Two Suppers – By William Wise

Turkey Vulture; Walton County, Georgia by William Wise

Turkey Vulture; Walton County, Georgia by William Wise

Two Suppers

By William Wise of www.williamwisephoto.com

Revelation 19:17-18  And I saw an angel standing in the sun; and he cried with a loud voice, saying to all the fowls that fly in the midst of heaven, Come and gather yourselves together unto the supper of the great God;  18 That ye may eat the flesh of kings, and the flesh of captains, and the flesh of mighty men, and the flesh of horses, and of them that sit on them, and the flesh of all men, both free and bond, both small and great.

While running a 10K race with my 69-year-old father, I laughed as he looked up and shouted at a group of circling vultures and said, “Go away! I’m not dead yet!” Although they were waiting to dine on him, he wasn’t quite ready to be their supper.

King James Authorized 1611 Pulpit Folio

The Bible tells us (and yes, I believe it) that one day in the future, God is going to host two great suppers, or feasts. The first is the party of the century… no, the party of the millennia… no, the party of the ages! It is called the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. And all the followers of Jesus Christ will be given clean, white garments and enjoy the greatest wedding reception of all time.

Georgia Vultures by William Wise

Georgia Vultures by William Wise

But simultaneously, there is another feast. It is called the Supper of the Great God. Those who did not RSVP for the Marriage Supper of the Lamb, but lived for themselves, will be attendees at this gathering. For it is a gathering of fowls; of carrion crows and vultures to feed upon the slain who turned in battle against returning Messiah. But you need not attend that feast.

Turkey Vulture; Clarke County, Georgia by William Wise

Turkey Vulture; Clarke County, Georgia by William Wise

When you pass a roadside party of vultures dining on last night’s unlucky road crossing, just remind yourself, “I’d rather feast at the Marriage Supper of the Lamb than be feasted upon at the Supper of the Great God.”


We are excited to introduce a new Photographer/Writer to the Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures blog. Not only is he a great Christian photographer, but a blogger who writes about Creation topics also. Welcome, William!

Check out his website at: http://www.williamwisephoto.com/index.html

Ted and Red – By Emma Foster

House Finch male ©Glenn Bartley-Wichita StateU

Ted and Red

by Emma Foster

Once there were two finches named Ted and Red who were brothers. They lived in two trees that had been planted next to each other. Their trees were in a courtyard by a museum, which provided them with plenty of shade because Florida was almost always hot. Both birds had many friends in the courtyard.

The birds spent most of their time flying around the beaches and hectic streets searching for food or just having fun watching the different tourists around the coast. Many times, people on the dock would feed them breadcrumbs.

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes

But as summer came, the days grew hotter and longer, and there were many rainy days. Ted and Red stayed in their nests most of the time under the protection of their large shady trees. Their friends stayed in their little homes too: the fish remained comfortable in their pond, the two cranes who lived nearby nestled in their nests in the bushes, and the black snake stayed in his small hole in the grass.

House Finch Resting

One day when there wasn’t much rain, Red went out to search for some food. While he was gone, the clouds grew black, and Red knew he needed to hurry home. However, when he reached the courtyard, the rain poured down harder, and Red couldn’t see very well. He flew toward a light that he saw up ahead and accidentally flew into the museum, sliding across the slippery floor. Red knocked against a small object, sending it crashing to the ground. An alarm went off somewhere, and Red quickly flew back outside and into his nest, where he told Ted what had happened. The rain slowly lessened, and the alarm stopped. Several museum employees had to clean up the mess. Red felt terrible for breaking the vase, but Ted and their friends told him it was an accident and it wasn’t his fault.

House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) by Raymond Barlow

Just then, another alarm went off, and someone ran out of one of the entrances, holding a large vase. Ted, Red, and their friends thought fast. The fish quickly pointed to the machine that visitors inserted quarters into to obtain fish food to throw to the fish. Ted and Red flew against it and beat on it with their feet as hard as they could, while the two cranes beat their wings against it. The black snake followed behind the man in case he turned around, hoping that the man would be too scared to step over him. The fish food spilled across the walkway, and the man stealing the vase fell over, while the security guards ran after him and caught him. The security guards were afraid to step over the black snake too. Ted and Red flew back into their nests. Red felt much better afterwards, knowing that he made up for his earlier mistake.

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

Ted and Red spent the rest of their summer with their friends in the courtyard. From then on, whenever it rained Ted and Red were careful to stay in their comfortable nests. To their friends, they were now considered honorary security guards.


What an interesting story, Emma. I trust our readers enjoy it as much as I do. The teamwork of this mixture of critters reminds us of how, as Christians, we work together, even though we have different gifts. The seems to blend us together to accomplish His Will.

“Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone. To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.” (1 Corinthians 12:4-7 ESV)

See More of Emma’s Stories

The Locket in the Woods by Emma Foster

The Locket in the Woods

By Emma Foster

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Nora lived in the middle of a sunny wood beside a river that flowed under a small bridge. She spent most of her time building her nest, searching for food, and watching people walk across the bridge. Because Nora lived on a forest preserve, she didn’t have to worry about having to find a new home in case people chopped down her tree. Throughout the day, Nora watched groups of people walk along the many trails that were strewn along the forest preserve.

One day Nora was busy collecting some worms near the river as it rushed by. She looked up at the bridge to see a group of girls walking across and taking pictures of the trees. Nora hopped closer and watched them pass by, but when they left, she spotted something shiny in the bushes near her.

Nora rifled through the bushes and eventually found a small necklace with a heart-shaped locket on the end. Picking it up in her beak, Nora immediately started searching for the group of girls.

Locket

Unfortunately, Nora couldn’t find them anywhere. She followed the path, but it became a fork in the road, and she wasn’t sure which way she should go. It would be difficult to fly ahead because so many trees blocked her view. Nora finally decided to go left, hoping she would eventually find them.

Along the path she found an elderly couple who were biking along the trail and a couple of alligators sleeping in the water, but she didn’t find the girls. Nora decided to cut through the trees and head out to the other path.

After flying for a few minutes with the heavy locket in her beak, Nora rested on a tree in the middle of the woods. A small creek flowed near the tree she sat on. The sun shone down on Nora, making her very hot. Because of the heat and the weight, Nora accidentally dropped the locket into the small creek!

Nora raced after the locket, but the locket tumbled away down the river. Eventually, the bushes surrounding the creek became too thick for her to fly through them. Just as she was about to give up, however, a fish swam upstream with the locket in his mouth, and when Nora told him who the locket was for, he explained that he had seen the girls pass by on the other path. Nora thanked him then flew away with the locket.

When Nora finally caught up with the girls, she placed the locket on the path where they could easily see it. The girl who had lost it was glad to have found it, though she had no idea how it had gotten there. Nora, happy that she had accomplished her mission, flew back to her nest and took a well-deserved nap in the shade of her tree by the river.


“For He will deliver the needy when he cries, The poor also, and him who has no helper.” (Psalms 72:12 NKJV)

“…For your Father knows the things you have need of before you ask Him.” (Matthew 6:8b NKJV)

Lee’s Addition:

Since Emma didn’t indicate what type of bird the story is about, I am using my imagination. Besides, this bird wears a Necklace. :)

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Or, it could be a Raven. They like to collect things.

Raven holding key on chain ©Pixabay

Thanks, Emma, for another interesting tale about the birds. Now, we even have a talking fish. I love your stories. Keep on writing them for us.


More of Emma Foster’s Stories

Wordless Birds

Longing For Robins by Dorothy Belle Malcolm

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by Ian

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by Ian

It has been 10 years since I’ve seen a robin in my yard. When they came then, it was an amazing sight which I have cherished. Once there was a Baltimore Oriole, however, that was many years ago. In the meantime, there are a variety that come to my feeder and the neighborhood for which I am happy about and keep food out for them.

Puzzle by a window ©Pxhere

I sit at a table which always has a puzzle on it, and if I don’t make sudden moves, I enjoy watching them. Of course the Sandhill Cranes walk around the neighborhood, The Cooper’s Hawks and Crows don’t come to my yard, but I see them in the trees as I walk.

The regular visitors are Blue Jays, Red-winged Blackbirds, Red-headed Woodpecker, Turtle Doves, Titmice, and Sparrows.

American Robin (Turdus migratorius)by Raymond Barlow

American Robin)by Raymond Barlow

In my heart I’m longing for the joy of seeing just one Robin. Maybe it will happen this spring.

2/22/19 Dorothy Malcolm


“But I know, that even now, whatsoever thou wilt ask of God, God will give it thee.” (John 11:22 KJV)

Lee’s Addition:

It has been awhile since Dottie (Dorothy) has written an article for us. I asked her if she would like to write another one. Here is her latest birdwatching desire. The verse is one I have used while birdwatching. I have asked the Lord to please have the bird in that bush come out where I can see it better. Maybe even take a photo. Not surprising, some have appeared to my delight. I think the Lord cares about our desires, especially when observing His Creation. Dottie, we are praying that the Lord will let some Robins land in your yard when they start migrating back north this spring. Stay Tuned!

If you have missed some of Dottie (Dorothy’s) stories, they are listed below. She is also Emma Foster’s grandmother. Humm! Wonder if that is where Emma started her interest in her birdwatching tales? Emma’s Stories

Dorothy (Dottie) Belle Malcolm’s:

Reginald the Turkey Commander: The Corn Field

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

Reginald the Turkey Commander: The Corn Field [Part 4]

by Emma Foster

Here are the Thanksgiving, Reginald, the Turkey Commander Tales

Reginald, Turkey Commander [2014]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander – Part 2 [2016]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm [2017]

And Now – Reginald, the Turkey Commander: The Corn Field [Part 4]

The turkeys were looking forward to another Thanksgiving at their fort as they made their way through the forest. Reginald had them march to the fort early that year just in case there were any hunters getting ready to hunt. The fort that the turkeys had built helped protect them from the hunters every Thanksgiving and Christmas. Reginald led the way through the forest until he came to the farmer’s old house they had visited a year before. This time, however, a large corn field was in their way.

Corn Maze © Pixabay

The turkeys inadvertently wandered into the field and became confused. Everything began to look the same. Reginald eventually made all of the turkeys stop, and he declared that they all needed to turn around and walk back to where they had come from in order to get out of the field. The turkeys turned around and followed Reginald as he led them out of the corn field. Suddenly, Reginald realized that Oliver was missing.

Shaking his head, Reginald led the turkeys back to the forest. As soon as he returned the turkeys to the forest, he set out to find Oliver.

Reginald searched the field, making sure that no one would hear him. He hoped that there were no hunters nearby in case anyone heard Oliver. Reginald spotted Oliver, who was wandering through the field, loudly gobbling and stomping through the stalks of corn in order to find the other turkeys.

Reginald dragged Oliver back toward the forest. Halfway there, a large scarecrow toppled over as Reginald and Oliver made their way through the corn field. Oliver bolted away, gobbling loudly as Reginald ran after him.

Scarecrow beginning to fall over ©foodista-com

Oliver continued running as fast as he could, terrified because he thought that the scarecrow was going to eat him. Eventually, Oliver tripped and landed head-first in a tumbled-over wheelbarrow. Shaking his head, Reginald resignedly picked up the wheelbarrow by the handles and carried Oliver back to where the other turkeys were hiding.

Wild Turkeys ©WikiC

Dumping Oliver in front of the other turkeys, Reginald proceeded to lead them through the forest. When they were close, one of the turkeys pointed out that they had less food than they expected. Some of the turkeys began to believe that there might not be enough for the winter.

Oliver had an idea. He remembered all of the corn he had seen in the field, and he told Reginald that they could take the corn to the fort with them.

Corn for the Winter ©rode diaz. unsplash.com

After taking the rest of the turkeys to the fort, Reginald and Oliver returned to the corn field, though Oliver was a little afraid that the scarecrow might jump out of the field and attack. They took a wheelbarrow full of corn and brought it back to the fort. The turkeys now had plenty of food to last them through the winter and Thanksgiving, which was now approaching. The farmer eventually harvested all of the corn in the field, but not before Reginald returned the wheelbarrow. The turkeys were safe in the fort, and once again the hunters would not have turkey for their Thanksgiving dinner.

***

Lee’s Addition:

Oliver should have remembered these verses:

“Be not afraid of sudden fear, neither of the desolation of the wicked, when it cometh. For the LORD shall be thy confidence, and shall keep thy foot from being taken.” (Proverbs 3:25-26 KJV)
“Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous! Do not tremble or be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.” (Joshua 1:9 NASB)

*

Emma, you continue to entertain us with your Turkey Commander, Reginald. It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving this year without another of these tales. Thanks for taking the time out from your studies to provide us with some wholesome adventures.

Thanksgiving – Reginald, the Turkey Commander Tales

Reginald, Turkey Commander [2014]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander – Part 2 [2016]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm [2017]

Emma’s Other Stories