Birds That Can’t Fly – Creation Moments

Birds That Can’t Fly – Creation Moments

Genesis 1:21

“And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good.”

There are quite a number of birds that cannot fly. This sometimes surprises us, but it shouldn’t. We tend to wonder how they “lost” the ability to fly, but, although there are some species that might possibly have lost an ability to fly (as losing such an ability usually involves loss of information, not spontaneous creation), there is no reason to suppose that many have lost an ability. After all, we do not wonder at mammals that fly (i.e., bats), and we accept that these were created on Day Five, whereas most mammals were made on Day Six. In the same way, most flightless birds seem to be perfectly designed the way that they are. Ratite birds, for example, have no keel on their sternum. The keel is what anchors muscles to the wings, to enable flight. But birds like ostriches, rheas, emus and kiwis show no evidence, either in extant species or in the fossil record, to suggest that they ever had a structure. Therefore, they have not evolved into such a state – they were designed like that by God because that is the best design for us.

Other birds are flightless for other reasons. Penguins, for example, do not fly, but they do sort-of fly through water! Again, this requires a particular type of design that could not arise by itself. God designed penguins just perfectly for their habitat and their lives.

Flightless birds do not support evolutionary ideas. God created them as He saw fit.

Prayer: Thank You Father, even for those creatures that seem so strange to us! But they are part of Your overall design, and they give witness to Your creative power. Amen.

Author: Paul F. Taylor

Ref: O’daniel, D. (2015), Flightless Birds—Alternate Flight Plan, < https://answersingenesis.org/birds/flightless-birds-alternate-plan/ >, accessed 1/30/2019. Image: CC BY-SA 2.5 Generic.

North Island Brown Kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) by Derek©©

Lesser Rhea (Rhea pennata) ©WikiC

Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) Memphis Zoo by Lee

Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) Memphis Zoo by Lee

Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) Lowry Pk Zoo

Emu ((Dromaius novaehollandiae) Zoo Tampa by Lee

Creation Moments

More When I Consider Articles

Good News Tracts

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Cat – Bird Fight

James J. S. Johnson made a remark on the Tickle Me Tuesday post. Dr. Jim, as I call him, suggested that we revive the Tickle Me Tuesday series. The last one was posted in 2015, so I am sure by now, there must be some more funny videos to discover.

In fact, this Epic Crow and Cat fight is just the one to start us off with a new “Tickle.”

by ignoramusky

These four are definitely not showing Kindness!!

“Be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another;” (Romans 12:10 NKJV)

Other Tickle Me Tuesday’s

World’s Fastest Seagull

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) ©

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) ©

‘World’s fastest seagull’ stuns experts

Jul. 30, 2019 – 1:26 – A lesser black-backed seagull, is stunning experts with its apparent speed, traveling more than 500 miles in just seven days. The seagull which was ringed on Burhou in the Channel islands on July 17, was later found at Ares Beach in A Coruna Spain, on July 24. Alderney Bird Observatory warden John Horton said that the distance traveled by the bird in such a short period of time was unusual.

Here is a link attached to this clip:

https://video.foxnews.com/v/6065781298001/#sp=show-clips

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (Heuglin's)

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (Heuglin’s)

The lesser black-backed gull was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th-century work, Systema Naturae, and it still bears its original name of Larus fuscus. The scientific name is from Latin. Larus appears to have referred to a gull or other large seabird, and fuscus meant black or brown.

“Will you set your eyes upon wealth, when [suddenly] it is gone? For riches certainly make themselves wings, like an eagle [ or Lesser-Black-backed Gull] that flies toward the heavens.” (Proverbs 23:5 AMP)

Lesser Black-backed Gull – All About Birds

Lesser Black-backed Gull – eBird

Lesser Black-backed Gull – Wikipedia

Birdwatching at Staffa: Puffins, Shags, & more

Birdwatching at Staffa, near Iona: Puffins, Shags, and Herring Gulls

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

Let them give glory unto the Lord, and declare his praise in the islands.  (Isaiah 42:12)

The three birds that I recall most, from visiting the island of Staffa (Inner Hebrides, just north of Iona) were Herring Gulls (a very common seagull),  Shags (a yellow-mouthed but otherwise all-black cormorant), and those cute and colorful (and comically clown-like) Atlantic Puffins, a couple of which settled (after some aerial arcing) not much more than a yard (i.e., meter) form where I was standing, upon the grassy cliff-side of the pasture-topped island.

Shag-Staffa.PublicInsta-[hoto

SHAG  at  STAFFA   (Public Insta photo credit)

Below is a limerick I wrote to recall my observations at the Isle of Staffa (same island that has Fingal’s Cave, made famous by Felix Mendelssohn’s overture written in AD1829), a small uninhabited island north of Iona (where I ate some of the best sea scallops, after soaking my feet in the cold Sound of Iona tidewaters!), in the Inner Hebrides archipelago on the western side of Scotland (July 19th AD2019).  Norse Vikings were reminded of staves (plural of “staff”) when they saw the upright timber/log-like columns (contiguous pillars) of basalt there  —  hence the name “Staffa“.

BIRDWATCHING  FROM  CLIFF-EDGE  ATOP  STAFFA  ISLAND,  NORTH  OF  IONA  (INNER  HEBRIDES)

Herring gulls, puffins, and shags,

Launch from cliff-edge grass and crags;

Flying low — then a splish!

Success!  Caught a fish!

Herring gulls, puffins, and shags.

Herring gulls, of course, I first observed during my boyhood days (in elementary school).  But shags and puffins are not seen in the parts of America where I have lived, so seeing them at Staffa was quite a privilege!

Puffins-Staffa.Mull-n-IonaRangerService

PUFFINS at STAFFA   (Mull & Iona Ranger Service)

 

 

Who Provides For The Sawfly?

Sawfly on Horsetail drinking dew Cornwall UK Drinking Dew ©Photography of B Smith

“Who hath divided a watercourse for the overflowing of waters, or a way for the lightning of thunder; To cause it to rain on the earth, where no man is; on the wilderness, wherein there is no man; To satisfy the desolate and waste ground; and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth? Hath the rain a father? or who hath begotten the drops of dew?” (Job 38:25-28 KJV)

When I saw this photo today, I asked permission from Barry Smith to use it. Thankfully, he has given permission and also for the usage of others on his Facebook site. Thanks, Barry.

Many species of sawfly have retained their ancestral attributes throughout time, specifically their plant-eating habits, wing veins and the unmodified abdomen, where the first two segments appear like the succeeding segments. The absence of the narrow wasp waist distinguishes sawflies from other members of hymenoptera, although some are Batesian mimics with coloration similar to wasps and bees, and the ovipositor can be mistaken for a stinger. Most sawflies are stubby and soft-bodied, and fly weakly. Sawflies vary in length: Urocerus gigas, which can be mistaken as a wasp due to its black-and-yellow striped body, can grow up to 20 millimetres (0.8 in) in length, but among the largest sawflies ever discovered was Hoplitolyda duolunica from the Mesozoic, with a body length of 55 millimetres (2.2 in) and a wingspan of 92 millimetres (3.6 in). The smaller species only reach lengths of 2.5 millimetres (0.1 in).

Sawfly Larvae Damage by their Larvae ©Pests.org

Predators include birds, insects and small animals. The larvae of some species have anti-predator adaptations such as regurgitating irritating liquid and clustering together for safety in numbers. Sawflies are hosts to many parasitoids, most of which are Hymenoptera, the rest being Diptera.

Adult sawflies are short-lived, with a life expectancy of 7–9 days, though the larval stage can last from months to years, depending on the species.

Woodpeckar Feeding Chicks From Pinterest

They are a pest for humans

Sawflies are major economic pests of forestry. For example, species in the Diprionidae, such as the pine sawflies, Diprion pini and Neodiprion sertifer, cause serious damage to pines in regions such as Scandinavia. D. pini larvae defoliated 500,000 hectares (1,200,000 acres) in the largest outbreak in Finland, between 1998 and 2001. Up to 75% of the trees may die after such outbreaks, as D. pini can remove all the leaves late in the growing season, leaving the trees too weak to survive the winter. Little damage to trees only occurs when the tree is large or when there is minimal presence of larvae. Eucalyptus trees can regenerate quickly from damage inflicted by the larvae; however, they can be substantially damaged from outbreaks, especially if they are young. The trees can be defoliated completely and may cause “dieback”, stunting or even death.

Sawflies are serious pests in horticulture. Different species prefer different host plants, often being specific to a family or genus of hosts. For example, Iris sawfly larvae, emerging in summer, can quickly defoliate species of Iris including the yellow flag and other freshwater species. Similarly the rose sawflies, Arge pagana and A. ochropus, defoliate rose bushes.

They are a pest for humans, yet the Lord, their Creator, cares enough for them to provide dew to drink.

“The LORD by wisdom hath founded the earth; by understanding hath he established the heavens. By his knowledge the depths are broken up, and the clouds drop down the dew.” (Proverbs 3:19-20 KJV)

Do we not sometimes misbehave, yet the Lord continues to provide water, sun, air to breathe, and other benefits for us? Critters are provided for, but we, humans, have even a greater blessing available to us. Salvation through the Lord Jesus Christ.

Photograghy of B Smith

Sawfly Wikipedia

Who Paints The Leaves?

Woodstock’s Dilemma

Peanuts for Sunday June 9, 2019 – A Dilemma

“A friend loves at all times,…” (Proverbs 17:17a NKJV)

Well, my friends Woodstock and Snoopy were at it again this Sunday. It appears that Woodstock has a Dilemma and patient Snoopy listened, and then offered a solution to the problem. It’s nice to have friends like that as we go through life.

Peanuts for Sunday June 9, 2019 – Split Hairs

“…And the sweetness of a man’s friend gives delight by hearty counsel.” (Proverbs 27:9b NKJV)

Here is some information that helps us understand how birds do get “Split Ends.” Notice the number 3 feather.

“A close look at feather growth reveals how these intricate structures form.

  1. Each new feather grows from a small outgrowth of skin called the papilla.
  2. As feathers mature, their tips get pushed away from the papilla, where the newest parts of the feather form. Like human hair, feathers are youngest at their base.
  3. The feather’s structure develops as proteins are laid down around the surface of this bump of skin. It’s here that the branching patterns form by smaller branches fusing at the base to make thicker ones—barbules fuse into barbs and barbs fuse into a rachis.
  4. As the feather grows, it stays curled in a tubular shape around the papilla until it is pushed away from the growth area.
  5. A protective sheath maintains the feather’s cylindrical shape until it starts to disintegrate near the tip, allowing the mature part of the feather to unfurl.
  6. The sheath falls off and the growth process is complete.”

The feather photo and above information is from: Everything You Need To Know About Feathers

Here is an interesting video that explains quite a bit about moulting. Even though she explains with captive birds, the principles are the same.

Most of us have watched birds preening their feathers. Often, they are working on a new feather that they are fixing up.

Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) Preening at Circle B

Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) Preening at Circle B

What a wonderful Creator of these Avian Wonders. I’ll never believe that feathers and their structures “just evolved.” No, their was, is, and will be a Master Creator at work.

“Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.” (Genesis 1:20 NKJV)

Interesting Things

Save The Parrots

Does Global Warming Threaten Bird Habitats?

Tricolored Heron by Dan

Does Global Warming Threaten Bird Habitats?

Written by Dr. James J. S. Johnson in the latest Acts And Facts about birds, especially the Tricolored Heron, being affected by the threats of global warming.

“If you love birds, should you fight petroleum production in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? How you answer depends on whether you believe man-made global warming is threatening Earth’s climate. That crisis scenario is actually based on evolutionary old-earth assumptions,1 and constant media stories feed the fear.

An amateur naturalist recently sounded the global-warming alarm over tricolored herons expanding their range. He reported that about three-quarters of the population lived in Louisiana in 1976, but now many are relocating northward up the Atlantic coast.2 He had little trouble identifying the culprits:

Isolated islands, prime breeding grounds safe from land-based predators, are being lost everywhere to rising sea levels and devastating storms. The tricolor I was watching was apparently trying to adapt to a rapidly warming planet. It had arrived earlier and farther north than its ancestors ever did [sic].…Birds everywhere are being threatened by the climate crisis. The fossil fuel lobby and its enablers in Washington, DC, are handing tricolors and thousands of other species a life-threatening legacy.2

But wait! Are the fossil fuel lobby and the politically powerful petroleum industry really villains that are forcing the poor tricolored herons to migrate—in temperature-troubled desperation—to a Virginia wildlife refuge “farther north” than their ancestors had ever been? No, because the same writer admitted that earlier heron generations had populated eastern America outside of Louisiana….

Does Global Warming Threaten Bird Habitats?

 

Clark’s Nuthatch’s Memory – Creation Moments

Job 38:41

“Who provideth for the raven his food? when his young ones cry unto God, they wander for lack of meat.”

 The shy bird called Clark’s nutcracker collects food during the growing season and stores it for the cold winter months. In one year, a bird will store between 22,000 and 33,000 seeds in as many as 2,500 locations, which can be more than ten miles apart. But does the little bird remember where he put all those seeds?

Biologists tracked the activity of Clark’s nutcrackers in the San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona. A small army of researchers tracked the birds’ seed gathering and storing activities. One of the first things they discovered was that the birds quickly figured out that they were being observed. Some refused to store food when researchers were watching them. Others faked storing seeds when they were watched. Back in the lab, researchers studied the storing activity of Eurasian nutcrackers. After the birds stored seeds in a large sand floor, the birds were removed. Then the seeds they stored were dug up. When the birds were allowed to return, they quickly discovered that their seeds had been stolen, so they refused to store any more seeds. In the end, researchers concluded that the nutcrackers recover as many as two-thirds of their stored seeds within 13 months.

Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

The remarkable memory of these little birds is their gift from God that enables them to be fed all year around.

Prayer: Father, I thank You because You are gracious and generous, not just to the birds, but also to me. Amen.

Ref: Science News, 2/14: 2004, pp. 103-105, Susan Milius, “Where’d I Put That?” Photo: Clark’s nutcracker PD

Copyright © 2019 Creation Moments, Inc. PO Box 839, Foley, MN 56329 800-422-4253  www.creationmoments.com


What an interesting memory. How is your memory doing? Is it as good as these Nutcrackers?

See More From:

Interesting Things

‘Sarge, Will You Tell Us About God?’ – The Story of God’s Miraculous Protection of an Entire U. S. Marine Unit

via ‘Sarge, Will You Tell Us About God?’ – The Story of God’s Miraculous Protection of an Entire U. S. Marine Unit

From my friend at “A Walk In The Word”

Honoring Those Who Have Served Our Country – Repost

Harry Otto Boles, 1894-1947,

Died as a result of injuries in WWI

Memorial Day is a solemn day of remembrance for everyone who has died serving in the American armed forces. The holiday, originally known as Decoration Day, started after the Civil War to honor the Union and Confederate dead.

I was originally thinking about showing some of those in my family who have served in the military, but after re-reading the true purpose of Memorial Day, I’ll save that for Veteran Day

I would like to honor my father, Harry Otto Boles. He fought in World War I, went to France, and was in the trenches that the enemy used Mustard Gas on. He suffered for many years from that incident. Then at 53 years of age, he died from stomach related problems because of having been gassed. Here are copies of his transportation over to France and then his departure for home…..

via Honoring Those Who Have Served Our Country

From Lee’s Ancestry Adventures

Lee’s Ancestry Adventures Blog

Broken Limb/Branch off of Tree

“O God, thou hast taught me from my youth: and hitherto have I declared thy wondrous works. Now also when I am old and grayheaded, O God, forsake me not; until I have shewed thy strength unto this generation, and thy power to every one that is to come.” (Psalms 71:17-18 KJV)

Thought you might be interested in a new blog that I have started. It is in the infancy of a blog. As many of you know, I have been dealing with back problems. It has slowed our birdwatching down quite a bit. Though we did get to Gatorland Friday and will write about it soon.

Lee’s Ancestry Adventure was started a few days ago and the goal is to write about efforts and joys in attempting to trace my ancestors. Here is an excerpt from the About page:

“My family has a great heritage. We have some famous and not so famous ancestors. This blog will attempt to introduce you to some of them. Also I hope to reveal the trials and challenges of trying to trace them.

One of my goals along the way is to find out about their way of life, occupations, and whether they were religious. Especially, find out if they knew the Lord as Savior. If so, I look forward to meeting them in Heaven one day.”

I have been setting up a menu structure that will give a place to have links to the different branches of my family tree. All of this is in the beginning stages.

So far there are five articles posted. Please stop by and see what you think. Are you working on your ancestors? I always welcome advice.

I trust you will swing by and take a look. As this develops and the great-great-greats get added, it just might be that we are distant cousins. Or maybe, not so distant.

Stay Tuned!

 

 

 

Answer’s Dingo Dog

Singing Dogs at Lowry Pk Zoo by Lee

Ken Ham, from Answers in Genesis, wrote an article about Dingos, The Dingo—It’s Not a Dog, But It’s a “Dog”. We have watched a pair of them at the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa many times.

In fact the ones at Lowry are promoted as “Singing Dogs.”

Singing Dog Sign LPZ by Lee

“they and every beast after its kind, all cattle after their kind, every creeping thing that creeps on the earth after its kind, and every bird after its kind, every bird of every sort.” (Genesis 7:14 NKJV)

Anyway, the article tell how with DNA testing, it is just again proving that the Lord created different “Kinds” with in the Dog Family. The Dingo is its own species, yet it is still in the Canidae Family. They “can reproduce with domestic and feral dogs.”

I always enjoy when real science reveals the truths which the Lord God has already revealed in His Word, the Bible.

Here’s a video that I took at the zoo when the two of them got to calling/singing back and forth.

“There are, it may be, so many kinds of voices in the world, and none of them is without signification.” (1 Corinthians 14:10 KJV)

Singing Dogs at Lowry Pk Zoo

“Let everything that has breath praise the LORD. Praise the LORD!” (Psalms 150:6 NKJV)

New Guinea Singing Dogs at Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, Florida

The Dingo—It’s Not a Dog, But It’s a “Dog”

A previous blog here about the Singing Dogs:

Singing Dogs at Lowry Park Zoo

3:16 The Numbers of Hope