Creation Moment’s – Let Birds Fly Across The Expanse

LET BIRDS FLY ACROSS THE EXPANSE

Genesis 1:20

“And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.”

On the fifth day of the Creation Week, God created swarms of sea creatures. He also created flying creatures. In Genesis 1:20, God says: “Let birds fly above the earth across the expanse of the heavens.” The birds were not, in fact, in the firmament. When the KJV translates the phrase as “in the open firmament”, the word open reminds us that the birds are simply seen against the background of the firmament, and are not in it. We heard in the previous Creation Moment that God created whole swarms of sea creatures. It could also be assumed that He created a very large variety of flying creatures.

This brings us to the fact that many translations tell us that God made birds. The KJV refers to fowl. The use of a word other than bird in the KJV is significant. The Hebrew word is ôph (עוֹף). There is another Hebrew word that means birds. It is tsippor(צִפּוֹר). In fact, the word ôph is much wider in meaning than birds and includes all flying creatures. For instance, in Leviticus 11:13-19, the bat is included at the end of a list of birds. But the collective word used in Leviticus 11:13 is ôph, not tsippor. So ôph does not really mean birds – it means flying creatures. Hence, the creation of flying creatures in Genesis 1:20 includes not only birds, but also bats, and, by implication, flying insects also – and pterosaurs – the flying dinosaurs.

Once again, we notice the efficiency and economy of the words used in Genesis 1, which gives far more information than at first we think.  

Prayer: Your wonderful book, the Bible, astonishes us again and again as it explains to us how and why You created this world. Thank You for the wide variety of creatures that You put in the world. Amen.

Ref: Sarfati, J. (2015), The Genesis Account, (Powder Springs, GA: CMI), pp. 223-225. Image: Adobe Stock Images, licensed to author.

©Creation Moments 2019, Used with permission.


A very interesting study of the creation of the “fowls/birds.” Would make for a good BIrds of the Bible article, but they beat me to it. :)

Eleventh Anniversary of Blogging About Birds – Part II

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

“Remember His marvelous works which He has done, His wonders, and the judgments of His mouth,” (1 Chronicles 16:12 NKJV)

Yesterday, the Eleventh Anniversary of Blogging About Birds article mentioned our early beginnings for this blog. Today, I’d like to continue with what the Lord has enabled us to do. Over the years, there have been Anniversary articles written. Each one tried to update the latest events, but also, to look back and thank the Lord for His blessings. The Lord wants us to “Remember.” His blessings.

“Remember to magnify His work, Of which men have sung.” (Job 36:24 NKJV)

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) by Dan

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) by Dan

Here are six of those years:

“I remember the days of old; I meditate on all Your works; I muse on the work of Your hands.” (Psalms 143:5 NKJV)

Actually, yesterday, I used a quotes from Jim Elliot, but was actually thinking of a quote I used in the Happy One Year Anniversary! article. This is what happens as you age. :) Both men were great missionaries and showed tremendous insight in their quotes.

“Our pastor just reminded us of a quote by William Carey, an English Missionary to India:

“Expect great things from God, attempt great things for God.”

That article was reposted in 2017. Looking Back – Happy One Year Anniversary! – Repost

In 2010, the 2nd Anniversary rolled around and some quest writers were added. Also, Ian Montgomery started allowing his Bird of the Week articles to be posted. Also, the Plus section, Birds of the World, and Birds in Hymns started up. This is all covered in Second Anniversary of Blog

It appears that I forgot to produce a Third or Fourth year anniversary article. Plenty was going on. The number of visitors to this blog, for which I am thankful for everyone who visits every time, was up to 250,000 on Apr. 9, 2011. 500,000 visits by Mar. 1, 2012, and about 850,000 by the time the Fifth Anniversary rolled around. Formed by Him started around the beginning of 2012. Also, many very talented photographers allowed me the permission to use their photos. There has been a list of them in the right column for years.

White-throated Sparrow by Ray Barlow

In 2013, I remembered to produce a Fifth Blog Anniversary post. There I mentioned the second blog site, Birds of the Bible for Kids. That website was started to get back to the roots of the whole purpose of blogging. That is, introducing young people to the Birds that are mentioned in the Bible. Like this main blog, it also has had growing pains. It was started, then I killed it and moved all the articles over here. Then last year, I decided to restart it back up. Much of the ups and downs of doing the “kids blog” has been due to my health issues. Right now it is up and running, not full speed, but then, neither am I running at full speed. Though I am much improved from last summer’s back surgery. Let’s hope and pray that the young people’s blog starts producing more articles.

I forgot again on the Sixth anniversary of the blog, but WordPress reminded me. Never Give Up

“The steps of a good man are ordered by the LORD, And He delights in his way. Though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down; For the LORD upholds him with His hand. I have been young, and now am old; Yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken, Nor his descendants begging bread.” (Psalms 37:23-25 NKJV)

Enough for now. I trust you are enjoying seeing how the Lord leads in our lives. Who ever thought that six years into doing a blog would have lead me to that point. I’ll tell you more in the next part.

Whatever your talent or abilities, if you know the Lord as your Savior, let Him use you. This is just a little blog in the midst of millions, yet the Lord has been using it. That is what I read from your remarks. Thank you for visiting over the years.

Using Whatever Talent the Lord Has Given You written Sept 16, 2010

Eleventh Anniversary of Blogging About Birds

Wood Stork by Lee

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you;” Job 12:7

The idea for the Birds of the Bible lessons began when we were members of Bethany Baptist Church in Avon Park, Florida. I used to carry a laptop into a junior Sunday School class, and for five minutes each week, present a different bird mentioned in the Bible.

Then, we moved up to Winter Haven and began attending Faith Baptist Church, where we are still members. For two years there was no outlet for me to present my birds. When Stephen, the assistant to the pastor, at that time, became aware of what I did, he offered me a chance to post on The Fountain. [The church’s blog] I have written about this before, but am still surprised at how the Lord has allowed me to continue this adventure for so long. On February 15th, 2019, it will be eleven years since this began.

The Fountain was/is on the Blogger platform where I cut my “blogging teeth.” They stopped using the blog in 2013, but have kept all their post. So, all my beginning blogs are still there, along with my learning process. Lee’s Birdwatching Adventure was begun so I could learn how to layout articles for the church blog.

My first blog in February, 2008: Birds of the Bible – Introduction (by Lee Dusing)

American White Pelicans at Lake Hollingsworth

On July 05, 2008, Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus was created on the WordPress platform, where it still is today. All those original articles were moved over to the new blog and removed from the old one. What they look like on the church’s blog is how they looked originally.

When all this began, it never crossed my mind that the Lord would allow it to grow to where it is today.  Our pastor is always challenging us to give the Lord whatever talent or ability we have. Let Him decide how it is to be used, and be willing to let Him use us.

“So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day.” (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

Thank you Lord for letting me love you and your created critters, especially the birds of the air. Another saying our pastor uses is from Missionary Jim Elliot: “He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose.” There has been many hours given, and I won’t know until heaven to find out what rewards these efforts may have earned.

Looking through Jim Elliot’s quotes on that link, I found these also:

“Wherever you are, be all there! Live to the hilt every situation you believe to be the will of God. ― Jim Elliot

“God always gives his best to those who leave the choice with him.” ― Jim Elliot

“Oh, the fullness, pleasure, sheer excitement of knowing God on earth!”― Jim Elliot

“Lord, make my way prosperous not that I achieve high station, but that my life be an exhibit to the value of knowing God.”― Jim Elliot

“I couldn’t have asked for more than God in deliberate grace has surprised me with!”― Jim Elliot

I am so thankful for the various writers that have contributed to this blog over the years. Two have already gone on to heaven, A J Mithra, and April Lorier. Currently, Ian Montgomery, Dr. James J. S. Johnson, Emma Foster, Golden Eagle, and others are contributing to the blog.

Again, all of these efforts would be of no avail, if you, the reader, had not stopped by to read these articles. Thank you for all your visits over the years. We trust you will continue to stop in to see what new Birdwatching Adventures we have written about.

One of my most favorite videos was on the Eagles post, which isn’t currently working on the Fountain post, The Birds of the Bible ~ Eagles

but here it is:

“Now my days are swifter than a runner; They flee away, they see no good. They pass by like swift ships, Like an eagle swooping on its prey.” (Job 9:25-26 NKJV)

Here are some of the first Birds of the Bible articles on The Fountain:

February 2008

March 2008

April 2008

Looking through the Blog Archive [right side] on the Fountain, you will find others also.

Woodstock’s Mating Dance

Woodstock and Mating Dance ©Peanuts

Well, it’s mating time here in Florida for many of our Herons and Egrets. Not that Woodstock is in their family, but he made his efforts.

Great Egret by Dan at Gatorland

We haven’t been to Gatorland yet this year, but reports are coming in for the mating of some and the hatching of other birds over there.

Gatorland 4-2-15 by Lee

Thought you might enjoy seeing some of the previous year’s photos of mating rituals. Maybe Woodstock can improve his technique from seeing them.

Tricolored Heron on Rail at Gatorland

The birds even brighten up their faces (lore) for mating. Wonder what Woodstock’s beak would look like?

Snowy Egret at Gatorland by Lee

Snowy Egret at Gatorland

Tricolored Heron at Gatorland

Tricolored Heron at Gatorland

Great Egret at Gatorland by Lee

SNOWY EGRETS, showing off for the Dusings (Lee Dusing photo, at Gatorland, Forida)

Where the birds make their nests: as for the stork, the fir trees are her house.” (Psalms 104:17 KJV)

When they get through all that displaying, eventually, we should start seeing some of these around there.

Baby Great Egret at Gatorland 3-6-18

Now! To find the time to get over to Gatorland. It’s only about 50 miles away.

A few other Gatorland blogs:

Gatorland’s Taxi Service

Great Egret Preening at Gatorland

Baby Snowy Egrets at Gatorland

Gatorland From Dan’s Camera

Sharing The Gospel

Orni-Theology and Woodstock’s High-rise Nest

Woodstock’s High-rise Nest

Woodstock is not the only bird to live in a nest complex. Birds in this area, central Florida, have at least one bird, the Monk Parakeet, or Quaker Parakeet that makes an “apartment” nest.

Monk Parakeet and Nest

Monk Parakeet and Nest – Near South Lake Howard Nature Park

We used to own two Monk Parakeets, so I was familiar with them when we moved here. In South Florida, where we lived in the past, they were wild there also. In fact, Bandi, our first Monk parakeet had been shot out of the tree next door by teenagers. Some neighbor kids brought her to me and long story short, her wing had to be amputated. So, she never went back to the wild.

Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) Hoppy & Bandi

Hoppy in front, Bandi in back – Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus)

Hoppy, our second one, had a broken leg, which our vet fixed up. That is the bandage on his leg. Back to the High-rise.

Sociable Weaver nest (Philetairus socius) © Ingo Arndt-NPL

The Sociable Weaver (Philetairus socius) is a great example of building a “Highrise.” [from 16 Most Amazing Bird Nest ]

Weaverbirds Nests are Like Huts has a great photo of an elaborate “homestead.” Also, it is a very interesting article about how they make the nest.

Sociable Weaver nest (Philetairus socius) ©Dillon Marsh

Then again, maybe Woodstock would like to visit the Montezuma Orpendola and select one of the higher nest apartments.

Montezuma Oropendola (Psarocolius montezuma) Nest Complex ©WikiC

There are many more examples of how the Lord, in His Wisdom, has given the birds the knowledge to build these nest and also, to know that “community” can aid in their protection.

The book of Ecclesiastes has great words of wisdom from Solomon when he refers to one person, versus two or more:

“There is one alone, without companion: He has neither son nor brother. Yet there is no end to all his labors, Nor is his eye satisfied with riches. But he never asks, “For whom do I toil and deprive myself of good?” This also is vanity and a grave misfortune. Two are better than one, Because they have a good reward for their labor. For if they fall, one will lift up his companion. But woe to him who is alone when he falls, For he has no one to help him up. Again, if two lie down together, they will keep warm; But how can one be warm alone? Though one may be overpowered by another, two can withstand him. And a threefold cord is not quickly broken.” (Ecclesiastes 4:8-12 NKJV)


Extreme Cold For Zoo Birds

House Finch in Snow ©WikiC

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you;” (Job 12:7 NKJV)

The last few days, the northern states of the United States and Canada have been experiencing extreme cold temperatures. Watching the news today, our Manatees, here in Florida, are heading in to the warmer waterways. But how about the birds?

Checking articles about how the Zoos protect their avian wonders during this severe cold snap, there were several interesting things that are being done to protect the birds.

In Chicago, they actually closed the “Lincoln Park Zoo …closed at 3 p.m. on Tuesday and was to remain shut on Wednesday, when temperatures are expected to reach a daytime high of around 14 degrees below zero. Brookfield Zoo planed to close its doors Wednesday and Thursday.” [edited to make it past tense, written Jan 28, 2019]

“To ensure the safety of our animals and staff, the zoo will only have a skeleton crew on site who will provide basic core functions, including animal care and to check on the facilities,” said Stuart Strahl, president and CEO of the Chicago Zoological Society, which manages Brookfield Zoo, in a statement.

That zoo has closed just three other times in its 85-year history: Feb. 2, 2011, due to a snowstorm; and Sept. 14, 2018 and April 18, 2013, because of significant flooding.”

“Lincoln Park Zoo spokesperson Jillian Braun said the zoo has closed just one other time due to extreme weather in recent memory. ”

Chicago Zoos to Close in Anticipation of Extreme Cold

Swallows Keeping Warm in Cold and Snow ©WTTW

Another article by the same source “Shiver, Fluff and Cuddle: How Birds Keep Warm in the Winter

Even the Penguins in Canada aren’t too sure about this cold weather. See:

These Zoo Penguins Are Clearly Not Enjoying Canada’s Cold Winter

“The Calgary Zoo in Alberta had to bring its penguins inside after the weather dropped to -25 degrees below zero Celsius.

Calgary Zoo – Gentoo Penguins ©Inside Edition

The zoo’s 51 Gentoo penguins, Humboldt penguins, king penguins and rockhopper penguins, are usually brought in at some point every year.

“The keepers are able to call the penguins in and they have an instinct to want to be indoors when it gets that cold as well. We do this every winter when the temperature plummets to where it was a few days ago,” a zoo official told InsideEdition.com. “They are cold weather birds, but the temperatures were colder than they prefer.”

Another Zoo, Saskatoon zoo works to keep animals safe in extreme cold weather, says, “The species that might be tropical or from regions that never see minus temperatures have to come inside at the beginning of the winter season.”

Dunlins in Snow

The St. Louis Zoo in Missouri says, “On one of the coldest days in over 20 years, employees at the St. Louis Zoo are busy making sure animals are being cared for and protected from the dangerously cold weather….

“A lot of times you’ll see those animals adapted to cold weather actually being more active in the cooler weather than you would in the summer heat,” Anne Tieber, curator of birds. In the historic buildings that house the birds, monkeys, and reptiles, zookeepers keep the temperature around 70 degrees, with a little of humidly for the tropical plants and some animals.”

“One surprisingly warm place the zoo is the Penguin and Puffin Coast, the building is kept at a balmy 45 degrees year-round.  So, right now it seems incredibly warm to the 7 degrees outside but flips to feeling cold in the summer.”

Enjoy these articles, plus a few more that tell how the wild birds also survive these extreme cold days and nights.

Chicago Zoos to Close in Anticipation of Extreme Cold

Shiver, Fluff and Cuddle: How Birds Keep Warm in the Winter

These Zoo Penguins Are Clearly Not Enjoying Canada’s Cold Winter

Saskatoon zoo works to keep animals safe in extreme cold weather

St. Louis Zoo in Missouri

More:

COLD-WEATHER SKILLS OF FEATHERED FRIENDS – Zoo Atlanta

Keeping Warm in Winter is for the Birds

Do Animals Hate the Bitter Cold?

How Does Extreme Winter Weather Affect Wildlife?

How Canada’s zoos protect their animals from the bitter cold

Wordless Birds

 

Avian and Attributes – Star

Star Finch (Neochmia ruficauda) ©WikiC

“I see Him, but not now; I behold Him, but not near; A Star shall come out of Jacob; A Scepter shall rise out of Israel, And batter the brow of Moab, And destroy all the sons of tumult. (Numbers 24:17 NKJV)

Avian and Attributes: Star

STAR, n.
1. An apparently small luminous body in the heavens, that appears in the night, or when its light is not obscured by clouds or lost in the brighter effulgence of the sun. Stars are fixed or planetary. The fixed stars are known by their perpetual twinkling, and by their being always in the same position in relation to each other. The planets do not twinkle, and they revolve about the sun. The stars are worlds, and their immense numbers exhibit the astonishing extent of creation and of divine power.

5. In Scripture, Christ is called the bright and morning star, the star that ushers in the light of an eternal day to his people. Revelations 22. Ministers are also called stars in Christs right hand, as, being supported and directed by Christ, they convey light and knowledge to the followers of Christ. Revelations 1. The twelve stars which form the crown of the church, are the twelve apostles. Revelations 12.
6. The figure of a star; a badge of rank; as stars and garters.
The pole-star, a bright star in the tail of Ursa minor, so-called from its being very near the north pole.
Star of Bethlehem, a flower and plant of the genus Ornithogalum. There is also the star of Alexandria, and of Naples, and of Constantinople, of the same genus.
STAR, v.t. To set or adorn with stars or bright radiating bodies; to bespangle; as a robe starred with gems.

Star Finch (Neochmia ruficauda) Female front-Male back ©WikiC

Star Finch (Neochmia ruficauda), an estrildid finch, between 4.5—5 inches in length, with crimson fore-parts of the head and a scarlet bill. The upper and lower plumage is yellow-green, white spotted on the underparts, the belly more yellow. The upper tail coverts are scarlet, tail feathers are brownish scarlet. The female has less crimson on the head, and generally duller than the male, the immature star finch is olive to brownish with a grey face and head.

Found in northern coastal regions of Australia, occurring at sparsely wooded habitat of tall grass or rushes around creeks and swamps

Crimson Finch (Neochmia phaeton) X Star Hybrid by Ian

saying, “Where is He who has been born King of the Jews? For we have seen His star in the East and have come to worship Him.” (Matthew 2:2 NKJV)

Star-chested Treerunner (Margarornis stellatus)

Star-chested Treerunner (Margarornis stellatus)

The Star-chested Treerunner (Margarornis stellatus or Fulvous-dotted Treerunner is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in Colombia and Ecuador.

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceedingly great joy. And when they had come into the house, they saw the young Child with Mary His mother, and fell down and worshiped Him. And when they had opened their treasures, they presented gifts to Him: gold, frankincense, and myrrh. (Matthew 2:10-11 NKJV)

Star-spotted Nightjar (Caprimulgus stellatus) ©WikiC

“For He received from God the Father honor and glory when such a voice came to Him from the Excellent Glory: “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.” And we heard this voice which came from heaven when we were with Him on the holy mountain. And so we have the prophetic word confirmed, which you do well to heed as a light that shines in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts; knowing this first, that no prophecy of Scripture is of any private interpretation, for prophecy never came by the will of man, but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit.” (2 Peter 1:17-21 NKJV)

Star-throated Antwren (Rhopias gularis) ©WikiC

“I, Jesus, have sent My angel to testify to you these things in the churches. I am the Root and the Offspring of David, the Bright and Morning Star.” And the Spirit and the bride say, “Come!” And let him who hears say, “Come!” And let him who thirsts come. Whoever desires, let him take the water of life freely.” (Revelation 22:16-17 NKJV)

Avian and Attributes

White-Eye Changes from I.O.C. Ver 9.1

Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) by W Kwong

Japanese White-eye now the Warbling White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) by W Kwong

“Keep me as the apple of the eye, hide me under the shadow of thy wings,” (Psalms 17:8 KJV)

Now that all the indexes are updated, I thought you might find it interesting what they did to the White-eye family. The they are part of the Zosteropidae family. Wikipedia gives this about them:

“White-eyes are mostly of undistinguished appearance, the plumage being generally greenish olive above, and pale grey below. Some species have a white or bright yellow throat, breast or lower parts, and several have buff flanks. As their common name implies, many species have a conspicuous ring of tiny white feathers around their eyes.[1] The scientific name of the group also reflects this latter feature, being derived from the Ancient Greek for “girdle-eye”. They have rounded wings and strong legs. Like many other nectivorous birds, they have slender, pointed bills, and brush-tipped tongues.[1] The size ranges up to 15 cm (5.9 in) in length.

All the species of white-eyes are sociable, forming large flocks which only separate on the approach of the breeding season. They build tree nests and lay two to four unspotted pale blue eggs.[citation needed] Though mainly insectivorous, they eat nectar and fruits of various kinds. The silvereye can be a problem in Australian vineyards, through piercing the grape allowing infection or insect damage to follow.

White-eyes are the city bird of Kurayoshi City, in Tottori, Japan.”

Oriental now Indian White-eye (Zosterops palpebrosus) by Nikhil Devasar

“I will instruct thee and teach thee in the way which thou shalt go: I will guide thee with mine eye.” (Psalms 32:8 KJV)

Below are all the White-eyes and their new names or species. This is not the whole Zosteropidae Family. There is one Black-eye in here. [As of the 9.1 Version Update]

Megazosterops
Giant White-eye (Megazosterops palauensis)
Apalopteron
Bonin White-eye (Apalopteron familiare)
Cleptornis
Golden White-eye (Cleptornis marchei)
Rukia
Teardrop White-eye (Rukia ruki)
Long-billed White-eye (Rukia longirostra)
Tephrozosterops
Rufescent Darkeye (Tephrozosterops stalkeri)
Lophozosterops
Grey-hooded White-eye (Lophozosterops pinaiae)
Mindanao White-eye (Lophozosterops goodfellowi)
Streak-headed White-eye (Lophozosterops squamiceps)
Mees’s White-eye (Lophozosterops javanicus)
Cream-browed White-eye (Lophozosterops superciliaris)
Crested White-eye (Lophozosterops dohertyi)
Heleia
Spot-breasted Heleia (Heleia muelleri)
Thick-billed Heleia (Heleia crassirostris)
Oculocincta
Pygmy White-eye (Oculocincta squamifrons)
Woodfordia
Bare-eyed White-eye (Woodfordia superciliosa)
Sanford’s White-eye (Woodfordia lacertosa)
Zosterops
Marianne White-eye (Zosterops semiflavus)
Karthala White-eye (Zosterops mouroniensis)
Mauritius Olive White-eye (Zosterops chloronothos)
Reunion Olive White-eye (Zosterops olivaceus)
Mauritius Grey White-eye (Zosterops mauritianus)
Reunion Grey White-eye (Zosterops borbonicus)

Mountain Blackeye (Chlorocharis emiliae) ©WikiC

“He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?” (Psalms 94:9 KJV)

Mountain Blackeye (Zosterops emiliae)
Chestnut-flanked White-eye (Zosterops erythropleurus)
Warbling White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) was Japanese White-eye
Swinhoe’s White-eye (Zosterops simplex) Added
Hume’s White-eye (Zosterops auriventer) Added
Lowland White-eye (Zosterops meyeni)
Indian White-eye (Zosterops palpebrosus) was Oriental White-eye
Sangkar White-eye (Zosterops melanurus) Added
Sri Lanka White-eye (Zosterops ceylonensis)
Rota White-eye (Zosterops rotensis)
Bridled White-eye (Zosterops conspicillatus)
Citrine White-eye (Zosterops semperi)
Plain White-eye (Zosterops hypolais)
Black-capped White-eye (Zosterops atricapilla)
Everett’s White-eye (Zosterops everetti)
Yellowish White-eye (Zosterops nigrorum)
Yellow-ringed White-eye (Zosterops wallacei)
Javan White-eye (Zosterops flavus)
Lemon-bellied White-eye (Zosterops chloris)
Ashy-bellied White-eye (Zosterops citrinella)
Pale-bellied White-eye (Zosterops consobrinorum)
Pearl-bellied White-eye (Zosterops grayi)
Golden-bellied White-eye (Zosterops uropygialis)
Black-ringed White-eye (Zosterops anomalus)
Cream-throated White-eye (Zosterops atriceps)
Sangihe White-eye (Zosterops nehrkorni)
Black-crowned White-eye (Zosterops atrifrons)
Togian White-eye (Zosterops somadikartai)
Seram White-eye (Zosterops stalkeri)
Black-fronted White-eye (Zosterops minor)
Tagula White-eye (Zosterops meeki)
Bismarck White-eye (Zosterops hypoxanthus)
Biak White-eye (Zosterops mysorensis)
Capped White-eye (Zosterops fuscicapilla)
Buru White-eye (Zosterops buruensis)
Ambon White-eye (Zosterops kuehni)
Papuan White-eye (Zosterops novaeguineae)
Yellow-throated White-eye (Zosterops metcalfii)
Christmas White-eye (Zosterops natalis)
Canary White-eye (Zosterops luteus)
Louisiade White-eye (Zosterops griseotinctus)
Rennell White-eye (Zosterops rennellianus)
Vella Lavella White-eye (Zosterops vellalavella)
Gizo White-eye (Zosterops luteirostris)
Ranongga White-eye (Zosterops splendidus)
Solomons White-eye (Zosterops kulambangrae)
Dark-eyed White-eye (Zosterops tetiparius)
Kolombangara White-eye (Zosterops murphyi)
Grey-throated White-eye (Zosterops rendovae)
Malaita White-eye (Zosterops stresemanni)
Santa Cruz White-eye (Zosterops sanctaecrucis)
Vanikoro White-eye (Zosterops gibbsi)
Samoan White-eye (Zosterops samoensis)
Fiji White-eye (Zosterops explorator)
Vanuatu White-eye (Zosterops flavifrons)
Small Lifou White-eye (Zosterops minutus)
Green-backed White-eye (Zosterops xanthochroa)
Silvereye (Zosterops lateralis)
Slender-billed White-eye (Zosterops tenuirostris)
Robust White-eye (Zosterops strenuus)
White-chested White-eye (Zosterops albogularis)
Large Lifou White-eye (Zosterops inornatus)
Kosrae White-eye (Zosterops cinereus)
Grey-brown White-eye (Zosterops ponapensis)
Olive-colored White-eye (Zosterops oleagineus)
Dusky White-eye (Zosterops finschii)
Socotra White-eye (Zosterops socotranus) Added
Principe White-eye (Zosterops ficedulinus)
Annobon White-eye (Zosterops griseovirescens)
Sao Tome White-eye (Zosterops feae)
Black-capped Speirops (Zosterops lugubris)
Principe Speirops (Zosterops leucophaeus)
Mbulu White-eye (Zosterops mbuluensis) Added
Abyssinian White-eye (Zosterops abyssinicus)
Pale White-eye (Zosterops flavilateralis) Added
Seychelles White-eye (Zosterops modestus)
Aldabra White-eye (Zosterops aldabrensis)Added
Kirk’s White-eye (Zosterops kirki)
Mayotte White-eye (Zosterops mayottensis)
Malagasy White-eye (Zosterops maderaspatanus)
Taita White-eye (Zosterops silvanus)
South Pare White-eye (Zosterops winifredae) Added
Orange River White-eye (Zosterops pallidus)
Cape White-eye (Zosterops virens)
Southern Yellow White-eye (Zosterops anderssoni) Added
Mount Cameroon Speirops (Zosterops melanocephalus)
Fernando Po Speirops (Zosterops brunneus)
Forest White-eye (Zosterops stenocricotus)
Heuglin’s White-eye (Zosterops poliogastrus) was Montane White-eye
Kikuyu White-eye (Zosterops kikuyuensis)

Montane White-eye (Zosterops poliogastrus eurycricotus) subspecies now the Broad-ringed White-eye (Zosterops eurycricotus) ©WikiC

“The hearing ear, and the seeing eye, the LORD hath made even both of them.” (Proverbs 20:12 KJV)

Broad-ringed White-eye (Zosterops eurycricotus) Added
Northern Yellow White-eye (Zosterops senegalensis) was African Yellow White-eye
Green White-eye (Zosterops stuhlmanni) Added
Pemba White-eye (Zosterops vaughani)


I.O.C. Version 9.1 (Last Name First List, Now updated)

*


Zosteropidae Family

Woodstock and the I.O.C. 9.1 Update

World Bird Names – I.O.C. Version 9.1

 

Woodstock and the I.O.C. 9.1 Update

Woodstock Trying To Find His Identity

Today’s Woodstock and Snoopy agrees with the latest I.O.C. 9.1 Update. Snoopy is not sure what kind of bird he is and this update has been shuffling birds from one Genus to another, making new birds from subspecies, etc.

Mauritius Olive White-eye (Zosterops chloronothos) ©WikiC

With all the ongoing DNA studies, birds are being moved around quite a bit. This time, they rearranged the White-eyes around and added several new Drongos. The Laughingthrushes were also shaken up.

Crested Drongo (Dicrurus forficatus) ©WikiC

I am still working on updating my site, but have most of it completed. All the main indexes, and the bird names alphabetical [first, last] lists are completed. Today I hope to finish up the bird names [last, first] pages. That should finish most of it. Eventually, photos will need to be renamed, but, that is not my main priority.

It takes a good three to four days of work to do these pages. That explains why there hasn’t been a new post up. I’m on it. Stay tuned! My favorite verse for these updates is from the NASB this time.

“But beyond this, my son, be warned: the writing of many books is endless, and excessive devotion to books is wearying to the body.” (Ecclesiastes 12:12 NASB)

Joe Cool

(Black and White) Sumatran Laughingthrush (Garrulax bicolor) by Lee

These pages are finished:

Birds of the World

Orders – Scientific Order

Orders – Alphabetical Order

Family Indexes:

Indexes by First Name of Bird

Birds of the Bible – Mountain Birds II

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) by Lee LPZ

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

While you were reading Birds of the Bible – Psalm 50:11’s Mountain Birds I, did you notice where the birds/fowls are?

Most of them are from the mountains. Where else are they mentioned?

They are:

  • “in the mountains”
  • “of the mountains”
  • “on the mountains”
  • “of the hills”
  • “upon the mountains”
  • “living in the fields”
  • “every mountain bird”
  • “of the air”
  • “in the sky”
  • flying over the mountains” [more on this later]
Common Crane (Grus grus) by Nikhil Devasar

Common Crane (Grus grus) by Nikhil Devasar

Whose birds are they? What did the Creator say about these birds?

  • “I know all the birds, every bird”
  • “I know and am acquainted with all the birds”
  • “all the wild birds are mine”
  • “I keep track of every bird”
  • “I know every movement of the birds”
  • “I have known every fowl”
  • “I see all the birds”
  • “I know every mountain bird by name”

This reminds us of “Are not two sparrows sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will.”
(Matthew 10:29 NKJV)

At the end of these verses from Psalm 50:11, what does the Word say about them?

  • “are/is mine/Mine”
  • “are Mine and are with Me, in My mind”
  • “is in my care”
  • “is with me”
  • “indeed, everything that moves… is mine”
  • “All creation and its bounty are mine…”
  • “belong to me”
  • “are at my commandment”
  • “are in my sight”
  • ” is in my thoughts. The entire world and everything it contains is mine.”

Alpine Chough, in snowy French Alps ©Static1-Philip Braude

WOW! 

As my pastor would say, let those words sink in. If God, the Creator, cares that much about the birds and animals, how much more does He care about us.

Psalm 50:11 refers to all the birds living in and around the mountains. One of those translations caught my attention when it mentioned the birds “flying over the mountains“. I have never heard of the VOICE translation, but this is how it reads:

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) Zoo Miami by Lee

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) Zoo Miami by Lee

Every bird flying over the mountains I know; every animal roaming over the fields belongs to Me.”

Yes, they all fly over the mountains, but the Bar-headed Goose, that we saw at the zoo, is known to fly over the “peaks of the Himalayas on their migratory path.” At an altitude of 29,000 feet/8,800 meters. But this Goose isn’t the highest flying bird.

An article from Institute for Creation Research mentions high flying birds. “What about high-flying birds that have no such oxygen mask? How can they survive elevations of 15,000 feet and sometimes higher without a supplemental source of oxygen? Many bird migrations occur at extremely high elevations: 21,000 feet for the mallard duck, 27,000 feet for swans, even 36,000 feet for vultures!The article goes on to explain about the Creators design of such birds:

“A bird’s lungs function according to the through-flow principle: the inspired [inhaled] air collects in the bird’s posterior air-sacs and flows through the lungs to the anterior air-sacs before it passes back out. In the lungs the blood is oxygenated by fine air capillaries, where air and blood flow in opposite directions. Owing to this counterflow, the oxygenated blood that leaves the bird lung acquires a higher oxygen concentration than that corresponding to the oxygen pressure in the expired [exhaled] air.

In addition to flow-through lungs, birds have hearts that are proportionately larger to their bodies than those of mammals—from 0.8 to 1.5% of total body mass, compared to mammals, which average around 0.6%. The birds’ larger hearts enable speedy blood transport and intensive oxygen renewal.”

Which is the highest flying bird? The Ruppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppellii). One was hit by a plane at 11,300 metres (37,100 feet).

Rüppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppellii) ©WikiC

I have a tendency, at times, to just read a verse and then move on. Yet, sometimes it is good to check out some of the other translations. [Read my disclaimer in the last article.] The last article showed photos of some of the birds that live in the mountains, but how about these that fly over the mountains. Only a Creator could design them with those capabilities. Chance molecules, evolution, or whatever theory man devises does not explain the Wisdom that comes Only from the Lord Jesus Christ, their Creator.


High Altitude Flying For Birds – I.C.R.

List of Birds by Flight Heights – Wikipedia

Top 10 Highest Flying Birds in the World – TMW

Birds of the Bible

Birds of the Bible – Psalm 50:11’s Mountain Birds

Gideon

Birds of the Bible – Psalm 50:11’s Mountain Birds I

Mountain Wheatear (Myrmecocichla monticola) ©WikiC

“I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.” (Psalm 50:11) NKJV

Hooded Mountain Tanager (Buthraupis montana) ©BirdPhotos.com

This is Part I. Shown are the many translations of Psalm 50:11. God is speaking and telling us that He knows all these birds and cares about them. How much more does God the Creator care about us?
In the next post, there will be more facts about the Birds of the Mountains.
This list of verses came from the Bible Gateway when searching for Birds of the “mountain/s”. Psalm 50:11 was one of them., this is a list of all their translations for that verse. The version links will take you to the verse in that translation.
I know all the fowls of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
I know and am acquainted with all the birds of the mountains, and the wild animals of the field are Mine and are with Me, in My mind.

Mountain Blackeye (Chlorocharis emiliae) ©WikiC

I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures of the field are mine.
I know every mountain bird; even the insects in the fields are mine.
I know all the birds in the mountains; whatever moves in the fields is mine.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) ©Elaine R Wilson WikiC

I know all the birds in the mountains, and every wild creature is in my care.
I know all the fowl of the mountains, and the roaming creatures of the field are mine:
I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
I know every bird in the mountains, and everything that moves in the field is with me.

Mountain Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola fytchii) by Lee Zoo Miami

I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and every living thing in the fields is mine.
I know all the fowls on the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus) ©WikiC

I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
All the wild birds are mine and all living things in the fields.
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures of the field are Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains. Every living thing in the fields is mine.

Rufous-bellied Mountain Saltator (Saltator rufiventris)©Flickr Ron Knight

I know all the birds in the mountains; indeed, everything that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the fowls of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are with me.
I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Tucuman Mountain Finch (Compsospiza baeri) ©Flickr Ron Knight

I know every bird of the mountains, and every moving creature in the field is mine.
For all the animals of field and forest are mine! The cattle on a thousand hills! And all the birds upon the mountains!
“…Every creature in the forest is mine, the wild animals on all the mountains. I know every mountain bird by name; the scampering field mice are my friends. If I get hungry, do you think I’d tell you? All creation and its bounty are mine….”
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures that move in the field are Mine.

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) ©Flickr Lip Kee Yap

I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
I know every bird in the heights; whatever moves in the wild is mine.
“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and every living thing in the fields is mine.

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

I keep track of every bird in the hills, and the insects of the field are mine.
I own every bird in the mountains. The insects in the fields belong to me.
I know every bird in the mountains, and the insects in the fields are mine.
I know every bird in the mountains, and the insects in the fields are mine.

Mountain Tailorbird (Phyllergates cucullatus) by© Wiki

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
I know every bird of the mountains. And all things that move in the field are Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and all the animals of the field are mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
Mountain Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) ©WikiC

Mountain Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) ©WikiC

I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know kol oph (every bird) of the harim; and the animals of the wild are Mine.
Mountain Caracara (Phalcoboenus megalopterus) ©WikiC

Mountain Caracara (Phalcoboenus megalopterus) ©WikiC

Every animal of field and forest belongs to me, the Creator. I know every movement of the birds in the sky, and every animal of the field is in my thoughts. The entire world and everything it contains is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know every bird of the mountains. Everything moving in the field is Mine.
Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Every bird flying over the mountains I know; every animal roaming over the fields belongs to Me.
I know all the birds of the mountains. The wild animals of the field are mine.
I have known all the volatiles of the firmament; and the fairness of the field is with me. (I know all the birds on those hills; and the wild beasts of the fields be mine.)
I have known every fowl of the mountains, And the wild beast of the field [is] with Me.

Green-crowned Brilliant and Purple-throated Mountain-Gem by Ray

Additional Psalms 50:11 verses from e-Sword versions loaded [no links]:
(ACV)  I know all the birds of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(AKJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(ASV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(BBE)  I see all the birds of the mountains, and the beasts of the field are mine.
Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

(Bishops)  I knowe all the foules vpon the mountaynes: and the wylde beastes of the fielde are at my commaundement.
(Brenton)  I know all the birds of the sky; and the beauty of the field is mine.
(DRB)  I know all the fowls of the air: and with me is the beauty of the field.
(ECB)  I know all the flyers of the mountains and the creatures of the field with me.
Mountain Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus sindianus) by Nikhil Devasar

Mountain Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus sindianus) by Nikhil Devasar

(Geneva)  I knowe all the foules on the mountaines: and the wilde beastes of the fielde are mine..
(HRB)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
(IAV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(Phillips) No verse
Brandt's Mountain Finch (Leucosticte brandti) by Nikhil

Brandt’s Mountain Finch (Leucosticte brandti) by Nikhil

(LITV-TSP)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
(JPS)  I know all the fowls of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
(KJ2000)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
White-throated Mountaingem (Lampornis castaneoventris) by Ian

White-throated Mountaingem (Lampornis castaneoventris) by Ian

(KJV-1611)  I know all the foules of the mountaines: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJVA)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJV-BRG)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(LITV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
Mountain Thornbill (Acanthiza katherina) by Ian

Mountain Thornbill (Acanthiza katherina) by Ian

(MKJV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
(NAS77)  “I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
(RV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(The Disciple’s Bible)  I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
Plate-billed Mountain Toucan (Andigena laminirostris) by Michael Woodruff

Plate-billed Mountain Toucan (Andigena laminirostris) by Michael Woodruff

(TRC)  I know all the fowls upon the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are in my sight.
(TS2009)  “I know all the birds of the mountains, And all moving in My field are Mine.
(UKJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(Webster)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Colombian Mountain Grackle (Macroagelaius subalaris) ©WikiC

Birds of the Bible – Birds of the What??

Birds of the Bible

Gospel Message

Birds of the Bible – Birds of the What??

Wood Stork flying over Lake Morton by Lee 2009

Wood Stork flying over Lake Morton by Lee 2009

In my last post, Birds of the Bible – Birds of the Air Updated, I mentioned that I was going to search my many versions of the Bible. WELL!! I may just have bit off more than I can chew or have more material for articles than I have years left on this earth. :0)

So far in my searching through the two sources that I am using, [e-Sword and Bible Gateway] I have been busy for the last several days, just trying to find verses with “Birds of the“[in English versions]. Have I ever been surprised! There have been translations with “0” (Zero) verses up to several with over 50 verses.

Mallards flying off by Ian

Mallards flying off by Ian

Before you get too upset with me using so many versions, let me place a disclaimer here. I believe God inspired the original manuscripts, and that they have been preserved through diligent copying of those. He promised: “For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled.” Matthew 5:18, KJV. I use the KJV, but also use a few other Bibles that I believe are very close to those original scripts. I do use other versions occasionally, like this, to find verses about the birds. Some versions today are questionable as to the way it was translated.

Thousands of Snow Geese flying ©Hager Mannwr-moreno

Along with all the “Birds of the”; sky, heavens, heaven, trees, air, mountains, waste land, sky lodge, and hills, some versions use fowl and fowls. My next search is of the fowls, so the verses can be matched.

What are they doing? Why are they there? What lessons can we learn from them, etc.? That is where the Birds of the What?? is heading. Stay turned.

For a starter, almost all of the versions list Genesis 1:26. They all mention God creating man, and then giving them rule over the “birds of the …”

And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.
Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; and let them rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over the cattle and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.”
Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.”
Then God said, “Let Us (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) make man in Our image, according to Our likeness [not physical, but a spiritual personality and moral likeness]; and let them have complete authority over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, the cattle, and over the entire earth, and over everything that creeps and crawls on the earth.”

    Vermilion-Flycatcher-male-flying ©Brent Paull