge

Sharing The Gospel

Lee’s Six Word Saturday – 2/25/17

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Northern Shoveler by Lee at Blackpoint Dr. Merritt Is. NWR

AS IN WATER FACE REFLECTS FACE

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As in water face reflects face, So a man’s heart reveals the man.”
(Proverbs 27:19 NKJV)

Northern Shoveler by Lee at Blackpoint Dr. Merritt Is. NWR

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More Daily Devotionals

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Lee’s Five Word Friday – 2/24/17

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Roseate Spoonbill by Lee at Merritt Island NWR

SEEK ME, AND FIND ME

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“And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart.
(Jeremiah 29:13 KJV)

Roseate Spoonbill by Lee at Merritt Island NWR

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More Daily Devotionals

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Rhea, The Featherless [bald] Lovebird

Rhea the featherless Lovebird in a knitted sweater

Rhea the featherless Lovebird in a knitted sweater

“They cause the naked to lodge without clothing, that they have no covering in the cold.” (Job 24:7 KJV)

Thanks to some news articles, I heard about Rhea, a Lovebird that lost all her feathers. She has Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD). The feathers will not grow back and has to be kept warm. That fact caused many to send little outfits to her owner to help keep Rhea warm.

“Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.” (Hebrews 4:13 KJV)

Enjoy the articles and the video of little Rhea. If you wanted to study bird anatomy, Rhea provides some interesting things to observe. Notice her ear holds.

She has her own Instagram site at rhea_thenakedbirdie

This Featherless Lovebird Is Actually So, So Cute

Article from the Daily Mail Great photos and a video

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Lee’s Four Word Thursday – 2/23/17

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Great Horned Owl Youngsters at Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

OWL MAKE HER NEST

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“There shall the great owl make her nest, and lay, and hatch, and gather under her shadow: there shall the vultures also be gathered, every one with her mate.” (Isaiah 34:15 KJV)

Great Horned Owl Youngsters at Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

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More Daily Devotionals

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Lee’s Three Word Wednesday – 2/22/17

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Luzon Bleeding-heart Dove by Dan at Zoo Miami

SUCH AN HEART

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“O that there were such an heart in them, that they would fear me, and keep all my commandments always, that it might be well with them, and with their children for ever!” (Deuteronomy 5:29 KJV)

Luzon Bleeding-heart Dove by Dan at Zoo Miami

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More Daily Devotionals

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Looking Back – Happy One Year Anniversary! – Repost

In all the busyness of things, the anniversary of this blog, slipped by unnoticed. The 15th of February was the 9th Anniversary of Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus. Today, we are getting close to 1.7 million views since the blog was moved to WordPress in July of 2009. Am not sure how many hits were made to the original blog that started out on Blogger. But the Lord has be gracious.

We now have had visitors from 228 Countries. Wow! Who would have thought? I was excited in 2009 and I am still excited in 2017 at what the Lord had done with this blog.

Happy One Year Anniversary!

FEBRUARY 15, 2009

It is hard to believe that today is the One Year Anniversary of “Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus“! When asked by Stephen, at our church (Faith Baptist Church) to write a blog each Friday about the “Birds of the Bible,” I produced the first blog which can be seen at “Birds of the Bible – Introduction.

Ring-necked Duck at Lake Morton by Dan

Ring-necked Duck at Lake Morton by Dan

I never imagined that the Lord would bless my efforts to this extent. From that start, I made a blog of my own on Blogspot.com so that I could learn how to post on the church’s blog. Once I began learning how to blog, it has been growing every since. Then in July, the blog was moved over to here at WordPress.com. This is a great place to host a blog/website (as I call it) and it is free.

Of course, Dan, my husband, has been our main photographer (Dan’s Pix), and we have been blessed with the permission to use the photos of some mighty fine photographers. Thank all of you for your expertise and permission. Check the sidebar out under Photography for links to the photographers.

Most importantly, Praise the Lord, for His blessings on this blog. Had the Lord not created everything, we would not have anything to write about, nor would we be here to write it.

When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? … O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! (Psa 8:3,4,9 KJV)

Our pastor just reminded us of a quote by William Carey, an English Missionary to India:

Expect great things from God, attempt great things for God.

Great Blue Heron by Dan

Great Blue Heron by Dan

I am not sure this was attempted as a “great thing,” but it was attempted to honor the Lord. That is a very great thing, and God has turned that attempt into a blog that has been visited over 10,000 times just since July. Many of those visits have come from around the world. Thank all of you for your visits.

Carey also said, “If I begin a thing I must go through with it!” This blog has been started and we trust we will continue to keep writing about God’s wonderful creation, especially His birds, and the joy of observing all God’s marvelous handiwork.

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Birds of the Bible – Introduction – First Blog

“Nature of God” Video by Andie’s Isle

Nature of God Intro Page for Video by Andie's Isle

“Who is like unto thee, O LORD, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?” (Exodus 15:11 KJV)

Please Click the Link to View A Very Great Video – http://www.andiesisle.com/thenatureofgod.html

This was sent to me by our Mission’s Pastor Peter Brock.

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Wordless Toucan

Lee’s One Word Monday – 2/20/17

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Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) Flock ©OhioDNR

FOLLOW

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“But thou, O man of God, flee these things; and follow after righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness.
(1 Timothy 6:11 KJV)

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) Flock ©OhioDNR

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More Daily Devotionals

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Lee’s Seven Word Sunday – 2/19/17

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Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) by Kent Nickel

NO ONE OF YOU BE PUFFED UP

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“And these things, brethren, I have in a figure transferred to myself and to Apollos for your sakes; that ye might learn in us not to think of men above that which is written, that no one of you be puffed up for one against another.” (1 Corinthians 4:6 KJV)

Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) by Kent Nickel

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More Daily Devotionals

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Sunday Inspiration – Pheasants and Allies I

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

“But of all clean fowls ye may eat.” (Deuteronomy 14:20 KJV)

The Phasianidae Family has 183 species and is the last family in the Galliformes Order. This will take several Sunday Inspirations to cover all of these interesting birds. In Scripture, they are considered “clean fowl” and may be eaten. Here in America, many Wild Turkeys have found themselves the center of attraction on Thanksgiving Day.

turkey1

Thankfully, Reginald, our Turkey Commander, and his group have avoided this result. Reginald, Turkey Commander. See the rest of Emma’s Stories of Reginald and others.

Part I begins with the first twenty one (21) members of the Phasianidae clan in ten (10) genera. There are 2 Turkeys, 12 Grouse, 2 Capercaillies, 2 Prairie Chickens and 3 Ptarmigans.

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Raymond Barlow

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Raymond Barlow

The Phasianidae are a family of heavy, ground-living birds which includes pheasants, partridges, junglefowl, chickens, Old World quail, and peafowl. The family includes many of the most popular gamebirds. The family is a large one, and is occasionally broken up into two subfamilies, the Phasianinae, and the Perdicinae. Sometimes, additional families and birds are treated as part of this family. For example, the American Ornithologists’ Union includes Tetraonidae (grouse), Numididae (guineafowl), and Meleagrididae (turkeys) as subfamilies in Phasianidae.

Ocellated Turkey (Meleagris ocellata) ©USFWS

Ocellated Turkey (Meleagris ocellata) ©USFWS

The first genus, Meleagris, has the Wild Turkey and the Ocellated Turkey. The Ocellated Turkey (Meleagris ocellata) is a species of turkey residing primarily in the Yucatán Peninsula. A relative of the Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), it was sometimes previously treated in a genus of its own (Agriocharis), but the differences between the two turkeys are currently considered too small to justify generic segregation. They relatively large birds.

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) ©WikiC

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) ©WikiC

The Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) is a medium-sized grouse occurring in forests from the Appalachian Mountains across Canada to Alaska. It is non-migratory. It is the only species in the genus Bonasa. The ruffed grouse is sometimes incorrectly referred to as a “partridge”, and is a bird of open areas rather than woodlands. The ruffed grouse is the state bird of Pennsylvania, United States.

Hazel Grouse (Tetrastes bonasia) ©©7-Skogshons-M

Hazel Grouse (Tetrastes bonasia) ©©7-Skogshons-M

Tetrastes is a genus of birds in the grouse subfamily. It contains the following species: Hazel grouse (Tetrastes bonasia) and Chinese grouse(Tetrastes sewerzowi). Both species live in forests with at least some conifers in cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

Spruce Grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) by Michael Woodruff

Spruce Grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) by Michael Woodruff

Falcipennis is a genus of birds in the grouse family that comprises two very similar species: Siberian grouse (Falcipennis falcipennis) and Spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis)
Both inhabit northern coniferous forests and live on conifer needles during the winter. Both have breeding systems with dispersed male territories, intermediate between the leks of some grouse and the monogamy of others.

Western Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus)©Wiki-Richard_Bartz

Western Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus)©Wiki-Richard_Bartz

The Western Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), also known as the wood grouse, heather cock, or just capercaillie /ˌkæpərˈkli/, is the largest member of the grouse family. The species shows extreme sexual dimorphism, with the male twice the size of the female. Found across Eurasia, this ground-living forest bird is renowned for its mating display.  The Black-billed Capercaillie (Tetrao urogalloides), which is just a bit smaller, is a sedentary species which breeds in the Larch taiga forests of eastern Russia as well as parts of northern Mongolia and China.

Black Grouse (Lyrurus tetrix) Cock ©WikiC

Black Grouse (Lyrurus tetrix) Cock ©WikiC

The next two, Black Grouse (Lyrurus tetrix) and Caucasian Grouse (Lyrurus mlokosiewiczi) recently split from the Tetrix above.

Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) by Kent Nickel

Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) by Kent Nickel

The sage-grouse are the two species in the bird genus Centrocercus, the Sage and the Gunnison, (which is about a third smaller in size, with much thicker plumes behind the head; it also has a less elaborate courtship dance.) They are the largest grouse from temperate North America. The Sage Grouse, adult male has a yellow patch over each eye, is grayish on top with a white breast, and has a dark brown throat and a black belly; two yellowish sacs on the neck are inflated during courtship display. The adult female is mottled gray-brown with a light brown throat and dark belly. Gunnison Grouse adults have a long, pointed tail and legs with feathers to the toes. Each spring, the both species of males congregate on leks and perform a “strutting display”. Groups of females observe these displays and select the most attractive males with which to mate.

Dusky Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) ©©MyersFamily

Dusky Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) ©©MyersFamily

The genus Dendragapus contains two closely related species of grouse that have often been treated as a single variable taxon (blue grouse). The two species are the dusky grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) and the sooty grouse (Dendragapus fuliginosus). In addition, the spruce grouse and Siberian grouse have been considered part of this genus

Greater Prairie Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido) ©WikiC

Greater Prairie Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido) ©WikiC

Tympanuchus is a small genus of birds in the grouse family. They are commonly referred to as prairie chickens. The genus contains three species: Sharp-tailed grous, Greater prairie-chicken, and Lesser prairie-chicken. All three are among the smaller grouse, from 40 to 43 cm (16 to 17 in) in length. They are found in North America in different types of prairies. In courtship display on leks, males make hooting sounds and dance with the head extended straight forward, the tail up, and colorful neck sacks inflated.

Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus Muta) ©WikiC

Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus Muta) ©WikiC

Lagopus is a small genus of birds in the grouse subfamily, commonly known as ptarmigans. The genus contains three living species with numerous described subspecies, all living in tundra or cold upland areas. The three species are all sedentary specialists of cold regions. Willow ptarmigan is a circumpolar boreal forest species, white-tailed ptarmigan is a North American alpine bird, and rock ptarmigan breeds in both Arctic and mountain habitats across Eurasia and North America. All, with the exception of the red grouse, have a white winter plumage that helps them blend into the snowy background. Even their remiges are white, while these feathers are black in almost all birds. The Lagopus grouse apparently found it easier to escape predators by not being seen than by flying away.

(Wikipedia with editing)

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“Let the heaven and earth praise him, the seas, and every thing that moveth therein.” (Psalms 69:34 KJV)

“While the Ages Roll” ~ Men’s Quartet – Faith Baptist .

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Sunday Inspirations

Pheasants and allies – Phasianidae

Sharing The Gospel

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