Avian And Attributes – Ring

Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) ©WikiC

“But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.” ” It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.” (Luke 15:22-24, 32 KJV) [Refers to salvation]


Avian and Attributes – Ring

RING, n.
1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring, to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Exodus 25. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.
2. A circular course.
RING, n. [from the verb.]
1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as the ring of a bell.
2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as the ring of acclamations.
3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.
RING, v.t. [from the noun.
1. To encircle.
2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine’s snout.


Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) ©WikiC

The Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) is a European member of the thrush family, Turdidae. It is the mountain equivalent of the closely related common blackbird, and breeds in gullies, rocky areas or scree slopes.

“Ouzel” (or “ousel”) is an old name for common blackbird from Old English osle. “Ouzel” may also be applied to a group of superficially similar but unrelated birds, the dippers, the European representative of which is sometimes known as the water ouzel.

As with the English name, the scientific name also refers to the male’s obvious white neck crescent, being derived from the Latin words turdus, “thrush”, and torquatus, “collared”.

The adult male is all black except for a white crescent on the breast and a yellowish bill. The wings have a silvery appearance due to white feather edgings. The male sings its loud and mournful song from trees or rocks.

Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) Femaile ©WikiC Rainbirder

The female is similar but duller, and younger birds often lack the breast crescent. The juvenile has brown plumage.

This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema naturae in 1758 under its current scientific name.

It breeds in the higher regions of western and central Europe and also in the Caucasus and in the Scandinavian mountains. Most populations are migratory, wintering in the Mediterranean region. It is declining in parts of its range, particularly in Ireland.

It is territorial and normally seen alone or in pairs, although loose flocks may form on migration. When not breeding, several birds may also be loosely associated in good feeding areas, such as a fruiting tree, often with other thrushes.

There are other “Ring” named birds, but not just plain “Ring”:

Ring-billed Gull
Ringed Antpipit
Ringed Kingfisher
Ringed Teal
Ringed Warbling Finch
Ringed Woodpecker
Ring-necked Dove
Ring-necked Duck
Ring-necked Francolin
Ring-tailed Pigeon


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus. With Editing]

Avian And Attributes – Reunion

Reunion Stonechat (Saxicola tectes) ©WikiC

Reunion Stonechat (Saxicola tectes) ©WikiC

“You can start looking forward to a great reunion when I come visit you again. We’ll be praising Christ, enjoying each other.
(Philippians 1:26 MSG)

“Oh, we’ll be walking on air! And then there will be one huge family reunion with the Master. So reassure one another with these words.” (1 Thessalonians 4:18 MSG)

“Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord. Wherefore comfort one another with these words.” (1 Thessalonians 4:17-18 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Reunion

REUN’ION, n.
1. A second union; union formed anew after separation or discord; as a reunion of parts or particles of matter; a reunion of parties or sects.
2. In medicine, union of parts separated by wounds or accidents.


Reunion Birds

Reunion Harrier (Circus maillardi) ©WikiC

The Réunion harrier or Réunion marsh harrier (Circus maillardi) is a bird of prey belonging to the marsh harrier group of harriers. It is now found only on the Indian Ocean island of Réunion, although fossil material from Mauritius has been referred to this species. It is known locally as the papangue or pied jaune. The Malagasy harrier(C. macrosceles) of Madagascar and the Comoro Islands was previously treated as a subspecies of this bird but is increasingly regarded as a separate species. The Réunion harrier appears to be declining in numbers and it is classed as an endangered species.

Reunion Ibis (Threskiornis solitarius) Extinct ©Drawing WikiC

The Réunion Ibis or Réunion Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis solitarius) is an extinct species of ibis that was endemic to the volcanic island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean. The first subfossil remains were found in 1974, and the ibis was first scientifically described in 1987. Its closest relatives are the Malagasy sacred ibis, the African sacred ibis, and the straw-necked ibis.

Reunion Kestrel (Falco duboisi) ©Drawing WikiC

The Réunion Kestrel (Falco duboisi) is an extinct bird of prey which belongs to the falcon family. It inhabited the Mascarene island of Réunion and was part of the Western Indian Ocean radiation of kestrels.

Reunion Night Heron

No Photo available with permission. Can see it HERE

The Réunion Night Hheron (Nycticorax duboisi) is an extinct species of heron formerly occurring on the Mascarene island of Réunion.

It was for a long time only known from a single description, that of Dubois published in 1674. He stated:

Bitterns or Great Egrets, large as capons, but very fat and good. They have grey plumage, each feather spotted with white, the neck and beak like a Heron, and the feet green, made like the feet of Poullets d’Inde (Porphyrio, W.R.). This bird lives on fish.[2]

Reunion Olive White-eye (Zosterops olivaceus) ©WikiC

Reunion Olive White-eye (Zosterops olivaceus) ©WikiC

The Réunion Olive White-eye (Zosterops olivaceus) is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is found on Réunion. Its natural habitats are boreal forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.

Reunion Owl (Mascarenotus grucheti) ©Pinterest

The Réunion Owl (Mascarenotus grucheti) was a small owl that occurred on the Mascarene island of Réunion, but became extinct before living birds could be described; it is only known from subfossil bones. It belongs to the Mascarene owls of the genus Mascarenotus, and most likely was similar to a long-eared owl in size and appearance, but with nearly naked legs. The Mascarene owls were, however, more closely related to the genus Ninox. Compared to the Mauritius owl and the Rodrigues owl, it was the most terrestrial species of the genus, with long legs and possibly somewhat reduced flight capability; more probably though it was simply smaller than the Mauritius bird – between that species and the one from Rodrigues in size – but had equally long legs: the only suitable food available in quantity on Réunion were small birds.

[No photo available]
The Réunion Rail (Dryolimnas augusti) also known as Dubois’s wood-rail is an extinct rail species which was endemic to the Mascarenes island of Réunion. The scientific name commemorates French poet Auguste de Villèle (1858-1943) whose interest in the history of Réunion and hospitality made it possible for numerous naturalists to discover and explore the caves of Réunion.

Reunion Sheldgoose (Alopochen kervazoi) ©Pinterest

The Réunion Shelduck or Kervazo’s Egyptian goose (Alopochen kervazoi) is an extinct species of goose from Réunion. It was a close relative of the Egyptian goose and was about the same size. There is only one description remaining, that of Dubois made in 1674. He merely mentions that they were similar to European geese but smaller, with the bill and feet being red. Apart from that, the species is only known from brief reports and subfossil bones.

Reunion Stonechat (Saxicola tectes) Female ©WikiC

Réunion Stonechat (Saxicola tectes) Female ©WikiC

The Réunion Stonechat (Saxicola tectes) is a species of stonechat, endemic to the island of Réunion. This small passerine bird is common in clearings and open mountain bushlands there.

** As I was putting this together, the extinction of so many of these birds reminds us of the verses used. When we get caught for the “Reunion in the Air” we will be extinct down here on earth. Just make sure you have your reservation completed.  Gideon **


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Reed

Reed Parrotbill (Paradoxornis heudei) ©Drawing WikiC

“When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And they bowed the knee before Him and mocked Him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” Then they spat on Him, and took the reed and struck Him on the head.” (Matthew 27:29-30 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Reed

REED, n.
1. The common name of many aquatic plants; most of them large grasses, with hollow jointed stems, such as the common reed of the genus Arundo, the bamboo, &c. The bur-reed is of the genus Sparganium; the Indian Flowering reed of the genus Canna.
2. A musical pipe; reeds being anciently used for instruments of music.
3. A little tube through which a hautboy, bassoon or clarinet is blown.
4. An arrow, as made of a reed headed.
5. Thatch.


Reed Cormorant

Reed Cormorant (Microcarbo africanus) by Daves BirdingPix

TheReed Cormorant (Microcarbo africanus), also known as the long-tailed cormorant, is a bird in the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae. It breeds in much of Africa south of the Sahara, and Madagascar. It is resident but undertakes some seasonal movements.

The Reed Cormorant can dive to considerable depths, but usually feeds in shallow water. It frequently brings prey to the surface. It takes a wide variety of fish. It prefers small slow-moving fish, and those with long and tapering shapes, such as mormyrids, catfishes, and cichlids. It will less frequently eat soles (which can be important in its diet locally), frogs, aquatic invertebrates, and small birds.

Two to four eggs are laid in a nest in a tree or on the ground, normally hidden from view by long grass.

Reed Parrotbill

Reed Parrotbill (Paradoxornis heudei) ©Drawing WikiC

The Reed Parrotbill (Paradoxornis heudei) is a species of bird in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Manchuria and eastern China. It is threatened by habitat loss.

The northern subspecies P. h. polivanovi is sometimes regarded as a separate species, the northern parrotbill.

See Parrotbill article Good photos


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Rainbow

Rainbow Lorikeet Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

“Like the appearance of a rainbow in a cloud on a rainy day, so was the appearance of the brightness all around it. This was the appearance of the likeness of the glory of the LORD. So when I saw it, I fell on my face, and I heard a voice of One speaking.
(Ezekiel 1:28 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Rainbow

RA’INBOW, n. A bow, or an arch of a circle, consisting of all the colors formed by the refraction and reflection of rays of light from drops of rain or vapor, appearing in the part of the hemisphere opposite to the sun. When the sun is at the horizon, the rainbow is a semicircle. The rainbow is called also iris.
The moon sometimes forms a bow or arch of light, more faint than that formed by the sun, and called lunar rainbow. Similar bows at sea are called marine rainbows or sea bows.


Rainbow Bee-eater

Rainbow Bee-eater (Merops ornatus) by Ian

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet by Lee at Zoo Tampa

Rainbow Pitta

Rainbow Pitta-Australia-Birdway

Rainbow Starfrontlet

Rainbow Starfrontlet ©Brendan Ryan Flickr

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani) ©Flickr Jei Pov


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Purple

Purple-crowned Fairywren From Pinterest

“And they clothed him with purple, and platted a crown of thorns, and put it about his head, And began to salute him, Hail, King of the Jews! And they smote him on the head with a reed, and did spit upon him, and bowing their knees worshipped him. And when they had mocked him, they took off the purple from him, and put his own clothes on him, and led him out to crucify him.
(Mark 15:17-20 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Purple

PUR’PLE, a. [L. purpureus; purpura, a shell from which the color was obtained.]
1. Designating a color composed of red and blue blended, much admired, and formerly the roman emperors wore robes of this color.
2. In poetry, red or livid; dyed with blood.
PUR’PLE, n. A purple color or dress; hence, imperial government in the Roman empire, as a purple robe was the distinguishing dress of the emperors.
1. A cardinalate.
PUR’PLE, v.t. [L. purpuro.] To make purple, or to dye of a red color; as hands purpled with blood.


Purple-throated Woodstar (Calliphlox mitchellii) ©WikiC

Purple Birds

There are many birds that have “Purple” as the first word of their names (14). Plus there are 34 “Purple-” birds and 5 “Purplish” birds. So that you can see many of them, below is a slideshow with a good many of them. These are all the real purple birds and not the phoney colored ones seen on Pinterest and other “photoshoped” places. These are shown the way their Creative Creator colored them.

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Pilot

Pilotbird (Pycnoptilus floccosus) by Ian

“But the centurion was more persuaded by the pilot and the captain of the ship than by what was being said by Paul.” (Acts 27:11 NASB)

“Look at the ships also, though they are so great and are driven by strong winds, are still directed by a very small rudder wherever the inclination of the pilot desires.” (James 3:4 NASB


Avian and Attributes – Pilot

PI’LOT, n.
1. One who steers a ship in a dangerous navigation, or rather one whose office or occupation is to steer ships, particularly along a coast, or into and out of a harbor, bay or river, where navigation is dangerous.
2. A guide; a director of the course of another person. [In colloquial use.]
PI’LOT, v.t. To direct the course of a ship in any place where navigation is dangerous.


Pilotbird (Pycnoptilus floccosus) by AGrosset

Pilotbird (Pycnoptilus floccosus) by AGrosset

Pilotbird

The Pilotbird (Pycnoptilus floccosus) is a species of bird in the family Acanthizidae. It is monotypic within the genus Pycnoptilus. The species is endemic to south-east New South Wales and eastern Victoria in Australia. Its natural habitat is temperate wet sclerophyll forests and occasionally temperate rainforest. There are two subspecies Pycnoptilus floccosus floccosus lives in alpine areas of New South Wales such as the Snowy Mountains and Pycnoptilus floccosus sandfordi lives in lowland forest from Newcastle to Melbourne.

The pilotbird is a large, plump species of acanthizid, measuring around 18 centimetres (7.1 in) in length and weighing 27 grams (0.95 oz). It has a large head and a short bill. The plumage is mostly brown with scalloping on the chest and an orangeish throat. The species is highly terrestrial. The name of the species comes from its supposed habit of following lyrebirds, taking prey that they flush. This habit is well known but seldom observed.

The steps of a good man are ordered by the LORD: and he delighteth in his way.” (Psalms 37:23 KJV)

One of the my favorite songs about being piloted is “I Will Pilot Thee.” Who else should be directing our steps?

Fear thou not for I’ll be with thee
I will still thy Pilot be
Never mind the tossing billows
Take My hand and trust in Me

*** I really stretched it this time. We haven’t been birdwatching much lately. ***


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Pearl

Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) by Robert Scanlon

Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) by Robert Scanlon

“And the twelve gates were twelve pearls; every several gate was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass. And I saw no temple therein: for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple of it.” (Revelation 21:21-22 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Pearl

PEARL, n. perl.
1. A white, hard, smooth, shining body, usually roundish, found in a testaceous fish of the oyster kind. The pearl-shell is called matrix perlarum, mother of pearl, and the pearl is found only in the softer part of the animal. It is found in the Persian seas and in many parts of the ocean which washes the shores of Arabia and the continent and isles of Asia, and is taken by divers. Pearls are of different sizes and colors; the larger ones approach to the figure of a pear; some have been found more than an inch in length. They are valued according to their size, their roundness, and their luster or purity, which appears in a silvery brightness.
2. Poetically, something round and clear, as a drop of water or dew.
3. A white speck of film growing on the eye.
PEARL,v.t. perl. To set or adorn with pearls.
PEARL, v.i. perl. To resemble pearls.

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it.” (Matthew 13:45-46 KJV)


Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) by Ian

Pearl Kite

The Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) is a very small raptor found in open savanna habitat adjacent to deciduous woodland. It is the only member of the genus Gampsonyx. The scientific name commemorates the English naturalist William Swainson.

The type specimen was collected from Brazil by English naturalist William Swainson, and described by Nicholas Aylward Vigors in 1825.  Vigors noted the similarity to both hawks and falcons, but placed Gampsonyx within the “Accipitrine subfamily” because it lacks the notched beak of the falcons. He also noted its striking resemblance to the coloration of the falconets.

Later, the pearl kite was classified with the falcons. For example, Peters placed it with the forest falcons in subfamily Polyhieracinae. In the mid-20th century it was found to be related to Elanus based on morphology and its molt schedule.

This tiny kite breeds from Panama, Colombia and Venezuela south to Bolivia and northern Argentina, with an isolated sedentary population in Nicaragua. It is expanding its range and was proved to breed on Trinidad in 1970. It was first reported in Costa Rica in the mid-1990s, and now is fairly common along Pacific slope, to 1000m.

Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) ©Flickr Fernando Flores

The pearl kite is 20.3–23 cm (8.0–9.1 in) in length and weighs 80–95 g (2.8–3.4 oz). It is the smallest raptor in the Americas and one of the two smallest accipitrids in the world (besides the little sparrowhawk). The tiny hawk, another neotropical species, attains a slightly higher weight than the pearl kite. The adult has a black crown, upperparts, wing and tail, a rufous edged white collar, yellow forehead and cheeks, mainly white underparts, and yellow legs. Immature birds are similar to the adults but have white and chestnut tips to the back and wing feathers, a buff collar and some buff on the white underparts. In flight this species looks mainly black above and white below. The northern form G. s. leonae differs from the nominate G. s. swainsonii in that it has rufous flanks.

The nest is a deep cup of sticks built high in a tree. The clutch is 2-4 brown-marked white eggs, incubated mainly by the female for 34–35 days to hatching, with a further 5 weeks to fledging. There may be two broods in a season.

The pearl kite feeds mainly on lizards, especially Anolis, but also takes small birds and insects; it usually sits on a high open perch from which it swoops on its prey. The call is a high musical pip-pip-pip-pip or kitty-kitty-kitty.


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What will you do with Jesus?

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Paradise

Paradise Tanager (Tangara chilensis) by Juan D Ramirez Rpo on Flickr From Pinterest

“And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise.” (Luke 23:42-43 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Paradise

PAR’ADISE, n. [Gr.] The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed immediately after their creation.
1. A place of bliss; a region of supreme felicity or delight.
The earth
Shall all be paradise–
2. Heaven, the blissful seat of sanctified souls after death.
This day shalt thou be with me in paradise. Luke 23.
3. Primarily, in Persia, a pleasure-garden with parks and other appendages.

“He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the tree of life, which is in the midst of the paradise of God.” (Revelation 2:7 KJV)


Paradise Birds

Paradise Drongo 

Paradise Drongo Photo

The paradise drongo or ribbon-tailed drongo (Dicrurus megarhynchus) is a species of bird in the family Dicruridae. It is endemic to New Ireland in the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea.

Paradise Jacamar

Paradise Jacamar (Galbula dea) ©Arthur Grosset

The Paradise Jacamar (Galbula dea) distributed throughout tropical rainforests and savanna of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and the Guyanas. Its range encompasses nearly the entire Amazon Basin, except in the northwest basin in parts of Colombia and Venezuela, (the northeast is the three countries of the Guyanas, which drain to the Atlantic-Caribbean). The diet consists mainly of butterflies and other flying insects.

Paradise Riflebird

Paradise Riflebird-Australia-Birdway

Paradise Riflebird (Ptiloris paradiseus) is medium-sized, up to 30 cm long. The male is black with an iridescent greenish blue crown, throat and central tail feathers. It has a black curved bill, black feet, dark brown iris and yellow mouth. The female is an olive brown bird with barred blackish below with a long white brow above her eye. The species is Endemic to eastern Australia, where it occurs in the rainforests of New South Wales and central Queensland.

Paradise Riflebird (Ptiloris paradiseus) Female ©WikiC

Paradise Shelduck

Paradise Shelduck (Tadorna variegata) by Ian 2

Paradise Shelduck (Tadorna variegata) by Ian 2

The Paradise Shelduck (Tadorna variegata) is a large goose-like duck endemic to New Zealand. It is a shelduck, a group of large goose-like birds which are part of the bird family Anatidae. The genus name Tadorna comes from Celtic roots and means “pied waterfowl”. Known to the Māori as pūtangitangi, but now commonly referred to as the “paradise duck”, it is a prized game bird. Both the male and female have striking plumage: the male has a black head and barred black body, the female a white head with a chestnut body. The paradise shelducks usually live as pairs, grazing on grass and weeds, and will raid crops, particularly when molting.

Paradise Tanager

Paradise Tanager (Tangara_chilensis) -DenverZoo-WikiC

Paradise Tanager (Tangara chilensis) -DenverZoo-WikiC

The Paradise Tanager (Tangara chilensis) is a brilliantly multicolored, medium-sized songbird whose length varies between 13.5 and 15 cm. It has a light green head, sky blue underparts and black upper body plumage. Depending on subspecies, the rump is yellow and red or all red. The beak is black and the legs are grey.

Found in humid tropical and subtropical forests in the western and northern Amazon Basin in South America, it occurs in Venezuela, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil and the Guianas. Despite its scientific name, it is not found in Chile.

Paradise-crow

Paradise-crow (Lycocorax pyrrhopterus) ©©Flickr

The Paradise-crow (Lycocorax pyrrhopterus) also known as the silky crow, is a medium-sized crow-like bird-of-paradise. One of the few monogamous birds-of-paradise, the paradise-crow is endemic to lowland forests of North Maluku in Indonesia. The diet consists mainly of fruits and arthropods.


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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Palm

Palm Tanager (Thraupis palmarum) 2 by Kent Nickell

Palm Tanager (Thraupis palmarum) by Kent Nickell

“Then did they spit in his face, and buffeted him; and others smote him with the palms of their hands,” (Matthew 26:67 KJV)

“Took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.” (John 12:13 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Palm

PALM, n. p`am.. [L. palma.]
1. The inner part of the hand.
2. A hand or hand’s breadth; a lineal measure of three inches.
4. The name of many species of plants, but particularly of the date-tree or great palm, a native of Asia and Africa.
The palms constitute a natural order of monocotyledonous plants,with a simple cylindric stem, terminating in a crown of leaves or fronds, within which rises a tuft of flowers and fruits; all natives of warm climates. They vary in size from 2 to more than 100 feet in height.
5. Branches of the palm being worn in token of victory, hence the word signifies superiority, victory, triumph. The palm was adopted as an emblem of victory, it is said, because the tree is so elastic as when pressed, to rise and recover its correct position.
Namur subdued is England’s palm alone.

“Took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.” (John 12:13 KJV)


Palm Cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus) ©Wikipedia

Palm Birds

Palm Cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus), also known as the goliath cockatoo or great black cockatoo, is a large smoky-grey or black parrot of the cockatoo family native to New Guinea, Aru Islands, and Cape York Peninsula. It has a very large black beak and prominent red cheek patches.

Palm Lorikeet (Charmosyna palmarum) ©Drawing WikiC

The Palm Lorikeet (Charmosyna palmarum) is a species of parrot in the family Psittaculidae. It is found in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical moist montane forest and plantations.

Palm Tanager (Thraupis palmarum) ©Arthur Grosset

The Palm Tanager (Thraupis palmarum) is a medium-sized passerine bird. This tanager is a resident breeder from Nicaragua south to Bolivia, Paraguay and southern Brazil. It also breeds on Trinidad and, since 1962, on Tobago. In Trinidad and Tobago, it is known by colloquial names such as the “palmiste” and the “green jean”.

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) by Bob-Nan

The Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) is a small songbird of the New World warbler family. The species comprises two distinct subspecies that may merit specific status.

“Yellow palm warbler” or “eastern palm warbler” (S. p. hypochrysea) of the eastern third of the breeding range has brownish-olive upper parts and thoroughly yellow underparts with bold rufous breast and flank streaking. It migrates later in the fall than its western counterpart.

“Brown palm warbler” or “western palm warbler” (S. p. palmarum) inhabits the remaining western two-thirds of the breeding range. It has much less yellow below, with less colorful streaking, and cold grayish-brown upper parts.

Palmchat (Dulus dominicus) ©SevenSeas of Rhye

Palmchat (Dulus dominicus) ©SevenSeas of Rhye

The Palmchat (Dulus dominicus) is a small, long-tailed passerine bird, the only species in the genus Dulus and the family Dulidae. It is thought to be related to the waxwings, family Bombycillidae, and is sometimes classified with that group. The name reflects its strong association with palms for feeding, roosting and nesting. The palmchat is the national bird of the Dominican Republic.


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Birds whose first name starts with “P”

Gideon

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Noble

Noble Snipe (Gallinago nobilis) ©WikiC

“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.” (Acts 17:11 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Noble

NO’BLE, a.
1. Great; elevated; dignified; being above every thing that can dishonor reputation; as a nobel mind; a noble courage; noble deeds of valor.
2. Exalted; elevated; sublime.
3. Magnificent; stately; splendid; as a noble parade; a noble edifice.
4. Of an ancient and splendid family; as nobel by descent.
5. Distinguished from commoners by rank and title; as a noble personage.
8. Ingenuous; candid; of an excellent disposition; ready to receive truth. Acts 17.
9. Of the best kind; choice; excellent; as a noble vine. Jer 2.
NO’BLE, n.
1. A person of rank above a commoner; a nobleman; a peer; as a duke, marquis, earl, viscount or baron.
2. In Scripture, a person of honorable family or distinguished by station. Exo 24. Neh 6.


Noble Snipe (Gallinago nobilis) ©Drawing WikiC

Noble Snipe (Gallinago nobilis) is a small stocky wader. It breeds in the Andes of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela above or just below the treeline. It is entirely sedentary.

This 30–32.5 cm long snipe has a stocky body and relatively short legs for a wader. Its upperparts, head and neck are streaked and patterned with dark brown and buff, and gold edges to the feathers form distinct lines down its back. The belly is white with brown barring on the flanks. The horn-coloured bill is very long and straight. The legs and feet are greyish-green. The sexes are similar, but females are longer billed; immature birds differ only in showing pale fringes on the wing coverts. The noble snipe has a clear melodious call.

The noble snipe is found high altitude wet grassland marshes and swamps from 2,700 – 4,200 m.

Little is known of its biology, but it has an aerial display, which involves flying high in circles, followed by a powerful stoop during which the bird makes a drumming sound, caused by vibrations of modified outer tail feathers, lower pitched than that of common snipe. It breeds from March to July.

The noble snipe is usually alone or in pairs, but is difficult to observe on the ground. It forages by pushing its long bill deep into the mud seeking insects and worms. Its cryptic plumage provides effective camouflage when the bird stands motionless amongst marsh vegetation.


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Sharing The Gospel

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828) edited, unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Night

Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) ©WikiC by ornithologist Steve Murphy

“Then saith Jesus unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad. But after I am risen again, I will go before you into Galilee. Peter answered and said unto him, Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended. Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, That this night, before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.” (Matthew 26:31-34 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Night

NIGHT, n. [The sense may be dark, black, or it may be the decline of the day, from declining, departing.]
1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise.
2. The time after the close of life; death. John 9.
She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
3. A state of ignorance; intellectual and moral darkness; heathenish ignorance. Rom 13.
4. Adversity; a state of affliction and distress. Isa 21.
5. Obscurity; a state of concealment from the eye or the mind; unintelligibleness.
Nature and natures works lay hid in night.
In the night, suddenly; unexpectedly. Luke 12.
To-night, in this night. To-night the moon will be eclipsed.


Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) Drawing WikiC

Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) Drawing WikiC

Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) is a small parrot endemic to the continent of Australia. It is well known as being one of the most elusive and mysterious birds in the world, with no confirmed sightings of the bird between 1912 and 1979, leading to speculation that it was extinct. Sightings since 1979 have been extremely rare and the bird’s population size is unknown, though based on the paucity of records it is thought to number between 50 and 249 mature individuals. The first photographic and video evidence of a live individual was publicly confirmed in July 2013.

A relatively small and short-tailed parrot, the species’ colour is predominantly a yellowish green, mottled with dark brown, blacks and yellows. Both sexes have this coloration. It is distinguished from the two superficially similar ground parrot species by its shorter tail and different range and habitat. Predominantly terrestrial, taking to the air only when panicked or in search of water, the night parrot has furtive, nocturnal habits and—even when it was abundant—was apparently a highly secretive species. Its natural habitat appears to be the spinifex grass which still dominates much of the dry, dusty Australian interior; other early reports also indicate that it never strayed far from water. It may also inhabit chenopod shrublands, eucalyptus woodlands, and mallee shrublands. One of the vocalisations of the night parrot has been described as a croak and identified as a contact call. Other calls, mostly short ‘ding-ding’ whistles, and a more drawn out whistle, have been recorded from Queensland and Western Australia.


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Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Birds of the Bible – Yellow-billed Storks at Zoo Tampa

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee 032718

“And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.” (Deuteronomy 14:18 KJV)

We were at Lowry Park Zoo, now called Zoo Tampa at Lowry Park, and saw the Yellow-billed Storks in the Sulawesi aviary. This was the first time we have seen them in there. It gave a great opportunity to watch them up-close. Really, up-close! It was great!

Storks are mentioned in the Bible in five verses in the KJV. Leviticus 11:19, Deuteronomy 14:18, Psalm 104:18, Jeremiah 8:7, and Zechariah 5:9. The first two verses have to do with the “Do Not Eat” list, the next two with nesting and migration, and the last with a prophecy.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee 032718

The Yellow-billed stork (Mycteria ibis), sometimes also called the wood stork or wood ibis, is a large African wading stork species in the family Ciconiidae. It is widespread in regions south of the Sahara and also occurs in Madagascar.

The yellow-billed stork is closely related to 3 other species in the Mycteria genus: the American woodstork (Mycteria americana), the milky stork (Mycteria cinerea) and the painted stork (Mycteria leucocephala). It is classified as belonging to one clade with these 3 other species because they all display remarkable homologies in behavior and morphology. In one analytical study of feeding and courtship behaviours of the wood-stork family, M.P. Kahl attributed the same general ethology to all members of the Mycteria genus, with few species-specific variations. [Probably only one of that genus was onboard the Ark] These four species are collectively referred to as the wood-storks, which should not be confused with one alternative common name (wood-stork) for the yellow-billed stork.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee

Before it was established that the yellow-billed stork was closely related to the American woodstork, the former was classified as belonging to the genus Ibis, together with the milky stork and painted stork. However, the yellow-billed stork has actually long been recognised as a true stork and along with the other 3 related stork species, it should not strictly be called an ibis.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee 032718

It is a medium-sized stork standing 90–105 cm (35–41 in) tall. The body is white with a short black tail that is glossed green and purple when freshly moulted. The bill is deep yellow, slightly decurved at the end and has a rounder cross-section than in other stork species outside the Mycteria. Feathers extend onto the head and neck just behind the eyes, with the face and forehead being covered by deep red skin. Both sexes are similar in appearance, but the male is larger and has a slightly longer heavier bill. Males and females weigh approximately 2.3 kg (5.1 lb) and 1.9 kg (4.2 lb) respectively.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee

Colouration becomes more vivid during the breeding season. In the breeding season, the plumage is coloured pink on the upperwings and back; the ordinarily brown legs also turn bright pink; the bill becomes a deeper yellow and the face becomes a deeper red.

Their diet comprises mainly small, freshwater fish of about 60-100mm length and maximally 150g, which they swallow whole. They also feed on crustaceans, worms, aquatic insects, frogs and occasionally small mammals and birds.

This species appears to rely mainly on sense of touch to detect and capture prey, rather than by vision. They feed patiently by walking through the water with partially open bills and probe the water for prey. Contact of the bill with a prey item is followed by a rapid snap-bill reflex, whereby the bird snaps shut its mandibles, raises its head and swallows the prey whole.[3] The speed of this reflex in the closely related American woodstork (Mycteria americana) has been recorded as 25 milliseconds[15] and although the corresponding reflex in the yellow-billed stork has not been quantitatively measured, the yellow-billed stork’s feeding mechanism appears to be at least qualitatively identical to that of the American woodstork.

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

In addition to the snap-bill reflex, the yellow-billed stork also uses a systematic foot stirring technique to sound out evasive prey. It prods and churns up the bottom of the water as part of a “herding mechanism” to force prey out of the bottom vegetation and into the bird’s bill. The bird does this several times with one foot before bringing it forwards and repeating with the other foot. Although they are normally active predators, they have also been observed to scavenge fish regurgitated by cormorants.

[Information from Wikipedia with editing]

Timmy and the Stork

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