Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill – Cincinnati Zoo

Trying to get through the fence/cage Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) Cincinnati Zoo 2016
If you followed the posts while we were on our trip, you are aware that we skipped going to the Cincinnati Zoo because of weather. Home Again After 2,000 Mile Trip
And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; And patience, experience; and experience, hope: (Romans 5:3-4 KJV)
Since we have been there twice already, I decided to see if there were some birds that were not written about from those trips. Actually, there are quite a few. This Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill’s photo caught my attention. It is so hard to get a photo through the cages of the zoos. This Avian Wonder was just as hard to capture. After several tries, the Hornbill came into focus and I still remember my excitement. Patience is hard at times, but it does pay off.
Yeah! I got through! Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) Cincinnati Zoo 2016
“But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it.” (Romans 8:25 KJV)
Here are some more articles written about our visits to the Cincinnati Zoo: Here is a video by another visitor to the Hornbills:

Weavers At Work

Lesser Masked Weaver (Ploceus intermedius) by Bob-Nan

My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle,… (Job 7:6a KJV)

“Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work.” (Exodus 35:35 KJV) [This has to do with the Tabernacle bulders, but the wisdom of heart applies here also.]

A friend shared a video with me of the Weaver Birds on Facebook while we were traveling. I thought I would share some of the fantastic weaving ability given these birds by their Creator.

These are just a few of the videos of Weavers at Work

Here’s another video on YouTube taken at the San Diego Zoo

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Previous Articles about the Weaver Birds:

Sunday Inspiration – Weavers and Allies
Wonga Dove and Taveta Weavers at Houston Zoo
Nuggets Plus – The Weaver, The Caller (Ready)
Interesting Things – The Weaver Bird
Baya Weaver – The Model Church

Who Paints The Leaves?

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Avian And Attributes – Sharp Part II

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) ©WikiC

“Like a club and a sword and a sharp arrow Is a man who bears false witness against his neighbor.” (Proverbs 25:18 NASB)

“Thy tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.” (Psalms 52:2 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sharp Part II

The rest of the SHARP definitions. See Part I

SH’ARP, n.
1. In music, an acute sound.
2. A note artificially raised a semitone; or,
3. The character which directs the note to be thus elevated; opposed to a flat, which depresses a note a semitone.
4. A pointed weapon. [Not in use.]
SH’ARP, v.t.
1. To make keen or acute.
2. To render quick.
3. To mark with a sharp, in musical composition; or to raise a not a semitone.
SH’ARP, v.i. To play tricks in bargaining; to act the sharper.


Sharp-tailed Birds

There are seven Sharp-tailed birds:

Sharp-tailed Grass Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Grass Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae, the only one in the genus Culicivora. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) (previously: Tetrao phasianellus) is a medium-sized prairie grouse. It is also known as the sharptail, and is known as fire grouse or fire bird by Native American Indians[clarification needed] due to their reliance on brush fires to keep their habitat open. The Sharp-Tailed Grouse is the provincial bird of Saskatchewan.

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) ©WikiC

Adults have a relatively short tail with the two central (deck) feathers being square-tipped and somewhat longer than their lighter, outer tail feathers giving the bird its distinctive name. The plumage is mottled dark and light browns against a white background, they are lighter on the underparts with a white belly uniformly covered in faint “V”-shaped markings. These markings distinguish sharp-tailed grouse from lesser and greater prairie chickens which are heavily barred on their underparts(Connelly et al. 1998). Adult males have a yellow comb over their eyes and a violet display patch on their neck. This display patch is another distinguishing characteristic from prairie chickens as male prairie chickens have yellow or orange colored air sacs

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) is a species of ibis native to open wet savannas in parts of northern South America. This ibis is distinguished by its notably long tail, which is the longest among all extant ibis species; measuring 250-301mm in males and 256-272mm in females. The tail projects beyond the tips of the folded wings when the ibis stands; and beyond the trailing legs in flight. The plumage is predominantly black with greenish glossing; and with purplish tinges on the upper back, hind neck, wings and tail. The forehead and cheek region are occasionally greyish brown. Juveniles appear similar to adults, but their plumage lacks a metallic sheen.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) – breeding adults are a rich brown with darker feather centres above, and white underneath apart from a buff breast. They have a light superciliary line above the eye and a chestnut crown. In winter, sharp-tailed sandpipers are grey above. The juveniles are brightly patterned above with rufous coloration and white mantle stripes.

This bird looks a lot like the pectoral sandpiper, within whose Asian range it breeds. It differs from that species in its breast pattern, stronger supercilium and more rufous crown. It has some similarities to the long-toed stint, but is much larger than the stint.

Sharp-tailed Starling (Lamprotornis acuticaudus) ©WikiC

Sharp-tailed Starling (Lamprotornis acuticaudus), also known as the sharp-tailed glossy-starling, is a species of starling in the family Sturnidae. It inhabits open woodland (namely miombo) in Angola, northern Botswana, the southern DRC, northern Namibia, western Tanzania, and Zambia.

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper (Lochmias nematura) by Dario Sanches

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper (Lochmias nematura) is a passerine bird of South America belonging to the family Furnariidae, the ovenbirds. It is the only member of the genus Lochmias. The species is also known as the streamside streamcreeper.

This bird is about 6 in (15 cm) long, with a short tail and a long, thin, slightly curved bill. The plumage is dark brown, densely spotted white on the underparts. There is a white stripe over the eye and the tail is blackish. The song is an accelerating trill, lasting for about five seconds.


Avian and Attributes – Sharp Part I

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Birds Heading South – We Are Heading North

Myrtle (Yellow-rumped) Warbler (Setophaga coronata) breeding ©WikiC

Looking forward to our northern birds to begin heading down for the winter. Actually, there have been reports already of migrating birds in various places around Florida. Unfortunately, some of them currently in Florida may be grounded for awhile until Tropical Storm Gordon blows out of the state.

“I would hasten my escape from the windy storm and tempest.” (Psalms 55:8 KJV)

Hurricane season gets active about the same time the fall migration gets underway. The Lord has given most of the birds the instinct to take cover during these disturbances.

We are currently headed the opposite direction. We are going North for a few days. Hope there will be a few birds left up there to enjoy while we are there. Dan has a High School reunion [60th] to attend. I will be visiting with a niece that I haven’t seen in years. When we get back home, maybe we will have some winter bird visitors already in Florida setting up their lawn chairs for the winter. That will give us some birding photos to take. Summer time is pretty slim on birding.

I am trusting the Lord to help me heal from my back surgery so we can get out and about with the birds again. So far, I am getting better, but still taking it easy. Also hope to get a few photos taken while on trip. Stay tuned!

Avian And Attributes – Sharp Part I

Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) Female ©WikiC

“For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.” (Hebrews 4:12-13 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sharp

SH’ARP, a.
1. Having a very thin edge or a fine point; keen; acute; not blunt. Thus we may say, a sharp knife, or a sharp needle. A sharp edge easily severs a substance; a sharp point is easily made to penetrate,it.
2. Terminating in a point or edge; not obtuse; as, a hills terminates in a sharp peak, or a sharp ridge.
3. Forming an acute or too small angle at the ridge; as a sharp roof.
4. Acute of mind; quick to discern or distinguish; penetrating; ready at invention; witty; ingenious.

“Thy tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.” (Psalms 52:2 KJV)


Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) ©WikiC

There are many “Sharp” named birds, but for this post, we will mention two of them. The Sharp-beaked Ground Finch and the Sharpbill. There will be more in a second article.

Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) ©Nancy Bell Mangoverde

The Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) is a species of bird in the Tanager family Thraupidae. It is classified as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and it is native to the Galápagos Islands in Ecuador. It has a mass of around 20 grams (0.71 oz) and the males have black plumage, while females have streaked brown plumage. This finch was described by Richard Bowdler Sharpe in 1888.

This relatively small, slender-billed finch is endemic to the Galápagos Islands, where it is found on Fernandina, Santiago, Pinta, Genovesa, Darwin, and Wolf Islands. On the first three islands, it breeds in the humid highlands and disperses afterwards, but on the remaining smaller and lower islands the sharp-beaked ground finch is found in the arid zone year-round. Due to habitat destruction its range has decreased. It was formerly also present in the highlands of several other islands, and it is possible it still occurs on Isabela.

Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) ©WikiC

The Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) is a small passerine bird in the family Tityridae. Its range is from the mountainous areas of tropical South America and southern Central America (Panama and Costa Rica).

It inhabits the canopy of wet forest and feeds on fruit and some invertebrates. It has an orange erectile crest, black-spotted yellowish underparts and scaling on the head and neck. As its name implies, it has a straight, pointed beak, which gives its common name.

Sharpbills are most commonly found in tall dense forests but occasionally venture to the forest edge. Their diet consists of primarily of fruit, but they will also take insects, hanging upside down in from twigs to obtain insect larvae.


Sharp-Beaked Ground Finch – The Bloodsucker..

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Bill It To The White Stork

White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) by Bob-Nan

“Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times; and the turtle and the crane and the swallow observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 KJV)

This migrating stork was tagged with a tracking device and ended up running up quite a phone bill. Here are excerpts from two different articles about Kajtek, the White Stork.

“A migrating, tagged, male white stork—known to the Polish environmentalists who were tracking him as “Kajtek”—blipped out of contact on 26 April.

That, however, did not stop him from making good use of the SIM card in his GPS tracker, with which the bird—or somebody who found the GPS device and picked it apart in order to get at the card—racked up a $2,700 phone bill.” [SIM card in bird’s GPS tracker]

White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) by Ian

“In a Facebook post, the group explains that “for unknown reasons” Kajtek stayed in the area for over two months, “travelling 25 kms in different directions during the day”.

Last month, EkoLogiczna was surprised with a phone bill linked to the SIM card installed in the Kajtek’s GPS tracker for a total amount of 10,000 PLN (€2,278).

“Someone quite simply removed the card from the tracker, put it in a phone and used it for 20 hours of communication,” the group said in the Facebook post.

According to the EuroNatur Foundation, Poland is a major centre of distribution for the white stork, accounting for 40% of the bird’s world population.”

“Let him that stole steal no more: but rather let him labour, working with his hands the thing which is good, that he may have to give to him that needeth.” (Ephesians 4:28 KJV)

Here are the stories about this:

SIM card in bird’s GPS tracker used to rack up $2,700 phone bill …

Roaming stork lands Polish charity with huge phone bill

USA Today

You Hold Me Up

Skimmer Baby Leaning against Parents Beak – ©Thomas C – NatlGeog – Pinterest

“If I say, “My foot slips,” Your mercy, O LORD, will hold me up. In the multitude of my anxieties within me, Your comforts delight my soul.” (Psalms 94:18-19 NKJV)

A Black Skimmer chick holding on to it’s parent. Adorable!

What verse(s) would you use for this photo?

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Gideon

Avian And Attributes – Shade

Shade Bush Warbler Drawing ©HBAlive

“The LORD is thy keeper: the LORD is thy shade upon thy right hand.” (Psalms 121:5 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Shade

SHADE, n. [L. scutum, a shield.]
1. Literally, the interception, cutting of or interruption of the rays of light; hence, the obscurity which is caused by such interception. Shad differs from shadow, as it implies no particular form or definite limit. whereas a shadow represents in form the object which intercepts the light. Hence when we say, let us resort to the shade of a tree, we have no reference to its form; but when we speak of measuring a pyramid or other object by its shadow, we have reference to its extent.
2. Darkness; obscurity; as the shades of night.
3. An obscure place, properly in a grove or close wood, which precludes the sun’s rays; an hence, a secluded retreat.
4. A screen; something that intercepts light or heat.
5. Protection; shelter.
6. In painting, the dark part of the picture.
7. Degree or gradation of light.
White, red, yellow, blue, with their several degrees, or shades and mixtures, as green, come only in by the eyes. Locke.
8. A shadow.


Shade Bush Warbler in Middle Drawing by John Anderton

Shade Bush Warbler (Horornis parens) or shade warbler (Horornis parens) is a species of bird in the family Cettiidae. It is found only in Solomon Islands, where it is endemic to the island of Makira (formerly San Cristobal Island). Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests and tropical moist montane forest above 600m. It feeds on insects in the undergrowth and on the ground.

There are really no photos available on line.

H B Alive Drawing

https://goo.gl/images/aiFdky


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Seaside

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (Dusky-extinct) ©WikiC

“The same day went Jesus out of the house, and sat by the sea side.” (Matthew 13:1 KJV)

“And he began again to teach by the sea side: and there was gathered unto him a great multitude, so that he entered into a ship, and sat in the sea; and the whole multitude was by the sea on the land.” (Mark 4:1 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Seaside

Sea-side
SE’A-SIDE, n. [sea and side.]

The land bordering on the sea; the country adjacent to the sea, or near it.


Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis) (Cape Sabel) ©WikiC

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritima) is a small American sparrow.

Adults have brownish upperparts with gray on the crown and nape, and a grayish-buff-colored breast with dark streaks; they have a dark face with gray cheeks, a white throat, and a short, pointed tail. Birds show a small yellow streak just above the eye.

Their breeding habitat is salt marshes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States from southern New Hampshire to southern Texas. The nest is an open cup usually built in the salt marsh on tidal reeds and spartina grasses. Females lay two to five eggs.

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimusl) ©WikiC

Northern birds most often migrate further south along the eastern coast of the United States. They forage on the ground or in marsh vegetation, sometimes probing in mud. They mainly eat insects, marine invertebrates and seeds. Their feeding areas are often some distance away from the areas they choose to nest.

The song is a raspy buzz that closely resembles a distant red-winged blackbird.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Screaming

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) ©WikiC

“And when the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were terrified and said, It is a ghost! And they screamed out with fright. But instantly He spoke to them, saying, Take courage! I AM! Stop being afraid!” (Matthew 14:26-27 AMP)

Jesus walked on the sea and they were terrified and might have screamed in fear.


Avian and Attributes – Scream

screamshoutyellshriekhoothollervociferationoutcrybellow, or raising one’s voice is a loud vocalization in which air is passed through the vocal folds with greater force than is used in regular or close-distance vocalization. This can be performed by any creature possessing lungs, including humans. There are slight differences in meaning among them; for example, “scream” and “shriek” generally refer to a higher-pitched, sharp sound, used by some birds and other animals, and a “hoot”, such as emitted by an owl, usually does not involve words.

A scream is often an instinctive or reflex action, with a strong emotional aspect, like fear, pain, surprise, joy, anger, etc. [This would describe what those in the boat most like did.]


Screaming Birds

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris) ©WikiC

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillarisis an obligate brood parasite belonging to the family Icteridae and is found in South America. It is also known commonly as the short billed cowbird.

Within South America, the screaming cowbird is found in north east and central Argentina, south east Bolivia, central Brazil and throughout Paraguay and Uruguay. Its natural habitat is pastureland where it forages amongst grazing animals such as cows, hence the name “cowbird”. Similar to other cowbirds, it forages predominantly on the ground, eating invertebrates that have been disturbed by grazing stock. The distribution of the screaming cowbird has increased significantly in recent decades due to habitat alteration caused by deforestation and by following its hosts into new areas.

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) is a species of passerine bird in the family Cotingidae. It is found in humid forests in the Amazon and tropical parts of the Mata Atlântica in South America. It is adapting well to human settlement areas like gardens and parks.

Both sexes have dull grey plumage (wings and tail often somewhat browner) and a voice that is extraordinary loud. Males often gather in loose leks, where they sing to attract females.

The Cofan people of Ecuador call it the Pwe-pwe Yoh, which is a reference to its voice. Among the Ecuadorian Secoyas, the bird is known as the Kwow-kwee-yo. The sound is frequently used in movies, and also can be heard in the background of the popular game Angry Birds Rio.

[Wikipedia with editing]


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Take A Note

Secretarybird look straight at the lens – ©Pinterest – Rudi Luyten

You would like me to take a note?

Secretarybird -Notice the eyelashes – ©Pinterest

Looking down to start writing! [Notice the eyelashes]

Just because these are neat birds, decided to share these Secretarybird photos from Pinterest.

“Let not mercy and truth forsake you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart,” (Proverbs 3:3 NKJV)

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Secretary Bird – The Walker

I.O.C. World Bird List Version 8.2 – Updated

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Gray Jay now Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

I finally finished updating the Birds of the World pages to reflect the newest version, 8.2. of the IOC’s bird list. The family pages and the indexes have been modified. Since the photos on the site were hacked last year, the family pages were changed. Now the photos are at the bottom of the pages instead of with each name.

With this version, I added the Genera in with Green. Many of the new changes are in red and a few in blue. The red are spelling or Genera changes. Blue seems to represent reshuffled positions within a family. [I think – this is from their Excel spreadsheet]

White-crested Helmetshrike (Prionops plumatus) ©WikiC

Two families were moved into the Vangidae – Vanga and Allies family.

Here is the over update:

The IOC World Bird List 8.2 contains 10,711 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  246 Families (plus 1 Incertae Sedis) and 2,313 Genera.  The list also includes 20,055 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Changes include:

SPECIES ADDED:                15 

SPECIES DELETED:             3

ENGLISH NAMES:               18

TAXONOMY:                         18 incl revisions of  Campephagidae, Phylloscopidae and Locustellidae, and expansion of Vangidae to include helmetshrikes, woodshrikes, and shrike-flycatchers

Large woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis) ©WikiC

The three articles listed in the Time For Another Update From The I.O.C. explain the changes and saves me rewriting the same information.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

2018 checklist changes include few splits

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

The Indexes, Alphabetical Pages and Family Pages are all current here on the site:

Birds of the World

Alphabetical List of the Birds.

ORDER

Family

Families – Alphabetical (Scientific)

Families – Alphabetical (English)

Families – Taxonomic (Scientific – English)

Families – Taxonomic (English – Scientific)

Species Index