Eagles and the Family Circus

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with youngsters by Raymond Barlow

I wonder if this adult Eagle is having problems teaching its young lessons for their future.

“But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” (Isaiah 40:31 KJV)

Family Circle with Eagles

This is just for your enjoyment. We all need a chuckle.

 

Wordless Yellow-fronted Woodpecker

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

This GOLD reminds us of Heaven. The Bible tells us Heaven has a street of gold! But the best part about Heaven is that God, who created you and me, lives there. The Bible, God’s Word, says: “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” — John 3:16 Jesus, God the Son, is in Heaven preparing a place for all who put their trust in Him. (John 14:2-3) God is holy and perfect. He cannot allow anything in Heaven that is less than perfect, so there’s one thing that can never be in Heaven. Can you think of what that might be?

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

It is sin! That is what this DARK reminds us of. Sin is anything you think, say, or do that does not please God, like lying, cheating, being selfish, or hurting others. The Bible says: “All have sinned and come short of the glory of God.” — Romans 3:23 That means everyone, big or little, young or old! No matter where you live or who you are, you have sinned. Everyone is born with a “want to” to do wrong. God says that sin must be punished (Romans 6:23), and the punishment for sin is to be separated from God forever in a place of suffering….a place called Hell. But God has a wonderful plan so that you will not have to be punished for your sin!

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) ©WikiC

God sent Jesus Christ, His perfect Son, to be born as a little baby. Jesus lived a perfect life….He never sinned. When He was grown, wicked men nailed Him to a cross. The bird’s RED reminds us of Jesus’ blood. The Bible says that without the giving of blood there can be no forgiveness of sin (Hebrews 9:22). So Jesus Christ willingly died to take your sin punishment. “…Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures; and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day, according to the Scriptures.“— 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 Now, because of what Jesus has done for you, you can have your sins forgiven. Read on to see how!

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) ©Galo Torquato

The Bible says: “As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believed on His name.” — John 1:12 The WHITE reminds us of a CLEAN heart. How can you have a clean heart? A = Admit to God you are a sinner and want to turn away from those sins. B = Believe in Jesus Christ, that He is God’s perfect Son who died for your sin, was buried, and rose again. C = Call on Him to save you from your sin. Would you like to do that right now? He has promised to hear, and once you are His child, He will never leave you (Hebrews 13:5). Take a moment and talk to God right now. It will change your life forever. Only one more color! What can it mean?

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

The GREEN stands for things that grow. When you ask God to forgive you and save you, you become His child. God wants you to get to know Him better and to grow to become more like Him. These four things will help you grow:

1. PRAY (talk to God every day)
2. READ & OBEY THE BIBLE (to know what He says, then do it)
3. TELL OTHERS ABOUT JESUS
4. GO TO A BIBLE-BELIEVING CHURCH (where you can learn more about pleasing Him)

As a child of God, if you should sin again, stop and tell Him about it. He promises in His Word… “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” — 1 John 1:9 Ask God to help you live a life to please Him! Share the Good News of this story with someone else.

The Wordless Book has been used for many years by CEF (Child Evangelism Fellowship). These words are from CEF.

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

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A friend shared with me about someone who uses the Toucan to teach the “Wordless Book.”

Other Wordless Birds:

Wordless Birds

Wordless Birds – With Hummingbirds

The Wordless Book

Story of the Wordless Book

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker – Cornell Neotropical

Feel free to share any of these “Wordless Birds.” All photos are Creative Commons.

Newest Articles on the Kid’s Blog

Barred Owl at Circle B by Lee

Our latest trip to Circle B Bar Reserve was rewarded with my first sighting of a wild Barred Owl. We have seen them in Zoos, but never in the wild.

See – Bible Birds – Owl’s Provision

Bible Birds – Holding On With My Feet

Blue-Winged-Teal-Dabbling ©Flyways USFWS

Blue-Winged-Teal-Dabbling ©Flyways USFWS

Birdwatching Term – Dabbling Duck

White-winged Coot (Fulica leucoptera) Cropped ©WikiC

White-winged Coot (Fulica leucoptera) Cropped ©WikiC

Birdwatching Term – Frontal Shield

Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) by Ian

Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) by Ian

Jenny Wren Arrives – Chapter 1

Hope you will check these out and if you like them, consider following that blog also. Lots of interesting things to share with your children and grandchildren.

“And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.” (Deuteronomy 6:5-7 KJV)

No, the posts aren’t scripture, but there are always principles to grow and learn by. Enjoy!

Sharing the Gospel

Morris The Finch In The Airport by Emma Foster

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

Morris The Finch In The Airport

By Emma Foster

Morris was a small house finch who lived in the sunny state of Florida. He had built a tiny nest for himself and lived in a small forest away from busy streets and people. The only road that was close by was a highway leading to a large building that was about half a mile away. Morris could barely see the building from the top of a high tree in which he lived. Every day Morris would watch incredibly large birds fly to and from the building, but he had no idea what they were. The building was in fact an airport, and the large birds were airplanes, but Morris did not know this.

Eventually, the weather became really hot as spring turned into summer. Morris grew tired of the heat and decided to find a new place to stay, at least for the summer. Morris flew out of his nest into the air and began to search for a cooler place to live.

He slowly reached the giant building in the hot sun. Looking inside, Morris noticed trees that seemed comfortable in the cool air. He tried to find a place to fly in, but every part of the building seemed to be made of windows. After trying to get inside for a long time Morris caught sight of a shuttle zipping inside the building. He followed the shuttle inside into the refreshingly cool air and instantly flew toward a tall tree that stood in the sunlight.

House Finch male ©Glenn Bartley-Wichita StateU

The tree gave Morris a broad view of a wide space were many people were eating. At first, he thought we would be able to handle the noisy people, but as the sun rose higher into the sky more people began to arrive and the building grew louder. Morris tried to ignore it, knowing when the air became colder he could fly back to his nest.

After a few minutes of trying to pull up some branches and twigs to make a new nest, Morris realized that the “tree” was fake, which made him slightly annoyed. Fortunately, he could still make his new home cozy because it was cool and comfortable sitting in the branches and watching the people.

Morris began to grow hungry and decided that he should find some food, though it didn’t look as if there were any worms around. He swooped down to where several people were eating and picked up a few dry crumbs from off the ground. After eating a few pieces Morris was still hungry so he decided to fly back outside to search for some worms.

It felt nice to be away from the noise, but as Morris flew back the way he came, he accidentally flew into the shuttle that carried passengers back and forth. He couldn’t get out before the doors closed. He flew up and down in a frenzy, searching for a way out. People around him screamed, terrified, until finally he was able to fly back outside.

House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) by Raymond Barlow

Instead of searching for worms Morris flew straight back to his nest and stayed there for the rest of the day even though it was still hot. That night Morris’s surroundings became cool and Morris was able to sleep peacefully despite the chaos of the morning.

The next morning Morris stayed in his nest, deciding that, despite the heat, he would rather be home than anywhere else. He remembered how quiet it was even with the big birds flying overhead, and decided that no matter how hot it became, he would never fly back into that building again


Lee’s Addition:

“Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” (Hebrews 13:5 KJV)

Emma has treated us to another interesting story. Not sure if a bird ever went looking for air conditioning, but it sounds logical. But, like us, we are better off being right where the Lord has placed us and with the provisions that have been provided by Him. Thanks again, Emma.

See More of Emma’s Stories

Many More Birds Have Arrived!

Birds of the Bible for Kids is Under Construction
Keep Checking

The dust is thinning out a bit.

Here is the Latest list of pages and articles that have flown over to the Birds of the Bible for Kids site. The ones in blue are the newest arrivals. Wow! I had forgotten about so many of these articles. They are being re-published to current dates.

I trust you will check some of these out. If you have youngsters and/or teenagers, or, grandchildren, you may want to share these with them.

The Bible Bird indexes that are now open are GROWING:

“I will meditate also of all thy work, and talk of thy doings.” (Psalms 77:12 KJV)

Bible Birds

Brown Pelican and Laughing Gull - Waiting

Waiting

Here are some of the articles that are active again: (reverse order as they were released)

STAY TUNED!!

Really Really Dusty!!

Birds of the Bible for Kids is Under Construction
Keep Checking

At times I think I may have bitten off more than I can chew. It was easier moving the Birds of the Bible for Kids material over here than it is trying to move it back to the original location. :)

Things are progressing over there, but it is still quite dusty.

Dust storm over I-10 in Arizona ©AZGeology

In fact, the birds have been taking “Dust Baths”!!

Turkey taking a Dust Bath ©Jim Block

Here’s another one I caught Dust Bathing with some of the dust that is being kicked up:

Dust Bathing

There has been some progress though. All of the Scriptural Alphabet of Animals are active.

Here are some of what has been going on over at Birds of the Bible for Kids:

The Bible Bird indexes that are open are:

Bible Birds

Here are some of the articles that are active again: (reverse order as they were released)

STAY TUNED!!

 

Reginald and Oliver’s Christmas Tree by Emma Foster

Wild Turkeys ©Pixabay

Reginald and Oliver’s Christmas Tree by Emma Foster

Before the heavy snow fell, Reginald and the turkeys settled into their fortress. Reginald knew now that he had to start looking for a Christmas tree. When the snow lightened, Reginald decided he should find a tree. One morning he left in search of the perfect Christmas tree, accompanied by Oliver.

Reginald and Oliver traveled for some time, dragging themselves through the snow. Oliver insisted on wearing his army helmet because he was afraid they would run into hunters. He followed Reginald through the snow, occasionally having to be pulled out of the snow with Reginald’s help.

After walking a little way, Reginald and Oliver found a wide open space near a circle of trees. In the sunlight, a small tiny pine tree stood in front of most of the other trees, and Reginald thought it would be the perfect tree for Christmas that year. The trunk was just right for Reginald and Oliver to be able to push the tree over since they had nothing to cut it with.

Tiny Tree

Just as they were about to head for the tree, Reginald noticed some hunters lurking in some bushes nearby. Oliver and Reginald hid and attempted to form a plan. Reginald decided that he would go off and distract the hunters so Oliver could knock the tree over and take it back to the fortress.

Reginald left Oliver by the bushes and walked a few yards away. He began gobbling, hoping that the hunters would hear him and try to see where he was. Reginald quickly hid in the bushes near a river where he wouldn’t be seen and waited for the hunters to come look for him. Eventually, he heard footsteps as the hunters moved closer.

Turkey in Snow ©SABaking

Once the hunters had gone Oliver quickly ran to the tree and began pushing on it until it toppled over. Unfortunately, when Oliver pushed the tree down it began rolling forward, dragging Oliver into its branches until it fell into the nearby river and began drifting away. Reginald watched Oliver fall into the river and quickly ran after him, shaking his head and hoping the hunters couldn’t see him. He caught up to Oliver and tried to pull him to shore, but Oliver only dragged him onto the tree, causing Reginald to get soaked.

Oliver and Reginald floated down the river on the tree for a very long time until they ran into a rock, which kept the tree from drifting farther down the river. Oliver began gobbling loudly, but Reginald quickly told him to be quiet. Fortunately, they had floated far away from the hunters toward their fortress.

Reginald and Oliver quickly dragged the tree up onto land and carried it back to the fortress. The turkeys had already begun making ornaments and stringing berries by the time they arrived back at the fortress. After they set up the tree, Reginald and the turkeys hung the ornaments and sang some turkey carols quietly. As for the hunters, they searched all day for Reginald and Oliver, but eventually had to go home because more snow had begun to fall. Again, it was ham for Christmas.

Christmas Ham ©WikiC


Lee’s Addition:

“Who remembered us in our lowly state, For His mercy endures forever; And rescued us from our enemies, For His mercy endures forever; Who gives food to all flesh, For His mercy endures forever. Oh, give thanks to the God of heaven! For His mercy endures forever.” (Psalms 136:23-26 NKJV)

Well, Oliver has again given Reginald his challenge. This time, their need for a Christmas tree provides the adventure. We trust you have been enjoying the various adventures through the pen of Ms. Emma Foster. Emma, you have written another enjoyable tale for us. Thank you, and Merry Christmas to you.

More of Emma’s Stories

Wordless Birds

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Rounded Up Some Bluebirds

Vol. 2 – 6 The Mountain Bluebird, which is from the Kid’s Section, had some Bluebirds skip out and break their links. They were too pretty to let them get away.

The Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited has some very interesting information about birds, but written from a young reader’s level. Here is the Mountain Bluebird reblogged with some added information and the Bluebirds back on their posts.

This was written back in 2013. Trust you enjoy this article and links to other Bluebird articles.

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Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) for Birds Illustrated

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) for Birds Illustrated

From col. Chi. Acad. Sciences. Copyrighted by
Nature Study Pub. Co., 1897, Chicago.

THE MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.

imgi

N an early number of Birds we presented a picture of the common Bluebird, which has been much admired. The mountain Bluebird, whose beauty is thought to excel that of his cousin, is probably known to few of our readers who live east of the Rocky Mountain region, though he is a common winter sojourner in the western part of Kansas, beginning to arrive there the last of September, and leaving in March and April. The habits of these birds of the central regions are very similar to those of the eastern, but more wary and silent. Even their love song is said to be less loud and musical. It is a rather feeble, plaintive, monotonous warble, and their chirp and twittering notes are weak. They subsist upon the cedar berries, seeds of plants, grasshoppers, beetles, and the like, which they pick up largely upon the ground, and occasionally scratch for among the leaves. During the fall and winter they visit the plains and valleys, and are usually met with in small flocks, until the mating season.

Nests of the Mountain Bluebird have been found in New Mexico and Colorado, from the foothills to near timber line, usually in deserted Woodpecker holes, natural cavities in trees, fissures in the sides of steep rocky cliffs, and, in the settlements, in suitable locations about and in the adobe buildings. In settled portions of the west it nests in the cornice of buildings, under the eaves of porches, in the nooks and corners of barns and outhouses, and in boxes provided for its occupation. Prof. Ridgway found the Rocky Mountain Bluebird nesting in Virginia City, Nevada, in June. The nests were composed almost entirely of dry grass. In some sections, however, the inner bark of the cedar enters largely into their composition. The eggs are usually five, of a pale greenish-blue.

The females of this species are distinguished by a greener blue color and longer wings, and this bird is often called the Arctic Bluebird. It is emphatically a bird of the mountains, its visits to the lower portions of the country being mainly during winter.

Heaped in the hollows of the grove, the autumn leaves lie dead;
They rustle to the eddying gust, and to the rabbits’ tread.
The Robin and the Wren are flown, and from the shrubs the Jay,
And from the wood-top calls the Crow all through the gloomy day.
—Bryant.

Summary:

MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.Sialia arctica. Other names: “Rocky Mountain” and “Arctic Bluebird.”

Range—Rocky Mountain region, north to Great Slave Lake, south to Mexico, west to the higher mountain ranges along the Pacific.

Nest—Placed in deserted Woodpecker holes, natural cavities of trees, nooks and corners of barns and outhouses; composed of dry grass.

Eggs—Commonly five, of pale, plain greenish blue.


Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Daves BirdingPix

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Daves BirdingPix

Lee’s Addition:

…In the LORD put I my trust: how say ye to my soul, Flee as a bird to your mountain? … If the foundations be destroyed, what can the righteous do? The LORD is in his holy temple, the LORD’S throne is in heaven: his eyes behold, his eyelids try, the children of men. … For the righteous LORD loveth righteousness; his countenance doth behold the upright.
(Psalms 11:1,3,4,7 KJV)

The Mountain Bluebird belongs to the Turdidae – Thrushes Family and as such have Thrush characteristics. Since blue is my favorite color, the bluebirds are some of my favorites. The Lord has used such variety in His coloration, that I am happy that blue was one of them. We have also the Eastern and Western Bluebirds plus the Asian and Philippine Fairy-bluebirds.

The Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a medium-sized bird weighing about 1.1 ounces (30 g) with a length from 6.3–7.9 in (16–20 cm). They have light underbellies and black eyes. Adult males have thin bills that are bright turquoise-blue and somewhat lighter beneath. Adult females have duller blue wings and tail, grey breast, grey crown, throat and back. In fresh fall plumage, the female’s throat and breast are tinged with red-orange; brownish near the flank contrasting with white tail underparts. Call is a thin few; Song is warbled high chur chur.

The mountain bluebird is migratory. Their range varies from Mexico in the winter to as far north as Alaska, throughout the western U.S. and Canada. Northern birds migrate to the southern parts of the range; southern birds are often permanent residents. Some birds may move to lower elevations in winter. They inhabit open rangelands, meadows, generally at elevations above 5,000 feet. Contrary to popular belief, mountain bluebirds are not a species of concern in the United States. The turn around in mountain bluebird numbers is due to the overwhelming efforts of landowners in the West to provide nest boxes for these birds. At one time, mountain bluebird numbers were threatened because of increased agricultural activities destroying habitats.

These birds hover over the ground and fly down to catch insects, also flying from a perch to catch them. They mainly eat insects, over 90%, and berries. They may forage in flocks in winter, when they mainly eat grasshoppers. Mountain bluebirds will come to a platform feeder with live meal worms, berries, or peanuts.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery nest

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery nest

Their breeding habitat is open country across western North America, including mountain areas, as far north as Alaska. They nest in pre-existing cavities or in nest boxes. In remote areas, these birds are less affected by competition for natural nesting locations than other bluebirds. Mountain bluebirds are a monogamous breed. The male can be seen singing from bare branches. The singing takes place right at dawn, just when the sun rises. Females usually build the nests themselves. Eggs: pale blue and unmarked, sometimes white. Clutch Size: 4-5 eggs. Young are naked and helpless at hatching and may have some down. Incubation normally last 14 days and the young will take about 21 days before they leave the nest. Both males and females fiercely protect the nest.

It is the state bird of Idaho and Nevada.

Mountain bluebirds are cavity nesters and can become very partial to a nest box, especially if they have successfully raised a clutch. They may even re-use the same nest, though not always. Providing nest boxes is a great way to observe these beautiful birds. Mountain bluebirds will not abandon a nest if human activity is detected close by or at the nest. Because of this, mountain bluebirds can be easily banded while they are still in the nest.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Margaret Sloan

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Margaret Sloan

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Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

The above article is an article in the monthly serial for October 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

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(Information from Wikipedia and other internet sources, with editing)

Next Article – The English Sparrow

The Previous Article – The Ornithological Congress

Gospel Presentation

Links:

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Lily’s New Camera ~ by Emma Foster

Lily’s New Camera ~ by Emma Foster

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) Cockatoo - Brevard Zoo

“Lily” – Galah Cockatoo – Brevard Zoo

“And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.” (1 Timothy 6:8 KJV)

In a large zoo in the center of a city, a Galah the zookeepers affectionately called Lily lived contentedly in the parrot/cockatoo exhibit. Lily was very glad to be living in such a nice zoo. One of her favorite activities was meeting all of the people who would pass by the parrot exhibit every day. The crowds that came to the exhibit always noticed Lily because of her bright pink feathers.

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) trying to off juice.

“Lily” curious about camera

One day a man with a large camera stopped by the exhibit to take some pictures of the tropical birds for a magazine. Curious to see what he was holding, Lily flew off the tree branch she was sitting on and landed directly on top of the camera without any fear at all. The man holding the camera and the people beginning to surround him laughed as Lily pecked at the buttons in curiosity. All of a sudden Lily pressed a large button near the top of the camera and took a picture.

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) Hopping on the camera

“Lily” Hopping on the camera

The man holding the camera was surprised at how well the picture turned out and he decided to set the camera down carefully to see what Lily would do next. Lily, however, had no idea what happened when she pressed the button, but she found great enjoyment in pressing it.

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and Dan

Next, the man picked the camera back up and moved it back and forth as Lily kept pressing the same button to take pictures. Eventually, Lily had created an entire series of photographs that the man and the crowd thought were actually quite good.

Impressed by Lily’s talent, the man decided to take the pictures to the head zookeeper. The man, who called himself Steve Watts, explained that he was a photographer for a local magazine and told the zookeeper that Lily had taken the pictures rather than himself. The zookeeper was happy to hear that Steve was going to put the pictures in the next edition of the magazine. Lily was exited too, even though she had no idea what a magazine was.

"Lily" the Galah and Dan

“Lily” the Galah and Dan (a/k/a Steve Watts)

Steve Watts

A few days later, a crowd even larger than normal gathered around the parrot exhibit to see Lily. Lily was surprised at the amount of people, especially when all of the people clustered around her as the zookeeper brought her out of the exhibit on his arm.

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) Up Close

Lily – Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) Up Close

Most of the people in the crowd were holding up the magazines that they had bought which contained some of the pictures Lily had taken, including one she had taken when she had placed her face in front of the lens. Lily was happy to know that everyone loved her pictures, and looked forward to being able to take more. Fortunately Steve came to the zoo often. He eventually gave some of Lily’s pictures to a local art gallery, which brought increased business to the zoo. People enjoyed coming to the zoo to see Lily. From then on, the parrot exhibit was the busiest section of the zoo. Lily loved the crowds of people, and became one of the most contented bird in the entire zoo.

“Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.” (Philippians 4:11 KJV)


Lee’s Addition:

And now you have the birds view of Dan’s Galah encounter. Or, at least, this is Emma’s Version of the incident. Emma, we love it. Thanks you so much for keeping us entertained with your constantly improving tales of birds from their Creator. [Her parents, I, and others have been encouraging her to write about this event.]

See More of Emma’s Stories

See the Galah Encounter Article

Abigail and the Pumpkin Carving Contest

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) Female-©WikiC

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) Female-©WikiC

Abigail and the Pumpkin Carving Contest ~ by Emma Foster

Once there was a small Robin named Abigail who lived in a tiny nest in a massive oak tree by a pumpkin patch. As autumn steadily approached, more and more red and yellow leaves fell into Abigail’s nest. Every day Abigail pushed them off down into the pumpkin patch on top of the growing pumpkins. Eventually, Abigail noticed that most of the pumpkins had grown really large and the leaves no longer covered them up.

pumpkins-small-nipomo-pumpkin-patch

Several families began coming to the pumpkin patch near Abigail’s nest. The parents picked heavy round pumpkins to take home to carve. Sometimes the owners of the pumpkin patch would come and teach some of the children how to carve a small pumpkin of their very own. One day Abigail decided that she should carve her own pumpkin for Halloween.

Flapping down into the pumpkin patch, Abigail surveyed a small pumpkin left alone in the corner. Carefully watching to see how the kids carved their pumpkins with small knives, Abigail began to carefully peck with her beak to make a small hole. She decided that this would be the eye. Abigail pecked out an identical hole next to it and another hole underneath the two, making the other eye and nose. Lastly, Abigail pecked out a long wide oval to substitute as the mouth. But looking around, she noticed that several children were cutting a hole in the top of their pumpkins and pulling out seeds. Abigail followed them, pecking until she could pull off the top by the stem with her beak. Abigail began pulling out gobs of seeds and pumpkin insides with her beak. This proved to be her favorite part because of how much she loved pumpkin seeds.

Pumpkins Tasty Bird ©Nipomo Pumpkin Patch

Pumpkins Tasty Bird ©Nipomo Pumpkin Patch

After triumphantly finishing her pumpkin, Abigail realized how late it was. Almost everyone had already gone, but one of the owners was nailing a sign up on a telephone pole. Flying over to it, Abigail read the sign. The sign read: PUMPKIN CARVING CONTEST THIS SATURDAY.

Abigail grew excited. Today was Monday. If she began practicing, she could carve a pumpkin good enough to enter the contest.

Wind up Bird Pumpkin ©Daneof5683

Wind up Bird Pumpkin ©Daneof5683

For the next several days, Abigail spent most of the day carving pumpkins until pumpkins with all kinds of faces were scattered about the pumpkin patch. When the contest day arrived, Abigail rolled her best-carved pumpkin over to the judges who had gathered near the crowd as the contest began.

Everyone in the crowd was astonished that a bird had entered a carved pumpkin in the contest, but the contest continued as planned. Abigail waited patiently as the judges examined each of the carved pumpkins by each of the participants, and eventually the winner of the contest was called. Abigail did not win the contest, but she had fun anyway. She considered the most fun part of the day was giving away the rest of her carved pumpkins to each of the contestants.

Pumpkin Inspector came by to check out Abrigail's Pumpkins.

Pumpkin Inspector came by to check out Abigail’s Pumpkins.

From then on, Abigail entered the contest every year. She even won a few times. She was sure to carve a pumpkin for each of the contestants in the contest whether she won or not. For Abigail, the best part of carving the pumpkins and giving them away was being able to eat the pumpkin seeds.

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) ©Laura Erickson

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) ©Laura Erickson

“I have shewed you all things, how that so labouring ye ought to support the weak, and to remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he said, It is more blessed to give than to receive.” (Acts 20:35 KJV)

(Photos added by Lee. Sorry, but I couldn’t resist these photos. I just imagine Abigail’s Pumpkins had to be rather fancy.)

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See Emma’s Other Stories

Georgina Goes on Summer Vacation – by Emma Foster

Northern Mockingbird Viera Wetlands

Northern Mockingbird Viera Wetlands

Georgina Goes on Summer Vacation

~ by Emma Foster

There once was a Mockingbird named Georgina who lived in a large bustling city in the south. She had built her nest on top of a street light in the middle of a busy street. Every day, Georgina would watch the busy cars drive by as they beeped their horns. The scenery was nice during the winter, which was always mild, but Georgina never liked the city during the summertime. It was too hot and crowded for her.

Every day, since Georgina was a mockingbird, she would try to mimic the sounds that she heard in the city all of the time. But the hotter it became, the more Georgina grew tired of all the noises in the city and the hard work of mimicking them.

It was on one very busy, very hot day that Georgina decided that she needed a vacation. She decided that it would have to be somewhere cool and near the ocean. First she needed a map.

Georgina was flying around one day when she found a quarter that someone had dropped on the sidewalk. Georgina picked it up in her beak and used to it buy a map by the newspaper stand.

When Georgina flew back to her nest above the busy street, she searched the map looking for a place that seemed like a good vacation spot. Eventually she decided that she needed to fly north because it was colder up north no matter what time of the year.

Georgina left the busy city early one morning to fly north. She decided that she would come back in a few weeks when it was sure to not be as hot. For now, it was cool because it was early in the morning.

Georgina guessed that if she followed the map she would be able to travel farther up north in the direction she wanted to fly. She would stop when it became cold enough.

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) At Sunset Beach NC ©WikiC

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) At Sunset Beach NC ©WikiC

After a few days, the weather was still hot, but it was nice because Georgina was flying close to a beach. Georgina settled on top of a tall palm tree and made her nest out of broken sticks and twigs. She watched the waves ripple back and forth. Seagulls flew in all directions and the palm trees swayed. Georgina liked the peace and quiet. This was much better than the city.

But after a while, Georgina began to become uncomfortable. She had gone on vacation to get away from the noises of the city, but the ocean was pretty noisy too. Georgina mimicked a lot of the noises of the beach, but she eventually began to get tired of it. It was really hot near the beach as well. She didn’t remember mockingbirds ever going to the beach, and the heat was probably why. Georgina began to miss the city and all of its noises.

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) In Flight ©Flickr Tom Wicker

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) In Flight ©Flickr Tom Wicker

Georgina decided it was time to fly back to the city. As she began traveling back, the weather didn’t seem as hot as she remembered it to be. When she flew back to her nest on top of the street light, the weather already felt cooler in the city.

Georgina decided she would never go back to the beach. She would always be content where she was. Even if the summer was a little uncomfortable in the city with all the people, Georgina would stay all year round. And the next time she decided to travel, Georgina would buy a travel magazine.

THE END


Lee’s Addition:

Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. (Philippians 4:11 KJV)

Great story, Emma. Many times humans act like Georgina and become discouraged with how things are. They think like the cattle. They think the “grass is greener on the other side.” Maybe a nest in a tree rather than on a street light. Keep up the great stories. We are all enjoying them.

See more of Emma’s stories along with some of our other guest writers.

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“School Calls Sheriff to Stop 7-Year-Old From Handing Out Bible Verses”

Sheriff Sent to Warn Seven Year Old about Bible Verses

Sheriff Sent to Warn Seven Year Old about Bible Verses

And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. (John 8:32 KJV)

I receive an email today and was shocked to read what is going on in California. This is supposed to be America! You can do any sinful act and get by with it, but when a seven-year old boy is treated like the following story, it is outrageous. This country was founded on the Bible and Christianity and now, we are not allowed to say anything? Lord help America. We are headed for collapse. Read this article:

“School Calls Sheriff to Stop 7-Year-Old From Handing Out Bible Verses”
Jun 2, 2016 From Liberty Council

Liberty Counsel has demanded that Desert Rose Elementary School correct an outrageous violation of a first grader’s constitutional rights. The situation started with an encouraging note and Bible verse from mom Christina Zavala, tucked into a packed lunch for her little boy (“C”). The seven-year-old boy read the note and verse, and showed them to his friends during lunch time at school.

Mrs. Zavala’s daily note for her son soon turned into an expectation by the other children during lunch, who excitedly begged C for copies of the notes, which grew to include short stories from the Bible to provide context for the verses.

However, when one little girl said “teacher – this is the most beautiful story I’ve ever seen,” “separation of church and state” was the response, and the notes were banned from lunchtime distribution. C was told that the school gate was the only location at which he could give the Bible verses to his friends, and only after the bell rang.

On April 19, 2016, Mrs. Zavala wrote the school to correct its misinformation, but the only response was that C was reprimanded again, in front of the whole class, and again told to stop talking about religion or sharing his mother’s notes. C returned home in tears.

The Zavalas and C complied with the school gate directive, and soon, as many as 15 fellow students looked forward to the after-school Bible notes. However, on May 9, 2016, Principal Melanie Pagliaro approached Mr. Zavala at that location, and demanded that C only hand out the notes on a public sidewalk, far from the exit, off school property. The family immediately complied.

Later that day, however, a Los Angeles Deputy Sheriff knocked at the door of C’s home, demanding that C’s note sharing cease altogether because “someone might be offended.” C’s family then asked Liberty Counsel to help protect their child’s constitutional freedoms.

This is a clear, gross violation of the rights of a child. That the school district enlisted a police officer to intimidate C and his family makes this case even more outrageous. “I would expect something like this to happen in Communist Romania, where I went to elementary school, but cops don’t bully 7-year-olds who want to talk about Jesus in the Land of the Free”said Horatio “Harry” Mihet, Esq., Vice President of Legal Affairs & Chief Litigation Counsel of Liberty Counsel.

Desert Rose Elementary School

Desert Rose Elementary School

***  I went on-line to see if it is true and here are some of the other links to this outrageous story: ***

Fox News Opinion – School sends sheriff to order child to stop sharing Bible verses

Liberty Counsel – School Calls Sheriff to Stop 7-Year-Old From Handing Out Bible Verses

WND – School sends deputy to warn 7-year-old about Bible verses

Santa Monica Observer – School Calls Sheriff to Stop 7-Year-Old From Handing Out Bible Verses

Canada Free Press – Desert Rose Elementary School – School Calls Sheriff to Stop 7-Year-Old From Handing Out Bible Verses

Washington Times – Elementary school sends deputy to boy’s home to warn him about sharing Bible verses: Report

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Just last evening, while reading from Taking Back The Good Book, by Woodrow Kroll, I yellow highlighted the following:

“America had a splendid heritage in the Word of God. We built our government on it. We built our laws on it. We built our lives on it. But when we began to put the Bible on the back burner, a New America was formed. It’s an America that is not friendly toward the Bible, an America that doesn’t read the Bible or respect it. It’s an America in which Bible illiteracy is rampant.

Sadly, it’s our America. We gave it life. And now we are reaping what we have sown.”

Shame on that teacher, shame on the principal, shame on the school district, shame on California courts and legislatures, and shame on the U. S. Government – all of them for allowing all kinds of sinful acts, which I won’t innumerable, yet not allowing the Word of God to be read at lunch, when this country, government, and schools were based on the Word of God. You can only turn your back on the truth for only so long. Lord help us!

And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. (John 8:32 KJV)

Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God. Those by the way side are they that hear; then cometh the devil, and taketh away the word out of their hearts, lest they should believe and be saved. They on the rock are they, which, when they hear, receive the word with joy; and these have no root, which for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall away. And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and riches and pleasures of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection. But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience. (Luke 8:11-15 KJV)

Birds of the Bible – Wayside Sower Birds