I.O.C. World Bird List Version 8.2 – Updated

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Gray Jay now Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

I finally finished updating the Birds of the World pages to reflect the newest version, 8.2. of the IOC’s bird list. The family pages and the indexes have been modified. Since the photos on the site were hacked last year, the family pages were changed. Now the photos are at the bottom of the pages instead of with each name.

With this version, I added the Genera in with Green. Many of the new changes are in red and a few in blue. The red are spelling or Genera changes. Blue seems to represent reshuffled positions within a family. [I think – this is from their Excel spreadsheet]

White-crested Helmetshrike (Prionops plumatus) ©WikiC

Two families were moved into the Vangidae – Vanga and Allies family.

Here is the over update:

The IOC World Bird List 8.2 contains 10,711 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  246 Families (plus 1 Incertae Sedis) and 2,313 Genera.  The list also includes 20,055 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Changes include:

SPECIES ADDED:                15 

SPECIES DELETED:             3

ENGLISH NAMES:               18

TAXONOMY:                         18 incl revisions of  Campephagidae, Phylloscopidae and Locustellidae, and expansion of Vangidae to include helmetshrikes, woodshrikes, and shrike-flycatchers

Large woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis) ©WikiC

The three articles listed in the Time For Another Update From The I.O.C. explain the changes and saves me rewriting the same information.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

2018 checklist changes include few splits

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

The Indexes, Alphabetical Pages and Family Pages are all current here on the site:

Birds of the World

Alphabetical List of the Birds.

ORDER

Family

Families – Alphabetical (Scientific)

Families – Alphabetical (English)

Families – Taxonomic (Scientific – English)

Families – Taxonomic (English – Scientific)

Species Index

Avian And Attributes – Scarlet-plus Birds

Scarlet-and-white Tanager (Chrysothlypis salmoni) ©WikiC

“They shall spread over them a scarlet cloth, …” (Numbers 4:8a NKJV)

“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” (Isaiah 1:18 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet II

Scarlet
This dye was obtained by the Egyptians from the shell-fish Carthamus tinctorius; and by the Hebrews from the Coccus ilicis, an insect which infests oak trees, called kermes by the Arabians.
This colour was early known (Gen_38:28). It was one of the colours of the ephod (Exo_28:6), the girdle (Exo_28:8), and the breastplate (Exo_28:15) of the high priest. It is also mentioned in various other connections (Jos_2:18; 2Sa_1:24; Lam_4:5; Nah_2:3). A scarlet robe was in mockery placed on our Lord (Mat_27:28; Luk_23:11). “Sins as scarlet” (Isa_1:18), i.e., as scarlet robes “glaring and habitual.” Scarlet and crimson were the firmest of dyes, and thus not easily washed out. [Easton’s Bible Dictionary]

Crimson, red, purple, and scarlet:
Used in the symbolisms of the tabernacle furnishings and priestly vestments and functions, as types and shadows of the atonement. ]Nave’s Topical Bible]


There are so many birds whose names begin with “Scarlet-“, that I decided to do a Part II. I want to show more of God’s Handiwork in the Avian Creations. These are by far not all of them.

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr vll.sandl

Scarlet-rumped Cacique (Cacicus microrhynchus) ©WikiC

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) ©Flickr Dave Curtis

The scarlet-throated Frigate bird, Galapagos islands, EcuadorFrom Pinterest

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) by ©Wiki

Scarlet-headed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum trochileum) by© Wiki

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird asleep by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird by Dan

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Dan


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Scarlet

Scarlet Myzomela (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Ian at Birdway

Scarlet Myzomela (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Ian at Birdway

“And they stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And they bowed the knee before Him and mocked Him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” (Matthew 27:28-29 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet

SC’ARLET, n.
1. A beautiful bright red color, brighter than crimson.
2. Cloth of a scarlet color.
All her household are clothed with scarlet. Prov 31.
SC’ARLET, a. of the color called scarlet; of a bright red color; as a scarlet cloth or thread; a scarlet lip.


Scarlet Birds

Scarlet Finch

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Flycatcher

Scarlet Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

Scarlet Ibis

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) ©whm.ac.uk

Scarlet Macaw

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Minivet

Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus speciosus) by Ian

Scarlet Myzomela

Scarlet Honeyeater or Myzolema (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Tom Tarrant

Scarlet Robin

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Tanager

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

She is not afraid of snow for her household, For all her household is clothed with scarlet. (Proverbs 31:21 NKJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Scale

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) by Michael Woodruff

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) by Michael Woodruff

Who has measured the waters in the hollow of His hand, Measured heaven with a span And calculated the dust of the earth in a measure? Weighed the mountains in scales And the hills in a balance? Who has directed the Spirit of the LORD, Or as His counselor has taught Him? With whom did He take counsel, and who instructed Him, And taught Him in the path of justice? Who taught Him knowledge, And showed Him the way of understanding?” (Isaiah 40:12-14 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scale

SCALE, n. [L. id. If the sense is to strip, it coincides with the Gr. to spoil.]
1. The dish of a balance; and hence, the balance itself, or whole instrument; as, to turn the scale.
Long time in even scale the battle hung.
3. The small shell or crust which composes a part of the covering of a fish; and hence, any thin layer or leaf exfoliated or separated; a thin lamin; as scales of iron or of bone.
4. A ladder; series of steps; means of ascending. [L. scala.]
5. The art of storming a place by mounting the wall on ladders; an escalade, or scalade.
6. A mathematical instrument of wood or metal, on which are marked line and figures for the purpose of measuring distances, extent or proportions; as a plain scale; a diagonal scale.
7. Regular gradation; a series rising by steps or degrees like those of a ladder. Thus we speak of the scale of being, in which man occupies a higher rank than brutes, and angels a higher rank than man.
8. Any instrument, figure or scheme, graduated for the purpose of measuring extent or proportions as a map drawn by a scale of half an inch to a league.
9. In music, a gamut; a diagram; or a series of lines and spaces rising one above another, on which notes are placed; or a scale consists of the regular gradations of sounds. A scale may be limited to an octave, called by the Greeks a tetrachord, or it may extend to the compass of any voice or instrument.
10. Any thing graduated or marked with degrees at equal distances.
SCALE, v.t.
1. To climb, as by a ladder; to ascend by steps; and applied to the walls of a fortified place, to mount in assault or storm.
Oft have I scal’d the craggy oak.
2. [from scale, a balance.] To measure; to compare; to weight.
3. [from scale, the covering of a fish.] to strip or clear of scales; as, to scale a fish.
4. To take off in thin lamins or scales.
5. To pare off a surface.
If all the mountains were scaled, and the earth made even –
[Edited]


Scale- Birds

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus)

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) ©WikiC

The Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae. It was given its name for the small crown-like ring of feathers on the top of its head. It raises these feathers both to attract a mate and to seem larger when frightened.

It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Venezuela, and possibly Honduras. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. Not much is known about the habits or breeding of the bird.

Scale-feathered Malkoha

Scale-feathered Malkoha (Dasylophus cumingi) ©WikiC

Scale-throated Earthcreeper

The Scale-feathered Malkoha (Dasylophus cumingi) is a species of cuckoo in the family Cuculidae. It is endemic to the northern Philippines.

Scale-throated Earthcreeper (Upucerthia dumetaria) ©WikiC

Scale-throated Hermit

The Scale-throated Earthcreeper (Upucerthia dumetaria) is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in Argentina and the Altiplano; it winters in the Pampas and east of Córdoba. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. They build their nests at the end of tunnels measuring between one and two meters. These tunnels are almost exclusively based on slopes; however, rock crevices are occasionally used. It formerly included the Patagonian forest earthcreeper (U. saturatior) as a subspecies.

Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) by Dario Sanches

The Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) is a species in the hummingbird family, Trochilidae.

It is found in the Atlantic forest in north-eastern Argentina, south-eastern Brazil, and eastern Paraguay. The supposed “black-billed hermit”, described as P. nigrirostris, has turned out to be a mutant P. eurynome with an all-black bill.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Flying – By Creation Moments

Falcon flying

“But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” Isaiah 40:31

Flying – By Creation Moments

The concept of flying has inspired so much in the way of art – visual, musical, and literary. “One day, I’ll fly away,” sang Randy Crawford, evoking a view of flying as a metaphor for freedom. Other songs have taken up the same theme. “You are the wind beneath my wings”. “Love lift us up where we belong”. “Come fly with me, come fly, let’s fly away”.

The Bible also uses this metaphor. “They who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.” (Isaiah 40:31). We instinctively know that Isaiah is referring to a sense of strength, produced by the power of the Lord, by waiting on Him.

Being free from the clutches of sin is like being free of gravity! And this freedom evokes images of eagles soaring without even flapping their wings as they ride the thermal air currents.

An evolutionist has to believe that the ability to fly has evolved. Not only that, but they must believe that this ability has evolved at least three times, and maybe four – birds, bats, flying insects, and pteradactyls being the four groups of animals which fly.

In contrast, the Bible tells us that flight was a deliberate design of God. Flying creatures were created on Day Five of the creation week. God designed flight, and the Bible says that He pronounced it “good”.

Prayer:
Lord, it is my prayer that I might soar on wings like eagles. Praise You that it is You who provide the freedom for us to do this. Amen.
Notes:
Ref: The Miracle of Flight, accessed 11/27/2017. Image: Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 Unported.
Used with permission ©Creation Moments 2018
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Avian And Attributes – Sapphire

Sapphire Flycatcher (Ficedula sapphira) ©WikiC

“And the foundations of the wall of the city were garnished with all manner of precious stones. The first foundation was jasper; the second, sapphire; the third, a chalcedony; the fourth, an emerald;” (Revelation 21:19 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sapphire

Sapphire Gem ©WikiC

SAP’PHIRE, n. [L. sapphirus; Gr. to scrape, to shine, to be fair, open, beautiful.]

A species of silicious gems or minerals, of several varieties. In hardness it is inferior to the diamond only. Its colors are blue, red, violet, yellow, green, white, or limpid, and one variety is chatoyant, and another asteriated or radiated.

Sapphire is a subspecies of rhomboidal corundum.

The oriental ruby and topaz are sapphires.

Sapphire is employed in jewelry and the arts.


Sapphire Birds

Sapphire Flycatcher

Sapphire Flycatcher (Ficedula sapphira) ©WikiC

Sapphire Quail-Dove

Sapphire Quail-Dove (Geotrygon saphirina) ©Drawing WikiC

Sapphire-bellied Hummingbird

Sapphire-bellied-hummingbird-perched-on-branch ©ARKive

Sapphire-rumped Parrotlet

Sapphire-rumped Parrotlet ©Drawing WikiC

Sapphire-spangled Emerald

Sapphire-spangled Emerald (Amazilia lactea) by Dario Sanches

Sapphire-throated Hummingbird

Sapphire-throated Hummingbird (Lepidopyga coeruleogularis) ©WikiC

Sapphire-vented Puffleg

Sapphire-vented Puffleg (Eriocnemis luciani) by Michael Woodruff


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

The Raven and the Old Woman’s Garden – by Emma Foster

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Ray

The Raven and the Old Woman’s Garden by Emma Foster

And be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave you.” (Ephesians 4:32 NKJV)

Once there was a small raven that lived in a tree that stood in the middle of a large garden a woman had planted years ago. The woman had grown old now and spent most of the time in her small brick house. She did come out to devoutly water her plants so that her garden would be kept beautiful, but it was very difficult for her to pull out the weeds in the flower beds.

The raven would often watch the old woman from her nest in the tree as she watered her flowers. The raven enjoyed the garden the old woman had planted because so many of the flowers were different colors. During the day the raven would often fly through the flowers, and every day it seemed that there was a new and different flower for her to look at.

PAS-Corv Raven ©Pixabay

But one day the old woman didn’t come out of her house. The raven waited for her to come and water her flowers, but the old woman had become ill and couldn’t get out of her bed. Eventually, the raven saw from her nest a bright red and white vehicle with flashing lights come up the driveway. The raven watched some people in uniforms come into the house and take the old woman out on a bed and drive away.

A few days went by and the old woman did not come home. The raven began to worry because there was no one to water the flowers to keep the old woman’s garden looking beautiful. Several weeds had sprung up in the flower beds as well.

The raven suddenly had the idea to begin pulling out some of the weeds while the old woman was gone. She started in the flower bed closest to her nest and began pulling weeds out from the beds. While she was pulling out some of the weeds, the raven found a few seeds that the old woman hadn’t planted yet. The raven promptly decided to dig up a small place off to the side with her beak in order to plant them.

PAS-Corv Raven ©Pixabay

The raven continued to pull out more weeds for the rest of the day. Fortunately, because it wasn’t terribly hot outside the work was a little easier. Toward the end of the day, rain began to fall. The raven quickly retreated to her nest and watched from the protection of the tree as the rain watered the flowers to keep them from dying.

The rain stopped the next morning but continued occurring every now and then for the next couple of days. One morning the raven woke to see tiny buds had appeared out of the ground where she had planted the seeds. This made the raven very happy, but she became even happier when a car drove up into the driveway. The old woman had come back from the hospital but had to be taken into her house on a bed. The raven stayed in her nest, hoping that the old woman would be able to see the new flowers and her well-kept garden through her bedroom window.

Fortunately, the old woman was able to see her garden very clearly, but she was no longer able to come outside. The raven decided she would keep pulling out the weeds for her. It continued to rain nearly every day, which was good because the flowers had to be watered. But one day another loud flashing vehicle came back up to the house and took the old woman away, and the raven knew that she wasn’t coming back.

PAS-Corv Raven ©Pixabay

Eventually, several people came to the house and moved out all of the old woman’s things leaving the house bare and empty. To honor the old woman the raven kept pulling out weeds, hoping that she could keep the old woman’s garden as long as possible. But eventually it stopped raining and the flowers began to wilt. The raven began to fear that all of the old woman’s flowers would eventually die, until one day the raven woke up in her nest to see a family moving into the old woman’s house. The wife, who moved into the house with her husband and children, decided that she should continue tending the garden, which made the raven very happy. After a few weeks the garden and was healthy and beautiful again, and the flowers the raven had planted grew incredible large and tall.

My help comes from the LORD, Who made heaven and earth.” (Psalms 121:2 NKJV)


Lee’s Addition:

Another very entertaining and delightful story from Emma. Emma picks the birds in her tales and I supply the photos and scriptures. She may not be aware that the Ravens are very intelligent and can do some might surprising tasks. So, maybe this story is not really so “far-fetched”!

Enjoy her other tales at Emma’s Stories.

Avian And Attributes – Sand

Sand Partridge (Ammoperdix heyi) ©WikiC

How precious also are thy thoughts unto me, O God! how great is the sum of them! If I should count them, they are more in number than the sand: when I awake, I am still with thee.” (Psalms 139:17-18 KJV)

He rained flesh also upon them as dust, and feathered fowls like as the sand of the sea:” (Psalms 78:27 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sand

SAND, n.
1. Any mass or collection of fine particles of stone, particularly of fine particles of silicious stone, but not strictly reduced to powder or dust.
That finer matter called sand, is no other than very small pebbles.
2. Sands, in the plural, tracts of land consisting of sand, like the deserts of Arabia and Africa; as the Lybian sands.
SAND, v.t.
1. To sprinkle with sand. It is customary among the common people in America, to sand their floors with white sand.
2. To drive upon the sand.


Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis)and young (4) by Dan's Pix

Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis)and young by Dan’s Pix

Sand Birds

Sand Lark

Sand Lark (Calandrella raytal) by Nikhil Devasar

Sand Martin

Sand Martin (Riparia riparia) ©WikiC

Sand Partridge

Sand Partridge (Ammoperdix heyi) ©WikiC

Sand-colored Nighthawk

Sand-colored Nighthawk (Chordeiles rupestris) by ©AGrosset

Sanderling

Sanderling (Calidris alba) by Robert Scanlon

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Youngster in Yard 3-26-16

Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock. And every one that heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them not, shall be likened unto a foolish man, which built his house upon the sand: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it.” (Matthew 7:24-27 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Sad

Sad Flycatcher (Myiarchus barbirostris) ©WikiC

“And it came to pass, that, while they communed together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them. But their eyes were holden that they should not know him. And he said unto them, What manner of communications are these that ye have one to another, as ye walk, and are sad? And the one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answering said unto him, Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem, and hast not known the things which are come to pass there in these days? And he said unto them, What things? And they said unto him, Concerning Jesus of Nazareth, which was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people: And how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him to be condemned to death, and have crucified him. But we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, to day is the third day since these things were done. Yea, and certain women also of our company made us astonished, which were early at the sepulchre; And when they found not his body, they came, saying, that they had also seen a vision of angels, which said that he was alive. And certain of them which were with us went to the sepulchre, and found it even so as the women had said: but him they saw not.

Then he said unto them, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken: Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory? And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself.
(Luke 24:15-27 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sad

SAD, a. [It is probable this word is from the root of set. I have not found the word is from the root of set. I have not found the word in the English sense, in any other language.]
1. Sorrowful; affected with grief; cast down with affliction.
Th’ angelic guards ascended, mute and sad.
Sad for their loss, but joyful of our life.
2. Habitually melancholy; gloomy; not gay or cheerful.
3. Downcast; gloomy; having the external appearance of sorrow; as a sad countenance. Mat 6.
4. Serious; grave; not gay, light or volatile.
5. Afflictive; calamitous; causing sorrow; as a sad accident; a sad misfortune.
8. Heavy; weighty; ponderous.


Sad Flycatcher (Myiarchus barbirostris) ©WikiC

“The Sad Flycatcher (Myiarchus barbirostris) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.” [Wikipedia]

“The Sad Flycatcher is endemic to the island of Jamaica, where it is known colloquially as the Little Tom Fool, but it is apparently most closely related to the very widely distributed Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer).” [Neotropical Birds]

These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Where Did the Elephant Get Its Trunk? – Creation Moments

Baby Elephant at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

Where Did the Elephant Get Its Trunk? – Creation Moments

“And God said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so.” (Genesis 1:24)

On a previous Creation Moments program, we told you about the elephant’s trunk with its 40,000 muscles. This is 70 times the number of muscles in your entire body! And that amazing trunk can bulldoze a tree or pick up a pin.

Where Did the Elephant Get Its Trunk? But why does an elephant have a trunk in the first place? For the answer to that question, we looked in a very old book called Natural Theology. It was written by William Paley in 1802. Yes, that’s the same William Paley who came up with the famous analogy of a person who finds a watch and deduces that the watch must have had a watchmaker.

According to Paley, “The short unbending neck of the elephant is compensated by the length and flexibility of his proboscis,” or trunk. “He could not have reached the ground without it.” In other words, the elephant needed such a trunk to reach food and water. But, then, a person could ask why does the elephant have such a short and unbending neck? Paley answers that he needed such a neck to support such a heavy head!

Obviously, the elephant was given its trunk by a very wise Creator. As Paley so well pointed out, if the elephant had waited millions of years for his trunk to grow, “how was the animal to subsist in the meantime… until the prolongation of its snout was completed?” It is a question that evolutionists today are still unable to answer.

Prayer:
Heavenly Father, thank You that even the elephant’s trunk provides a witness to Your hand in creation! In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Notes:
William Paley, DD, Natural Theology, 1809, p. 140. (The Works of William Paley, Ward Lock & Co.)

Other interesting articles from Creation Moments

Plus

Avian And Attributes – Sacred

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) by Ian

“Consecrate a fast, Call a sacred assembly; Gather the elders And all the inhabitants of the land Into the house of the LORD your God, And cry out to the LORD.” (Joel 1:14 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sacred

SA’CRED, a. [L. sacer, sacred, holy, cursed, damnable. We here see the connection between sacredness and secrecy. The sense is removed or separated from that which is common, vulgar, polluted, or open, public; and accursed is separated from society or the privileges of citizens, rejected, banished.]
1. Holy; pertaining to God or to his worship; separated from common secular uses and consecrated to God and his service; as a sacred place; a sacred day; a sacred feast; sacred service; sacred orders.
2. Proceeding from God and containing religious precepts; as the sacred books of the Old and New Testament.
3. Narrating or writing facts respecting God and holy things; as a sacred historian.
4. Relating to religion or the worship of God; used for religious purposes; as sacred songs; sacred music; sacred history.
5. Consecrated; dedicated; devoted; with to.
A temple sacred to the queen of love.
6. Entitled to reverence; venerable.
Poet and saint to thee alone were given, the two most sacred names of earth and heav’n.
7. Inviolable, as if appropriated to a superior being; as sacred honor or promise.
Secrets of marriage still are sacred held.
Sacred majesty. In this title, sacred has no definite meaning, or it is blasphemy.
Sacred place, in the civil law, is that where a deceased person is buried.

“and that from childhood you have known the sacred writings which are able to give you the wisdom that leads to salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.” (2 Timothy 3:15-17 NASB)


Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) ©WikiC

The Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) is a medium-sized woodland kingfisher that occurs in mangroves, woodlands, forests, and river valleys in Australia, New Zealand, and other parts of the western Pacific. In New Zealand the species is also known by its Māori name kōtare.

The sacred kingfisher is a medium-sized kingfisher. They are mostly turquoise, with white underparts and collar feathers. Both sexes are similar, but females are usually more dull-colored. Juveniles have rusty-brown edges on the collar and underparts.

It is called “sacred” for it was said to be a holy bird for Polynesians, who believed it to have control over the waves. Likewise, the local subspecies of collared kingfisher and other kingfishers in the southwestern Pacific were ascribed venerable power over the ocean.

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) by Ian


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Sharing The Gospel

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Ruby

Ruby Throated Hummingbird by Africaddict

“For wisdom is better than rubies; and all the things that may be desired are not to be compared to it.” (Proverbs 8:11 KJV)

“If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.” (James 1:5 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Ruby

RU’BY, n. [L. rubeo, to be red.]
1. A precious stone; a mineral of a carmine red color, sometimes verging to violet, or intermediate between carmine and hyacinth red; but its parts vary in color, and hence it is called sapphire ruby or orange red, and by some vermeille or rubicel.
There are two kinds of ruby, the oriental or corundum, and the spinelle. The latter is distinguishable from the former by its color and crystallization.
The ruby is next in hardness and value to the diamond, and highly esteemed in jewelry.
2. Redness; red color.
3. Any thing red.
4. A blain; a blotch; a carbuncle. [The ruby is said to be the stone called by Pliny a carbuncle.]
Ruby of arsenic or sulphur, is the realgar, or red combination of arsenic and sulphur.
Ruby of zink, is the red blend.
Rock ruby, the amethystizontes of the ancients, is the most value species of garnet.
RU’BY, v.t. To make red.
RU’BY, a. Of the color of the ruby; red; as ruby lips.


Ruby- Birds

Ruby-cheeked Sunbird (Chalcoparia singalensis) by Ian

Ruby-cheeked Sunbird – It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) by BirdingPix

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) by BirdingPix

Ruby-crowned Kinglet – It is found throughout North America.

Ruby-crowned Tanager (Tachyphonus coronatus) M-black F-ruby ©WikiC

Ruby-crowned Tanager – It is found in the southern areas of Brazil and the Atlantic Forest.

Ruby-throated Bulbul (Pycnonotus dispar) ©WikiC

Ruby-throated Bulbul –  It is found on Sumatra, Java, and Bali.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird by Ray’s Wildlfie

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – It spends the winter in Central America, Mexico, and Florida, and migrates to Eastern North America for the summer to breed. It is by far the most common hummingbird seen east of the Mississippi River in North America.

ruby-throated myzomela/red-throated myzomela

Ruby-throated Myzomela [from Flickr] –  It is found in New Guinea

Ruby-topaz Hummingbird (Chrysolampis mosquitus) ©WikiC

Ruby-topaz Hummingbird – It  breeds in the Lesser Antilles and tropical northern South America from Colombia, Venezuela and the Guyanas, south to central Brazil and northern Bolivia; also from Colombia into southern Panama.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “R”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]