Many Thanks!

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©Brindusa Art

As many of the readers of this blog know, I had back surgery on August 3rd. Before I mention the results of the surgery, I want to give some thanks.

#1  I want to thank the Lord for His Watching over all that has happened during this. Thanks and praise to a wonderful Savior who cares so much about us.

“O give thanks unto the LORD; call upon his name: make known his deeds among the people.” (Psalms 105:1 KJV)

#2  I want to thank all of you for your prayers and well wishes. Also, for continuing to keep up with the blog. I cannot thank you enough for that. Thank you.

“For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open unto their prayers: ” (1 Peter 3:12a KJV)

American Oystercatchers (American Bird Conservancy photo)

#3  I want to especially thank Dr. James J. S. Johnson, who has been practically carrying on this blog, by providing almost an article a day. The articles have been very interesting and entertaining, as I detect by the remarks that have been posted. He posts occasional posts here, but Dr. Jim, as I call him, has written the last 11 posts. Thank you, Dr. Jim.

“We therefore ought to receive such, that we might be fellowhelpers to the truth.” (3 John 1:8 KJV)

My forty-five (45) minute surgery and an overnight stay in the hospital ended up being a two and a half hour surgery and five nights in the hospital. Then we I returned home on Tuesday (100 mile ride), I ended up in the Emergency Room the next day, here in town. It is taking me a while to get back up to strength.

I just found out yesterday why the longer surgery. While they were placing the wedge/cage by my vertebra, the vertebrae fractured due to soft bone. I started bleeding immediately and they had to stop to get that stopped. Then they had to figure out what to do with the vertebra. [How many times I have prayed for other’s surgeries that the Lord would guide their hands, and their thinking.] Thank you for praying.

As a result of that, I ended up with fluid in the sac by the lung. That had to be drained a few days after the surgery. I believe I am now on the mend. I am still weak and on medicine that has slowed me down from even thinking about blogging. See why I am so thankful for the last 11 articles by Dr. Johnson. Needless to say, I have not done any birdwatching. :)

SNOWY EGRET wading & shading (Mrs. Bursk Science Class blog)

Thanks again to all of you for your thoughts and prayers, and especially for the Lord who knew all about this before, during, and after the surgery, and never left me.

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If you missed the latest 11 articles by Dr. Jim:

Shake a Leg (or 2 or 3 or 4), Crab-Eater! – Aug 7

Crazy as a Coot! – Aug 8

Pinyon Jay, Grand Canyon’s Forester – Aug 9

Killdeer atop Killdeer: Appreciating Help from Others – Aug 10

Loggerhead Shrike: Converting Thorns into Meat-hooks – Aug 11

Oystercatchers Must be Gentiles – Aug 12

Eggs Taste Better if Salted – Aug 13

Penguin Eggs Tragedy – Aug 14

Shades of Snowies – Aug 15

Peregrine Falcon – Proactive Hunter – Aug 16

Egret Feathers Worth More Than Gold – Aug 17

Avian And Attributes – Shade

Shade Bush Warbler Drawing ©HBAlive

“The LORD is thy keeper: the LORD is thy shade upon thy right hand.” (Psalms 121:5 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Shade

SHADE, n. [L. scutum, a shield.]
1. Literally, the interception, cutting of or interruption of the rays of light; hence, the obscurity which is caused by such interception. Shad differs from shadow, as it implies no particular form or definite limit. whereas a shadow represents in form the object which intercepts the light. Hence when we say, let us resort to the shade of a tree, we have no reference to its form; but when we speak of measuring a pyramid or other object by its shadow, we have reference to its extent.
2. Darkness; obscurity; as the shades of night.
3. An obscure place, properly in a grove or close wood, which precludes the sun’s rays; an hence, a secluded retreat.
4. A screen; something that intercepts light or heat.
5. Protection; shelter.
6. In painting, the dark part of the picture.
7. Degree or gradation of light.
White, red, yellow, blue, with their several degrees, or shades and mixtures, as green, come only in by the eyes. Locke.
8. A shadow.


Shade Bush Warbler in Middle Drawing by John Anderton

Shade Bush Warbler (Horornis parens) or shade warbler (Horornis parens) is a species of bird in the family Cettiidae. It is found only in Solomon Islands, where it is endemic to the island of Makira (formerly San Cristobal Island). Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests and tropical moist montane forest above 600m. It feeds on insects in the undergrowth and on the ground.

There are really no photos available on line.

H B Alive Drawing

https://goo.gl/images/aiFdky


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Seaside

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (Dusky-extinct) ©WikiC

“The same day went Jesus out of the house, and sat by the sea side.” (Matthew 13:1 KJV)

“And he began again to teach by the sea side: and there was gathered unto him a great multitude, so that he entered into a ship, and sat in the sea; and the whole multitude was by the sea on the land.” (Mark 4:1 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Seaside

Sea-side
SE’A-SIDE, n. [sea and side.]

The land bordering on the sea; the country adjacent to the sea, or near it.


Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis) (Cape Sabel) ©WikiC

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritima) is a small American sparrow.

Adults have brownish upperparts with gray on the crown and nape, and a grayish-buff-colored breast with dark streaks; they have a dark face with gray cheeks, a white throat, and a short, pointed tail. Birds show a small yellow streak just above the eye.

Their breeding habitat is salt marshes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States from southern New Hampshire to southern Texas. The nest is an open cup usually built in the salt marsh on tidal reeds and spartina grasses. Females lay two to five eggs.

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimusl) ©WikiC

Northern birds most often migrate further south along the eastern coast of the United States. They forage on the ground or in marsh vegetation, sometimes probing in mud. They mainly eat insects, marine invertebrates and seeds. Their feeding areas are often some distance away from the areas they choose to nest.

The song is a raspy buzz that closely resembles a distant red-winged blackbird.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Happy 55th Anniversary

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and Dan

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and Dan

My most favorite photo of Dan!

Today is our 55th Wedding Anniversary. On July 26, 1963 we said “I Do” and we would say it again today. I am thankful to the Lord for our Salvation #1, but also for His gift of Dan to me #2.

In honor of our anniversary, here are some of the photos I have caught of Dan as we have been out an about. My most recent one was taken July 16th this year. We were at the beach and he was busy taking a photo of something.

Dan at Atlantic Ocean

The photos leading up to the Galah and Dan

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) trying to off juice.

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) trying to offer juice.

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) Hopping on the camera

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) Hopping on the camera

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and Dan

This is Birdwatching really close

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and Dan

Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and Dan

Boat-billed Heron over Dan’s Shoulder by Lee at LPZ

Dan photographing one of the Peacocks

Dan at Magnolia Plantation

Retired Gunners Mate Dan at Patriots Point

Dan at work

Dan and a Radjah Duck Brevard Zoo

Dan and a Radjah Duck Brevard Zoo

Galah and Dan Brevard Zoo by Lee

Galah and Dan Brevard Zoo by Lee

Dan at Work at Jacksonville Zoo

Dan at Work at Jacksonville Zoo

Dan

Dan and Black Skimmers

Dan and Black Skimmers

20090918 Circle B Dan at Work

Penguins being photographed by Dan

Dan searching for something to photo

Dan searching for something to photograph

Dan feeding a Black Swan at Lake Morton

Dan feeding a Black Swan at Lake Morton

Caught Dan on the Boardwalk trying to find a bird

Caught Dan on the Boardwalk trying to find a bird

“Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.” (Genesis 2:24 KJV)

Avian And Attributes – Screaming

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) ©WikiC

“And when the disciples saw Him walking on the sea, they were terrified and said, It is a ghost! And they screamed out with fright. But instantly He spoke to them, saying, Take courage! I AM! Stop being afraid!” (Matthew 14:26-27 AMP)

Jesus walked on the sea and they were terrified and might have screamed in fear.


Avian and Attributes – Scream

screamshoutyellshriekhoothollervociferationoutcrybellow, or raising one’s voice is a loud vocalization in which air is passed through the vocal folds with greater force than is used in regular or close-distance vocalization. This can be performed by any creature possessing lungs, including humans. There are slight differences in meaning among them; for example, “scream” and “shriek” generally refer to a higher-pitched, sharp sound, used by some birds and other animals, and a “hoot”, such as emitted by an owl, usually does not involve words.

A scream is often an instinctive or reflex action, with a strong emotional aspect, like fear, pain, surprise, joy, anger, etc. [This would describe what those in the boat most like did.]


Screaming Birds

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris) ©WikiC

Screaming Cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillarisis an obligate brood parasite belonging to the family Icteridae and is found in South America. It is also known commonly as the short billed cowbird.

Within South America, the screaming cowbird is found in north east and central Argentina, south east Bolivia, central Brazil and throughout Paraguay and Uruguay. Its natural habitat is pastureland where it forages amongst grazing animals such as cows, hence the name “cowbird”. Similar to other cowbirds, it forages predominantly on the ground, eating invertebrates that have been disturbed by grazing stock. The distribution of the screaming cowbird has increased significantly in recent decades due to habitat alteration caused by deforestation and by following its hosts into new areas.

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) by AGrosset

Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans) is a species of passerine bird in the family Cotingidae. It is found in humid forests in the Amazon and tropical parts of the Mata Atlântica in South America. It is adapting well to human settlement areas like gardens and parks.

Both sexes have dull grey plumage (wings and tail often somewhat browner) and a voice that is extraordinary loud. Males often gather in loose leks, where they sing to attract females.

The Cofan people of Ecuador call it the Pwe-pwe Yoh, which is a reference to its voice. Among the Ecuadorian Secoyas, the bird is known as the Kwow-kwee-yo. The sound is frequently used in movies, and also can be heard in the background of the popular game Angry Birds Rio.

[Wikipedia with editing]


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Take A Note

Secretarybird look straight at the lens – ©Pinterest – Rudi Luyten

You would like me to take a note?

Secretarybird -Notice the eyelashes – ©Pinterest

Looking down to start writing! [Notice the eyelashes]

Just because these are neat birds, decided to share these Secretarybird photos from Pinterest.

“Let not mercy and truth forsake you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart,” (Proverbs 3:3 NKJV)

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Secretary Bird – The Walker

Amazing Grace – Andre Rieu

Thought you might enjoy this video.

Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.

Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) by Nikhil Devasar

Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) by Nikhil Devasar

T’was Grace that taught my heart to fear.
And Grace, my fears relieved.
How precious did that Grace appear
The hour I first believed.

Injured Roseate Spoonbill at Flamingo Gardens by Lee

Through many dangers, toils and snares
I have already come;
‘Tis Grace that brought me safe thus far
and Grace will lead me home.

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

The Lord has promised good to me.
His word my hope secures.
He will my shield and portion be,
As long as life endures.

Yea, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease,
I shall possess within the veil,
A life of joy and peace.

Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis) ©WikiC

When we’ve been there ten thousand years
Bright shining as the sun.
We’ve no less days to sing God’s praise
Than when we’ve first begun.


Birds in Hymns

What will you do with Jesus?

 

Those Who Wish To Sing

I received an email recently to ask if I would allow permission to use this photo:

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

“Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him, talk ye of all his wondrous works.” (1 Chronicles 16:9 KJV)

Since this beautiful singing Vireo is on the internet as Creative Commons, they were free to use it.

Here is how a very artistic person painted it. Wow! I can hardly draw a stick man correctly!

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©Brindusa Art

Here is a little about her:

I am a Christian woman who greatly enjoys painting and sharing some of the beauty she sees around her. I am very grateful for God’s grace and for this gift of painting that He’s given me…

Please visit her site and see this lovely drawing and her other drawings.

Those Who Wish To Sing Always Find A Song

https://www.facebook.com/BrindusaArt/

http://brindusa-art.ro/wordpress/gallery/

 

Avian And Attributes – Scarlet-plus Birds

Scarlet-and-white Tanager (Chrysothlypis salmoni) ©WikiC

“They shall spread over them a scarlet cloth, …” (Numbers 4:8a NKJV)

“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” (Isaiah 1:18 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet II

Scarlet
This dye was obtained by the Egyptians from the shell-fish Carthamus tinctorius; and by the Hebrews from the Coccus ilicis, an insect which infests oak trees, called kermes by the Arabians.
This colour was early known (Gen_38:28). It was one of the colours of the ephod (Exo_28:6), the girdle (Exo_28:8), and the breastplate (Exo_28:15) of the high priest. It is also mentioned in various other connections (Jos_2:18; 2Sa_1:24; Lam_4:5; Nah_2:3). A scarlet robe was in mockery placed on our Lord (Mat_27:28; Luk_23:11). “Sins as scarlet” (Isa_1:18), i.e., as scarlet robes “glaring and habitual.” Scarlet and crimson were the firmest of dyes, and thus not easily washed out. [Easton’s Bible Dictionary]

Crimson, red, purple, and scarlet:
Used in the symbolisms of the tabernacle furnishings and priestly vestments and functions, as types and shadows of the atonement. ]Nave’s Topical Bible]


There are so many birds whose names begin with “Scarlet-“, that I decided to do a Part II. I want to show more of God’s Handiwork in the Avian Creations. These are by far not all of them.

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr vll.sandl

Scarlet-rumped Cacique (Cacicus microrhynchus) ©WikiC

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) ©Flickr Dave Curtis

The scarlet-throated Frigate bird, Galapagos islands, EcuadorFrom Pinterest

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) by ©Wiki

Scarlet-headed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum trochileum) by© Wiki

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird asleep by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird by Dan

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Dan


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Scarlet

Scarlet Myzomela (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Ian at Birdway

Scarlet Myzomela (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Ian at Birdway

“And they stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And they bowed the knee before Him and mocked Him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” (Matthew 27:28-29 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet

SC’ARLET, n.
1. A beautiful bright red color, brighter than crimson.
2. Cloth of a scarlet color.
All her household are clothed with scarlet. Prov 31.
SC’ARLET, a. of the color called scarlet; of a bright red color; as a scarlet cloth or thread; a scarlet lip.


Scarlet Birds

Scarlet Finch

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Flycatcher

Scarlet Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

Scarlet Ibis

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) ©whm.ac.uk

Scarlet Macaw

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Minivet

Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus speciosus) by Ian

Scarlet Myzomela

Scarlet Honeyeater or Myzolema (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Tom Tarrant

Scarlet Robin

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Tanager

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

She is not afraid of snow for her household, For all her household is clothed with scarlet. (Proverbs 31:21 NKJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Scale

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) by Michael Woodruff

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) by Michael Woodruff

Who has measured the waters in the hollow of His hand, Measured heaven with a span And calculated the dust of the earth in a measure? Weighed the mountains in scales And the hills in a balance? Who has directed the Spirit of the LORD, Or as His counselor has taught Him? With whom did He take counsel, and who instructed Him, And taught Him in the path of justice? Who taught Him knowledge, And showed Him the way of understanding?” (Isaiah 40:12-14 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scale

SCALE, n. [L. id. If the sense is to strip, it coincides with the Gr. to spoil.]
1. The dish of a balance; and hence, the balance itself, or whole instrument; as, to turn the scale.
Long time in even scale the battle hung.
3. The small shell or crust which composes a part of the covering of a fish; and hence, any thin layer or leaf exfoliated or separated; a thin lamin; as scales of iron or of bone.
4. A ladder; series of steps; means of ascending. [L. scala.]
5. The art of storming a place by mounting the wall on ladders; an escalade, or scalade.
6. A mathematical instrument of wood or metal, on which are marked line and figures for the purpose of measuring distances, extent or proportions; as a plain scale; a diagonal scale.
7. Regular gradation; a series rising by steps or degrees like those of a ladder. Thus we speak of the scale of being, in which man occupies a higher rank than brutes, and angels a higher rank than man.
8. Any instrument, figure or scheme, graduated for the purpose of measuring extent or proportions as a map drawn by a scale of half an inch to a league.
9. In music, a gamut; a diagram; or a series of lines and spaces rising one above another, on which notes are placed; or a scale consists of the regular gradations of sounds. A scale may be limited to an octave, called by the Greeks a tetrachord, or it may extend to the compass of any voice or instrument.
10. Any thing graduated or marked with degrees at equal distances.
SCALE, v.t.
1. To climb, as by a ladder; to ascend by steps; and applied to the walls of a fortified place, to mount in assault or storm.
Oft have I scal’d the craggy oak.
2. [from scale, a balance.] To measure; to compare; to weight.
3. [from scale, the covering of a fish.] to strip or clear of scales; as, to scale a fish.
4. To take off in thin lamins or scales.
5. To pare off a surface.
If all the mountains were scaled, and the earth made even –
[Edited]


Scale- Birds

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus)

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) ©WikiC

The Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant (Lophotriccus pileatus) is a species of bird in the family Tyrannidae. It was given its name for the small crown-like ring of feathers on the top of its head. It raises these feathers both to attract a mate and to seem larger when frightened.

It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Venezuela, and possibly Honduras. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. Not much is known about the habits or breeding of the bird.

Scale-feathered Malkoha

Scale-feathered Malkoha (Dasylophus cumingi) ©WikiC

Scale-throated Earthcreeper

The Scale-feathered Malkoha (Dasylophus cumingi) is a species of cuckoo in the family Cuculidae. It is endemic to the northern Philippines.

Scale-throated Earthcreeper (Upucerthia dumetaria) ©WikiC

Scale-throated Hermit

The Scale-throated Earthcreeper (Upucerthia dumetaria) is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in Argentina and the Altiplano; it winters in the Pampas and east of Córdoba. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. They build their nests at the end of tunnels measuring between one and two meters. These tunnels are almost exclusively based on slopes; however, rock crevices are occasionally used. It formerly included the Patagonian forest earthcreeper (U. saturatior) as a subspecies.

Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) by Dario Sanches

The Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) is a species in the hummingbird family, Trochilidae.

It is found in the Atlantic forest in north-eastern Argentina, south-eastern Brazil, and eastern Paraguay. The supposed “black-billed hermit”, described as P. nigrirostris, has turned out to be a mutant P. eurynome with an all-black bill.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Flying – By Creation Moments

Falcon flying

“But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” Isaiah 40:31

Flying – By Creation Moments

The concept of flying has inspired so much in the way of art – visual, musical, and literary. “One day, I’ll fly away,” sang Randy Crawford, evoking a view of flying as a metaphor for freedom. Other songs have taken up the same theme. “You are the wind beneath my wings”. “Love lift us up where we belong”. “Come fly with me, come fly, let’s fly away”.

The Bible also uses this metaphor. “They who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.” (Isaiah 40:31). We instinctively know that Isaiah is referring to a sense of strength, produced by the power of the Lord, by waiting on Him.

Being free from the clutches of sin is like being free of gravity! And this freedom evokes images of eagles soaring without even flapping their wings as they ride the thermal air currents.

An evolutionist has to believe that the ability to fly has evolved. Not only that, but they must believe that this ability has evolved at least three times, and maybe four – birds, bats, flying insects, and pteradactyls being the four groups of animals which fly.

In contrast, the Bible tells us that flight was a deliberate design of God. Flying creatures were created on Day Five of the creation week. God designed flight, and the Bible says that He pronounced it “good”.

Prayer:
Lord, it is my prayer that I might soar on wings like eagles. Praise You that it is You who provide the freedom for us to do this. Amen.
Notes:
Ref: The Miracle of Flight, accessed 11/27/2017. Image: Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 Unported.
Used with permission ©Creation Moments 2018
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