Tilly’s Pumpkin House – by Emma Foster

Tilly’s Pumpkin House

by Emma Foster

Tilly the raven normally lived in a tree, but as winter came closer, the weather felt colder, and Tilly knew she needed to find a warmer place to live.

Her tree was near a small pumpkin farm, and several pumpkins had been left behind, going unused for Halloween. Tilly observed the different kinds of pumpkins that were still in the field. Many of them looked old, with green and yellow splotches on them. One of the pumpkins, however, looked perfect.

The pumpkin was large and perfectly round. When Tilly pecked at it with her beak, she noticed that it was soft enough for her to make a little door in it. She pecked her way into the pumpkin and surveyed the inside.

For a while, Tilly pulled out the seeds and guts from the inside of the pumpkin, until she had enough room to sit comfortably. Tilly felt protected from the wind and cold. Eventually, she fell asleep.

Gathering Pumpkins ©casienserio.blogspot.com

The next morning, Tilly woke up to her pumpkin house shaking. Someone had picked up her house and was taking it somewhere. Tilly peeked her head out of the door of her house. She noticed groups of people taking the old pumpkins and placing them to a pickup truck.

Pickup Truck With Pumpkins

Someone placed Tilly’s house in a pile beside other pumpkins. A second later, she rolled around and around and around as her house fell down a hill.

Splash! Tilly landed in the river. Fortunately, her house floated to the top, and the door she had made pointed up to the sky. Tilly carefully climbed out and flew back to land, sad that her house was floating away.

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Ray

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Ray

Snow started to fall to the ground. Tilly needed to come up with another plan. She decided to leave the pumpkin field and find somewhere else to live. Flying through the air as the snow fell, Tilly searched and found another pumpkin field. She searched for the next perfect pumpkin she could use. One of the pumpkins was soft and round just like the other one, and by the time she settled down inside, night had fallen and Tilly fell asleep instantly.

The next morning, Tilly woke up to something knocking against her new house. A deer she didn’t recognize was sniffing at her pumpkin and then took a giant chunk out of the top. Tilly looked up at the deer and the deer stared back at her. She flew out of her house, forced to watch the deer eat the rest of her pumpkin.

Deer Looking at Tilly ©CC

Deer Looking at Tilly ©CC

The snow made everything colder until Tilly could barely fly. She flew into some woods, hoping to find a tree in which to get warm. Eventually, she found a tree with a small hole in it. Tilly flew inside only to discover a small owl in the hole in the tree.

The owl introduced herself as Milly the long-eared owl. Tilly offered to leave since this was Milly’s home, but Milly explained that she was only stopping there for a minute. She said that she had found a nest in a tree a few miles away that had belonged to a raven. She also explained that long-eared owls liked to live in nests that belonged to ravens.

“Milly” – Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) ©Flickr Slgurossom

Tilly grew excited, believing that the nest Milly was talking about was hers, which meant she had to explain the pumpkin houses she had had, and how she had ended up there. Milly offered to let Tilly keep the tree to stay warm. Tilly also said that it was perfectly all right if Milly kept her nest.

All throughout the winter, Tilly stayed in the tree where she had met Milly, while Milly lived in Tilly’s nest next to the pumpkin field. When spring came around, Tilly and Milly remained friends, and Tilly even showed Milly how to make her own pumpkin house, though she didn’t recommend living there.

*

Linda Marcille carved the Raven in pumpkin.


“Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.” (Luke 10:38 KJV)

“Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God.” Philippians 4:6 KJV)

What a great story from Emma. It is enjoyable to watch her talent developing. Also, it is good to see Tilly and Milly being so hospitable. This is only fiction, but how did the animals interact with each other before the fall and the curse affected all of nature? Maybe this story is just a glimpse of how they got along so well.

Emma’s Stories

Good News

Wow!! Two Million And Counting!!

Snowy Egret Viera Wetlands – 12-31-2018 by Lee

“Therefore I will give thanks to You among the nations, O LORD, And I will sing praises to Your name.” (Psalms 18:49 NASB)

Thank You!!, Thank You!! again for all visits and views of this blog. Last night (Oct 31, 2019) sometime the counter flipped over the Two Million mark on the visitor counter on the left side of the blog.

2 Million Views

2 Million Views

Here’s a closer view:

Close-up of Two Million Views

Close-up of Two Million Views

On October 20th in 2013, we hit the One Million Mark. See:

Thank You – One Million And Counting!

Now, here we are just a tad over 6 years to the two million mark. Who ever thought that we would still be blogging after all these years. We have now been using WordPress for over 11 years, and the blog is almost 12 years old. It was begun in February 2008, but when it was moved to WordPress the counter was reset.

I am so thankful to the Lord for letting this blog be used to present His beautifully Created birds. Also, without you readers, it would not have been successful. Thank You for every visit, pages viewed, and the many comments. Those comments have come many times when I was thinking of quitting and giving up. But, just when I needed a little extra encouragement, along came a comment that was perfectly timed to keep me going.

Red-crested Turaco at Brevard Zoo by Lee

After these many years, we have met so many people from around the world, and many have become personal friends. [At least I consider you personal friends.]

Also, those that write for the blog have made great contributions: James J.S. Johnson. or Dr. Jim, as I call him; Emma Foster and her Emma’s Stories, have been two of the newest writers used during this six year span. Also, Golden Eagle drops by occasionally. Our Ian Montgomery has provide numerous post from his birding adventures.

“God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarmed after their kind, and every winged bird after its kind; and God saw that it was good. God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:21-22 NASB)

Thank you, Lord, for giving us so many birds to learn and write about. Thank you, readers, for every visit to this blog. I trust that the Lord will allow me the wisdom, strength, and curiosity about the Avian Wonders from His Hand to keep writing about them.

Stay Tuned!

Feeding White Ibises at Lake Morton, by Lee [Dr. J.J.S. Johnson, Baron, and Dan]

Ted and Red – By Emma Foster

House Finch male ©Glenn Bartley-Wichita StateU

Ted and Red

by Emma Foster

Once there were two finches named Ted and Red who were brothers. They lived in two trees that had been planted next to each other. Their trees were in a courtyard by a museum, which provided them with plenty of shade because Florida was almost always hot. Both birds had many friends in the courtyard.

The birds spent most of their time flying around the beaches and hectic streets searching for food or just having fun watching the different tourists around the coast. Many times, people on the dock would feed them breadcrumbs.

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes

But as summer came, the days grew hotter and longer, and there were many rainy days. Ted and Red stayed in their nests most of the time under the protection of their large shady trees. Their friends stayed in their little homes too: the fish remained comfortable in their pond, the two cranes who lived nearby nestled in their nests in the bushes, and the black snake stayed in his small hole in the grass.

House Finch Resting

One day when there wasn’t much rain, Red went out to search for some food. While he was gone, the clouds grew black, and Red knew he needed to hurry home. However, when he reached the courtyard, the rain poured down harder, and Red couldn’t see very well. He flew toward a light that he saw up ahead and accidentally flew into the museum, sliding across the slippery floor. Red knocked against a small object, sending it crashing to the ground. An alarm went off somewhere, and Red quickly flew back outside and into his nest, where he told Ted what had happened. The rain slowly lessened, and the alarm stopped. Several museum employees had to clean up the mess. Red felt terrible for breaking the vase, but Ted and their friends told him it was an accident and it wasn’t his fault.

House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) by Raymond Barlow

Just then, another alarm went off, and someone ran out of one of the entrances, holding a large vase. Ted, Red, and their friends thought fast. The fish quickly pointed to the machine that visitors inserted quarters into to obtain fish food to throw to the fish. Ted and Red flew against it and beat on it with their feet as hard as they could, while the two cranes beat their wings against it. The black snake followed behind the man in case he turned around, hoping that the man would be too scared to step over him. The fish food spilled across the walkway, and the man stealing the vase fell over, while the security guards ran after him and caught him. The security guards were afraid to step over the black snake too. Ted and Red flew back into their nests. Red felt much better afterwards, knowing that he made up for his earlier mistake.

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

Ted and Red spent the rest of their summer with their friends in the courtyard. From then on, whenever it rained Ted and Red were careful to stay in their comfortable nests. To their friends, they were now considered honorary security guards.


What an interesting story, Emma. I trust our readers enjoy it as much as I do. The teamwork of this mixture of critters reminds us of how, as Christians, we work together, even though we have different gifts. The seems to blend us together to accomplish His Will.

“Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone. To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.” (1 Corinthians 12:4-7 ESV)

See More of Emma’s Stories

The Locket in the Woods by Emma Foster

The Locket in the Woods

By Emma Foster

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Nora lived in the middle of a sunny wood beside a river that flowed under a small bridge. She spent most of her time building her nest, searching for food, and watching people walk across the bridge. Because Nora lived on a forest preserve, she didn’t have to worry about having to find a new home in case people chopped down her tree. Throughout the day, Nora watched groups of people walk along the many trails that were strewn along the forest preserve.

One day Nora was busy collecting some worms near the river as it rushed by. She looked up at the bridge to see a group of girls walking across and taking pictures of the trees. Nora hopped closer and watched them pass by, but when they left, she spotted something shiny in the bushes near her.

Nora rifled through the bushes and eventually found a small necklace with a heart-shaped locket on the end. Picking it up in her beak, Nora immediately started searching for the group of girls.

Locket

Unfortunately, Nora couldn’t find them anywhere. She followed the path, but it became a fork in the road, and she wasn’t sure which way she should go. It would be difficult to fly ahead because so many trees blocked her view. Nora finally decided to go left, hoping she would eventually find them.

Along the path she found an elderly couple who were biking along the trail and a couple of alligators sleeping in the water, but she didn’t find the girls. Nora decided to cut through the trees and head out to the other path.

After flying for a few minutes with the heavy locket in her beak, Nora rested on a tree in the middle of the woods. A small creek flowed near the tree she sat on. The sun shone down on Nora, making her very hot. Because of the heat and the weight, Nora accidentally dropped the locket into the small creek!

Nora raced after the locket, but the locket tumbled away down the river. Eventually, the bushes surrounding the creek became too thick for her to fly through them. Just as she was about to give up, however, a fish swam upstream with the locket in his mouth, and when Nora told him who the locket was for, he explained that he had seen the girls pass by on the other path. Nora thanked him then flew away with the locket.

When Nora finally caught up with the girls, she placed the locket on the path where they could easily see it. The girl who had lost it was glad to have found it, though she had no idea how it had gotten there. Nora, happy that she had accomplished her mission, flew back to her nest and took a well-deserved nap in the shade of her tree by the river.


“For He will deliver the needy when he cries, The poor also, and him who has no helper.” (Psalms 72:12 NKJV)

“…For your Father knows the things you have need of before you ask Him.” (Matthew 6:8b NKJV)

Lee’s Addition:

Since Emma didn’t indicate what type of bird the story is about, I am using my imagination. Besides, this bird wears a Necklace. :)

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush (Garrulax pectoralis) ©WikiC

Or, it could be a Raven. They like to collect things.

Raven holding key on chain ©Pixabay

Thanks, Emma, for another interesting tale about the birds. Now, we even have a talking fish. I love your stories. Keep on writing them for us.


More of Emma Foster’s Stories

Wordless Birds

Walter the Directionally Challenged Goose

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) by Ian

Walter the Directionally Challenged Goose by Emma Foster

Once there was a large Canadian goose named Walter. He lived in the north beside a little pond, and he went south for the winter. Sometimes he got lost because he didn’t know which way was North and which way was South. Walter was directionally challenged. On the times he did not get lost, he usually stayed by the beach where it was warm.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©USFWS

Is That South?

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) by Ian

Or Is That South?

Walter loved to stay by his little pond because it had just the right amount of grass, the water was always cool, and he always had plenty to eat. After successfully making his way back to the pond after flying south for the winter, Walter looked forward to relaxing in the warm spring sun. However, he noticed that it was a bit colder than he remembered it being at that time of year.

Walter started thinking. Maybe he had come back too early or maybe he had come back too late and it was already winter again. A few moments later it started to snow, and Walter began to shiver. He decided that he would just have to go back south for the rest of the winter, though he first had to figure out which way South was again. After thinking for another minute in the snow, Walter soared into the sky and began flying, nearly running into a few trees in the process.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) by Kent Nickel

After flying for what felt like hours, Walter thought that the air seemed a bit warmer. He didn’t know if he was South yet because he hadn’t found a beach or anything. Eventually, however, he found a large lake that seemed like the perfect place to spend the winter. Walter dove down toward the lake, skimming down to what he thought was water.

Bang! Walter flew straight into a giant garage door then tumbled down toward the water. The garage door was so close to the lake that Walter accidentally misdirected his flight by a few feet. He felt fine, but he decided to lie there for a few minutes before getting up. After a while, he fell asleep.

When Walter woke up, he realized he was in a small cage. He flailed about trying to get out. He was afraid because he didn’t know where he was, but he was able to calm down when a lady came in and gave him some food. Walter noticed a while later that his foot was bandaged.

Canadian Goose with injured foot

Walter stayed at the veterinary clinic for a few days while his foot healed. When he was able to walk a little better, he waddled around the clinic, where he met new people. The veterinarians at the clinic always said hello when Walter wandered into the front lobby, and he always had plenty to eat. He grew very comfortable at the clinic because he was never lonely.

A few days later, some of the vets took Walter to the lake where he had attempted to land earlier and set him free. For a while, he kept following them back to the truck because he didn’t want them to leave.

When the truck pulled away, Walter sat by the lake, sad. After a few minutes of thinking, he suddenly came up with a good idea. He flew up into the air, swooped down, and hit the same garage door again, though this time lightly enough so that he wouldn’t get injured as badly.

The veterinarians came back and took him to the clinic, even though Walter was perfectly fine this time. The vets at the clinic ultimately decided to let Walter stay since he liked it there so much, and Walter was very happy now because he didn’t have to worry about which way was South and which way was North.


Lee’s Addition:

Wow! Emma. Another great story. This is very interesting, especially because of all the birds that are migrating north now. I hope there aren’t any other “directionally challenged” birds facing Walter’s dilemma.

Maybe Walter should have prayed and read Psalm 143:8 before he travels.

“Cause me to hear thy lovingkindness in the morning; for in thee do I trust: cause me to know the way wherein I should walk [FLY], for I lift up my soul unto thee.” (Psalms 143:8 KJV)

See Emma’s Other Stories

 

Reginald’s Happy New Year by Emma Foster

Deer and Turkeys in Snow

Reginald’s Happy New Year by Emma Foster

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Turkeys in Snow ©Bryant Olsen Flickr

Reginald, Oliver, and the turkeys had sufficiently prepared for the winter, and now that they were safe in the fort they were able to celebrate Christmas in comfort. When Christmas was over, the turkeys spent their time building snow-turkeys and having snowball fights, knowing that they were safe from the hunters. Reginald watched over Oliver so that he didn’t get into any trouble, while he also made sure that the preparations for the New Year’s party were properly handled. On the day before New Year’s Day, however, everyone discovered that Oliver was missing.

Reginald and the turkeys searched for Oliver, and they eventually discovered him close by near a frozen river, where he was searching for berries. The turkeys stepped onto the river and realized that the ice was thick, and they all decided to skate across the ice. While they were skating, Reginald watched, making sure there wasn’t anyone nearby who could see them.

Baby Raccoon ©Flickr Chief Trent

Suddenly, a small creature emerged from the bushes, looking for food. It was a tiny baby racoon, who appeared to be lost. She was cold, tired, and hungry, and the turkeys decided to take her back to the fort so she could get warm and eat some food.

The baby raccoon said that her name was Ruby, and that she had lost her way yesterday and couldn’t find her mom. Reginald and the turkeys immediately set out to search for Ruby’s mom. Ruby pointed out the direction she had come from and where she had last seen her mom, and Reginald, Oliver, and a few other turkeys began marching that way.

Momma and Baby Raccoon ©Flickr Debbie

After about an hour, they heard a raccoon calling Ruby’s name. Ruby ran toward the voice excitedly, reuniting with her mother in the bushes. Ruby’s mother thanked the turkeys, and in turn the turkeys invited her and Ruby to their New Year’s party. Every year the turkeys celebrated the New Year by staying up all night and waiting for the first sunrise in the forest.

Reginald, Oliver, and the others returned to the fort. The sun was already beginning to set, and Reginald began to oversee the preparations for the New Year’s party. Reginald and the other turkeys made party hats by sticking leaves onto their army helmets, and Oliver made special hats for Ruby and her mom out of leaves all by himself.

Alaska Wild Berries ©WikiC

Throughout the night, the turkeys celebrated by skating on the ice and eating the berries that they had stored for the winter. Oliver placed some berries on a small piece of bark that served as a tray and waited on the turkeys in order to be kept out of trouble.

Later that night, the turkeys and the raccoons sat down and gazed at the stars just as the sun was beginning to peek out. When the sun rose on New Year’s Day, the turkeys and the raccoons celebrated, happy to know that they were safe from the hunters and that a new year had begun.


Lee’s Addition:

I am glad the turkeys befriended the young raccoon and helped find its mother. Not sure if the turkeys had this much trouble walking on the snow and ice as these turkeys:

It was nice of the turkeys to let the raccoons join in their New Year’s Eve Celebration.

We all trust you have a very Happy New Year in 2019.

“For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.” (Luke 19:10 KJV)

See more of Emma’s Stories:

Emma’s Stories

 

Reginald the Turkey Commander: The Corn Field

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) by Daves BirdingPix

Reginald the Turkey Commander: The Corn Field [Part 4]

by Emma Foster

Here are the Thanksgiving, Reginald, the Turkey Commander Tales

Reginald, Turkey Commander [2014]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander – Part 2 [2016]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm [2017]

And Now – Reginald, the Turkey Commander: The Corn Field [Part 4]

The turkeys were looking forward to another Thanksgiving at their fort as they made their way through the forest. Reginald had them march to the fort early that year just in case there were any hunters getting ready to hunt. The fort that the turkeys had built helped protect them from the hunters every Thanksgiving and Christmas. Reginald led the way through the forest until he came to the farmer’s old house they had visited a year before. This time, however, a large corn field was in their way.

Corn Maze © Pixabay

The turkeys inadvertently wandered into the field and became confused. Everything began to look the same. Reginald eventually made all of the turkeys stop, and he declared that they all needed to turn around and walk back to where they had come from in order to get out of the field. The turkeys turned around and followed Reginald as he led them out of the corn field. Suddenly, Reginald realized that Oliver was missing.

Shaking his head, Reginald led the turkeys back to the forest. As soon as he returned the turkeys to the forest, he set out to find Oliver.

Reginald searched the field, making sure that no one would hear him. He hoped that there were no hunters nearby in case anyone heard Oliver. Reginald spotted Oliver, who was wandering through the field, loudly gobbling and stomping through the stalks of corn in order to find the other turkeys.

Reginald dragged Oliver back toward the forest. Halfway there, a large scarecrow toppled over as Reginald and Oliver made their way through the corn field. Oliver bolted away, gobbling loudly as Reginald ran after him.

Scarecrow beginning to fall over ©foodista-com

Oliver continued running as fast as he could, terrified because he thought that the scarecrow was going to eat him. Eventually, Oliver tripped and landed head-first in a tumbled-over wheelbarrow. Shaking his head, Reginald resignedly picked up the wheelbarrow by the handles and carried Oliver back to where the other turkeys were hiding.

Wild Turkeys ©WikiC

Dumping Oliver in front of the other turkeys, Reginald proceeded to lead them through the forest. When they were close, one of the turkeys pointed out that they had less food than they expected. Some of the turkeys began to believe that there might not be enough for the winter.

Oliver had an idea. He remembered all of the corn he had seen in the field, and he told Reginald that they could take the corn to the fort with them.

Corn for the Winter ©rode diaz. unsplash.com

After taking the rest of the turkeys to the fort, Reginald and Oliver returned to the corn field, though Oliver was a little afraid that the scarecrow might jump out of the field and attack. They took a wheelbarrow full of corn and brought it back to the fort. The turkeys now had plenty of food to last them through the winter and Thanksgiving, which was now approaching. The farmer eventually harvested all of the corn in the field, but not before Reginald returned the wheelbarrow. The turkeys were safe in the fort, and once again the hunters would not have turkey for their Thanksgiving dinner.

***

Lee’s Addition:

Oliver should have remembered these verses:

“Be not afraid of sudden fear, neither of the desolation of the wicked, when it cometh. For the LORD shall be thy confidence, and shall keep thy foot from being taken.” (Proverbs 3:25-26 KJV)
“Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous! Do not tremble or be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.” (Joshua 1:9 NASB)

*

Emma, you continue to entertain us with your Turkey Commander, Reginald. It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving this year without another of these tales. Thanks for taking the time out from your studies to provide us with some wholesome adventures.

Thanksgiving – Reginald, the Turkey Commander Tales

Reginald, Turkey Commander [2014]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander – Part 2 [2016]

Reginald, The Turkey Commander: The Great Snowstorm [2017]

Emma’s Other Stories

A Family of Ducks by Emma Foster

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) By Dan'sPix

Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) By Dan’sPix

A Family of Ducks by Emma Foster

Once there was a small family of mallard ducks that lived on a large lake in the country. The mother duck had just had three ducklings, and as Autumn was nearing, the ducklings were learning how to swim.

The lake the family lived on was surrounded by a college campus. There were several buildings near the lake, but it was still quiet and peaceful, and the family was never bothered by anyone. Many of the students at the college had seen the ducks before, and they were happy to see that the mother and father duck now had ducklings.

Momma Mallard and 2 Babies at Lake Morton

The mother duck spent most of her days teaching her ducklings how to search for food in the shallow water. The ducklings loved being in the water because of how hot it was outside and how cool the water was, even though it was almost October. Eventually, however, the wind began to pick up and grow colder.

The ducks started to hear rumors of a storm that was coming. Several flocks of birds had flown in from farther north to avoid the storm. As the winds became worse, the family of ducks decided to stay under the bridge on the lake for a while with the other ducks and birds. Small waves began to form on the lake, which scared the ducklings. Most of the birds decided to hide in the trees, leaving the family of ducks alone under the bridge.

“I would hasten my escape from the windy storm and tempest.” (Psalms 55:8 KJV)

Mallard in Storm ©Flickr Steve Baker

Rain began pouring down into the lake. After a few minutes, the ducklings got used to the sound of the rain. Even though the storm wasn’t as bad as the ducks thought it would be, the weather was getting colder. Soon they would have to fly south for the winter because it was getting colder, but right now they couldn’t leave the lake.

The father duck peeked out from under the bridge and noticed that several students were rushing into a nearby building. The father duck waited for the rain to lighten before he, the mother duck, and the ducklings hurried up the bridge onto the sidewalk. The mother duck and the ducklings followed the father duck toward the front entrance to the building.

Duck at Door ©Flickr Ann Fisher

At one point a group of college students rushed to the door to get out of the rain. The family of ducks quickly followed behind them and stood in the building to dry off and get warm. Eventually the ducklings settled down to take a nap while the stormed died down. Several students watched the family of ducks and took some pictures until one of them opened the door to let them out when the storm passed. When they made it back outside, they all returned to the lake and settled back down on the grass. Eventually the ducklings grew to the point where they were able to fly south for the winter, and the entire family was safe and happy.

Mallards by Lee at Lake Morton


Another interesting bird tale from Emma. This story makes me wonder if there was a storm up where she is now attending college. Maybe she opened the door to let the family in. Makes me Wonder!! Nice story, Emma.

See More of Emma’s Stories

 

The Painting by Emma Foster

House Finch Nest ©J-TWO-O

The Painting

by Emma Foster

Once there was a small finch named Michael who lived on a farm in the Kansas countryside. The farm was small with only a few acres of land, but on the land was a large red barn in which Michael lived. The barn was very comfortable because it was cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Michael had built his nest in the rafters, and every morning when he woke up he would fly out of the barn to look for worms to eat.

One day while Michael was looking for food, a woman walked down the dirt road to the farm. She carried a large easel, a canvas, a stool, and some paint. When she reached the top of the hill near the tree where Michael was sitting she sat down on the small tool and began setting her other materials down.

House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) by Raymond Barlow

Michael perched on a branch and watched the woman begin painting on her canvas. She painted for what felt like hours, mixing the paints together to make different colors. The woman started with the bright green trees in the background then painted the coarse grass. Just as she was about to start painting the barn, the sky grew dark.

Michael watched until thunder rumbled in the distance. He quickly retreated to the barn as it started to rain. The woman quickly packed her things and carried off her painting so it wouldn’t become wet.

Red Barn Painting ©Pinterest

Fortunately, the rain stopped the next morning. Michael was relieved when the woman came back to continue her painting. He watched her paint again the entire afternoon until he could see that the barn was finished. The barn in the painting looked exactly like the barn in real life, and as the woman finished the painting she signed it in the bottom corner. As the woman was packing her belongings again the wind began to pick up.

Michael flew into the barn and waited with the rest of the farm animals as the wind blew harder. The wind refused to stop. It shook the barn walls furiously. All of the animals grew very afraid, and they realized that the barn was about to come down. Fortunately, the door swung open, and all of the animals galloped to a nearby field away from the tornado that was quickly approaching. Michael followed them, hiding in a hole in a tree to keep away from the wind.

Barn Destroyed by Tornado in Madison County

When the tornado finally passed and the sky cleared, Michael came out of the tree to see that the barn was completely destroyed by the tornado. Michael saw the barn tumbled down in a large pile of wood. Many of the animals slowly returned to the barn because it was still their home, but Michael decided that he should find a new home somewhere safe.

Michael flew away until he came to a small town. Finding the nearest tree, he promptly began building a small nest.

Mrs Finch

A few days passed after Michael finished building his nest. He woke up one morning to see a small group of people gathering inside a building near him. Michael looked inside the window to see a series of paintings hung up on a wall. One of the paintings was of the barn. He recognized the lady who had painted it standing next to it, and he heard the lady announce that she was going to use some of the money from her exhibit to help rebuild the barn and other buildings that had been torn down during the tornado.

Construction begins

When Michael flew back to the countryside a few days later, he saw the barn being rebuilt by several construction workers. Several weeks went by before the barn was completely rebuilt, but when it was done all of the animals were happy to live in the barn again. Michael happily made a new nest in the rafters of the new barn, which kept him and the animals cool in the summer and warm in the winter.


Do Not Be Anxious

Then He said to His disciples, “Therefore I say to you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat; nor about the body, what you will put on. Life is more than food, and the body is more than clothing. Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds? (Luke 12:22-24)

What a delightful story, Emma. I am glad the finch and the critters were safe, and eventually were able to have a new red barn to live in. When things unexpectedly happen, we should not become anxious. The lady came up with a way to replace her barn. Our Lord love to provide for us.

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The Raven and the Old Woman’s Garden – by Emma Foster

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Ray

The Raven and the Old Woman’s Garden by Emma Foster

And be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave you.” (Ephesians 4:32 NKJV)

Once there was a small raven that lived in a tree that stood in the middle of a large garden a woman had planted years ago. The woman had grown old now and spent most of the time in her small brick house. She did come out to devoutly water her plants so that her garden would be kept beautiful, but it was very difficult for her to pull out the weeds in the flower beds.

The raven would often watch the old woman from her nest in the tree as she watered her flowers. The raven enjoyed the garden the old woman had planted because so many of the flowers were different colors. During the day the raven would often fly through the flowers, and every day it seemed that there was a new and different flower for her to look at.

PAS-Corv Raven ©Pixabay

But one day the old woman didn’t come out of her house. The raven waited for her to come and water her flowers, but the old woman had become ill and couldn’t get out of her bed. Eventually, the raven saw from her nest a bright red and white vehicle with flashing lights come up the driveway. The raven watched some people in uniforms come into the house and take the old woman out on a bed and drive away.

A few days went by and the old woman did not come home. The raven began to worry because there was no one to water the flowers to keep the old woman’s garden looking beautiful. Several weeds had sprung up in the flower beds as well.

The raven suddenly had the idea to begin pulling out some of the weeds while the old woman was gone. She started in the flower bed closest to her nest and began pulling weeds out from the beds. While she was pulling out some of the weeds, the raven found a few seeds that the old woman hadn’t planted yet. The raven promptly decided to dig up a small place off to the side with her beak in order to plant them.

PAS-Corv Raven ©Pixabay

The raven continued to pull out more weeds for the rest of the day. Fortunately, because it wasn’t terribly hot outside the work was a little easier. Toward the end of the day, rain began to fall. The raven quickly retreated to her nest and watched from the protection of the tree as the rain watered the flowers to keep them from dying.

The rain stopped the next morning but continued occurring every now and then for the next couple of days. One morning the raven woke to see tiny buds had appeared out of the ground where she had planted the seeds. This made the raven very happy, but she became even happier when a car drove up into the driveway. The old woman had come back from the hospital but had to be taken into her house on a bed. The raven stayed in her nest, hoping that the old woman would be able to see the new flowers and her well-kept garden through her bedroom window.

Fortunately, the old woman was able to see her garden very clearly, but she was no longer able to come outside. The raven decided she would keep pulling out the weeds for her. It continued to rain nearly every day, which was good because the flowers had to be watered. But one day another loud flashing vehicle came back up to the house and took the old woman away, and the raven knew that she wasn’t coming back.

PAS-Corv Raven ©Pixabay

Eventually, several people came to the house and moved out all of the old woman’s things leaving the house bare and empty. To honor the old woman the raven kept pulling out weeds, hoping that she could keep the old woman’s garden as long as possible. But eventually it stopped raining and the flowers began to wilt. The raven began to fear that all of the old woman’s flowers would eventually die, until one day the raven woke up in her nest to see a family moving into the old woman’s house. The wife, who moved into the house with her husband and children, decided that she should continue tending the garden, which made the raven very happy. After a few weeks the garden and was healthy and beautiful again, and the flowers the raven had planted grew incredible large and tall.

My help comes from the LORD, Who made heaven and earth.” (Psalms 121:2 NKJV)


Lee’s Addition:

Another very entertaining and delightful story from Emma. Emma picks the birds in her tales and I supply the photos and scriptures. She may not be aware that the Ravens are very intelligent and can do some might surprising tasks. So, maybe this story is not really so “far-fetched”!

Enjoy her other tales at Emma’s Stories.

The Spring Snowstorm – by Emma Foster

American Robin by Dan

American Robin by Dan

The Spring Snowstorm

By Emma Foster

Spring had arrived, and many robins had flown back to the north after a long winter. One of the robins, named Charlotte, had flown north to lay her eggs. After many long days of flying, Charlotte eventually landed in a small tree in the backyard of a large brick house.

Flower buds began to peek out of the green grass. The sun shone through the tree branches, making Charlotte very warm while she built her nest. When she finished building her nest out of twigs and leaves, Charlotte settled down and laid her first egg.

Robin Egg in Nest ©Lorl L Stalterl

Charlotte sat patiently on her egg, leaving only to search for some worms to eat. One day when she came back with a worm, the wind picked up and it began to grow really cold. Charlotte sat back down on her egg to keep it warm.

The next morning Charlotte woke up to see snow on the ground. The snow covered all of the flowers, and the wind picked up even more. More snow began to pile up on the ground until Charlotte couldn’t see any grass. She knew that even though the storm was worsening she couldn’t find another place farther south to live because her egg had already been laid.

Spring Snow ©Warren Brown

The next morning, a large black dog hobbled into the backyard. He was very old, and the snow felt good on his old hips. The people who lived in the house called him Jerry, and many times the man who lived in the house had to carry Jerry inside. Charlotte noticed that Jerry didn’t want to come in on his own.

Jerry shed a lot of his black hair, which would fall and stick in the snow. Charlotte grew very cold, and was afraid that her egg would freeze. Suddenly she had an idea. Quickly swooping down, Charlotte picked up some of Jerry’s hair and stuffed it into her nest to keep her egg warm.

At one point Charlotte became very hungry again, but she knew it would be difficult to find any worms. She thought her egg would be all right surrounded by Jerry’s hair. After some digging in the cold snow, Charlotte was able to find one worm, and then she quickly returned to her egg, but when she came to her nest the egg had disappeared.

Charlotte looked everywhere for her blue egg, realizing it must have been blown out of the nest by the strong wind. She saw Jerry sitting in the snow, but she didn’t see her egg anywhere near the tree. Jerry began barking, and Charlotte realized that he had something hiding in his fur. Jerry had found the egg at the bottom of the tree, and had decided to keep it warm in his fur. Charlotte thanked him by tweeting and
carefully followed him as he put the egg in his mouth and got on his back legs to put the egg into the nest.

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) Hatching ©WikiC

The snow began to melt, and after a while, the flowers began to grow again. Charlotte’s egg hatched her chick, who eventually learned how to fly. That next spring, Charlotte came back to the same tree in the backyard to lay another egg. Thankfully, this year it didn’t


Lee’s Addition:

“A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.” (Proverbs 17:17 KJV)

Another great story from Emma. This time the friendly dog came to the rescue during trouble. It is always nice when others are able to assist us when problems arise. Thankfully, Charlotte was able to see her egg hatch and grow up.

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Morris The Finch In The Airport by Emma Foster

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

Morris The Finch In The Airport

By Emma Foster

Morris was a small house finch who lived in the sunny state of Florida. He had built a tiny nest for himself and lived in a small forest away from busy streets and people. The only road that was close by was a highway leading to a large building that was about half a mile away. Morris could barely see the building from the top of a high tree in which he lived. Every day Morris would watch incredibly large birds fly to and from the building, but he had no idea what they were. The building was in fact an airport, and the large birds were airplanes, but Morris did not know this.

Eventually, the weather became really hot as spring turned into summer. Morris grew tired of the heat and decided to find a new place to stay, at least for the summer. Morris flew out of his nest into the air and began to search for a cooler place to live.

He slowly reached the giant building in the hot sun. Looking inside, Morris noticed trees that seemed comfortable in the cool air. He tried to find a place to fly in, but every part of the building seemed to be made of windows. After trying to get inside for a long time Morris caught sight of a shuttle zipping inside the building. He followed the shuttle inside into the refreshingly cool air and instantly flew toward a tall tree that stood in the sunlight.

House Finch male ©Glenn Bartley-Wichita StateU

The tree gave Morris a broad view of a wide space were many people were eating. At first, he thought we would be able to handle the noisy people, but as the sun rose higher into the sky more people began to arrive and the building grew louder. Morris tried to ignore it, knowing when the air became colder he could fly back to his nest.

After a few minutes of trying to pull up some branches and twigs to make a new nest, Morris realized that the “tree” was fake, which made him slightly annoyed. Fortunately, he could still make his new home cozy because it was cool and comfortable sitting in the branches and watching the people.

Morris began to grow hungry and decided that he should find some food, though it didn’t look as if there were any worms around. He swooped down to where several people were eating and picked up a few dry crumbs from off the ground. After eating a few pieces Morris was still hungry so he decided to fly back outside to search for some worms.

It felt nice to be away from the noise, but as Morris flew back the way he came, he accidentally flew into the shuttle that carried passengers back and forth. He couldn’t get out before the doors closed. He flew up and down in a frenzy, searching for a way out. People around him screamed, terrified, until finally he was able to fly back outside.

House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) by Raymond Barlow

Instead of searching for worms Morris flew straight back to his nest and stayed there for the rest of the day even though it was still hot. That night Morris’s surroundings became cool and Morris was able to sleep peacefully despite the chaos of the morning.

The next morning Morris stayed in his nest, deciding that, despite the heat, he would rather be home than anywhere else. He remembered how quiet it was even with the big birds flying overhead, and decided that no matter how hot it became, he would never fly back into that building again


Lee’s Addition:

“Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” (Hebrews 13:5 KJV)

Emma has treated us to another interesting story. Not sure if a bird ever went looking for air conditioning, but it sounds logical. But, like us, we are better off being right where the Lord has placed us and with the provisions that have been provided by Him. Thanks again, Emma.

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