A Fisherman Robbed – Chapter 20

King Eagle Plunger the Osprey - Burgess Bird Book ©©

King Eagle Plunger the Osprey – Burgess Bird Book ©©

A Fisherman Robbed

The Osprey and the Bald-headed Eagle.

The Burgess Bird Book For Children

*

Listen to the story read.

CHAPTER 20. A Fisherman Robbed.

Just out of curiosity, and because he possesses what is called the
wandering foot, which means that he delights to roam about, Peter Rabbit
had run over to the bank of the Big River. There were plenty of bushes,
clumps of tall grass, weeds and tangles of vines along the bank of the
Big River, so that Peter felt quite safe there. He liked to sit gazing
out over the water and wonder where it all came from and where it was
going and what, kept it moving.

He was doing this very thing on this particular morning when he happened
to glance up in the blue, blue sky. There he saw a broad-winged bird
sailing in wide, graceful circles. Instantly Peter crouched a little
lower in his hiding-place, for he knew this for a member of the Hawk
family and Peter has learned by experience that the only way to keep
perfectly safe when one of these hook-clawed, hook-billed birds is about
is to keep out of sight.

So now he crouched very close to the ground and kept his eyes fixed on
the big bird sailing so gracefully high up in the blue, blue sky over
the Big River. Suddenly the stranger paused in his flight and for a
moment appeared to remain in one place, his great wings heating rapidly
to hold him there. Then those wings were closed and with a rush he shot
down straight for the water, disappearing with a great splash. Instantly
Peter sat up to his full height that he might see better.

“It’s Plunger the Osprey fishing, and I’ve nothing to fear from him,” he
cried happily.

Out of the water, his great wings flapping, rose Plunger. Peter looked
eagerly to see if he had caught a fish, but there was nothing in
Plunger’s great, curved claws. Either that fish had been too deep or
had seen Plunger and darted away just in the nick of time. Peter had a
splendid view of Plunger. He was just a little bigger than Redtail the
Hawk. Above he was dark brown, his head and neck marked with white. His
tail was grayish, crossed by several narrow dark bands and tipped with
white. His under parts were white with some light brown spots on his
breast. Peter could see clearly the great, curved claws which are
Plunger’s fishhooks.

Eastern Osprey trying to catch fish by Ian

Up, up, up he rose, going round and round in a spiral. When he was well
up in the blue, blue sky, he began to sail again in wide circles as when
Peter had first seen him. It wasn’t long before he again paused and
then shot down towards the water. This time he abruptly spread his great
wings just before reaching the water so that he no more than wet his
feet. Once more a fish had escaped him. But Plunger seemed not in the
least discouraged. He is a true fisherman and every true fisherman
possesses patience. Up again he spiraled until he was so high that Peter
wondered how he could possibly see a fish so far below. You see, Peter
didn’t know that it is easier to see down into the water from high above
it than from close to it. Then, too, there are no more wonderful eyes
than those possessed by the members of the Hawk family. And Plunger the
Osprey is a Hawk, usually called Fish Hawk.

Osprey Catching Fish by Ian

A third time Plunger shot down and this time, as in his first attempt,
he struck the water with a great splash and disappeared. In an instant
he reappeared, shaking the water from him in a silver spray and flapping
heavily. This time Fetes could gee a great shining fish in his claws.
It was heavy, as Peter could tell by the way in which Plunger flew. He
headed towards a tall tree on the other bank of the Big River, there to
enjoy his breakfast. He was not more than halfway there when Peter was
startled by a harsh scream.

He looked up to see a great bird, with wonderful broad wings, swinging
in short circles about Plunger. His body and wings were dark brown, and
his head was snowy white, as was his tail. His great hooked beak was
yellow and his legs were yellow. Peter knew in an instant who it was.
There could be no mistake. It was King Eagle, commonly known as Bald
Head, though his head isn’t bald at all.

Peter’s eyes looked as if they would pop out of his head, for it was
quite plain to him that King Eagle was after Plunger, and Peter didn’t
understand this at all. You see, he didn’t understand what King Eagle
was screaming. But Plunger did. King Eagle was screaming, “Drop that
fish! Drop that fish!”

Plunger didn’t intend to drop that fish if he could help himself. It was
his fish. Hadn’t he caught it himself? He didn’t intend to give it up to
any robber of the air, even though that robber was King Eagle himself,
unless he was actually forced to. So Plunger began to dodge and twist
and turn in the air, all the time mounting higher and higher, and all
the time screaming harshly, “Robber! Thief! I won’t drop this fish! It’s
mine! It’s mine!”

Now the fish was heavy, so of course Plunger couldn’t fly as easily and
swiftly as if he were carrying nothing. Up, up he went, but all the time
King Eagle went up with him, circling round him, screaming harshly, and
threatening to strike him with those great cruel, curved claws. Peter
watched them, so excited that he fairly danced. “O, I do hope Plunger
will get away from that big robber,” cried Peter. “He may be king of the
air, but he is a robber just the same.”

Plunger and King Eagle were now high in the air above the Big River.
Suddenly King Eagle swung above Plunger and for an instant seemed to
hold himself still there, just as Plunger had done before he had shot
down into the water after that fish. There was a still harsher note in
King Eagle’s scream. If Peter had been near enough he would have seen
a look of anger and determination in King Eagle’s fierce, yellow eyes.
Plunger saw it and knew what it meant. He knew that King Eagle would
stand for no more fooling. With a cry of bitter disappointment and anger
he let go of the big fish.

Bald Eagle – San Diego Zoo

Down, down, dropped the fish, shining in the sun like a bar of silver.
King Eagle’s wings half closed and he shot down like a thunderbolt. Just
before the fish reached the water King Eagle struck it with his great
claws, checked himself by spreading his broad wings and tail, and then
in triumph flew over to the very tree towards which Plunger had started
when he had caught the fish. There he leisurely made his breakfast,
apparently enjoying it as much as if he had come by it honestly.

As for poor Plunger, he shook himself, screamed angrily once or twice,
then appeared to think that it was wisest to make the best of a bad
matter and that there were more fish where that one had come from, for
he once more began to sail in circles over the Big River, searching
for a fish near the surface. Peter watched him until he saw him catch
another fish and fly away with it in triumph. King Eagle watched him,
too, but having had a good breakfast he was quite willing to let Plunger
enjoy his catch in peace.

Late that afternoon Peter visited the Old Orchard, for he just had to
tell Jenny Wren all about what he had seen that morning.

“King Eagle is king simply because he is so big and fierce and strong,”
sputtered Jenny. “He isn’t kingly in his habits, not the least bit. He
never hesitates to rob those smaller than himself, just as you saw him
rob Plunger. He is very fond of fish, and once in a while he catches one
for himself when Plunger isn’t around to be robbed, but he isn’t a very
good fisherman, and he isn’t the least bit fussy about his fish. Plunger
eats only fresh fish which he catches himself, but King Eagle will eat
dead fish which he finds on the shore. He doesn’t seem to care how long
they have been dead either.”

“Doesn’t he eat anything but fish?” asked Peter innocently.

“Well,” retorted Jenny Wren, her eyes twinkling, “I wouldn’t advise you
to run across the Green Meadows in sight of King Eagle. I am told he is
very fond of Rabbit. In fact he is very fond of fresh meat of any kind.
He even catches the babies of Lightfoot the Deer when he gets a chance.
He is so swift of wing that even the members of the Duck family fear
him, for he is especially fond of fat Duck. Even Honker the Goose is not
safe from him. King he may he, but he rules only through fear. He is
a white-headed old robber. The best thing I can say of him is that he
takes a mate for life and is loyal and true to her as long as she lives,
and that is a great many years. By the way, Peter, did you know that
she is bigger than he is, and that the young during the first year after
leaving their nest, are bigger than their parents and do not have white
heads? By the time they get white heads they are the same size as their
parents.”

“That’s odd and its hard to believe,” said Peter.

“It is odd, but it is true just the same, whether you believe it or
not,” retorted Jenny Wren, and whisked out of sight into her home.

***

  • What kind of bird is Plunger?
  • Who was watching Plunger trying to catch a fish?
  • How many tries did it take to catch a fish?
  • Do you give up after the first try, or do you keep trying to accomplish (finish) a goal?
  • What happened to the fish?
  • Did both birds have a meal?
  • Is it right to steal?

“You shall not steal, nor deal falsely, nor lie to one another.” (Leviticus 19:11 NKJV)

Links:

*

Links:

 

  Next Chapter (A Fishing Party. Coming Soon)

 

 

Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 

  Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 

ABC's of the Gospel

  

  ABC’s of the Gospel

A Maker of Thunder and a Friend in Black – Chapter 19

One of our readers asked if I might continue this Burgess Bird Book for Children Series in the Bird Tales section. [She is reading them to her children.] Since I already have the stories, photos, and recordings on my computer, I agreed. Here is Chapter 19, and there are 45 chapters all total. So, STAY TUNED!

Strutter_the_Ruffed_Grouse - Burgess Bird Book ©©

Strutter, The Ruffed Grouse – Burgess Bird Book ©©

A Maker of Thunder and a Friend in Black

The Ruffed Grouse and the Crow Blackbird.

The Burgess Bird Book For Children

*

Chapter 19. A Maker of Thunder and a Friend in Black.

Listen to the story read.

Peter Rabbit’s intentions were of the best. Once safely away from that
lonesome part of the Green Forest where was the home of Redtail the
Hawk, he intended to go straight back to the dear Old Briar-patch. But
he was not halfway there when from another direction in the Green Forest
there came a sound that caused him to stop short and quite forget all
about home. It was a sound very like distant thunder. It began slowly at
first and then went faster and faster. Boom–Boom–Boom–Boom-Boom-Boom
Boo-Boo-B-B-B-B-b-b-b-b-boom! It was like the long roll on a bass drum.

Peter laughed right out. “That’s Strutter the Stuffed Grouse!” he cried
joyously. “I had forgotten all about him. I certainly must go over and
pay him a call and find out where Mrs. Grouse is. My, how Strutter can
drum!”

Peter promptly headed towards that distant thunder. As he drew nearer
to it, it sounded louder and louder. Presently Peter stopped to try to
locate exactly the place where that sound, which now was more than ever
like thunder, was coming from. Suddenly Peter remembered something.
“I know just where he is,” said he to himself. “There’s a big, mossy,
hollow log over yonder, and I remember that Mrs. Grouse once told me
that that is Strutter’s thunder log.”

Very, very carefully Peter stole forward, making no sound at all. At
last he reached a place where he could peep out and see that big, mossy,
hollow log. Sure enough, there was Strutter the Ruffed Grouse. When
Peter first saw him he was crouched on one end of the log, a fluffy ball
of reddish-brown, black and gray feathers. He was resting. Suddenly he
straightened up to his full height, raised his tail and spread it until
it was like an open fan above his back. The outer edge was gray, then
came a broad band of black, followed by bands of gray, brown and black.
Around his neck was a wonderful ruff of black. His reddish-brown wings
were dropped until the tips nearly touched the log. His full breast
rounded out and was buff color with black markings. He was of about the
size of the little Bantam hens Peter had seen in Farmer Brown’s henyard.

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Raymond Barlow

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Raymond Barlow

In the most stately way you can imagine Strutter walked the length of
that mossy log. He was a perfect picture of pride as he strutted very
much like Tom Gobbler the big Turkey cock. When he reached the end of
the log he suddenly dropped his tail, stretched himself to his full
height and his wings began to beat, first slowly then faster and faster,
until they were just a blur. They seemed to touch above his back but
when they came down they didn’t quite strike his sides. It was those
fast moving wings that made the thunder. It was so loud that Peter
almost wanted to stop his ears. When it ended Strutter settled down to
rest and once more appeared like a ball of fluffy feathers. His ruff was
laid flat.

Peter watched him thunder several times and then ventured to show
himself. “Strutter, you are wonderful! simply wonderful!” cried Peter,
and he meant just what he said.

Strutter threw out his chest proudly. “That is just what Mrs. Grouse
says,” he replied. “I don’t know of any better thunderer if I do say it
myself.”

“Speaking of Mrs. Grouse, where is she?” asked Peter eagerly.

“Attending to her household affairs, as a good housewife should,”
retorted Strutter promptly.

“Do you mean she has a nest and eggs?” asked Peter.

Strutter nodded. “She has twelve eggs,” he added proudly.

“I suppose,” said Peter artfully, “her nest is somewhere near here on
the ground.”

“It’s on the ground, Peter, but as to where it is I am not saying a
word. It may or it may not be near here. Do you want to hear me thunder
again?”

Of course Peter said he did, and that was sufficient excuse for Strutter
to show off. Peter stayed a while longer to gossip, but finding Strutter
more interested in thundering than in talking, he once more started for
home.

“I really would like to know where that nest is,” said he to himself
as he scampered along. “I suppose Mrs. Grouse has hidden it so cleverly
that it is quite useless to look for it.”

On his way he passed a certain big tree. All around the ground was
carpeted with brown, dead leaves. There were no bushes or young trees
there. Peter never once thought of looking for a nest. It was the last
place in the world he would expect to find one. When he was well past
the big tree there was a soft chuckle and from among the brown leaves
right at the foot of that big tree a head with a pair of the brightest
eyes was raised a little. Those eyes twinkled as they watched Peter out
of sight.

“He didn’t see me at all,” chuckled Mrs. Grouse, as she settled down
once more. “That is what comes of having a cloak so like the color
of these nice brown leaves. He isn’t the first one who has passed me
without seeing me at all. It is better than trying to hide a nest, and I
certainly am thankful to Old Mother Nature for the cloak she gave me.
I wonder if every one of these twelve eggs will hatch. If they do, I
certainly will have a family to be proud of.”

Meanwhile Peter hurried on in his usual happy-go-lucky fashion until
he came to the edge of the Green Forest. Out on the Green Meadows just
beyond he caught sight of a black form walking about in a stately way
and now and then picking up something. It reminded him of Blacky the
Crow, but he knew right away that it wasn’t Blacky, because it was so
much smaller, being not more than half as big.

Grackle by Dan

“It’s Creaker the Grackle. He was one of the first to arrive this spring
and I’m ashamed of myself for not having called on him,” thought Peter,
as he hopped out and started across the Green Meadows towards Creaker.
“What a splendid long tail he has. I believe Jenny Wren told me that he
belongs to the Blackbird family. He looks so much like Blacky the Crow
that I suppose this is why they call him Crow Blackbird.”

Just then Creaker turned in such a way that the sun fell full on his
head and back. “Why! Why-ee!” exclaimed Peter, rubbing his eyes with
astonishment. “He isn’t just black! He’s beautiful, simply beautiful,
and I’ve always supposed he was just plain, homely black.”

It was true. Creaker the Grackle with the sun shining on him was truly
beautiful. His head and neck, his throat and upper breast, were a
shining blue-black, while his back was a rich, shining brassy-green.
His wings and tail were much like his head and neck. As Peter watched
it seemed as if the colors were constantly changing. This changing of
colors is called iridescence. One other thing Peter noticed and this
was that Creaker’s eyes were yellow. Just at the moment Peter couldn’t
remember any other bird with yellow eyes.

“Creaker,” cried Peter, “I wonder if you know how handsome you are!”

“I’m glad you think so,” replied Creaker. “I’m not at all vain, but
there are mighty few birds I would change coats with.”

“Is–is–Mrs. Creaker dressed as handsomely as you are?” asked Peter
rather timidly.

Creaker shook his head. “Not quite,” said he. “She likes plain black
better. Some of the feathers on her back shine like mine, but she says
that she has no time to show off in the sun and to take care of fine
feathers.”

“Where is she now?” asked Peter.

“Over home,” replied Creaker, pulling a white grub out of the roots of
the grass. “We’ve got a nest over there in one of those pine-trees on
the edge of the Green Forest and I expect any day now we will have four
hungry babies to feed. I shall have to get busy then. You know I am
one of those who believe that every father should do his full share in
taking care of his family.”

“I’m glad to hear you say it,” declared Peter, nodding his head with
approval quite as if he was himself the best of fathers, which he isn’t
at all.

“May I ask you a very personal question, Creaker?”

“Ask as many questions as you like. I don’t have to answer them unless I
want to,” retorted Creaker.

“Is it true that you steal the eggs of other birds?” Peter blurted the
question out rather hurriedly.

Creaker’s yellow eyes began to twinkle. “That is a very personal
question,” said he. “I won’t go so far as to say I steal eggs, but I’ve
found that eggs are very good for my constitution and if I find a nest
with nobody around I sometimes help myself to the eggs. You see the
owner might not come back and then those eggs would spoil, and that
would be a pity.”

“That’s no excuse at all,” declared Peter. “I believe you’re no better
than Sammy Jay and Blacky the Crow.”

Creaker chuckled, but he did not seem to be at all offended. Just then
he heard Mrs. Creaker calling him and with a hasty farewell he spread
his wings and headed for the Green Forest. Once in the air he seemed
just plain black. Peter watched him out of sight and then once more
headed for the dear Old Briar-patch.

“There are three things which are stately in their march, Even four which are stately when they walk: The lion which is mighty among beasts And does not retreat before any, The strutting rooster, the male goat also, And a king when his army is with him. If you have been foolish in exalting yourself Or if you have plotted evil, put your hand on your mouth.” (Proverbs 30:29-32 NASB)

*

  • Who did Peter hear first in the forest?
  • What did that bird sound like? What kind of instrument?
  • Are we supposed to act better than others?
  • Did he find Mrs. Grouse? Why not?
  • How is the Grackle different from a Crow?

“A friend loveth at all times,…” (Proverbs 17:17a KJV)

*

Links:

Bible Birds

Birds Vol #6 – The Ruffled Grouse

Home, Home on the Sage: Nothing to Grouse about!

Fusion Unplugged by Boat-tailed Grackles by AJMithra

 

  Next Chapter (A Fisherman Robbed.)

 

Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 

  Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

Gold/Yellow = Heaven

  

 

Wordless Birds

 

 

**

50 Stunning Hummingbird Pictures – B & B

Ruby-throated Hummingbird by Ray's Wildlife

Ruby-throated Hummingbird by Ray’s Wildlife

“So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day.” (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

You have got to check out this interesting article from Birds & Blooms!!

50 Stunning Hummingbird Pictures You Need To See

Still haven’t been doing much birdwatching lately, except through my back door. So, I trust you will enjoy these great photos. We have had some nice photos of hummingbirds here over the years, but these are all right together.

Ruby-topaz Hummingbird (Chrysolampis mosquitus) Male ©WikiC

Some of our previous Hummingbird articles:

Ten Beautiful Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds See Colors Over (Beyond) the Rainbow

How Much Are You Being Monitored? A Hummingbird Lesson

Hummingbird from John 10:10 Project

Tickle Me Tuesday – Hummingbirds

Peru’s Marvellous Hummingbird – Again

Creation Moments – Double Life of the Hummingbird

Hummingbirds in Ultra Slow Motion

Hummingbird Families – Firecrowns

Calliope Hummingbirds – North America’s Smallest

Wordless Birds – Hummingbirds

New Duck In The Yard

Wood Duck among Black-bellied Whistling Ducks by Lee

Yesterday we added a new bird to our backyard list. He tried to hide, but with a look like that, it’s hard to do. So finally, he came out of hiding. Some of those Whistling Ducks don’t seem to be too happy with him being there. [I was very happy! :) ]

Wood Duck in our yard. 1-17-22

We’ve written about this beautiful bird before, but usually, we have seen them over in Lakeland on their lakes. So, this was a treat to be able to have him visit us.

When I see this duck, I think about how the Lord when he created these Avian Wonders must have had a delight in decorating this Wood Duck. What clear lines!

Wood Duck’s Crested Head and Back

I have to admit that the Duck had a bit of an attitude. While he was strutting around, ever so often he would throw his head like he was trying to flip that long “bonnet” of his. [my term] I tried to capture it on video, but I was only able to capture it once.

Several verses came to mind about this encounter with our beautiful duck:

The first photo, where he was sort of hidden behind the others.

“Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.” (Matthew 5:14-16 KJV)

We should not be afraid to let our Christianity be seen. Also, the look on the faces reminds me of how some people react to us when we do accept the Lord as our Savior.

Other Information:

All About Birds – Wood Duck

While putting these links about Wood Ducks here, I discovered that a Wood Duck and it’s mate HAS been here. I was surprised.

  1. Our Ducky Backyard
  2. Wood Duck
  3. Paintbrush Birds – Wood Ducks
  4. Lee’s One Word Monday – 3/28/16

Birds of the Bible – Foundation Reviews in 2022

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

Wow! Looking over the previous articles that have been written through the years on our blog, I thought it would be nice to read through some of our many posts.

To build a house, you need a foundation. To build a blog, you need a foundation. So, our foundation from the beginning for Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus, has always been this:

“For no other foundation can anyone lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ.” (1 Corinthians 3:11 NKJV)

He created our world, universe, us, and all His Avian Wonders, which we like to write about. We love to write about His birds and how we can learn from them. We’ve done our best, with a few stumbles here and there, but we have tried to honor Him through it all. He has been gracious to send me extra writers, photographers, and friends along this journey.

My thanks to Him, these extra hands to assist, my husband, and all of you who have visited us along the way.

Now, what has been written about the Foundations? Let’s take a look:

White Pelicans in Flight - Circle B Bar by Dan

White Pelicans in Flight – Circle B Bar

Birds of the Bible – Foundation #1 (2009) and then Foundation #1 Updated (2015)

These two posts explain about the beginning of birds and how they came to be here.

Fischer’s Lovebird (Agapornis fischeri) by W Kwong

Birds of the Bible – Foundation #2 (2009) and then Foundation #2 Updated (2015)

In Genesis Chapter 2, the birds and animals were named, but what happened in Chapter 3 caused the birds to be cursed and death now became a reality to them and others. But there is hope.

Noah’s Ark ©©Flickr elmada

Birds of the Bible – Foundation #3 (2009) and then Foundation #3 Updated (2015)

Now we find God has a plan to preserve the life of some of the people, animals, and the birds by having them enter the Ark.

Ernesto Carrasco’s Noah’s Ark Model

Birds of the Bible – Foundation #4 (2009) and then Foundation #4 Updated (2016)

What did the birds encounter as they came off the ark and afterwards?

Rainbow-clouds.© Readers Digest

Rainbow-clouds ©Readers Digest

Birds of the Bible – Foundation #5 (2009) – Not Updated Yet (Stay tuned)

This post presents many of the “theories” about where birds came from, versus how the creationist view where and how the Avian Wonders of this world came into being.

We trust you will enjoy reading (or re-reading_ through these Foundation of the Birds of the Bible posts.

Western Tanager: Red, Yellow, Black and White

Birds of the Bible

Birds of the Bible – Introduced Here In 2008

ln honor of the Top 100 Bird Blogs and Websites For Ornithologists and Bird Lovers rating they gave us, [#20] here is a copy of that very first blog on Feb. 16, 2008.

American White Pelicans at Lake Hollingsworth

American White Pelicans at Lake Hollingsworth

Goal: To encourage your understanding and help you form a mental picture of the fowls or birds of the air found in scripture.

God has created the fowls and birds and they are mentioned throughout the Bible. When you read the name of a bird, does a mental picture come to view or do you just keep reading without a thought to what you just read? Sure, you know some of them, like the Eagle or a Sparrow, but how about a Bittern, Ossifrage, Hoopoe, or Lapwing? Not just their names are important, but how about the illustrations that use birds to teach lessons? God’s care, strength, provision and other lessons are taught with birds as the examples.

Wood Stork

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you;” Job 12:7

So, let’s get started with:

The Birds of the Bible

“Then God said, ‘Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.’ So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, ‘Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.’ So the evening and the morning were the fifth day.” Gen 1: 20-23

Here we see that God created the birds on day five of creation and that “it was good.”

“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name.” Gen 2:19-20a

Adam was given the privilege of giving all the “critters” their names. Were there as many varieties of birds then as now? There have been changes within the species (kinds), but not evolution (changing from one kind to another kind).

Depending on which copy of the Bible you use, here are some of the names of birds mentioned in the Bible. These will be introduced in following blogs. Not necessarily in the following order.
; Chicken; Cormorant; Crane; Cuckoo; Dove; Eagle; Falcon; Glede; Hawk; Hen; Heron; Hoopoe; Kite; Lapwing; Night Hawk; Osprey; Ossifrage; Ostrich; Owl; Partridge; Peacock; Pelican; Pigeon; Quail; Raven; Sparrow; Stork; Swallow; Swan; Vulture


House Sparrows visiting National Aviary Parrot Show by Lee

House Sparrows visiting NA Parrot Show Outside

“Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?” (Matthew 6:26 NKJV)

Now it is 2022, and time to revisit these wonderful Birds of the Bible. Because of the Covid situation, we haven’t really been birdwatching much in almost two years. Yet, that doesn’t mean it’s time the “throw in the towel”, or the blog, in this case. So, we plan on writing more Birds of the Bible articles about the different Avian Wonders found in the Bible. Trying to bring in fresh material as we review the previous birds that we have written about. We will even ask some of our current writers like Dr. J. J. S. Johnson (Dr. Jim) and William Wise to join in.  Will also try to update the all the links to these articles.

STAY TUNED!

What An Honor – Top 100 Bird Blogs and Websites

Sunday Inspiration – Christmas Birds Revisited 2021

Two-barred Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera)(White-winged) by Raymond Barlow

Two-barred Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera)(White-winged) by Raymond Barlow

Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him. (Matthew 2:1-2 KJV)

Thought you might enjoy a Christmas post from the past. (2012)

Today I am doing something a little different. Instead of a song, there is a short Christmas message from my pastor. This was given during the Camel Lot Christmas Musical that we had in 2012. It applies for today, as well. Listen to Pastor Nathan Osborne III as you watch some of the Lord Jesus Christ’s creation among the birds.

The birth of the Jesus, His death on the cross and His resurrection are all a part of Christmas.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Our Pastor at the Christmas Camel Lot Musical – 2012

*

(Started adding Christmas colored birds, but then added newer photos from this year.)

Sunday Inspirations

Some Previous Christmas Articles

Eagles Wings – From Creation Moments

Isaiah 40:30-31

“Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and the young men shall utterly fall: but they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.”

As I sit in my backyard, enjoying some springtime sunshine while writing this script, my eyes are drawn to a pair of shapes, silhouetted against a bright sky, circling over the Cowlitz River. They look dark from where I am sitting, but I know that if they landed, they would not be so dark, and they would have white heads. They are eagles. A pair of them have been around this area since we moved here about three years ago.

I love the way that eagles seem to fly as if they are not flying. They catch the air currents, and their large outstretched wings enjoy a lift force which is not from their own muscles, but from those air currents. To maintain that height for so long by their own muscle power would be too tiring for such large, flying birds.

The way that these eagles soar is used in the Bible as a beautiful illustration of God’s grace. In Isaiah 40:31 we read:

“They who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.”

One can imagine that getting into the air, and flying high would cause the eagle to lose energy. But then it can rest and renew its strength. The Lord reminds us, through the things that He has created, that we should wait upon Him and rely on His strength.

Prayer: Help us, Father God, to wait for You, and to renew our strength through the grace that You give us. Amen.

Author: Paul F. Taylor

Ref:  With Wings Like Eagles , accessed 4/24/2020. Image: David R. Tribble, CC BY-SA 4.0 International.

© 2021 Creation Moments. Eagles Wings [Used with permission]

More Articles from Creation Moments

Who Paints The Leaves?

Psalm 91 “Shadow of the Almighty” – Pastor Totman

Under His Wings - (Dove - photographer unknown)

Under His Wings – by Ric Seet

“He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the LORD, He is my refuge and my fortress: my God; in him will I trust.” (Psalms 91:1-2 KJV)

We had a fantastic message yesterday from our Pastor, Dave Totman. It was based on Psalm 91, “Shadow of the Almighty.”

Needless to say, there were many references to our Creator’s Avian Wonders. Just thought you would enjoy watching this.

Praise the Lord for His watch care and protection of us!

Gathering Her Chicks Under Her Wings

“He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall be thy shield and buckler. Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor for the arrow that flieth by day;” (Psalms 91:4-5 KJV)

Here is a Killdeer protecting her eggs from a farm tractor. Almost hard to watch. [But it turns out okay!]

Good News

From 10,758 to 10,912 Living Species

Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) by Robert Scanlon. Now there’s a Burmese Collard Dove (Streptopelia xanthocycla) split off from it.

Wow! Since I last updated the World Bird List here on this site, 154 new Species have been added, 4 Orders have been added, 2 Families have been added, and 52 Genera have been added in the last two years.

This is what was last count in 2019:

Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019)

The IOC World Bird List 9.2 contains 10,758 extant species (and 158 extinct species) classified in 40 Orders,  250 Families and 2,320 Genera.  The list also includes 20,034 subspecies, their ranges and  authors.

Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian. Now there’s a Malabar Imperial Pigeon Ducula cuprea is split from Mountain Imperial Pigeon Ducula badia.

This is the new count:

Version 11.2 (July 15, 2021)

The IOC World Bird List 11.2 contains 10,912 extant species (and 160 extinct species) classified in 44 Orders, 252 Families and 2,372 Genera.  The list also includes 19,889 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Over the next few days, (or weeks) I hope to update our pages to the current list. Because of Covid concerns (no birding), and some health issues, I have neglected to update these. I am curious as to what they have added and deleted in the last few years. Stay tuned!

“For I am the LORD, I change not;” (Malachi 3:6 KJV)

Thankfully, Our Lord does not change!!

I did list some of the changes to the 10.1 version, but didn’t update the site. See:

World Bird Names Changes Version 10.1

I just discovered these Name Changes to 10.1 as I was finishing this article up. I just may do the same for 10.2 and 11.1 versions so you can see the changes in smaller batches. Stay tuned some more!

So, expect the links to the list to be changing as this process is on going:

World Bird List

Species

Orders

Families

 

Reviewing Avian and Attributes

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) by Jim Fenton

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) by Jim Fenton

August 14, 2017 the Avian and Attributes series was started. The first of the series was Avian and Attributes – Almighty.

I stated that, “A good friend of mine, Rhonda Sawtelle, (Create a Positive Day), has been posting every day on her Facebook a different attribute of our Lord God. She has been going through them alphabetically. What if each day, we had a different attribute and a bird that starts with that same letter. My challenge is to try to at least get through the alphabet at least once. Maybe several rounds. Stay tuned!” [By the way, she still has her blog.] I did manage to come up with at least an attribute and a bird for each letter of the alphabet, though I pushed it a few times, like with “X”.

If you would like to review them, or see them for the first time, see below. You can also find this list in the left menu as Avian and Attributes.

Avian and Attributes Articles:

A:

Admirable – Admirable Hummingbird

Almighty – American Avocet

Always There (Omnipresent) – American Bittern

Ancient (of Days) – Ancient Murrelet

Apostle’s Teacher – Apostlebird

B:

Beautiful – Beautiful Firetail

Bishop – Bishop Oo

Blood – Blood Partridge

Bountiful/Bountifully – Bounty Shag

Bush (Hosted God) – Bush Blackcap

Busy – Buzzing Flowerpiercer

C:

Captain – Celestial Monarch

Cheer – Cheer Pheasant

Clay (Potter) – Clay-colored Sparrow and Thrush

Cloud – Cloud Cisticola , Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl and C-F Screech Owl

Cook – Cook Reed Warbler, Cook’s Swift and Petrel

Creator – Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo

Creator – Creator of the Garden

Crowned I – First Four “Crowned” Birds – 1

Crowned II – Last Four “Crowned” Birds – 2

D:

David’s – David’s Fulvetta

Deliverer – Dove

Diadem – Diademed Tanager

Diademed – Diademed Amazon, Sandpiper-Plover, and Tapaculo

Diamond – Diamond Dove and Diamond Firetail 

E:

Ear(ed) – Eared Birds

Elegant – 13 Elegant Birds

Emerald – Emerald Birds

Ensign – Emperor Bird-of-Paradise

Everlasting – Bald Eagle

F:

Faithful – Peregrine Falcon

Fearful – Fearful Owl

Fire – Fire Birds

Flame – Flame Birds

Fortress – Flame Robin

Friend/Friendly – Friendly Bush Warbler and Friendly Fantail

G:

Garden [Creator of The Garden] – Garden Emerald and Garden Warbler

Glistening – Glistening-green Tanager

Glittering – Glittering Birds

Glowing – Glowing Puffleg

Gracious – Graceful Honeyeater

Glorious – Ruffed Grouse

H:

Helper – Hamerkop

Hill – Hill Birds

Holy – Lewin’s Honeyeater

Horn(ed) – Horn Birds

House – House Birds

I:

Immutable – Marshall’s Iora

Imperial – Imperial Birds

Invisible – Invisible Rail

J:

Judge – Joyful Greenbul

Justifier – Rufous-tailed Jacamar

K:

Kind – Kaempfer’s Woodpecker

King – Grey Kingbird

L:

Light – Light-mantled Albatross

Lord – Lord Derby and Lord Howe Birds

Love – Fischer’s Lovebird

M:

Majestic – Magnificent Frigatebird

Mercy – Chestnut-breasted Malkoha

Magnificent – Magnificent Birds

Mocking – Mocking Cliff Chat

Morning – Morningbird

Mount – Mount Birds

Mountain – Mountain Birds

Mute – Mute Swan

Myrtle – Myrtle Warbler

N:

Naked – Naked-faced Barbet and Spiderhunter

Name Above All Names – Common Nightingale

Nazarene – Nazca Booby

Night – Night Parrot

Noble – Noble Snipe

O:

Omnipotent – Great Horned Owl

Omnipresence – Orange-bellied Leafbird

P:

Palm – Palm Birds

Paradise – Paradise Birds

Peace – Peaceful Dove

Pearl – Pearl Kite

Pilot – Pilotbird

Providence – Parrot-billed Sparrow

Purple -Purple Birds

Q:

Quickens – Resplendent Quetzal

Quiets Our Fears – Queen Carola’s Parotia

R:

Rainbow –  Rainbow Birds

Redeemer – Brazilian Ruby

Reed – Reed Cormorant and Parrotbill

Reunion – Reunion Birds

Ring – Ring Ouzel

River – River Birds

Rock – Rock Dove

Royal – Royal Birds

Ruby/Rubies – “Ruby-” Birds

S:

Sacred – Sacred Kingfisher

Sad – Sad Flycatcher

Sand – Sand Birds

Sapphire – Sapphire Birds

Scale – Scale- Birds

Scarlet – Scarlet Birds

Scarlet – Scarlet-plus Birds

Screaming – Cowbird and Piha

Seaside – Seaside Sparrow

Shade – Shade Bush Warbler

Sharp – Part I

Sharp – Part II

Shepherd – Mute Swan

Song – Song Sparrow

Star – Star Birds

Step – Steppe Eagle

Stephen – Stephen’s Lorikeet

Stitch – Stitchbird

Stone – Stone Partridge

Stripes – Striped-backed Birds

Strong – Strong-billed Birds

Sun – Sun Birds

Superb – Superb Birds

Sword – Sword-billed Hummingbird

T:

Tears – Teardrop White Eye

Three (in One) – Three-banded Courser

Torrent – Torrent Birds

Truth – White-winged Triller

U:

Undefiled – Umbrellabird

Unreproveable – Unspotted Saw-whet Owl

V:

Variableness (No) – Variable Sunbird

Vine – Vireos

W:

Way – White-eyes

Willing – Willet

X:

X-Excellence – Xingu Scale-backed Antbird

X-Exalted – Xenops

Y:

Yahweh – Yellowthroat

Yoke – Yellow-crowned Bishop

Z:

Zeal – Zenaida Dove

Zoologist – Zone-Tailed Hawk

Paintbrush Birds – Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting Subspecies (Passerina ciris ciris) ©WikiC

Every since my first encounter with a Painted Bunting, they have been one of top favorites. [notice I have lots of favorites :)] When we lived in south Florida, I turned to look out my window and saw one of the Avian Wonders on my feeder hanging under the awning. Wow!!! I am sure my eyes were about ready to pop out!! What a beauty! This definitely qualifies for a Paintbrush Bird. In fact, it looks like the Creator had several bushes with a dab of color on each and painted these gorgeous birds.

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©Flickr Ralph Arvesen

The male painted bunting is often described as the most beautiful bird in North America and as such has been nicknamed nonpareil, or “without equal”. Its colors, dark blue head, green back, red rump, and underparts, make it extremely easy to identify, but it can still be difficult to spot since it often skulks in foliage even when it is singing. The plumage of female and juvenile painted buntings is green and yellow-green, serving as camouflage. Once seen, the adult female is still distinctive, since it is a brighter, truer green than other similar songbirds.

Painted Bunting – Female ©WikiC Dan_Pancamo

The juveniles have two inserted molts in their first autumn, each yielding plumage like an adult female. 

The painted bunting occupies typical habitat for a member of its family. It is found in thickets, woodland edges with riparian thickets, shrubbery and brushy areas. In the east, the species breeds in maritime hammocks and scrub communities. Today, it is often found along roadsides and in suburban areas, and in gardens with dense, shrubby vegetation. The wintering habitat is typically the shrubby edges along the border of tropical forests or densely vegetated savanna. The breeding range is divided into two geographically separate areas. These include southern Arizona, southern New Mexico, southern and eastern Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, northern Florida, coastal Georgia, the southern coast and inland waterways such as the Santee River of South Carolina and northern Mexico. They winter in South Florida, Cuba, the Bahamas, along both coasts of Mexico and through much of Central America. Occasionally, they may be vagrants further north, including to New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. The bird is also found every few years as far north as New Brunswick, Canada. (Wikipedia, with editing)

Great Verses:

“Now Israel loved Joseph more than all his children, because he was the son of his old age. Also he made him a tunic of many colors.” (Genesis 37:3 NKJV)

“The rainbow shall be in the cloud, and I will look on it to remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is on the earth.” (Genesis 9:16 NKJV) [Maybe the Lord gave us a “small reminder” of His rainbow for bright sunny days when our Painted Bunting is flitting about.]

See More Paintbrush Birds:

Other post about the Painted Bunting: