Birds Taking A Sabbath Rest? – from Creation Moments

DO BIRDS TAKE A SABBATH REST? from Creation Moments

Re-posted from Creation Moments

“And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.” Genesis 2:3

Myles Willard is an avid bird watcher, award-winning nature photographer and long-time friend of Creation Moments. Myles has given us hundreds of breathtaking nature photos, one of which accompanies the printed transcript of today’s program at the Creation Moments website.

The reason I’m telling you about him today is because of an unexpected discovery he made while looking out the window of his home in Michigan. Each fall he meticulously tracks and logs the number of migrating warblers that stop by for a rest in the big cedar tree in his yard. After tracking the activity of over 1,500 warblers for 18 years, he was surprised to see a statistically significant dip in the number of birds stopping by that occurred on every seventh day!

Did these migrating birds have a built-in instinct that somehow made them follow the biblical principle of a Sabbath rest? We are not saying, of course, that the warblers were knowingly obeying God’s fourth commandment. However, if God worked for six days and then rested on the seventh, why would it be hard to believe that God gave these birds a cycle of six days of work followed by a seventh day of rest?

According to the account given in the book Inspired Evidence: Only One Reality, “It would seem that Myles Willard, science teacher, nature photographer and bird watcher, has found and documented such a pattern.”

Prayer:
Oh Lord, thank You for doing all the work necessary for our salvation so we can rest securely in the knowledge that – by grace through faith – we can have eternal life! Amen.
Notes:
Myles Willard, The Rest Is History, monograph, 2008. Cited in Inspired Evidence: Only One Reality by Julie Von Vett and Bruce Malone, April 29 (Search for the Truth Publications, 2012). Photo: One of Myles Willard’s superb photos. Used with permission.

©Creation Moments 2017 – Used with permission

See:

More Interesting Things from Creation Moments

*

Avian And Attributes – Song

Avian And Attributes – Song

Song Sparrow in white flowers by Daves BirdingPix

Song Sparrow in white flowers by Daves BirdingPix

“The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father’s God, and I will exalt him.” (Exodus 15:2 KJV)

Behold, God is my salvation; I will trust, and not be afraid: for the LORD JEHOVAH is my strength and my song; he also is become my salvation.” (Isaiah 12:2 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Song

SONG, n.
1. In general, that which is sung or uttered with musical modulations of the voice, whether of the human voice or that of a bird.
2. A little poem to be sung, or uttered with musical modulations; a ballad. The songs of a country are characteristic of its manners. Every country has its love songs, its war songs, and its patriotic songs.
3. A hymn; a sacred poem or hymn to be sung either in joy or thanksgiving, as that sung by Moses and the Israelites after escaping the dangers of the Arabian gulf and of Pharaoh; or of lamentation, as that of David over the death of Saul and Jonathan. Songs of joy are represented as constituting a part of heavenly felicity. [edited]

“Yet the LORD will command his lovingkindness in the daytime, and in the night his song shall be with me, and my prayer unto the God of my life.” (Psalms 42:8 KJV)


Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

Song Sparrow

The Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) is a medium-sized American sparrow. Among the native sparrows in North America, it is easily one of the most abundant, variable and adaptable species.

Though a habitat generalist, the Song sparrow favors brushland and marshes, including salt marshes, across most of Canada and the United States. They also thrive in human dominated areas such as in suburbs, agricultural fields, and along roadsides. Permanent residents of the southern half of their range, northern populations of the song sparrow migrate to the southern United States or Mexico during winter and intermingle with the native, non-migratory population. The song sparrow is a very rare vagrant to western Europe, with a few recorded in Great Britain and Norway.

These birds forage on the ground, in shrubs or in very shallow water. They mainly eat insects and seeds. Birds in salt marshes may also eat small crustaceans. They nest either in a sheltered location on the ground or in trees or shrubs.

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) Nest ©WikiC

The sparrow species derives it name from its colorful repertoire of songs. Enthusiasts report that one of the songs heard often in suburban locations closely resembles the opening four notes of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5. The male uses a fairly complex song to declare ownership of its territory and attract females.

Singing itself consists of a combination of repeated notes, quickly passing isolated notes, and trills. The songs are very crisp, clear, and precise, making them easily distinguishable by human ears

Song Sparrow by Ray

Song Sparrow by Ray

(Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows & Allies Family) (Song Sparrow – Wikipedia)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Rock

Avian And Attributes – Rock

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©WikiC

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©WikiC

“Because I will publish the name of the LORD: ascribe ye greatness unto our God. He is the Rock, his work is perfect: for all his ways are judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is he.” (Deuteronomy 32:3-4 KJV)

And did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ.
(1 Corinthians 10:4 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Rock

ROCK, n. [Gr., L. rupes, from the root of rumpo, to break or burst. If this is not the origin of rock, I know not to what root to assign it.]
1. A large mass of stony matter, usually compounded of two or more simple minerals, either bedded in the earth or resting on its surface. Sometimes rocks compose the principal part of huge mountains; sometimes hugh rocks lie on the surface of the earth, in detached blocks or masses. Under this term, mineralogists class all mineral substances, coal, gypsum, salt, &c.
2. In Scripture, figuratively, defense; means of safety; protection; strength; asylum.
The Lord is my rock. 2 Sam 22.
3. Firmness; a firm or immovable foundation. Psa 28.
Mat 7. Mat 16.
4. A species of vulture or condor.
5. A fabulous bird in the Eastern tales.

ROCK, v.t.
1. To move backward and forward, as a body resting on a foundation; as, to rock a cradle; to rock a chair; to rock a mountain. It differs from shake, as denoting a slower and more uniform motion, or larger movements. It differs from swing, which expresses a vibratory motion of something suspended.
A rising earthquake rock’d the ground.
2. To move backwards and forwards in a cradle, chair, &c.; as, to rock a child to sleep.
3. To lull to quiet.

ROCK, v.i. To be moved backwards and forwards; to reel.
The rocking town supplants their footsteps.


Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Edward Townend

Rock Dove

The Rock Dove or Rock Pigeon (Columba livia) is a member of the bird family Columbidae (doves and pigeons). In common usage, this bird is often simply referred to as the “pigeon”.

The species include the domestic Pigeon, including the Fancy Pigeon. Escaped domestic Pigeons have raised the populations of feral Pigeons around the world.

Wild rock doves are pale grey with two black bars on each wing, while domestic and feral pigeons are very variable in colour and pattern. Few differences are seen between males and females.[6] The species is generally monogamous, with two squabs (young) per brood. Both parents care for the young for a time.

Habitats include various open and semi-open environments. Cliffs and rock ledges are used for roosting and breeding in the wild. Originally found wild in Europe, North Africa, and western Asia, pigeons have become established in cities around the world. The species is abundant, with an estimated population of 17 to 28 million feral and wild birds in Europe.

(Columbidae – Pigeons, Doves Family) (Wikipedia – Rock Dove)

Probably one of the most recognized birds around the world. It is a mentioned in Scripture, therefore making it one of the Birds of the Bible.

“And John bare record, saying, I saw the Spirit descending from heaven like a dove, and it abode upon him.” (John 1:32 KJV)

Rock Dove/Pigeon – Lake Morton by Lee


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “R”

Birds of the Bible – Doves and Pigeons

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

After the Storm – Zoos

Falcated Duck (Anas falcata) by Dan at Zoo Miami

“A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast: but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.” (Proverbs 12:10 KJV)

“Thy righteousness is like the great mountains; thy judgments are a great deep: O LORD, thou preservest man and beast.” (Psalms 36:6 KJV)

If you will recall, before Hurricane Irma attacked our state, we shared this blog with you: Hurricane Irma and the Animals at the Zoos

I was checking around the state to see what was being done to prepare for the Hurricane. Now, almost two months later, how did the Zoos do during and after the storm. We were discussing maybe visiting one of the zoos in a month or so, and I was wondering how much damage they received. Actually, one of our favorite birding places here in Lakeland, the Circle B Bar Reserve, just re-opened today, October 13, 2017. They had numerous downed trees and flooding.

While checking out my most favorite birding place at a Zoo, Zoo Miami, they are actually opening back up tomorrow, October 14th for the first time since Hurricane Irma.

Here are some articles and video that you might find informative as to how they did and how they protected their animals.


***

Zoo Miami to Open Oct. 14, after Hurricane Irma
In the article, you will see a photo like this. Click it and the photos will open. Click through them to see some of the damage. WPLG1 of 62 PHOTOS: Ron Magill shares photos of Zoo Miami after Hurricane Irma

“We greatly look forward to opening Zoo Miami again,” Zoo Miami director Carol Kruse said.

Huge Ficus Tree at Zoo Miami ©RonMagill

Zoo Miami’s Massive Ficus, Downed by Irma, to Remain as Hyena ‘Furniture’

Go to Google and search: “Zoo Miami irma” and you will find many photos of the protected animals and damage around the Zoo. Most of these are Copyrighted and can not be shared here.

Here one more interesting article:

Hurricane Irma: survival stories from 27 zoos & sanctuaries 

***

Birdwatching Trips

 

Northern Flickers: Red-shafted, Yellow-shafted, Whatever

Northern Flickers: Red-shafted, Yellow-shafted, Whatever

(Blending Biomes and Transitional Taxonomy)

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth. (Acts 1:8)

Was that a Red-shafted Flicker, or a Yellow-shafted Flicker, or a mix of them?

(Regarding Northern Flickers in Colorado, see “Want a Home in the Mountains? Some Birds Have One”, posted at https://leesbird.com/2015/09/24/want-a-home-in-the-mountains-some-birds-have-one/– the discussion notes the difference between the “Red-shafted” and “Yellow-shafted” varieties.)

Northern-Flicker-redshafted.Evergreen-edu

NORTHERN FLICKER (red-shafted form) photo credit: Evergreen State College

Hybrids don’t fit squarely into the category boxes that we use for convenience. The missionary mandate of Acts 1:8, given by the resurrected Christ, refers to outreach—to Jews and Gentiles, and a hybrid category: Samaritans.  In effect, Samaritans were a hybrid people, part Jew and part Gentile.

That reminds me of how birdwatching has its own taxonomy challenges, when “splitters” are forced to yield to “lumpers”, especially in transitional habitats.

NorthernFlicker-yellowshafted.BioQuick-News

NORTHERN FLICKER (yellow-shafted form) photo credit: BioQuick News

Have you ever seen a bird that looks partially like a particular subspecies, yet also like its “cousin” subspecies? Maybe you were looking at a hybrid.  After all, avian subspecies have shared ancestries, tracing back (through the Ark) to Day # 5 of Creation Week (Genesis 1:21).

When a gene pool is separated by geographic barriers the foreseeable result is geography-correlated phenotype pattern, illustrating recessive genes within the geographically isolated gene pool. Breaks in such geographic barriers, however, provide for transitional blending — of both biome-based habitats and of the communities of animals that inhabit those regions.  These “border” zones are sometimes called ecotones: expect to see (there) blended gene pool patterns.

“An ecotone is a boundary area between two kinds of habitats, or ecosystems. The transition between eastern deciduous forest and Great Plains prairie grassland forms one of the broadest and geographically largest ecotones in North America.  The separation between forest and prairie is a gradual one.  Remnant patches of prairie exist in Mississippi, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and other states, extending into southern Manitoba.  The farthest route of penetration of eastern deciduous forest into the west is provided by rivers:  the mighty Platte, Missouri, and Arkansas Rivers, and their many tributaries.  The forests that line these rivers usually flood in the spring when [snow-fed] meltwater brings the river to crest.  The floods are followed by summer drought, when evaporation tends to exceed precipitation, and the water level drops.  Because of this annual cycle, western riparian forests tend to have broad, fertile floodplains, where sediment is deposited as waters recede. ….

For the birder, the prairie riparian forest offers a unique mixture of eastern and western species and subspecies. Both Rose-breasted and Black-headed grosbeaks may be encountered in the same cottonwood grove [although usually the Rose-breasted Grosbeak lives in Eastern forests, while the Black-headed Grosbeak lives in Western forests].  Indigo and Lazuli buntings may sing from willows on opposite sides of a river [although usually the Indigo Bunting lives in Eastern forests, while the Lazuli Bunting lives in Western forests].  Eastern and Western kingbirds may sit side by side on utility wires.  A pendulous oriole’s nest may be inhabited by a pair of the [Western forest] “Bullock’s” subspecies of Northern Oriole, or a pair of the [Eastern forest] “Baltimore” subspecies—or a female “Baltimore” and male “Bullock’s”!  A Northern Flicker may prove to be a member of the [Western forest] “Red-shafted” subspecies, the [Eastern forest] “Yellow-shafted” subspecies, or a hybrid between them.”

[Quoting John C. Kricher, A FIELD GUIDE TO THE ECOLOGY OF WESTERN FORESTS (Houghton Mifflin,1993), pages 88-90.]

So, if you want to challenge your birdwatching taxonomy skills, go visit an ecotone — an don’t be surprised if you see a hybrid version of some bird that is otherwise known of regional subspecies.  It’s all about geographic barriers to the gene pool — if the birds can mix the birds can mate, assuming they all descend (biogenetically) from the same ancestors created by God on Day # 5!

Avian And Attributes – Quiets Our Fears

Avian And Attributes – Quiets Our Fears

Queen Carola’s Parotia (Parotia carolae) ©Drawing WikiC

“But whoso hearkeneth unto me shall dwell safely, and shall be quiet from fear of evil.” (Proverbs 1:33 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Quiet

QUI’ET, a. [L. quietus.]
1. Still; being in a state of rest; now moving. Judg 16.
2. Still; free from alarm or disturbance; unmolested; as a quiet life.
3. Peaceable; not turbulent; not giving offense; not exciting controversy, disorder or trouble; mild; meek; contented.
The ornament of a meek and quiet spirit. 1 Pet 3., 1 Th 4.
5. Smooth; unruffled.
6. Undisturbed; unmolested; as the quiet possession or enjoyment of an estate.
7. Not crying; not restless; as a quiet child.
QUI’ET, n. [L. quies.]
1. Rest; repose; stillness; the state of a thing not in motion.
2. Tranquility; freedom from disturbance or alarm; civil or political repose. Our country enjoys quiet.
3. Peace; security. Judg 18.
QUI’ET, v.t.
1. To stop motion; to still; to reduce to a state of rest; as, to quiet corporeal motion.
2. To calm; to appease; to pacify; to lull; to tranquilize; as, to quiet the soul when agitated; to quiet the passions; to quiet the clamors of a nation; to quiet the disorders of a city or town. [Edited]


Queen Carola’s Parotia

The Queen Carola’s Parotia (Parotia carolae) also known as Queen Carola’s six-wired bird-of-paradise is a species of bird-of-paradise.

One of the most colorful Parotias, the Queen Carola’s Parotia inhabits the mid-mountain forests of central New Guinea. The diet consists mainly of fruits and arthropods. The stunning courtship dance of this species was described in detail by Scholes (2006). It is similar to that of Lawes’s Parotia, but modified to present the iridescent throat plumage and the flank tufts to best effect.

The name commemorates Queen Carola of Vasa, the wife of King Albert I of Saxony. The king was honoured with the King of Saxony bird-of-paradise.

Due to copyrights, there are currently no photos that I can use. The video is of a male Queen Carola’s Parotia showing off for the ladies. [He is definitely not “Quiet”]

[A link to a photo of the Parotia] (Paradisaeidae – Birds-of-paradise Family) (Wikipedia article)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “Q”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Gila Woodpeckers and Saguaro Cactus, Illustrating Neighborliness

Gila Woodpeckers and Saguaro Cactus, Illustrating Neighborliness

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

Thine own friend, and thy father’s friend, forsake not; neither go into thy brother’s house in the day of thy calamity: for better is a neighbor that is near than a brother far off.  (Proverbs 27:10)

 

GilaWoodpecker-SaguaroCactus.NorthMountainVisitorCenter
[Gila Woodpeckers in Saguaro /  photo credit: North Mountain Visitor Center]

Like friends who help each other, the Gila Woodpecker and the Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea giganteus, f/k/a Cereus giganteus)make good neighbors.

A photogenic icon of the hot desert, the Saguaro Cactus,  thrives in America’s arid Southwest – is what ecologists call a “keystone” member of that hot desert community. For example, the Sonoran Desert (which overlaps Arizona, California, and parts of Mexico) hosts the equivalent of “forests” of these jolly green giants, growing amidst other succulents, xerophytic shrubs, and ephemeral flowers.

SaguaroNP-Arizona.JoeParks

[ Saguaro National Park, Arizona, near Tucson   /  photograph by Joe Parks ]

But, looking at Saguaro Cactus from a distance, would you guess that these prickly-spined tree-like columns provide homes for many desert denizens, including a variety of birds? They do!

The Saguaro cactus is in every way a keystone species on the Sonoran Desert’s bajadas [drainage-slope terrains]. Without it, much of the [desert neighborhood’s] richness of species would soon be dramatically reduced. For instance, many of the birds of the bajada either feed or nest (or both) on Saguaros. Gila Woodpeckers, Ladder-backed Woodpeckers, and Northern (Gilded) Flickers hollow our nest cavities that are later used by American Kestrels, Elf Owls, Western Screech-Owls, Purple Martins, and Brown-crested and Ash-throated flycatchers, as well as various species of bats.

Approximately 30 bird species, most recently the European Starling, have been documented to nest in woodpecker-carved Saguaro cavities. House Finches, Chihuahuan Ravens, Harris’s and Red-tailed hawks, and Great Horned Owls use the tall cactus arms as nest sites. Saguaro blossoms are fed upon by White-winged, Mourning, and Inca doves, Scott’s and Hooded orioles, House Finches, Cactus Wrens, and Curve-billed Thrashers. Sparrows and finches consume the [Saguaro] seeds.

[Quoting John C. Kricher, A FIELD GUIDE TO THE ECOLOGY OF WESTERN FORESTS (Houghton Mifflin, 1993), pages 279-280.]

Interestingly, the Saguaro Cactus is sometimes helped by its Sonoran Desert “neighbors”, in situations that ecologists call “mutual aid” relationships—with neighbors being neighborly. One example of this “mutual aid” is seen in the behavior of the non-migratory Gila Woodpecker.  (Like a good neighbor, Gila Woodpecker is “there”.)

A Saguaro whose stem is injured is subject to rapid and fatal necrosis from bacterial invasion. However, the site of the injury is an ideal place for a Gila Woodpecker to begin excavating a nest cavity. In doing so, the woodpecker may remove all of the diseased tissue [i.e., bacteria-infected soft tissue], essentially curing the cactus of what might have [become] a fatal bacterial infection.

[Quoting John C. Kricher, A FIELD GUIDE TO THE ECOLOGY OF WESTERN FORESTS (Houghton Mifflin, 1993), page 280.] Now that’s an appreciative neighbor, giving help when needed, returning good for good!  “For better is a neighbor that is near than a brother far off.”  (Proverbs 27:10b)

GilaWoodpecker-by-Saguaro.BrianSmall

[Gila Woodpecker approaching Saguaro Cactus, Arizona /  Photo credit: Brian Small]

Avian And Attributes – Peace

Avian And Attributes – Peace

Peaceful Dove (Geopelia striata) by Ian

Peaceful Dove (Geopelia striata) by Ian

“For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us;” (Ephesians 2:14 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Peace

PEACE, n. [L. pax, paco, to appease.]
1. In a general sense, a state of quiet or tranquillity; freedom from disturbance or agitation; applicable to society, to individuals, or to the temper of the mind.
3. Freedom from internal commotion or civil war.
4. Freedom from private quarrels, suits or disturbance.
5. Freedom from agitation or disturbance by the passions, as from fear, terror, anger, anxiety or the like; quietness of mind; tranquillity; calmness; quiet of conscience.
Great peace have they that love the law. Psa 119.

Great peace have they which love thy law: and nothing shall offend them.” (Psalms 119:165 KJV)
6. Heavenly rest; the happiness of heaven.
7. Harmony; concord; a state of reconciliation between parties at variance.
To be at peace, to be reconciled; to live in harmony.
To make peace, to reconcile, as parties at variance.
To hold the peace, to be silent; to suppress one’s thoughts; not to speak.

“That I may come unto you with joy by the will of God, and may with you be refreshed. Now the God of peace be with you all. Amen.” (Romans 15:32-33 KJV)


Zebra Dove (Geopelia striata) by Margaret Sloan

Peaceful Dove (Geopelia striata) by Margaret Sloan

Peaceful Dove

The Peaceful Dove (Geopelia placida) is a pigeon native to Australia and New Guinea. The Peaceful Dove is closely related to the zebra dove of south-east Asia and the barred dove of eastern Indonesia. Until recently, the three were classed as a single species, Geopelia striata, known as Peaceful dove or Zebra dove.

The bird is a relatively small pigeon and varies in length from 19 to 21 centimetres (7.6 to 8.4 inches). The peaceful dove has a pink-grey breast with chequered grey-brown wings. Thin striations of black appear around the neck and nape area and descend down the back. The eye is greyish-white and a blue-grey ring surrounds the eye that tapers off and joins the beak/cere. The juveniles are paler and less striated. They also have a duller eye ring. The nape is similar to that of the bar-shouldered dove in that the nape feathers are striated but differs in that the bar-shouldered dove does not have striated throat feathers like the peaceful dove. Furthermore, the nape feathers are grey-brown in colour compared to the vivid copper colour seen with bar-shouldered doves. (Wikipedia) (Columbidae – Pigeons, Doves Family)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “P”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Omnipresence

Avian And Attributes – Omnipresence

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) by W Kwong

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) by W Kwong

“Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or whither shall I flee from thy presence? If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; Even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.” (Psalms 139:7-10 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Omnipresence

OMNIPRES’ENCE, n. s as z. [L. omnis, and presens, present.]
Presence in every place at the same time; unbounded or universal presence; ubiquity. Omnipresence is an attribute peculiar to God.

OMNIPRES’ENT, a. Present in all places at the same time; ubiquitary; as the omnipresent Jehovah.

“The eyes of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good.” (Proverbs 15:3 KJV)


Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) by Lee at Wings of Asia

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) by Lee at Wings of Asia

Orange-bellied Leafbird

The Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) is a bird native to the central and eastern Himalayas, Yunnan and northern parts of Southeast Asia. The scientific name commemorates the English naturalist Thomas Hardwicke.

It is brightly coloured with an orange belly, a green back, a blue tail and flight feathers, and a black and blue patch over its throat and chest. It has a long, curved beak. It feeds on insects, spiders and nectar. Orange-bellied leafbirds make their nests from roots and fibers which are suspended from the edges of twigs at the end of a tree branch. They do not migrate. (Chloropseidae – Leafbirds Family) (Wikipedia)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “O”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

From The Archives – Birds of the Bible – Eagle’s Renewal

Birds of the Bible – Eagle’s Renewal

Bless the LORD, O my soul, And forget not all His benefits: Who forgives all your iniquities, Who heals all your diseases, Who redeems your life from destruction, Who crowns you with lovingkindness and tender mercies, Who satisfies your mouth with good things, So that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s. (Psalms 103:2-5 NKJV)

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by AestheticPhotos

The Eagle is an interesting bird and I have written about them before. In the King James Version of the Bible, an eagle is mentioned in 34 verses. So, there will be future articles about the eagle also.

The interest of this article is the renewing of the eagle. In Psalms 103:5 (quoted above), your youth is renewed like the eagle’s. What exactly does that mean? Also, in Isaiah 40:31, strength is renewed and “shall mount up with wings as eagles.”

But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. (Isaiah 40:31 KJV)

Many articles can be found on the internet about an eagle going off and plucking its feathers and not being able to fly for about five months. The image has even been added that the beak and claws are knocked off and then grow back during that time, giving them another 10 or so more years to their life. I have been trying to find proof of that, and am not finding it. Most Eagle authorities state that that would not happen, because the bird would die during that time with no flight feathers or beak or claws.

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)Grandfather Eagle by PastorBBC

If those facts are true, then what is meant by God’s Word about the eagle? I believe God’s Word is true, so there has to be an explanation of it. From the Southwestern Bald Eagle Management I found an interesting chart that shows the different stages of plumage (feathers) as an eagle ages.  They said, “In their five year development to adulthood, bald eagles go through one of the most varied plumage changes of any North American bird. During its first four weeks of life, an eaglet’s fluffy white down changes to a gray wooly down. At about five weeks, brown and black feathers begin to grow. It becomes fully feathered at 10 weeks of age. In its first year, the mostly dark-colored juvenile can often be mistaken as a golden eagle. However, the bald eagle progressively changes until it reaches adult plumage at five years. Notice in the pictures how its dark eye lightens throughout its first four years of life until it becomes yellow. Also, see how its beak changes form gray-black to a vibrant yellow.

ald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by AestheticPhotos

It is believed that the darker, more mottled plumage of a young eagle serves as camouflage, while the white head and tail announce that it is of breeding age.”

That to me sounds a lot like, “So that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.” As the eagle goes through the different stages of its life, the new feathers are graciously provided by a Creator that sees to the needs of His creation by having designed those features to renew as it matures.

The Lord provides for renewal for His children as they mature. The following verses tell of a renewed right spirit, mind, spirit of your mind, and knowledge:

Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me. (Psalms 51:10 KJV)
And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God. (Romans 12:2 KJV)
And be renewed in the spirit of your mind; (Ephesians 4:23 KJV)
And have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him: (Colossians 3:10 KJV)

(Update 11/2/11) Here is another possible explaination about this topic. It might be a vulture instead of an eagle. See: http://www.thewonderofbirds.com/griffon-vulture/bible.htm)
*


*** From the Archives ***

This is the first of “From the Archives.” We have decided to look back over the years and bring back some of the most popular articles. This post has had 114 remarks so far and was originally posted on 

[We have advanced in our layout of the blog over the year. The Birds of the Bible articles were the original reason for Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures being launched.


 

Avian And Attributes – Nazarene

Avian And Attributes – Nazarene

Nazca Booby (Sula granti) by Ian

“And he [Joseph] arose, and took the young child and his mother, and came into the land of Israel. But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither: notwithstanding, being warned of God in a dream, he turned aside into the parts of Galilee: And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene.” (Matthew 2:21-23 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Nazarene

Nazarene
(1): (n.) A native or inhabitant of Nazareth; — a term of contempt applied to Christ and the early Christians.

(2): (n.) One of a sect of Judaizing Christians in the first and second centuries, who observed the laws of Moses, and held to certain heresies.

[Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1913)]


Nazca Booby (Sula granti) with Chick ©WikiC

Nazca Booby

The Nazca Booby (Sula granti) is a colonial seabird in the family Sulidae, native to the eastern Pacific.

The species has a yellow iris, orange and pinkish beak, black facial skin in the form of a mask, and grey feet. Adults present white plumage with black tips of the wings and tail. The female is bigger and heavier than the male, has a slightly differently colored beak, and squawks while the male whistles. Chicks are snow white and fluffy, plumage changing to grey along with beak and feet upon fledging.

The species occurs in the eastern Pacific from the islands in Baja California to the Galapagos islands and the Isla de la Plata in Ecuador and Malpelo in Colombia.

The Nazca Booby preys on small fish caught by diving at high speed from flight into the ocean. The main food species is South American pilchard, but also take flying fish, anchovies and squid, especially during the El Niño events, when sardine numbers are low. Because of their sexual dimorphism, females tend to feed on bigger prey and dive deeper. (Sulidae – Gannets, Boobies)

Nazca Booby (Sula granti) ©WikiC


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “N”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Majestic

Avian And Attributes – Majestic

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©USFWS

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©USFWS

“But there the majestic LORD will be for us A place of broad rivers and streams, In which no galley with oars will sail, Nor majestic ships pass by” (Isaiah 33:21 NKJV)

“After it a voice roars; He thunders with His majestic voice, And He does not restrain them when His voice is heard. God thunders marvelously with His voice; He does great things which we cannot comprehend.” (Job 37:4-5 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Majestic

MAJES’TIC, a. [from majesty.] August; having dignity of person or appearance; grand; princely. The prince was majestic in person and appearance.
1. Splendid; grand.
2. Elevated; lofty.
3. Stately; becoming majesty; as a majestic air or walk.


Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) Female ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) Female ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens)

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) is a seabird of the frigatebird family Fregatidae. With a length of 89–114 centimetres (35–45 in) it is the largest species of frigatebird. It occurs over tropical and subtropical waters off America, between northern Mexico and Ecuador on the Pacific coast and between Florida and southern Brazil along the Atlantic coast. There are also populations on the Galápagos Islands in the Pacific and the Cape Verde islands in the Atlantic.

The magnificent frigatebird is a large, lightly built seabird with brownish-black plumage, long narrow wings and a deeply forked tail. The male has a striking red gular sac which it inflates to attract a mate. The female is slightly larger than the male and has a white breast and belly. Frigatebirds feed on fish taken in flight from the ocean’s surface (often flying fish), and sometimes indulge in kleptoparasitism, harassing other birds to force them to regurgitate their food.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “M”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]