Wordless Yellow-fronted Woodpecker

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

This GOLD reminds us of Heaven. The Bible tells us Heaven has a street of gold! But the best part about Heaven is that God, who created you and me, lives there. The Bible, God’s Word, says: “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” — John 3:16 Jesus, God the Son, is in Heaven preparing a place for all who put their trust in Him. (John 14:2-3) God is holy and perfect. He cannot allow anything in Heaven that is less than perfect, so there’s one thing that can never be in Heaven. Can you think of what that might be?

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

It is sin! That is what this DARK reminds us of. Sin is anything you think, say, or do that does not please God, like lying, cheating, being selfish, or hurting others. The Bible says: “All have sinned and come short of the glory of God.” — Romans 3:23 That means everyone, big or little, young or old! No matter where you live or who you are, you have sinned. Everyone is born with a “want to” to do wrong. God says that sin must be punished (Romans 6:23), and the punishment for sin is to be separated from God forever in a place of suffering….a place called Hell. But God has a wonderful plan so that you will not have to be punished for your sin!

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) ©WikiC

God sent Jesus Christ, His perfect Son, to be born as a little baby. Jesus lived a perfect life….He never sinned. When He was grown, wicked men nailed Him to a cross. The bird’s RED reminds us of Jesus’ blood. The Bible says that without the giving of blood there can be no forgiveness of sin (Hebrews 9:22). So Jesus Christ willingly died to take your sin punishment. “…Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures; and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day, according to the Scriptures.“— 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 Now, because of what Jesus has done for you, you can have your sins forgiven. Read on to see how!

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) ©Galo Torquato

The Bible says: “As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believed on His name.” — John 1:12 The WHITE reminds us of a CLEAN heart. How can you have a clean heart? A = Admit to God you are a sinner and want to turn away from those sins. B = Believe in Jesus Christ, that He is God’s perfect Son who died for your sin, was buried, and rose again. C = Call on Him to save you from your sin. Would you like to do that right now? He has promised to hear, and once you are His child, He will never leave you (Hebrews 13:5). Take a moment and talk to God right now. It will change your life forever. Only one more color! What can it mean?

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

The GREEN stands for things that grow. When you ask God to forgive you and save you, you become His child. God wants you to get to know Him better and to grow to become more like Him. These four things will help you grow:

1. PRAY (talk to God every day)
2. READ & OBEY THE BIBLE (to know what He says, then do it)
3. TELL OTHERS ABOUT JESUS
4. GO TO A BIBLE-BELIEVING CHURCH (where you can learn more about pleasing Him)

As a child of God, if you should sin again, stop and tell Him about it. He promises in His Word… “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” — 1 John 1:9 Ask God to help you live a life to please Him! Share the Good News of this story with someone else.

The Wordless Book has been used for many years by CEF (Child Evangelism Fellowship). These words are from CEF.

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker (Melanerpes flavifrons) by Dario Sanches

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A friend shared with me about someone who uses the Toucan to teach the “Wordless Book.”

Other Wordless Birds:

Wordless Birds

Wordless Birds – With Hummingbirds

The Wordless Book

Story of the Wordless Book

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker – Cornell Neotropical

Feel free to share any of these “Wordless Birds.” All photos are Creative Commons.

Newest Articles on the Kid’s Blog

Barred Owl at Circle B by Lee

Our latest trip to Circle B Bar Reserve was rewarded with my first sighting of a wild Barred Owl. We have seen them in Zoos, but never in the wild.

See – Bible Birds – Owl’s Provision

Bible Birds – Holding On With My Feet

Blue-Winged-Teal-Dabbling ©Flyways USFWS

Blue-Winged-Teal-Dabbling ©Flyways USFWS

Birdwatching Term – Dabbling Duck

White-winged Coot (Fulica leucoptera) Cropped ©WikiC

White-winged Coot (Fulica leucoptera) Cropped ©WikiC

Birdwatching Term – Frontal Shield

Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) by Ian

Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) by Ian

Jenny Wren Arrives – Chapter 1

Hope you will check these out and if you like them, consider following that blog also. Lots of interesting things to share with your children and grandchildren.

“And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.” (Deuteronomy 6:5-7 KJV)

No, the posts aren’t scripture, but there are always principles to grow and learn by. Enjoy!

Sharing the Gospel

A Heart Message

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©WikiC

“For if thou altogether holdest thy peace at this time, … and who knoweth whether thou art come to the kingdom for such a time as this?” (Esther 4:14 KJV)

Last weekend we had a great Missions Conference. All the missionaries that spoke were real “heroes of the faith.” Of all the Conferences at Faith Baptist Church, here in Florida, this was the best since we have been here. The Theme was For Such A Time As This! My heart was stirred as we listened to the heartbeat of these Christians who have dedicated their lives to go and reach others for Christ. Sometimes I grumble inwardly about having to fix problems on this blog, yet they have so many issues to deal with. They keep looking to the Lord to help them through. All the stories of problems and blessings from the Lord help us to remember that God is in control. Keep On, Keeping On!

On Sunday night, the final speaker was Mrs. Grace Fabian who was with Wycliffe Bible Translators in Papua New Guinea. She has written a book about all that happened to them while they were there. Her husband was murdered, yet she stayed on to help translate the Bible into the language of that tribe. I found two YouTube videos online that tell much of what she told us.

Check out: Part 1 – https://youtu.be/k5_5UHqwiv4 and Part 2 – https://youtu.be/6wI-FUjtwdg

So, what does all of this have to do with birds? One of the missionaries serves in Togo, West Africa. The Lethers family had on their display table a book of birds from Togo. It was opened to a photo of a Sunbird. Thanks to the Birds of the World blogs that have been here, I was able to immediately put a name on it. [The name was covered]

I was birdwatching at the conference. Most birders, after a while, notice photos or birds no matter where they are. Hopefully, you have become more aware of the birds around you. Whether they are in the wild, a zoo, or even in a book, your eyes will drift that way. Mine do.

Checking the Wikipedia list of birds in Togo, West Africa, there is a huge number of avian wonder in Togo. Here are just a few of them:

Morris The Finch In The Airport by Emma Foster

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

Morris The Finch In The Airport

By Emma Foster

Morris was a small house finch who lived in the sunny state of Florida. He had built a tiny nest for himself and lived in a small forest away from busy streets and people. The only road that was close by was a highway leading to a large building that was about half a mile away. Morris could barely see the building from the top of a high tree in which he lived. Every day Morris would watch incredibly large birds fly to and from the building, but he had no idea what they were. The building was in fact an airport, and the large birds were airplanes, but Morris did not know this.

Eventually, the weather became really hot as spring turned into summer. Morris grew tired of the heat and decided to find a new place to stay, at least for the summer. Morris flew out of his nest into the air and began to search for a cooler place to live.

He slowly reached the giant building in the hot sun. Looking inside, Morris noticed trees that seemed comfortable in the cool air. He tried to find a place to fly in, but every part of the building seemed to be made of windows. After trying to get inside for a long time Morris caught sight of a shuttle zipping inside the building. He followed the shuttle inside into the refreshingly cool air and instantly flew toward a tall tree that stood in the sunlight.

House Finch male ©Glenn Bartley-Wichita StateU

The tree gave Morris a broad view of a wide space were many people were eating. At first, he thought we would be able to handle the noisy people, but as the sun rose higher into the sky more people began to arrive and the building grew louder. Morris tried to ignore it, knowing when the air became colder he could fly back to his nest.

After a few minutes of trying to pull up some branches and twigs to make a new nest, Morris realized that the “tree” was fake, which made him slightly annoyed. Fortunately, he could still make his new home cozy because it was cool and comfortable sitting in the branches and watching the people.

Morris began to grow hungry and decided that he should find some food, though it didn’t look as if there were any worms around. He swooped down to where several people were eating and picked up a few dry crumbs from off the ground. After eating a few pieces Morris was still hungry so he decided to fly back outside to search for some worms.

It felt nice to be away from the noise, but as Morris flew back the way he came, he accidentally flew into the shuttle that carried passengers back and forth. He couldn’t get out before the doors closed. He flew up and down in a frenzy, searching for a way out. People around him screamed, terrified, until finally he was able to fly back outside.

House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) by Raymond Barlow

Instead of searching for worms Morris flew straight back to his nest and stayed there for the rest of the day even though it was still hot. That night Morris’s surroundings became cool and Morris was able to sleep peacefully despite the chaos of the morning.

The next morning Morris stayed in his nest, deciding that, despite the heat, he would rather be home than anywhere else. He remembered how quiet it was even with the big birds flying overhead, and decided that no matter how hot it became, he would never fly back into that building again


Lee’s Addition:

“Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” (Hebrews 13:5 KJV)

Emma has treated us to another interesting story. Not sure if a bird ever went looking for air conditioning, but it sounds logical. But, like us, we are better off being right where the Lord has placed us and with the provisions that have been provided by Him. Thanks again, Emma.

See More of Emma’s Stories

Many More Birds Have Arrived!

Birds of the Bible for Kids is Under Construction
Keep Checking

The dust is thinning out a bit.

Here is the Latest list of pages and articles that have flown over to the Birds of the Bible for Kids site. The ones in blue are the newest arrivals. Wow! I had forgotten about so many of these articles. They are being re-published to current dates.

I trust you will check some of these out. If you have youngsters and/or teenagers, or, grandchildren, you may want to share these with them.

The Bible Bird indexes that are now open are GROWING:

“I will meditate also of all thy work, and talk of thy doings.” (Psalms 77:12 KJV)

Bible Birds

Brown Pelican and Laughing Gull - Waiting

Waiting

Here are some of the articles that are active again: (reverse order as they were released)

STAY TUNED!!

Really Really Dusty!!

Birds of the Bible for Kids is Under Construction
Keep Checking

At times I think I may have bitten off more than I can chew. It was easier moving the Birds of the Bible for Kids material over here than it is trying to move it back to the original location. :)

Things are progressing over there, but it is still quite dusty.

Dust storm over I-10 in Arizona ©AZGeology

In fact, the birds have been taking “Dust Baths”!!

Turkey taking a Dust Bath ©Jim Block

Here’s another one I caught Dust Bathing with some of the dust that is being kicked up:

Dust Bathing

There has been some progress though. All of the Scriptural Alphabet of Animals are active.

Here are some of what has been going on over at Birds of the Bible for Kids:

The Bible Bird indexes that are open are:

Bible Birds

Here are some of the articles that are active again: (reverse order as they were released)

STAY TUNED!!

 

Reginald and Oliver’s Christmas Tree by Emma Foster

Wild Turkeys ©Pixabay

Reginald and Oliver’s Christmas Tree by Emma Foster

Before the heavy snow fell, Reginald and the turkeys settled into their fortress. Reginald knew now that he had to start looking for a Christmas tree. When the snow lightened, Reginald decided he should find a tree. One morning he left in search of the perfect Christmas tree, accompanied by Oliver.

Reginald and Oliver traveled for some time, dragging themselves through the snow. Oliver insisted on wearing his army helmet because he was afraid they would run into hunters. He followed Reginald through the snow, occasionally having to be pulled out of the snow with Reginald’s help.

After walking a little way, Reginald and Oliver found a wide open space near a circle of trees. In the sunlight, a small tiny pine tree stood in front of most of the other trees, and Reginald thought it would be the perfect tree for Christmas that year. The trunk was just right for Reginald and Oliver to be able to push the tree over since they had nothing to cut it with.

Tiny Tree

Just as they were about to head for the tree, Reginald noticed some hunters lurking in some bushes nearby. Oliver and Reginald hid and attempted to form a plan. Reginald decided that he would go off and distract the hunters so Oliver could knock the tree over and take it back to the fortress.

Reginald left Oliver by the bushes and walked a few yards away. He began gobbling, hoping that the hunters would hear him and try to see where he was. Reginald quickly hid in the bushes near a river where he wouldn’t be seen and waited for the hunters to come look for him. Eventually, he heard footsteps as the hunters moved closer.

Turkey in Snow ©SABaking

Once the hunters had gone Oliver quickly ran to the tree and began pushing on it until it toppled over. Unfortunately, when Oliver pushed the tree down it began rolling forward, dragging Oliver into its branches until it fell into the nearby river and began drifting away. Reginald watched Oliver fall into the river and quickly ran after him, shaking his head and hoping the hunters couldn’t see him. He caught up to Oliver and tried to pull him to shore, but Oliver only dragged him onto the tree, causing Reginald to get soaked.

Oliver and Reginald floated down the river on the tree for a very long time until they ran into a rock, which kept the tree from drifting farther down the river. Oliver began gobbling loudly, but Reginald quickly told him to be quiet. Fortunately, they had floated far away from the hunters toward their fortress.

Reginald and Oliver quickly dragged the tree up onto land and carried it back to the fortress. The turkeys had already begun making ornaments and stringing berries by the time they arrived back at the fortress. After they set up the tree, Reginald and the turkeys hung the ornaments and sang some turkey carols quietly. As for the hunters, they searched all day for Reginald and Oliver, but eventually had to go home because more snow had begun to fall. Again, it was ham for Christmas.

Christmas Ham ©WikiC


Lee’s Addition:

“Who remembered us in our lowly state, For His mercy endures forever; And rescued us from our enemies, For His mercy endures forever; Who gives food to all flesh, For His mercy endures forever. Oh, give thanks to the God of heaven! For His mercy endures forever.” (Psalms 136:23-26 NKJV)

Well, Oliver has again given Reginald his challenge. This time, their need for a Christmas tree provides the adventure. We trust you have been enjoying the various adventures through the pen of Ms. Emma Foster. Emma, you have written another enjoyable tale for us. Thank you, and Merry Christmas to you.

More of Emma’s Stories

Wordless Birds

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Harriet Newell Cook – Scripture Alphabet of Animals Re-post

Here is an older post from October 2010 that you might enjoy reading/re-reading. It is written for the younger readers, but all will find plenty of interesting facts about the Lord’s Creations.

Scripture Alphabet of Animals

Harriet Newell Cook (1814-1843) – author of Scripture Alphabet of Animals

Baudet Donkey - Shaky and Brown

Baudet Donkey – Shaky and Brown

While looking for the quoted thoughts by G. D. Watson, “Others May, You Cannot,” I found the Christian Articles Website. It is loaded with articles by numerous pastors and preachers, but also other Christian writers. That is where I found Harriet N. Cook’s “Scripture Alphabet of Animals.” Her works and the others on that website are in the public domain and usable. I have decided to use her as a guest writer and produce the bird sections (finished) she wrote about. The other sections are being done also. They are listed below. Also, her books are available on Google Books and can be read on the computer or one of the eBook readers.

Oriental Turtle Dove (Streptopelia orientalis) by Nikhil

Oriental Turtle Dove (Streptopelia orientalis) by Nikhil

Harriet Newell Cook was born in 1814 and died in 1843. In her short 29 years of life she wrote several juvenile books and thought I would share parts of them here. “Her first volume for the young was one of Natural History, calculated to illustrate portions of the Bible, for the young, and entitled, “The Scripture Alphabet of Animals.” Nearly thirty thousand copies of the work have been printed in its English dress, and eight thousand of the German translation. The style of this work is eminently lucid…”

Her last very interesting work for the young —“The Trees, Flowers and Fruits of the Bible“– she was not permitted to finish, by reason of her death. It was completed by Miss F. M. Caulkins…” (From Memoir of Mrs. Harriet Newell Cook By Lydia Howard Sigourney, at Google Books)

Beasts, and all cattle; creeping things, and flying fowl: Kings of the earth, and all people; princes, and all judges of the earth: Both young men, and maidens; old men, and children: Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven. (Psalms 148:10-13 KJV)

It was difficult finding information about her personally. Also, I couldn’t find a picture of her. One thing was for certain, she appears to have loved the Lord greatly and wanted to serve Him through her writing.

See Also:

Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ant
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ass
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Bear
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Bee
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Camel
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Dog
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Eagle
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Fox or Jackal
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Goat
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Hart and Hind
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Horse
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ibex or the Wild Goat
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Jerboa or Mouse
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Kite
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Leopard
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Lion
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Locust
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Mole
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Night-Hawk
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Ostrich
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Peacock
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Quail
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Raven
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Roe or Gazelle
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Scorpion
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Sheep
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Stork
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Turtle-Dove
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Unicorn
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Vulture
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Whale
Scripture Alphabet of Animals: The Wolf

See:

Birds of the Bible

Wordless Birds

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Reginald The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm

Reginald the Turkey Commander: the Great Snowstorm, by Emma Foster

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Thanksgiving was beginning to draw near and Reginald knew it was time for the turkeys to trek through the forest to their fortress, which they had built years before to keep safe from hunters. The turkeys were hoping to travel in a few days, but something about the weather began to concern Reginald. He decided it was best to check to see what the weather would be like when they would be travelling.

Reginald had to walk to a nearby farmer’s house to see the weather because the farmer that lived there always had the weather on the television early every morning because he was always concerned about the weather. Sometimes Reginald would leave the turkeys and go watch the weather so he would know if bad weather was headed to the forest. Reluctantly, Reginald let Oliver come along so that Oliver wouldn’t get into any mischief.

Wild Turkeys ©Pixabay

Reginald and Oliver hurried through the forest and across a field to where a lonely house stood. Reginald warned Oliver to be as quiet as he could when they reached the farm because there was a chance the farmer wouldn’t mind having them for Thanksgiving dinner like the other hunters. Oliver cautiously followed Reginald to a chicken coop, which stood near the window of the living room. Reginald climbed into the coop through the chicken wire by cutting part of the wire with a sharp piece of wood he had brought and was pulling it back to make a hole. Oliver attempted to crawl through, but some of his feathers got caught. Reginald told him to calm down and to stop gobbling so the farmer wouldn’t hear him. After pulling him out, Reginald quickly blended in with the chickens, hurried to the window, then peered inside to see what the weather was like. The television was on, and the weather report stated that a record amount of heavy snowfall would be coming before Thanksgiving.

Turkey looking in window. ©Julia@Home on 129Acres

Reginald knew they would have to hurry to make it to the fortress so he turned around to tell Oliver to run back and warn the turkeys. When he looked back Oliver had gotten his head stuck in the chicken coop and the chickens had gathered around him and had started clucking while Oliver’s army helmet (worn to protect them from hunters) clanged against the walls of the coop. Reginald shook his head and dragged him out, telling him to tell the turkeys about the snowfall and that they needed to build sleds out of pieces of wood from trees that they could pull with roots to their fortress.

Oliver raced back to the turkeys while Reginald stayed behind to watch the weather. Eventually, the farmer turned the news off and Reginald had to hurry back to the turkeys. When he got back, the turkeys had already begun building their sleds, which would be used to carry the elderly and baby turkeys through the snow that was already falling. All of the turkeys were present except Oliver.

Turkey looking in window. ©Pinterest

When Reginald asked about Oliver, the turkeys said he had gone back for him. Reginald shook his head and impatiently walked all the way back through the snow to the farmhouse. Oliver was standing by the window, watching a gameshow on the television. Reginald shook his head again and told Oliver to come back with him to the turkeys.

The turkeys had finished building the sleds when Reginald and Oliver returned, and lots of snow was now on the ground. Using the sleds, the turkeys were able to arrive at their fortress before the snowbanks grew too high and the winds were too strong. They were able to spend their Thanksgiving nice and warm underground, while yet again the hunters had to hunt for turkeys in other woods.


“…but that the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.” (1 Corinthians 12:25b-26 KJV)

Looks like Reginald and Oliver have returned in time for another Thanksgiving adventure. Thanks again, Emma, for providing an entertaining tale, for a favorite holiday.

Emma’s Stories

Especially:

 

Blue-gray Tanagers And Your Teenager


Blue-gray Tanager (Tangara azulada) ©Colombia Wildlife – Oswaldo Cortes

“For thou art my hope, O Lord GOD: thou art my trust from my youth.” (Psalms 71:5 KJV)

While watching this video of the Blue-gray Tanager youngster, my thoughts went to those of you who have teenagers. Many tell me that they, the teenagers, are difficult to fill up. Enjoy the video knowing that you are not alone in God’s Creation. Even the birds have to deal with filling up their offspring. :0)

Blue-gray Tanagers (Thraupis episcopus) are members of the Thraupidae Family. The tanager is a medium-sized South American songbird whose song is a squeaky twittering, interspersed with tseee and tsuup call notes. Its range is from Mexico south to northeast Bolivia and northern Brazil, all of the Amazon Basin, except the very south. It has been introduced to Lima (Peru). On Trinidad and Tobago, this bird is called blue jean.

Blue-grey Tanager (Thraupis episcopus) Reinier Munguia

The Blue-gray Tanager is 16–18 cm (6.3–7.1 in) long and weighs 30–40 g (1.1–1.4 oz). Adults have a light bluish head and underparts, with darker blue upperparts and a shoulder patch colored a different hue of blue. The bill is short and quite thick. Sexes are similar, but the immature is much duller in plumage.

The breeding habitat is open woodland, cultivated areas and gardens. The Blue-gray Tanager lives mainly on fruit, but will also take some nectar and insects. This is a common, restless, noisy and confiding species, usually found in pairs, but sometimes small groups. It thrives around human habitation, and will take some cultivated fruit like papayas (Carica papaya).

(Information from Wikipedia)

Blue-grey Tanager (Thraupis episcopus) by Raymond Barlow

Blue-gray Tanager (Thraupis episcopus) by Raymond Barlow

“O God, thou hast taught me from my youth: and hitherto have I declared thy wondrous works.” (Psalms 71:17 KJV)

Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies Family

 

Albert and the Midterm

(African) Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus lenne) at Parrot Mountain by Lee

Albert and the Midterm by Emma Foster

Once there was a parrot named Albert who lived with a family who had a son called James. James had
just graduated from high school, and summer had just ended. Albert, whose cage was in James’s room,
could tell that every night before he went to bed James was getting more and more nervous.

James left for his first day of classes early Monday morning. Albert waited patiently by his cage all
morning, for James to come home. When James came home, he took the time to tell Albert all about his
day. Because Albert was an African Grey Parrot, Albert understood nearly everything James said and
was able to repeat a lot of his words back to him.

After a week, James came home with his first homework assignment. He was taking psychology, and as
he worked on his homework Albert watched him write down the answers and read through the textbook.
James made sure to highlight the important stuff he needed to know for the test.

After a while, Albert started to learn some important terms in psychology. He would often open up the
book whenever James left his room and read through several sections. Eventually, Albert began
squawking out different words that James had to learn for his upcoming test.

As the first test for James’s class drew closer, he became more and more nervous about it. He started
writing down terms on notecards to memorize and highlighting different sections in the book that he
thought would be on the test. Albert watched intently, following along and moving the flashcards around
with his claws. Every now and then Albert would shout out some of the terms.

Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) WikiC

Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) WikiC

Suddenly James had an idea. He decided that it would be a good idea if Albert quizzed him using the
flashcards. Because Albert was able to say the words, he began squawking out everything James had
written down on the notecards. Albert and James practiced for the entire weekend because James’s test
was on Monday.

Albert waited all Monday morning, wondering if James would do well on his test. Albert had gone over
all of the terms with James so much that he was sure James would do well, but he couldn’t help still
feeling nervous.

James had to wait a few days before he received his test results. When he came home he told Albert he
had gotten at A. In fact, he had received the best grade in the class. He told Albert that his professor had
been very impressed and that he had been surprised when James had told him that Albert had helped him
study. For part of the class period, James’s professor had explained how African Grey Parrots were a very
smart bird because of how many words they could learn, and that they had been studied many times in
psychology. At one point, James’s psychology professor allowed James to bring Albert to class so he
could elaborate on how smart African Grey Parrots were.

From then on Albert helped James study for all of his classes, and James was able to do well in all of
them because of how much he studied. Though sometimes Albert would get carried away by
squawking out the terms in the middle of the night.

Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) by Dan

Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) by Dan


“For he shall deliver the needy when he crieth; …, and him that hath no helper.” (Psalms 72:12 KJV)

“My help cometh from the LORD, which made heaven and earth.” (Psalms 121:2 KJV)


Thanks, Emma for another truly interesting tale. We look forward to each new adventure from your pen ,with great anticipation.

Wikipedia said, “The species is common in captivity and is regularly kept by humans as a companion parrot, prized for its ability to mimic human speech, which makes it one of the most popular avian pets. An escaped pet in Japan was returned to his owner after repeating the owner’s name and address.”

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Emma’s Stories

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The Great Graduation Ceremony by Emma Foster

The Great Graduation Ceremony  ~ by Emma Foster

“A gift is as a precious stone in the eyes of him that hath it: whithersoever it turneth, it prospereth.” (Proverbs 17:8 KJV)

Once there was a family of common wood pigeons that lived deep in a large forest. The father and mother, David and Susan, had three children, Billy, Louisa, and Will. The children had not been in the nest for very long, but were now almost old enough to fly from the nest to make their own homes.

Common Wood Pigeon (Columba palumbus) with newly hatched young ©WikiC

Common Wood Pigeon (Columba palumbus) with newly hatched young ©WikiC

One day when Susan was flying through the forest searching for worms, she met an owl named Winston who was casually sitting on a branch. Because Winston was considered the wisest owl in the entire forest, all of the birds and other animals came to him for advice on how to solve their problems. When Susan explained to Winston that her children were nearly old enough to begin flying to find their own place to live, Winston immediately suggested holding a graduation ceremony.

Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) ©Flickr Slgurossom

Susan, confused on what exactly a graduation ceremony entailed, waited patiently for most of the afternoon as Winston slowly explained every detail of what a graduation ceremony was, what must be done, and the reason for it. Susan almost wished she hadn’t said anything because Winston had a history of being extremely long-winded. From what Susan gathered, however, graduation ceremonies were for people who had reached a certain point in their lives. They left a place called ‘school’ where they learned everything they needed to know before being given a piece of paper and going to another place to learn. Susan thought it was almost like the way her children would fly from the nest.

Common Rock Pigeon Pair ©ARKive

Susan quickly flew back home and told David everything that Winston had said, and David thought it was a great idea. They began to prepare for the ceremony by inviting all of the birds and animals in the woods, though they were informed that the turkeys couldn’t attend because hunters had been spotted and the turkeys were not taking any chances.

That Saturday, Winston flew over to a large nearby branch while all of the pigeons and several other birds and animals gathered around to listen. Winston’s speech lasted a very long time, and by the time he was done Billy, Louisa, Will, and most of the others were fast asleep.

David and Susan quickly woke their children up so they could rise for their diploma. David and Susan both decided that the perfect substitute for a diploma would be the biggest worms they could find. Winston called out each of their children’s names one by one, and, while the rest of the birds and animals all cheered, Billy, Louisa, and Will took their worms. The ceremony was officially over. Everyone had a party afterwards with all of the birds bringing worms and all the squirrels volunteering to bring nuts and berries for the others. Some of the animals even gave the young birds a few graduation presents. One kind squirrel brought the largest nut he could find, while a raccoon brought an assortment of leaves she had found that would look nice in a nest.

Bok Santuary Squirrel

Bok Santuary Squirrel by Lee

When Billy, Louisa, and Will began to prepare to fly away to make their new nests, Susan tried not to cry. Finally, all of the guests left and her children flew away. She hoped they would come home to visit soon, and that they would not fly too far.


Lee’s Addition:

“Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit….But all these worketh that one and the selfsame Spirit, dividing to every man severally as he will.” (1 Corinthians 12:4, 11 KJV)

Our young writer, Emma Foster, has been growing up and has just graduated from High School. We trust you have enjoyed her Bird Tales over the last 5 1/2 years. She started writing for us on the blog in January of 2012. Her stories have continually improved as she has matured. I still chuckle over her first story of the parrot, Mrs. Patterson’s Parrot, that was too large to come home in the car.

About a week ago, I asked Emma to write a story about birds graduating. This was her answer to the request. I wanted to honor her for her graduation and the wish her well as she starts college and the future.

Now that she has graduated, she plans to work on a degree in writing. She has also assured us that she will continue to send more Bird Tales for us to enjoy. I look forward to those and will continue praying for her as she enters this new phase of her life.

Emma’s Stories

Some of my favorites: (All of them actually)

Mrs. Patterson’s Parrot

George The Hummingbird

I give up, they are all my favorites. Thank you, Emma, for all these enjoyable Bird Tales.