Avian And Attributes – Shade

Shade Bush Warbler Drawing ©HBAlive

“The LORD is thy keeper: the LORD is thy shade upon thy right hand.” (Psalms 121:5 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Shade

SHADE, n. [L. scutum, a shield.]
1. Literally, the interception, cutting of or interruption of the rays of light; hence, the obscurity which is caused by such interception. Shad differs from shadow, as it implies no particular form or definite limit. whereas a shadow represents in form the object which intercepts the light. Hence when we say, let us resort to the shade of a tree, we have no reference to its form; but when we speak of measuring a pyramid or other object by its shadow, we have reference to its extent.
2. Darkness; obscurity; as the shades of night.
3. An obscure place, properly in a grove or close wood, which precludes the sun’s rays; an hence, a secluded retreat.
4. A screen; something that intercepts light or heat.
5. Protection; shelter.
6. In painting, the dark part of the picture.
7. Degree or gradation of light.
White, red, yellow, blue, with their several degrees, or shades and mixtures, as green, come only in by the eyes. Locke.
8. A shadow.


Shade Bush Warbler in Middle Drawing by John Anderton

Shade Bush Warbler (Horornis parens) or shade warbler (Horornis parens) is a species of bird in the family Cettiidae. It is found only in Solomon Islands, where it is endemic to the island of Makira (formerly San Cristobal Island). Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests and tropical moist montane forest above 600m. It feeds on insects in the undergrowth and on the ground.

There are really no photos available on line.

H B Alive Drawing

https://goo.gl/images/aiFdky


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Seaside

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (Dusky-extinct) ©WikiC

“The same day went Jesus out of the house, and sat by the sea side.” (Matthew 13:1 KJV)

“And he began again to teach by the sea side: and there was gathered unto him a great multitude, so that he entered into a ship, and sat in the sea; and the whole multitude was by the sea on the land.” (Mark 4:1 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Seaside

Sea-side
SE’A-SIDE, n. [sea and side.]

The land bordering on the sea; the country adjacent to the sea, or near it.


Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis) (Cape Sabel) ©WikiC

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritima) is a small American sparrow.

Adults have brownish upperparts with gray on the crown and nape, and a grayish-buff-colored breast with dark streaks; they have a dark face with gray cheeks, a white throat, and a short, pointed tail. Birds show a small yellow streak just above the eye.

Their breeding habitat is salt marshes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States from southern New Hampshire to southern Texas. The nest is an open cup usually built in the salt marsh on tidal reeds and spartina grasses. Females lay two to five eggs.

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimusl) ©WikiC

Northern birds most often migrate further south along the eastern coast of the United States. They forage on the ground or in marsh vegetation, sometimes probing in mud. They mainly eat insects, marine invertebrates and seeds. Their feeding areas are often some distance away from the areas they choose to nest.

The song is a raspy buzz that closely resembles a distant red-winged blackbird.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Osprey Feeding On His Catch of the Day

Osprey at Viera looking to the Creator and hopefully he is thanking Him for the fish.

“Who provideth for the raven [and Ospreys] his food? when his young ones cry unto God, they wander for lack of meat.” (Job 38:41 KJV)

Dan took a couple of really nice photos of the hungry Osprey.

Now for Dan’s great photos.

Time to strip the innards! Yuck!

When we were last at Viera Wetlands, we caught an Osprey eating a fish. Apparently he doesn’t like the “guts.” We watched it pull them out and then drop them. Did that several times, and then started eating the fish.

“But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds.” (1 Corinthians 15:38-39 KJV)

I am thankful that the Lord let me be born as a human. I am also very thankful that He provided salvation for our fallen sinful human nature.

What will you do with Jesus?

Other Photos by Dan

Avian And Attributes – Screaming

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) ©WikiC

“And when the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were terrified and said, It is a ghost! And they screamed out with fright. But instantly He spoke to them, saying, Take courage! I AM! Stop being afraid!” (Matthew 14:26-27 AMP)

Jesus walked on the sea and they were terrified and might have screamed in fear.


Avian and Attributes – Scream

screamshoutyellshriekhoothollervociferationoutcrybellow, or raising one’s voice is a loud vocalization in which air is passed through the vocal folds with greater force than is used in regular or close-distance vocalization. This can be performed by any creature possessing lungs, including humans. There are slight differences in meaning among them; for example, “scream” and “shriek” generally refer to a higher-pitched, sharp sound, used by some birds and other animals, and a “hoot”, such as emitted by an owl, usually does not involve words.

A scream is often an instinctive or reflex action, with a strong emotional aspect, like fear, pain, surprise, joy, anger, etc. [This would describe what those in the boat most like did.]


Screaming Birds

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris) ©WikiC

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillarisis an obligate brood parasite belonging to the family Icteridae and is found in South America. It is also known commonly as the short billed cowbird.

Within South America, the screaming cowbird is found in north east and central Argentina, south east Bolivia, central Brazil and throughout Paraguay and Uruguay. Its natural habitat is pastureland where it forages amongst grazing animals such as cows, hence the name “cowbird”. Similar to other cowbirds, it forages predominantly on the ground, eating invertebrates that have been disturbed by grazing stock. The distribution of the screaming cowbird has increased significantly in recent decades due to habitat alteration caused by deforestation and by following its hosts into new areas.

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) is a species of passerine bird in the family Cotingidae. It is found in humid forests in the Amazon and tropical parts of the Mata Atlântica in South America. It is adapting well to human settlement areas like gardens and parks.

Both sexes have dull grey plumage (wings and tail often somewhat browner) and a voice that is extraordinary loud. Males often gather in loose leks, where they sing to attract females.

The Cofan people of Ecuador call it the Pwe-pwe Yoh, which is a reference to its voice. Among the Ecuadorian Secoyas, the bird is known as the Kwow-kwee-yo. The sound is frequently used in movies, and also can be heard in the background of the popular game Angry Birds Rio.

[Wikipedia with editing]


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Take A Note

Secretarybird look straight at the lens – ©Pinterest – Rudi Luyten

You would like me to take a note?

Secretarybird -Notice the eyelashes – ©Pinterest

Looking down to start writing! [Notice the eyelashes]

Just because these are neat birds, decided to share these Secretarybird photos from Pinterest.

“Let not mercy and truth forsake you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart,” (Proverbs 3:3 NKJV)

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Secretary Bird – The Walker

Indecisive Black-bellied Whistling-Duck

Shall I Go To The This Way?

Shall I Go To That Way?

And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions? if the LORD be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him. And the people answered him not a word. (1 Kings 18:21 KJV)

Still Undecided As To Which Way To Go by Lee

Elijah went there and stood in front of the people. He said, “How long will it take you to make up your minds? If the LORD is the one and only God, follow him. But if Baal is the one and only God, follow him.” The people didn’t say anything. (1 Kings 18:21 NIrV)

Just About Decided

Elijah challenged the people: “How long are you going to sit on the fence? If GOD is the real God, follow him; if it’s Baal, follow him. Make up your minds!” Nobody said a word; nobody made a move. (1 Kings 18:21 MSG)

This Black-bellied Whistling-Duck was undecided about where to go. There were quite a few Whistling Ducks at Viera Wetlands, and they were playing “musical palm tree stubs.” They kept landing on these tree tops and chasing the other off. Yet, this verse comes to mind.

I trust all of us are decided about WHO we are going to follow.

Now for a picture of a Black-bellied Whistling-Duck by Dan [the much better photographer]

Black-bellied Whistling Duck by Dan

The Black-bellied Whistling-Duck is a large, gooselike duck with a long neck, long legs, and short tail. In flight, look for their broad wings, long neck, and hunched back.

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are dark overall: a chestnut breast and black belly are set off by a bright-pink bill and legs, grayish face, and broad white wing stripe, also visible in flight. Immatures are duller than adults, with a dark bill, pale breast, and mottled black belly. [Info from All About Birds]*

Atlantic Puffins on the Isle of Mull, Scotland

Atlantic Puffins by Bill Boothe, MD in the Isle of Mull Scotland

These Atlantic Puffin’s photo was taken by Bill Boothe, MD, in the Isle of Mull, Scotland. Dr. Boothe is a long time friend of Dr. James Johnson. It would have been nice to have been there also.

This puffin (Atlantic Puffin) has a black crown and back, pale grey cheek patches and white underparts. Its broad, boldly marked red and black beak and orange legs contrast with its plumage. It moults while at sea in the winter and some of the bright-colored facial characteristics are lost, with color returning again during the spring. The external appearance of the adult male and female are identical though the male is usually slightly larger. The juvenile has similar plumage but its cheek patches are dark grey. The juvenile does not have brightly colored head ornamentation, its bill is narrower and is dark-grey with a yellowish-brown tip, and its legs and feet are also dark. Puffins from northern populations are typically larger than in the south and it is generally considered that these populations are different subspecies.

Puffin Beaks – Breeding L and non-breeding R – 1905 PubDom Drawing

Spending the autumn and winter in the open ocean of the cold northern seas, the Atlantic puffin returns to coastal areas at the start of the breeding season in late spring. It nests in clifftop colonies, digging a burrow in which a single white egg is laid. The chick mostly feeds on whole fish and grows rapidly. After about six weeks it is fully fledged and makes its way at night to the sea. It swims away from the shore and does not return to land for several years. [Wikipedia with editing]

This photo was take in Mull, Scotland. “Mull (Scottish Gaelic: Muile, pronounced [ˈmulʲə]) is the second largest island of the Inner Hebrides (after Skye), off the west coast of Scotland in the council area of Argyll and Bute.

Argyll and Bute UK relief location map

With an area of 875.35 square kilometres (337.97 sq mi) Mull is the fourth largest Scottish island and the fourth largest island surrounding Great Britain (excluding Ireland). In the 2011 census the usual resident population of Mull was 2,800; a slight increase on the 2001 figure of 2,667; in the summer this is supplemented by many tourists. Much of the population lives in Tobermory, the only burgh on the island until 1973, and its capital.”

Lighter side verses: [yet very true]

“Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up;” (1 Corinthians 13:4 NKJV)

“We know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffs up, but love edifies.” (1 Corinthians 8:1 NKJV)

Butterflies at Brevard Zoo

Monarch and White Peacock at Brevard Zoo Butterfly Exhibit

“O LORD, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches.” (Psalms 104:24 KJV)

They recently opened up a new Butterfly area at the Brevard Zoo in Brevard, Florida. This was the first time we have been to this exhibit.

There was soft music playing and the butterflies were just flitting here and there. I took this video, which is not the best, but they were really beautiful [when I could keep it in focus].

It was not a frog making noise. It was a pair of Turocos calling.

White-crested Turaco at Brevard Zoo was calling

“He will bless them that fear the LORD, both small and great.” (Psalms 115:13 KJV)

Julia Butterfly

Below are some of the photo that I took. I trust I attached the right names to them. I used the signs they provided.

Brevard Zoo
Wordless Hummingbirds

When I Am Grown

Young Gallinule at Viera Wetlands

On the Fourth of July, yesterday, we were at Viera Wetlands, Viera, Florida and spotted this young Common Gallinule, depending on what they are calling it. Look at its feet. He/she has some growing to do to fit those feet.

Below is how it will look when it matures.

Common Gallinule (Gallinula chloropus) by Reinier Munguia

“I have been young, and now am old; yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread.” (Psalms 37:25 KJV)

Another promise our Savior and Creator has given us. Lord’s Blessings.

Common Gallinule – All About Birds

Shield of Thy Salvation

I.O.C. World Bird List Version 8.2 – Updated

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Gray Jay now Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

I finally finished updating the Birds of the World pages to reflect the newest version, 8.2. of the IOC’s bird list. The family pages and the indexes have been modified. Since the photos on the site were hacked last year, the family pages were changed. Now the photos are at the bottom of the pages instead of with each name.

With this version, I added the Genera in with Green. Many of the new changes are in red and a few in blue. The red are spelling or Genera changes. Blue seems to represent reshuffled positions within a family. [I think – this is from their Excel spreadsheet]

White-crested Helmetshrike (Prionops plumatus) ©WikiC

Two families were moved into the Vangidae – Vanga and Allies family.

Here is the over update:

The IOC World Bird List 8.2 contains 10,711 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  246 Families (plus 1 Incertae Sedis) and 2,313 Genera.  The list also includes 20,055 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Changes include:

SPECIES ADDED:                15 

SPECIES DELETED:             3

ENGLISH NAMES:               18

TAXONOMY:                         18 incl revisions of  Campephagidae, Phylloscopidae and Locustellidae, and expansion of Vangidae to include helmetshrikes, woodshrikes, and shrike-flycatchers

Large woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis) ©WikiC

The three articles listed in the Time For Another Update From The I.O.C. explain the changes and saves me rewriting the same information.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

2018 checklist changes include few splits

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

The Indexes, Alphabetical Pages and Family Pages are all current here on the site:

Birds of the World

Alphabetical List of the Birds.

ORDER

Family

Families – Alphabetical (Scientific)

Families – Alphabetical (English)

Families – Taxonomic (Scientific – English)

Families – Taxonomic (English – Scientific)

Species Index

Those Who Wish To Sing

I received an email recently to ask if I would allow permission to use this photo:

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

“Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him, talk ye of all his wondrous works.” (1 Chronicles 16:9 KJV)

Since this beautiful singing Vireo is on the internet as Creative Commons, they were free to use it.

Here is how a very artistic person painted it. Wow! I can hardly draw a stick man correctly!

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©Brindusa Art

Here is a little about her:

I am a Christian woman who greatly enjoys painting and sharing some of the beauty she sees around her. I am very grateful for God’s grace and for this gift of painting that He’s given me…

Please visit her site and see this lovely drawing and her other drawings.

Those Who Wish To Sing Always Find A Song

https://www.facebook.com/BrindusaArt/

http://brindusa-art.ro/wordpress/gallery/

 

Time For Another Update From The I.O.C.

White-collared Seedeater (Sporophila torqueola) male by Kent Nickell

White-collared Seedeater (Sporophila torqueola) male by Kent Nickell Now Split

The latest update from the I.O.C. [8.2] just came out yesterday. Thankfully, they are only doing two a year now, not four. So, while I dig in and rearrange and update this site, here are a couple of articles about the latest changes that might interest you.

If you are new to this blog, several times a year, the birding authorities accept and reject proposals for splits, lumps and new species. Some are accepted and many are rejected for now. These articles help explain that procedure better than I can. So, look them over. They reveal the hows and whys of the latest changes.

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) by Kent Nickell

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) by Kent Nickell Now Split

This first one shows the changes very well and may save me doing the same.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

BirdWatching magazine has this article:

2018 checklist changes include few splits

This next article by David Sibley is really good and helps us understand these changes from a personal level:

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

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Latest update online here is the IOC 8.1. Stay tuned, I’m on it!

“My son, fear thou the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change:” (Proverbs 24:21 KJV)

I.O.C. Version 8.1 Update Completed

Dividing the Buntings and Sparrows – I.O.C. 8.1

Hang On To Your Hat – I.O.C. 8.1 Update Underway