Afraid To Stick Neck Out

Great Egret with head tucked in at Gatorland

“Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest.” (Ecclesiastes 9:10 KJV)

I found this Great Egret at Gatorland recently who was afraid to stick his neck out. Have you ever felt that way? As many readers are aware, there have been numerous broken links discovered on this site. Many pages have been fixed already, yet there are hundreds and hundreds more that need to be corrected. After chatting with WordPress again today, there is not much they can do to revive the deleted photos and music from the Media Cache. I did find out today, it is possible that this site was hacked. “You’re kidding,” I told them. “No, others have had that happen”.

For those of us on WordPress and other sites for that matter, they said it is very important to use a STRONG password. Also, to use a two-step authentification. I have since rechanged the password again. Here is a link to instructions on how to do this on WordPress.com.

Two Step Authentication

For now, I am not going to pull my head in, but am going to plug away at repairing the damage done to Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus. This was not quite the “Adventure”  I had in mind, but it would be wrong to pull my head in and give up. Who knows, maybe the Lord will help me improve it and find more ways to show forth His wonderful Birds and Creation. Stay tuned!

Great Egret at Gatorland by Dan

 

Harriet Newell Cook – Scripture Alphabet of Animals Re-post

Here is an older post from October 2010 that you might enjoy reading/re-reading. It is written for the younger readers, but all will find plenty of interesting facts about the Lord’s Creations.

Scripture Alphabet of Animals

Harriet Newell Cook (1814-1843) – author of Scripture Alphabet of Animals

Baudet Donkey - Shaky and Brown

Baudet Donkey – Shaky and Brown

While looking for the quoted thoughts by G. D. Watson, “Others May, You Cannot,” I found the Christian Articles Website. It is loaded with articles by numerous pastors and preachers, but also other Christian writers. That is where I found Harriet N. Cook’s “Scripture Alphabet of Animals.” Her works and the others on that website are in the public domain and usable. I have decided to use her as a guest writer and produce the bird sections (finished) she wrote about. The other sections are being done also. They are listed below. Also, her books are available on Google Books and can be read on the computer or one of the eBook readers.

Oriental Turtle Dove (Streptopelia orientalis) by Nikhil

Oriental Turtle Dove (Streptopelia orientalis) by Nikhil

Harriet Newell Cook was born in 1814 and died in 1843. In her short 29 years of life she wrote several juvenile books and thought I would share parts of them here. “Her first volume for the young was one of Natural History, calculated to illustrate portions of the Bible, for the young, and entitled, “The Scripture Alphabet of Animals.” Nearly thirty thousand copies of the work have been printed in its English dress, and eight thousand of the German translation. The style of this work is eminently lucid…”

Her last very interesting work for the young —“The Trees, Flowers and Fruits of the Bible“– she was not permitted to finish, by reason of her death. It was completed by Miss F. M. Caulkins…” (From Memoir of Mrs. Harriet Newell Cook By Lydia Howard Sigourney, at Google Books)

Beasts, and all cattle; creeping things, and flying fowl: Kings of the earth, and all people; princes, and all judges of the earth: Both young men, and maidens; old men, and children: Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven. (Psalms 148:10-13 KJV)

It was difficult finding information about her personally. Also, I couldn’t find a picture of her. One thing was for certain, she appears to have loved the Lord greatly and wanted to serve Him through her writing.

See Also:
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ant
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ass
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Bear
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Bee
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Camel
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Dog
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Eagle
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Fox or Jackal
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Goat
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Hart and Hind
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Horse
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ibex or the Wild Goat
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Jerboa or Mouse
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Kite
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Leopard
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Lion
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Locust
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Mole
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Night-Hawk
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ostrich
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Peacock
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Quail
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Raven
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Roe or Gazelle
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Scorpion
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Sheep
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Stork
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Turtle-Dove
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Unicorn
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Vulture
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Whale
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Wolf

See:

Birds of the Bible

Wordless Birds

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The Snowy “Want-to-Be” at Gatorland

Great Egrets and a Snowy Egret at Gatorland

When we were at Gatorland a few weeks ago, I noticed two Great Egrets on the walkway rail. I zoomed in to get a better view of them. There were actually two Great Egrets and a Snowy Egret in between them.

Great Egrets and a Snowy Egret at Gatorland zoomed

By the time we arrived at their location, one of the Great Egrets had flown off to check something out. There sat the Great Egret and the Snowy Egret side-by-side. I thought maybe that Snowy was thinking he would like to be tall like this friendly Great Egret.

A Great Egret “Want to Be”

The Great Egret is tall and nice looking with his long yellow beak and black feet.

Great Egret up Close at Gatorland by Lee

The Snowy though shorter has a nice black beak and cool yellow feet.

Snowy Egret up close at Gatorland by Lee

Knowing that the Lord created both of these fine birds, He made them just the way He wanted them. One tall, one short. One with a black beak and the other with a yellow one. And He may have given height to the Great Egret, but He gave the shorter Snowy those neat yellow feet.

Do we get envious and desire what someone else has? Maybe taller, more talented, sing better, etc? God has made us just the way He wants us, and has provided us with different bodies, talents, abilities, and directions to serve Him. Are we content with what He has given us?

“Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.” (Philippians 4:11 KJV)

“And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.” (1 Timothy 6:8 KJV)

“Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” (Hebrews 13:5 KJV)

I am sure are Snowy Egret was not the least bit jealous or envious.

Snowy Egret up close at Gatorland by Lee


More posts from Gatorland:

Gatorland, FL

Gatorland’s Greedy Snowy Egret

Gatorland Roseate Spoonbills

Gatorland Grackle

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Far Flying Ducks and Their Allies

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks forming V by Lee

I’ll fly away, Oh Glory
I’ll fly away; (in the morning)
When I die, Hallelujah, by and by,
I’ll fly away (I’ll fly away).

“Who are these who fly like a cloud, And like doves to their roosts?” (Isaiah 60:8 NKJV)

Yep! That’s what they have been doing. Flying right off the pages. I am still working away trying to fix my broken links. It is time consuming, but maybe the new reworked Bird Family pages will be easier to work with.

As you know, from the last few posts, I have been fixing missing birds, photographers, songs, etc:

Mallard Duck army marching (I know it’s not a King, but it’s cute) ©WikiC

Today, a decision was made to rework ALL the Family Bird Pages. Hopefully, all of the pages listed below are error free. [Famous Last Words] These are in the new format. I wasn’t doing too bad until the Ducks pages were checked. 131 of them had taken off. Whew! I think most of them came back safely, especially because the hunters are out and about. The PLAN is to continue through the family pages one at a time. If you should find any escaped birds, would you try to SHOO them back this way??

Updated Family Pages

Stay Tuned!

Gatorland’s Greedy Snowy Egret

Happy Thanksgiving to you all.

May you have a great day enjoying family, friends, and fine food. But please, do not bite off more than you should! [This video of a Snowy Egret was taken at Gatorland this week.]

“A Psalm of Thanksgiving. Make a joyful shout to the LORD, all you lands! Serve the LORD with gladness; Come before His presence with singing. Know that the LORD, He is God; It is He who has made us, and not we ourselves; We are His people and the sheep of His pasture. Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, And into His courts with praise. Be thankful to Him, and bless His name. For the LORD is good; His mercy is everlasting, And His truth endures to all generations.” (Psalms 100:1-5 NKJV)

Family: Building a Home God’s Way

More Gatorland Adventures

Gatorland in Orlando, Florida

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Gatorland Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbill landing at Gatorland by Lee 11-21-17

Yesterday, I shared the Boat-tailed Grackle female. Today, here are a few photos of two Roseate Spoonbills that landed on one of the trees at Gatorland. [Plus a bonus at the end]

Didn’t realize that she was already there.

The Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) is a gregarious wading bird of the ibis and spoonbill family, Threskiornithidae. It is a resident breeder in South America mostly east of the Andes, and in coastal regions of the Caribbean, Central America, Mexico, the Gulf Coast of the United States, and on central Florida’s Atlantic coast at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, adjoined with NASA Kennedy Space Center. They are also found here in Central Florida. These were at Gatorland in Orlando on 11/21/17.

Zoomed in even on this photo. The first ones were also cropped.

The roseate spoonbill is 71–86 cm (28–34 in) long, with a 120–133 cm (47–52 in) wingspan. The tarsus measures 9.7–12.4 cm (3.8–4.9 in), the culmen measures 14.5–18 cm (5.7–7.1 in) and the wing measures 32.3–37.5 cm (12.7–14.8 in) and thus the legs, bill, neck and spatulate bill all appear elongated. Adults have a bare greenish head (“golden buff” when breeding) and a white neck, back and breast (with a tuft of pink feathers in the center when breeding), and are otherwise a deep pink. The bill is grey.

Roseate Spoonbilsl landing at Gatorland by Lee 11-21-17

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Like the American flamingo, their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. Another carotenoid, astaxanthin, can also be found deposited in flight and body feathers. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age, whether breeding or not, and location. Unlike herons, spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. They alternate groups of stiff, shallow wingbeats with glides.

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Yawning

This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. In the United States, a popular place to observe roseate spoonbills is “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Roseate spoonbills must compete for food with snowy egrets, great egrets, tricolored herons and American white pelicans. [Wikipedia, with editing]
Threskiornithidae – Ibises, Spoonbills Family
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“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name.” (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

Bonus:
I found this Great Egret along the edge and an alligator nearby with quite a look on its face. They really weren’t that close, but thought you would enjoy this series of photos. [Click to enlarge]

More Gatorland Adventures

Gatorland in Orlando, Florida

Reginald The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm

Reginald the Turkey Commander: the Great Snowstorm, by Emma Foster

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Thanksgiving was beginning to draw near and Reginald knew it was time for the turkeys to trek through the forest to their fortress, which they had built years before to keep safe from hunters. The turkeys were hoping to travel in a few days, but something about the weather began to concern Reginald. He decided it was best to check to see what the weather would be like when they would be travelling.

Reginald had to walk to a nearby farmer’s house to see the weather because the farmer that lived there always had the weather on the television early every morning because he was always concerned about the weather. Sometimes Reginald would leave the turkeys and go watch the weather so he would know if bad weather was headed to the forest. Reluctantly, Reginald let Oliver come along so that Oliver wouldn’t get into any mischief.

Wild Turkeys ©Pixabay

Reginald and Oliver hurried through the forest and across a field to where a lonely house stood. Reginald warned Oliver to be as quiet as he could when they reached the farm because there was a chance the farmer wouldn’t mind having them for Thanksgiving dinner like the other hunters. Oliver cautiously followed Reginald to a chicken coop, which stood near the window of the living room. Reginald climbed into the coop through the chicken wire by cutting part of the wire with a sharp piece of wood he had brought and was pulling it back to make a hole. Oliver attempted to crawl through, but some of his feathers got caught. Reginald told him to calm down and to stop gobbling so the farmer wouldn’t hear him. After pulling him out, Reginald quickly blended in with the chickens, hurried to the window, then peered inside to see what the weather was like. The television was on, and the weather report stated that a record amount of heavy snowfall would be coming before Thanksgiving.

Turkey looking in window. ©Julia@Home on 129Acres

Reginald knew they would have to hurry to make it to the fortress so he turned around to tell Oliver to run back and warn the turkeys. When he looked back Oliver had gotten his head stuck in the chicken coop and the chickens had gathered around him and had started clucking while Oliver’s army helmet (worn to protect them from hunters) clanged against the walls of the coop. Reginald shook his head and dragged him out, telling him to tell the turkeys about the snowfall and that they needed to build sleds out of pieces of wood from trees that they could pull with roots to their fortress.

Oliver raced back to the turkeys while Reginald stayed behind to watch the weather. Eventually, the farmer turned the news off and Reginald had to hurry back to the turkeys. When he got back, the turkeys had already begun building their sleds, which would be used to carry the elderly and baby turkeys through the snow that was already falling. All of the turkeys were present except Oliver.

Turkey looking in window. ©Pinterest

When Reginald asked about Oliver, the turkeys said he had gone back for him. Reginald shook his head and impatiently walked all the way back through the snow to the farmhouse. Oliver was standing by the window, watching a gameshow on the television. Reginald shook his head again and told Oliver to come back with him to the turkeys.

The turkeys had finished building the sleds when Reginald and Oliver returned, and lots of snow was now on the ground. Using the sleds, the turkeys were able to arrive at their fortress before the snowbanks grew too high and the winds were too strong. They were able to spend their Thanksgiving nice and warm underground, while yet again the hunters had to hunt for turkeys in other woods.


“…but that the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.” (1 Corinthians 12:25b-26 KJV)

Looks like Reginald and Oliver have returned in time for another Thanksgiving adventure. Thanks again, Emma, for providing an entertaining tale, for a favorite holiday.

Emma’s Stories

Especially:

 

Harriet, The Osprey

Osprey Harriet’s transmitter is safely attached ©Craig Koppie USFWS

James J. S. Johnson, [Dr. Jim, to me] sent a very interesting article to share with you all. It is about an Osprey, named Harriet, who lives up in the Baltimore, Maryland [USA] area. Recently they, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, mounted a satellite tracker on her. Wait, here is the article:

“…On July 10, Harriet was captured and fitted with a satellite transmitter to track her movements. The transmitter, which has a visible antenna, was comfortably and securely attached by a harness onto Harriet’s back.

Like so many other birds we see around the Chesapeake in spring and summer, ospreys begin to migrate to South America in September for the winter. Most of our Chesapeake osprey spend the colder months there, ranging from Venezuela, to as far south as Paraguay and even Argentina.”

Continue to the article, Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek, by CLICKING HERE

Harriot’s trip so far – Satelite ©USFWS


“Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south? Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high?” (Job 39:26-27 KJV)

We have also written articles along this line about tracking our migrating avian wonders from the Lord:

Rounded Up Some Bluebirds

Vol. 2 – 6 The Mountain Bluebird, which is from the Kid’s Section, had some Bluebirds skip out and break their links. They were too pretty to let them get away.

The Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited has some very interesting information about birds, but written from a young reader’s level. Here is the Mountain Bluebird reblogged with some added information and the Bluebirds back on their posts.

This was written back in 2013. Trust you enjoy this article and links to other Bluebird articles.

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Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) for Birds Illustrated

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) for Birds Illustrated

From col. Chi. Acad. Sciences. Copyrighted by
Nature Study Pub. Co., 1897, Chicago.

THE MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.

imgi

N an early number of Birds we presented a picture of the common Bluebird, which has been much admired. The mountain Bluebird, whose beauty is thought to excel that of his cousin, is probably known to few of our readers who live east of the Rocky Mountain region, though he is a common winter sojourner in the western part of Kansas, beginning to arrive there the last of September, and leaving in March and April. The habits of these birds of the central regions are very similar to those of the eastern, but more wary and silent. Even their love song is said to be less loud and musical. It is a rather feeble, plaintive, monotonous warble, and their chirp and twittering notes are weak. They subsist upon the cedar berries, seeds of plants, grasshoppers, beetles, and the like, which they pick up largely upon the ground, and occasionally scratch for among the leaves. During the fall and winter they visit the plains and valleys, and are usually met with in small flocks, until the mating season.

Nests of the Mountain Bluebird have been found in New Mexico and Colorado, from the foothills to near timber line, usually in deserted Woodpecker holes, natural cavities in trees, fissures in the sides of steep rocky cliffs, and, in the settlements, in suitable locations about and in the adobe buildings. In settled portions of the west it nests in the cornice of buildings, under the eaves of porches, in the nooks and corners of barns and outhouses, and in boxes provided for its occupation. Prof. Ridgway found the Rocky Mountain Bluebird nesting in Virginia City, Nevada, in June. The nests were composed almost entirely of dry grass. In some sections, however, the inner bark of the cedar enters largely into their composition. The eggs are usually five, of a pale greenish-blue.

The females of this species are distinguished by a greener blue color and longer wings, and this bird is often called the Arctic Bluebird. It is emphatically a bird of the mountains, its visits to the lower portions of the country being mainly during winter.

Heaped in the hollows of the grove, the autumn leaves lie dead;
They rustle to the eddying gust, and to the rabbits’ tread.
The Robin and the Wren are flown, and from the shrubs the Jay,
And from the wood-top calls the Crow all through the gloomy day.
—Bryant.

Summary:

MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.Sialia arctica. Other names: “Rocky Mountain” and “Arctic Bluebird.”

Range—Rocky Mountain region, north to Great Slave Lake, south to Mexico, west to the higher mountain ranges along the Pacific.

Nest—Placed in deserted Woodpecker holes, natural cavities of trees, nooks and corners of barns and outhouses; composed of dry grass.

Eggs—Commonly five, of pale, plain greenish blue.


Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Daves BirdingPix

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Daves BirdingPix

Lee’s Addition:

…In the LORD put I my trust: how say ye to my soul, Flee as a bird to your mountain? … If the foundations be destroyed, what can the righteous do? The LORD is in his holy temple, the LORD’S throne is in heaven: his eyes behold, his eyelids try, the children of men. … For the righteous LORD loveth righteousness; his countenance doth behold the upright.
(Psalms 11:1,3,4,7 KJV)

The Mountain Bluebird belongs to the Turdidae – Thrushes Family and as such have Thrush characteristics. Since blue is my favorite color, the bluebirds are some of my favorites. The Lord has used such variety in His coloration, that I am happy that blue was one of them. We have also the Eastern and Western Bluebirds plus the Asian and Philippine Fairy-bluebirds.

The Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a medium-sized bird weighing about 1.1 ounces (30 g) with a length from 6.3–7.9 in (16–20 cm). They have light underbellies and black eyes. Adult males have thin bills that are bright turquoise-blue and somewhat lighter beneath. Adult females have duller blue wings and tail, grey breast, grey crown, throat and back. In fresh fall plumage, the female’s throat and breast are tinged with red-orange; brownish near the flank contrasting with white tail underparts. Call is a thin few; Song is warbled high chur chur.

The mountain bluebird is migratory. Their range varies from Mexico in the winter to as far north as Alaska, throughout the western U.S. and Canada. Northern birds migrate to the southern parts of the range; southern birds are often permanent residents. Some birds may move to lower elevations in winter. They inhabit open rangelands, meadows, generally at elevations above 5,000 feet. Contrary to popular belief, mountain bluebirds are not a species of concern in the United States. The turn around in mountain bluebird numbers is due to the overwhelming efforts of landowners in the West to provide nest boxes for these birds. At one time, mountain bluebird numbers were threatened because of increased agricultural activities destroying habitats.

These birds hover over the ground and fly down to catch insects, also flying from a perch to catch them. They mainly eat insects, over 90%, and berries. They may forage in flocks in winter, when they mainly eat grasshoppers. Mountain bluebirds will come to a platform feeder with live meal worms, berries, or peanuts.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery nest

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery nest

Their breeding habitat is open country across western North America, including mountain areas, as far north as Alaska. They nest in pre-existing cavities or in nest boxes. In remote areas, these birds are less affected by competition for natural nesting locations than other bluebirds. Mountain bluebirds are a monogamous breed. The male can be seen singing from bare branches. The singing takes place right at dawn, just when the sun rises. Females usually build the nests themselves. Eggs: pale blue and unmarked, sometimes white. Clutch Size: 4-5 eggs. Young are naked and helpless at hatching and may have some down. Incubation normally last 14 days and the young will take about 21 days before they leave the nest. Both males and females fiercely protect the nest.

It is the state bird of Idaho and Nevada.

Mountain bluebirds are cavity nesters and can become very partial to a nest box, especially if they have successfully raised a clutch. They may even re-use the same nest, though not always. Providing nest boxes is a great way to observe these beautiful birds. Mountain bluebirds will not abandon a nest if human activity is detected close by or at the nest. Because of this, mountain bluebirds can be easily banded while they are still in the nest.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Margaret Sloan

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Margaret Sloan

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Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

The above article is an article in the monthly serial for October 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

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(Information from Wikipedia and other internet sources, with editing)

Next Article – The English Sparrow

The Previous Article – The Ornithological Congress

Gospel Presentation

Links:

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What is that Sound?

American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga aestiva) singing by J Fenton

American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga aestiva) singing by J Fenton

“LORD, thou hast heard the desire of the humble: thou wilt prepare their heart, thou wilt cause thine ear to hear:” (Psalms 10:17 KJV)

I am still in the process of fixing broken links, missing bird photos, etc. I am actually enjoying digging around in the older post. Had forgotten all about this series, and thought you might enjoy a challenge to your birdwatching.

In May of 2007, Start Birdwatching Today: What is that Sound? was published. Thought you might enjoy re-visiting this page. [After fixing a broken link on it.]

Birds are very vocal at times and they give us a great clue as to what bird it is. Eventually, as you become better in your birdwatching adventures, it will help to learn some of their sounds and noises.

As you are observing birds that are singing or calling, you can learn to associate that sound to that bird. That is the beginning and it is almost automatic. When you hear a bird, but do not see it, then you will either recall one you have seen and be able to ID it, or you can start studying the sounds so the next time you can know what the unseen bird is.

There are several methods that birders use. Audio CDs and computer programs have Bird sounds along with photos of the bird to assist your learning.

The Internet has places like the WhatBird, All About Birds, Birding by Ear Basics,

Here is an interesting video about blind people birding by ear. Very interesting.

Here are some of the birds you may already know. These are local birds here, but also seen around other parts of the country. Also a very nice verse to remember while “birding by sound.” I used this verse when taking my General Amateur License test that was all Morse Code. It helped calm my heart even though it refers to the Lord hearing us, but it helped me to hear those dots and dashes. (Only 8 of 115 of us passed the test that day.)

LORD, thou hast heard the desire of the humble: thou wilt prepare their heart, thou wilt cause thine ear to hear: (Psalms 10:17 KJV)

All of these sounds are coming from the Xeno-canto.org website.

Blue Jay in tree at Hampton Pines

Blue Jay in tree at Hampton Pines

Blue Jay

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) by Daves BirdingPix

Northern Cardinal

Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) at Lake Howard, Winter Haven, Florida By Dan’sPix

Boat-tailed Grackle

Red-winged Blackbird at Bok Sanctuary

Red-winged Blackbird at Bok Sanctuary

Red-winged Blackbird

Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus) by BirdsInFocus

Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus) by BirdsInFocus

Eastern Whip-poor-will

Great Horned Owl – Lowry Pk Zoo by Lee

Great Horned Owl

How many did you all ready know?
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Some like to put words to their sounds like these from Birding By Ear — Bird Song Identification
Listen here to a few bird songs and calls that have good mnemonic phrases:
Eastern Towhee — “Drink your tea-ea-ea”

Whip-poor-will — The name says it all.

Black-capped chickadee — Some music and talk first, then the “Chick-a-dee-dee-dee”

White throated sparrow — “Poor Sam Peabody, Peabody, Peabody

Black-throated green warbler — “Zee zee zee zoo zee”

Barred Owl — “Who cooks for you, who cooks for you all

Links:
WhatBird
All About Birds
Birding by Ear Basics
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Start Birdwatching Today Series

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A Merry Heart Is Like Medicine

To Do List – Bird Seeds

“A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.” (Proverbs 15:13 KJV)

A friend of mine posted this to my Facebook account. Needless to say, it made my day. Working on these broken links can be frustrating at times and when humor comes along, it lightens the day. We all need a good laugh now and then. The Bible mentions a merry heart several times, plus other terms like Joy.

“All the days of the afflicted are evil: but he that is of a merry heart hath a continual feast.” (Proverbs 15:15 KJV)

Most birders are aware that as the seasons change, many Avian Wonders, from their Creator, start their migration south, or north. Some even travel east or west. Many birds make very long migrations, and some make shorter journeys that involve an altitude change only.

I do not normally read the comics, but lately, I subscribed to some daily comics from Arcamax.com. and have been following Peanuts ©  There has been a series of them since fall started, that has the bird, Woodstock, making an effort to fly south. Decided to share them.

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Snoopy and Woodstock – Peanuts Oct 18,2017 [Encountering a tree in the way]

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Snoopy and Woodstock -Peanuts ?  [Finds out Woodstock’s name]

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Snoopy and Woodstock -Peanuts Nov 6,2017 [Not sure which was is south]

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Charles Schulz has been producing Peanuts for years. Snoopy has always been a favorite of mine, and now, I am beginning to feel kindly of Woodstock. Though, I do trust that the “real” birds have a better way of finding their way to their destinations. The Lord has given us assurances that He guides them in the way they should go.

“Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars and spreads his wings toward the south?” (Job 39:26 ESV)

“Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

More normal migration articles:

Birds of the Bible – Hawk Migration

Birds of the Bible – Migration September 2009

Interesting – Migration and Mechanics of Flight

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An Apology, Plus Much Work At Hand

Bald Eagle Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

An apology to those of our readers who have encountered a “404 Page Not Found” error. For some reason, there are many broken links on this Blog. I have been noticing them lately, especially links to photos. Yikes!! There are hundreds of them. There is no clue as to where they flew off to. Most of them are links to bird photos. The birds must have just flown the coop. :)  [Maybe Hurricane Irma blew them away.]

“And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.” (Genesis 2:19 KJV)

Actually, this is going to take much time working behind the scenes to replace the photos, once the broken “links” are discovered. There is a program online to scan your pages for missing links. As many of you know, we have tried to find a photo of all the living birds the Lord created. With over 10,600 birds, it has been a challenge finding these photos so that readers can click the links to see that particular bird.

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Flying by Aesthetic Photos

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Flying by Aesthetic Photos

That program scanned just the Accipitridae – Kites, Hawks and Eagles page and found 111 broken links. There are 256 birds in that Family. It will take hours just to fix THAT page. Pray that not every Family of birds are missing photos. Many other pages link to the same bird. The task is daunting, but, Lord Willing, the photo links can be repaired in a reasonable time period.

“Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing. If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed.” (James 1:3-6 KJV)

*** If you encounter a “404 Page Not Found” or another type of problem, please either leave a comment on that page or post, or contact me at Lee@Leesbird.com to leave a note.***

Your help will be greatly appreciated.

P.S. As of last week, the Master of Christian Education [M.CEd.] degree I have been working on was finally finished!!! Yeah!! Not bad for a 74-year-old. :) The Lord is Gracious! The degree was taken online from the School of Biblical Apologetics – Institute for Creation Research. I highly recommend considering taking courses from I.C.R. More about this in another post. [I only mentioned finishing because I’ll have more time to work on these broken links.]

Stay Tuned!!