Meet Another New Photographer – William Wise

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) ©williamwisephoto.com

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) ©williamwisephoto.com

Thankfully, we have another new photographer who has given permission to use his photos. William Wise has been taking photos of quite a variety of topics for some time. And he also is a Christian.

You can check out the main page at William Wise Photography. He has five sections to view his various subjects:

Home

“O LORD, how manifold are your works! In wisdom have you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures.”  Psalm 104:24 

Shelter Photography

Shelter Puppy ©WilliamWisePhoto.com

Nature Photography

Downy Woodpeckerr ©WilliamWise.com

Creation Speaks

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

CREATION SPEAKS
Creation Speaks is a Biblical creation teaching ministry that uses writing and photography to teach the truth of our origin and other spiritual truths from the Bible. The lessons from God’s creation are also taught in multi-media presentations designed for Christian schools, youth and adult groups, and church Sunday School groups utilizing slideshows, videos, mounted and live animals.

Blogs

Like you, I will be busy looking through these many photos and articles for ideas for this blog. His theme in the Creation Speaks section is similar to what we try to do here. This is from his Creation Speaks section:

Here is a photo from one of his blogs: Fighting The Reflection…

Tufted Titmouse Picture

“For if you listen to the word and don’t obey, it is like glancing at your face in a mirror. You see yourself, walk away, and forget what you look like.” James 1:23-24 New Living Translation

Thank you William for this new permission. Lord’s Blessing on on your do. Keep up the good photography, I might need them here. :)

 

Who Provides For The Sawfly?

Sawfly on Horsetail drinking dew Cornwall UK Drinking Dew ©Photography of B Smith

“Who hath divided a watercourse for the overflowing of waters, or a way for the lightning of thunder; To cause it to rain on the earth, where no man is; on the wilderness, wherein there is no man; To satisfy the desolate and waste ground; and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth? Hath the rain a father? or who hath begotten the drops of dew?” (Job 38:25-28 KJV)

When I saw this photo today, I asked permission from Barry Smith to use it. Thankfully, he has given permission and also for the usage of others on his Facebook site. Thanks, Barry.

Many species of sawfly have retained their ancestral attributes throughout time, specifically their plant-eating habits, wing veins and the unmodified abdomen, where the first two segments appear like the succeeding segments. The absence of the narrow wasp waist distinguishes sawflies from other members of hymenoptera, although some are Batesian mimics with coloration similar to wasps and bees, and the ovipositor can be mistaken for a stinger. Most sawflies are stubby and soft-bodied, and fly weakly. Sawflies vary in length: Urocerus gigas, which can be mistaken as a wasp due to its black-and-yellow striped body, can grow up to 20 millimetres (0.8 in) in length, but among the largest sawflies ever discovered was Hoplitolyda duolunica from the Mesozoic, with a body length of 55 millimetres (2.2 in) and a wingspan of 92 millimetres (3.6 in). The smaller species only reach lengths of 2.5 millimetres (0.1 in).

Sawfly Larvae Damage by their Larvae ©Pests.org

Predators include birds, insects and small animals. The larvae of some species have anti-predator adaptations such as regurgitating irritating liquid and clustering together for safety in numbers. Sawflies are hosts to many parasitoids, most of which are Hymenoptera, the rest being Diptera.

Adult sawflies are short-lived, with a life expectancy of 7–9 days, though the larval stage can last from months to years, depending on the species.

Woodpeckar Feeding Chicks From Pinterest

They are a pest for humans

Sawflies are major economic pests of forestry. For example, species in the Diprionidae, such as the pine sawflies, Diprion pini and Neodiprion sertifer, cause serious damage to pines in regions such as Scandinavia. D. pini larvae defoliated 500,000 hectares (1,200,000 acres) in the largest outbreak in Finland, between 1998 and 2001. Up to 75% of the trees may die after such outbreaks, as D. pini can remove all the leaves late in the growing season, leaving the trees too weak to survive the winter. Little damage to trees only occurs when the tree is large or when there is minimal presence of larvae. Eucalyptus trees can regenerate quickly from damage inflicted by the larvae; however, they can be substantially damaged from outbreaks, especially if they are young. The trees can be defoliated completely and may cause “dieback”, stunting or even death.

Sawflies are serious pests in horticulture. Different species prefer different host plants, often being specific to a family or genus of hosts. For example, Iris sawfly larvae, emerging in summer, can quickly defoliate species of Iris including the yellow flag and other freshwater species. Similarly the rose sawflies, Arge pagana and A. ochropus, defoliate rose bushes.

They are a pest for humans, yet the Lord, their Creator, cares enough for them to provide dew to drink.

“The LORD by wisdom hath founded the earth; by understanding hath he established the heavens. By his knowledge the depths are broken up, and the clouds drop down the dew.” (Proverbs 3:19-20 KJV)

Do we not sometimes misbehave, yet the Lord continues to provide water, sun, air to breathe, and other benefits for us? Critters are provided for, but we, humans, have even a greater blessing available to us. Salvation through the Lord Jesus Christ.

Photograghy of B Smith

Sawfly Wikipedia

Who Paints The Leaves?

Tail Feathers of North American Birds

Bald Eagle with Tail spread out

I’m thankful for an email from a Boy Scouts of America leader. He suggested placing links to this information about Tail Feathers in the Birdwatching section. [Which are now there, plus on two other pages.] It is part of a badge they are working on.

These feathers are interesting and would love to see each of these species in the field. Isn’t it amazing how the Creator of these Avian Wonders goes into such details in tail feather design. Along with the rest of the feathers attached to the birds. :)

60 Tail Feathers of North American Birds - AlansFactoryOutlet.com - Infographic
By AlansFactoryOutlet.com

“Of the birds after their kind, of animals after their kind, and of every creeping thing of the earth after its kind, two of every kind will come to you to keep them alive.” (Genesis 6:20 NKJV) [In to the Ark]

“Bring out with you every living thing of all flesh that is with you: birds and cattle and every creeping thing that creeps on the earth, so that they may abound on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.
(Genesis 8:17 NKJV) [Out of the Ark]

Here are most of the birds that these feathers would be attached to:

Wordless Birds

Avian And Attributes – Stone

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

“Jesus saith unto them, Did ye never read in the scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner: this is the Lord’s doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes?” (Matthew 21:42 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Stone

STONE, n. [Gr.]
2. A gem; a precious stone.
Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels.
3. Any thing made of stone; a mirror.
8. A monument erected to preserve the memory of the dead.
Should some relentless eye glance on the stone where our cold relics lie–
9. It is used to express torpidness and insensibility; as a heart of stone.
I have not yet forgot myself to stone.
10. Stone is prefixed to some words to qualify their signification. Thus stone-dead, is perfectly dead, as lifeless as a stone; stone-still, still as a stone, perfectly still; stone-blind, blind as a stone, perfectly blind.
To leave no stone unturned, a proverbial expression which signifies to do every thing that can be done; to use all practicable means to effect an object.
STONE, a. Made of stone, or like stone; as a stone jug.
STONE, v.t.
1. To pelt, beat or kill with stones.
And they stoned Stephen calling on God and saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit. Acts 7.


Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©Flickr Jean

The Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) is a bird of the new world quail family. This largely brown bird, which commonly holds its tail raised, is found in scrubland and lightly wooded habitats, often near rocks, from Kenya and Ethiopia to Gambia (a large part if its range is in the Sudanian Savanna). As traditionally defined, it is the only member of Ptilopachus, but based on genetic evidence this genus also includes the Nahan’s “francolin”

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

The Stone Partridge is exceptional among gamebirds in that the female, to human eyes, is showier than the male. Both sexes are predominantly earthy chocolate brown above, with sparse pale cream-grey spotting. The head, neck and chest are paler brown and have broad cream edging to the feathers that gives the bird a scaled appearance. In males the lower chest and belly are orange-cream; in females, very pale cream. Both sexes raise their crown feathers to form a rudimentary crest but the feathers of females are somewhat longer and hence more obvious when raised.

Eggs are pale pink, fading to cream, juveniles are dark chocolate-brown throughout, moulting into adult plumage at several weeks old. In captivity at least, the male plays a major role in both incubation and rearing of the young, offering young small items of food by picking them up, dropping them and calling to the chicks.


“But ye believe not, because ye are not of my sheep, as I said unto you. My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand. My Father, which gave them me, is greater than all; and no man is able to pluck them out of my Father’s hand. I and my Father are one. Then the Jews took up stones again to stone him. Jesus answered them, Many good works have I shewed you from my Father; for which of those works do ye stone me?” (John 10:26-32 KJV)

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Bird Barks And Lizard Growls – Creation Moments

Numbers 22:30

“So the donkey said to Balaam, ‘Am I not your donkey on which you have ridden, ever since I became yours, to this day? Was I ever disposed to do this to you?’ And he said, ‘No.’”

Have you ever noticed that we can usually sense whether an animal is hostile or friendly, simply by its sound? Did you ever wonder about the universal features that allow for important basic information to be shared between animals and humans?

None of us ever had to be taught that a dog, growling deeply and showing its teeth, was trying to threaten us. We’re all familiar with the high-pitched yips that same dog makes to welcome its owner home. Research shows that the motivations expressed by high-pitched and low-pitched sounds are universal among most creatures.

Researchers say that almost all animals bark (the high-pitched sounds) or growl (the low-pitched sounds). They were surprised to learn that animals don’t simply make arbitrary noises. Sound has meaning. Even the higher-pitched voice of birds has a barking mode that can be seen on a graph and heard when a slowed-down recording is played. Animals make lower, harsher sounds when they’re being aggressive. This is the growl. When friendly, an animal makes higher-pitched sounds. The bark seems to mean that an animal is neither hostile nor friendly, simply curious. Human speech follows the same general pattern.

These universal features of communication reflect the work of our Creator who intended for many different kinds of creatures to coexist. He gave us all a universal method for understanding important basic messages like fear, aggression and joy.

Prayer: I thank You, Lord, for the joy that animals add to our lives. I also thank You that You have made us able to share some basic but important features of communication. However, help me to value, most highly, Your communication to me in Your Holy Word. Amen.

REF.: Bennett, Dawn D. 1985. Making sense of animal sounds. Science Ne   Photo: Pembroke Corgi – pixabay.com (PD)

Used with permission. Creation Moments ©2019

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger niger), Northern subspecies, adult in breeding plumage calling and a pair of well camouflaged downy chicks at Nickerson Beach Park on Long Island, New York.

Wonder if this Skimmer is growling or barking?

More Creation Moments articles:

Interesting Things

What is the Gospel?

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Nice Birdwatching Video About Circle B Bar Reserve

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix

Bible Birds – Herons

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (NKJV)

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle BGreat Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix Bible Birds – HeronsSnowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (Romans 1:20 NKJV)

 

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Great Horned Owl Youngsters at Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B 8-3-12 by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Butterfly Circle B by Lee 7-16-14

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee - cropped

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee – cropped

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B -7-22-11 by Lee

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B by Lee

Sunset at Circle B by TommyT

IOC Version 9.2- Indexes Up To Date – Part IV

Blue-naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) at Cincinnati Zoo) by Lee

Blue-naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) at Cincinnati Zoo) by Lee

Thanks for patience as the Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures blog is being updated to the new I.O.C. Version 9.2. Along with cataract eye surgery this week, brain freeze [Couldn’t get my Excel to build my links. Oh, no! Could it be old age?], and a holiday, I think most of it is finished.

“But now finish doing it also, so that just as there was the readiness to desire it, so there may be also the completion of it by your ability. For if the readiness is present, it is acceptable according to what a person has, not according to what he does not have.” (2 Corinthians 8:11-12 NASB)

These links are all working:

I am still updating these new Family pages. They added six new families, but one of them was the old Incertae Sedis Family (now Hyliidae-Hylias). It was a holding place for birds they didn’t know where to place. With all the DNA testing going on, they keep finding surprises. In the future, they will most like shuffle some more families and species around.

Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) ©Flickr Nic Borrows

New Families Added with Version 9.2
Calyptomenidae – African and Green Broadbills (9.2)
Cinclosomatidae – Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes (9.2)
Falcunculidae – Shriketit (9.2)
Hyliidae – Hylias, Pholidornis (9.2)
Coliidae – Mousebirds (9.2)
Philepittidae – Asities (9.2)

An interesting link from Birdwatching Daily about this new update.
North American Bird Checklist 2019

Order Pages are Updated

Good News

American Revolution and the Fourth Of July

Originally entitled Yankee Doodle, this is one of several versions of a scene painted by A. M. Willard that came to be known as The Spirit of ’76

During the American Revolution, the legal separation of the Thirteen Colonies from Great Britain in 1776 actually occurred on July 2, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence that had been proposed in June by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia declaring the United States independent from Great Britain’s rule. After voting for independence, Congress turned its attention to the Declaration of Independence, a statement explaining this decision, which had been prepared by a Committee of Five, with Thomas Jefferson as its principal author. Congress debated and revised the wording of the Declaration, finally approving it two days later on July 4. [Some debate the actual date – Wikipedia]

A Fourth of July fireworks display at the Washington Monument ©WikiC.

It is time for another holiday here in the United States of America. This is one of the most important celebrations for the country because of what it represents. Once this Declaration of Independence was signed, the real growth of America began. God has blessed our country with one of the most freedoms for personal liberty and freedom of religion. [Unfortunately, many of these freedoms are being taken away. Christians have less and less freedom to worship the Lord as we once had. Our country was founded on Christian principles, but now some are trying to remove all traces of our founding truths.

I try not to get political on this site, but it does make us sad what is going on currently. With that said, I will be silent on the political side.

4th of July Independence Day Parade 2014 DC ©WikiC

Now is a day to show off some of our Red, White, and Blue birds that live here. [And fly off to other countries also.]

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) Male ©NW Ohio Bird Pictures

One of my favorite Red birds! A visitor to our feeders.

White Ibis on Table by Lee

White Ibis on Table by Lee

A very common White bird that walked through our yard today.

And the Blue Jay, another regular visitor to our feeders:

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

This refers to Abraham, but it is still very true today:

“All these died in faith, without receiving the promises, but having seen them and having welcomed them from a distance, and having confessed that they were strangers and exiles on the earth. For those who say such things make it clear that they are seeking a country of their own. And indeed if they had been thinking of that country from which they went out, they would have had opportunity to return. But as it is, they desire a better country, that is, a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God; for He has prepared a city for them.” (Hebrews 11:13-16 NASB)

PS: Keep me in your prayers. Tomorrow morning I am having a Cataract implant surgery. That is one reason this is a few days early for the holiday. Will be off the computer for a few days. I had the left eye implant completed several years ago and all went well. We are praying that the same will be true for this right eye. All the more to see the Lord’s Avian Wonders – BETTER!

Good News

Independence Day – Our Christian Heritage

Independence Day Wikipedia

IOC Version 9.2- Name Changes – Part III

IOC Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019) Name Changes

The nice thing about these name changes is that the Scientific Name normally stays with the bird. Many countries refer to birds by various names, but the scientific name helps everyone know which avian wonder is being referred to.

PREVIOUS IOC LISTS – SCIENTIFIC NAME – New Name IOC LIST V9.2

Sumatran Frogmouth ((Batrachostomus poliolophus) Female ©WikiC

Short-tailed Frogmouth – Batrachostomus poliolophus – Sumatran Frogmouth

Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla haematonota ©Oiseaux_net

Napo Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla haematonota – Stipple-throated Antwren

PAS-Tham Rio Madeira Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ©Flickr Claudio Dias Timm

Rio Madeira Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ©Flickr Claudio Dias Timm

Madeira Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla amazonica – Rio Madeira Antwren

Wayanad Laughingthrush (Pterorhinus delesserti) ©WikiC

Wynaad Laughingthrush – Pterorhinus delesserti – Wayanad Laughingthrush

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Grey Jay – Perisoreus canadensis – Canada Jay

Biak Whistler (Pachycephala megarhyncha)

Biak Whistler (Pachycephala megarhyncha) ©Flickr Graham Winterflood

Biak [Little] Shrikethrush – Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha – Biak Whistler

Arafura Shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) ©WikiC

Arafura Shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) ©WikiC

Little Shrikethrush – Colluricincla megarhyncha – Arafura Shrikethrush

Javan Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis banyumas) ©©Flickr

Hill Blue Flycatcher – Cyornis banyumas – Javan Blue Flycatcher

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Ray

Veracruz Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Ray

Rufous-naped Wren – Campylorhynchus rufinucha – Veracruz Wren

These were the name changes that I have found so far with this update. For those of us who have photos, it also required changing names of photos on the hard drive.

But names have been changing for years:

“Now among them from the sons of Judah were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah. Then the commander of the officials assigned new names to them; and to Daniel he assigned the name Belteshazzar, to Hananiah Shadrach, to Mishael Meshach and to Azariah Abed-nego.” (Daniel 1:6-7 NASB)

Now for the rest of the updates. Stay Tuned!

The Amazing Butterfly

World Birds I.O.C. Version 9.2 Part II

Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) ©Sci-news

Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) ©Sci-news

The post yesterday, I.O.C. 9.2 Update A Few Days Ago, was to inform you off the latest update. New birds aren’t usually discovered as much as the DNA studies they are providing better insight into how the birds are related. So, they like to shuffle things around, like the 5 new Families. The new species added are many times from subspecies being elevated to full species status.

Today, we will try to figure out who the new species are. As I type this, I have no clue until some investigation begins. So, Let’s Begin!

Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019)

The IOC World Bird List 9.2 contains 10,758 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  250 Families and 2,320 Genera.  The list also includes 20,034 subspecies, their ranges and  authors.

Updates include:

SPECIES ADDED:                25 

SPECIES DELETED:             5

ENGLISH NAMES:              9

TAXONOMY:                         37 including  sequence of Orders,  five new Families, and genera of  Petroicidae
Add Species

I know some of this below is confusing for some, but is beneficial for many birdwatchers.

Added Species:

Stejneger’s Scoter (Melanitta stejnegeri) – Split of Stejneger’s Scoter M. stejnegeri from White-winged Scoter M. deglandi
Australian Tern (Gelochelidon macrotarsa) – Split of G. macrotarsa is based on morphological differences
Malagasy Palm Swift (Cypsiurus gracilis) – from African Palm Swift Cypsiurus parvus split
Green-headed Hillstar (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar (Oreotrochilus estella stolzmanni)
Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar O. (estella) stolzmanni
Indochinese Roller (Coracias affinis) – Morphologically distinct Indochinese Roller is sister to Purple-winged Roller (C. temmincki) not to Indian Roller despite narrow hybrid zone
Small-headed Elaenia (Elaenia sordida) – Elaenia sordida is split (9.2) from Highland Elaenia based on mtDNA genetics and vocal
Ceara? Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) – Split of monotypic Ceara? Woodcreeper is based on genetic, morphological and vocal distinctions
Biak Whistler (Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha) – The endemic Biak Little ‘Shrikethrush’ C. m. melanorhyncha is a whistler, sister to Pachycephala phaionota. Elevated from ssp Colluricincla to species of Pachycephala. Rename

Little Shrikethrush spp Colluricincla spp – The following splits (9.2) of subspecies groups of the [Arafura] Little Shrikethrush species complex are based on genetics and morphology (Marki et al. 2018, Schodde pers. comm).
Variable Shrikethrush (Colluricincla fortis) – Arafura [Little] Shrikethrush C. megarhyncha Split (9.2) of Variable Shrikethrush includes ssp trobriandi and despecta (with neos and superflua)
Waigeo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla affinis) – Variable Shrikethrush C. fortis Split Waigeo Shrikethrush is monotypic
Mamberamo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla obscura) – Waigeo Shrikethrush C. affinis Split (9.2) of Mamberamo Shrikethrush includes ssp hybridus
Tagula Shrikethrush (Colluricincla discolor) – Split (9.2) monotypic Tagula Shrikethrush
Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush (Colluricincla tappenbecki) -Split (9.2) of Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush C. tappenbecki includes ssp madaraszi and maeandrina.
Rufous Shrikethrush (Colluricincla rufogaster) – Split (9.2) of Rufous Shrikethrush includes ssp griseata and goodsoni. Ssp aelptes and normani are included in goodsoni; gouldii and synaptica are included in nominate rufogaster.
Stejneger’s Scoter (Melanitta stejnegeri) – Split (9.2) of Stejneger’s Scoter M. stejnegeri from White-winged Scoter M. deglandi based on lack of hybridization and on morphological characters that include the black rather than brown flanks (deglandi also has brown tinged scapulars), a more obvious hook “nose” on stejnegeri, a longer white post-ocular mark on stejnegeri, and different bill coloration.
Australian Tern (Gelochelidon macrotarsa) – Split of G. macrotarsa is based on morphological differences (Rogers et al. 2005, HBW, Schodde pers. comm).
Malagasy Palm Swift (Cypsiurus gracilis) – Split of Malagasy Palm Swift from African Palm Swift (C. parvus) based on vocalizations and plumage coloration. Includes griveaudi on Comoro Is.
Green-headed Hillstar (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni) – Green-headed Hillstar is split from O. estella based on plumage differences and mtDNA relationship to O. melanogaster.
Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar O. (estella) stolzmanni.. Genomic analysis of estella species complex desired. New Hummingbird Species Discovered in Ecuador
Indochinese Roller (Coracias affinis) – Morphologically distinct Indochinese Roller is sister to Purple-winged Roller (C. temmincki) not to Indian Roller despite narrow hybrid zone.
Small-headed Elaenia (Elaenia sordida) – Elaenia sordida is split (9.2) from Highland Elaenia based on mtDNA genetics and vocals (Rheindt et al. 2008, Minns 2017, HBW, SACC 806). ENG Small-headed Elaenia follows SACC.

Ceara Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) ©HBW

Ceara? Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) –  Split of monotypic Ceara? Woodcreeper is based on genetic, morphological and vocal distinctions. ENG: Ceara?
Biak Whistler (Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha) – The endemic Biak Little ‘Shrikethrush’ C. m. melanorhyncha is a whistler, sister to Pachycephala phaionota. Elevated from ssp Colluricincla to species of Pachycephala. Rename
Little Shrikethrush spp (Colluricincla) spp – The following splits (9.2) of subspecies groups of the [Arafura] Little Shrikethrush species complex are based on genetics and morphology, Schodde pers. comm).
Variable Shrikethrush (Colluricincla fortis) – Split (9.2) of Variable Shrikethrush includes ssp trobriandi and despecta (with neos and superflua)
Waigeo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla affinis) – Split Waigeo Shrikethrush is monotypic
Mamberamo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla obscura) – Split (9.2) of Mamberamo Shrikethrush includes ssp hybridus
Tagula Shrikethrush (Colluricincla discolor) – Split (9.2) monotypic Tagula Shrikethrush
Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush (Colluricincla tappenbecki) – Split (9.2) of Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush C. tappenbecki includes ssp madaraszi and maeandrina.
Rufous Shrikethrush (Colluricincla rufogaster) – Split (9.2) of Rufous Shrikethrush includes ssp griseata and goodsoni. Ssp aelptes and normani are included in goodsoni; gouldii and synaptica are included in nominate rufogaster.
Hill Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis whitei) – C. whitei is split (9.2) from C. banyumas based on genetics and vocalizations. Includes subspecies lekhakuni, deignani, coerulifrons. Note transfer of established English name Hill Blue Flycatcher to C. whitei.
Indochinese Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis sumatrensis) – Widespread Indochinese Blue Flycatcher is split (9.2) from Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher based on morphology and vocalizations. Includes sumatrensis, indochina, lamprus.
Morotai White-eye (Zosterops dehaani) – Split of Morotai White-eye Z. dehaani from Cream-throated White-eye is based on distinct plumage, exceptional dawn song and submontane/montane ecology
Wakatobi White-eye (Zosterops flavissimus) – Split of Wakatobi White-eye is based on morphology, genetics, and vocalizations (O’Connell et al. 2019)
Campina Thrush (Turdus arthuri) – Split (9.2) of Campina Thrush T. arthuri from Black-billed Thrush T. ignobilis is based on sympatry without intergradation at two Colombian localities.
Pantepui Thrush (Turdus murinus) – Pantepui Thrush is split (9.2) from Black-billed Thrush T. ignobilis based on genetic divergence
Yucatan Gnatcatcher (Polioptila albiventri) – Split (9.2) of Yucatan Gnatcatcher P. albiventris from White-lored Gnatcatcher is based on genetic and vocal distinctions
Nicholson’s Pipit (Anthus nicholsoni) – Split (9.2) of South African pops of Long-billed Pipit is based on their allopatric distributions (southern and East African populations separated by ca. 1 800 km), their non-migratory nature and their high cyt b sequence divergence values. Includes palliditinctus, leucocraspedon, petricolus, and primarius.

***

Barbery Falcon now Perregrine Falcon ©Drew Avery

Barbary Falcon now Perregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus pelegrinoides) ssp©Drew Avery

Deleted Species (I can only find 4)
Schouteden’s Swift (Schoutedenapus schoutedeni) DEL AL Scarce Swift S. myioptilus Deemed to be darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts subspecies chapini (Fishpool 2019)
Barbary Falcon (Falco pelegrinoides)SSP of Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus Barbary Falcon (including subspecies babylonicus) is genetically similar to other subspecies of Peregrine Falcon and treated thus. Demoted back to SSP
Negro Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla pyrrhonota)SSP Negro Stipple-throated Antwren was split from [Napo] Stipple-throated Antwren, but vocalizations are identical and morphological differences slight. Demoted back to SSP
Yasuni Antwren (Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai) – SSP Yasuni Stipple-throated Antwren was split from [Napo] Stipple-throated Antwren, but vocalizations are identical and morphological differences slight. Demoted back to SSP

“He determines and counts the number of the stars; He calls them all by their names. Great is our Lord and of great power; His understanding is inexhaustible and boundless.” (Psalms 147:4-5 AMP)

If the Lord knows the names of all the stars, I wonder what names He calls the Birds by?

Still need to rework the Indexes – Stay Tuned

I.O.C. 9.2 Update A Few Days Ago

Chestnut Quail-thrush (Cinclosoma castanotum) ©Flickr David Cook

“So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:21-22 NKJV)

Just realized the new I.O.C. 9.2 Update was released a few days ago. Glad they changed to only two updates a year, but that means more birds to UPDATE. [Updates are of new species and proposed splits, taxonomic revisions, and changes of names.]

Here are the new counts for this update:

  • 10,758 extant species and 158 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 9.2), with subspecies (20,034)
  • Classification of 40 Orders, 250 Families), 2320 Genera

Last update, 9.1, was: [Beginning of 2019]

  • 10,738 extant species and 158 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 9.1), with subspecies (20,046)
  • Classification of 40 Orders, 245 Families (plus 1 Incertae sedis), 2313 Genera (World Bird Names)

I can see that I have some work ahead of me. Notice there are 20 new species [10,758 vs 10,738]. Also, there are five new Families – Wow! [250 vs 245] That is going to take making new pages, etc. to update this site. They also increased the genera by 7.

Here are the new Families Pages: [This is required new pages and shuffling of birds from other families to these new ones.]

Spotted Jewel-babbler (Ptilorrhoa leucosticta) ©Flickr Ross Tsai

Cinclosomatidae – Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes

Crested Shriketit (Falcunculus frontatus) by Ian

Falcunculidae – Shriketit

Green Broadbill (Calyptomena viridis) by Lee at ZM

Green Broadbill (Calyptomena viridis) by Lee at ZM

Calyptomenidae – African and Green Broadbills

Tit Hylia (Pholidornis rushiae ussheri) ©WikiC

Hyliidae – Hylia, Pholidornis

Yellow-bellied Sunbird-Asity (Neodrepanis hypoxantha) ©Flickr

Philepittidae – Asities

More updates will be posted as soon as possible.

 

Avian And Attributes – Stitch

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) by Tom Tarrant

“A time to tear, And a time to sew; A time to keep silence, And a time to speak;” (Ecclesiastes 3:7 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Stitch

STITCH, v.t. [G. This is another form of stick.]
1. To sew in a particular manner; to sew slightly or loosely; as, to stitch a collar or wristband; to stitch the leaves of a book and form a pamphlet.
2. To form land into ridges. [N. England.]
To stitch up, to mend or unite with a needle and thread; as, to stitch up a rent; to stitch up an artery.
STITCH, v.i. To practice stitching.
STITCH, n.
1. A single pass of a needle in sewing.
2. A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link of yarn; as, to let down a stitch; to take up a stitch.


Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) female ©Flickr Kathrin -Stefan Marks

“Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves coverings.” (Genesis 3:7 NKJV)

The Stitchbird or hihi (Notiomystis cincta) is a rare honeyeater-like bird endemic to the North Island and adjacent offshore islands of New Zealand. It became extirpated everywhere except Little Barrier Island but has been reintroduced to three other island sanctuaries and two locations on the North Island mainland. Its [genealogical] relationships have long puzzled ornithologists, but it is now classed as the only member of its own family, the Notiomystidae.

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) ©Flickr Duncan

Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) ©Flickr Duncan

The stitchbird is a small honeyeater-like bird. Males have a dark velvety cap and short white ear-tufts, which can be raised somewhat away from the head. A yellow band across the chest separates the black head from the rest of the body, which is grey. Females and juveniles are duller than males, lacking the black head and yellow chest band. The bill is rather thin and somewhat curved, and the tongue is long with a brush at the end for collecting nectar. Thin whiskers project out and slightly forward from the base of the bill.

Sewing has been around since Adam and Eve sinned in the Garden of Eden. When the fig leaves were sewed together, they must have used stitches.

[The word stitch is not in the Bible, but sewing is there. I took a bit of liberty with the verses.]


More Avian and Attributes

Notiomystidae – Stitchbird

Stitchbird– Wikipedia

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

In Our Place

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]