Tickle Me Tuesday – Hummingbirds

Allen's Hummingbird (Selasphorus sasin) ©WikiC

Allen’s Hummingbird (Selasphorus sasin) ©WikiC

The first video is of the various places that Hummingbirds place their nest:

“Where the birds make their nests:…” (Psalms 104:17a KJV)

Here is another video that shows a mother tending to two youngsters. More enjoyable than funny. Just thought I would share it also.

Hummingbirds are favorites of mine. Unfortunately, I have not been able to get to visit our yard here, let alone make a nest.

“And Jesus saith unto him, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.” (Matthew 8:20 KJV)

See other Tickle Me Tuesdays

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Laughing Kookaburras

2015’s Tickle Me Tuesday’s

Sharing The Gospel

Artistic Birds – Lady Amherst’s Pheasant

Lady Amherst's Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae)

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae)

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. Also He has put eternity in their hearts, except that no one can find out the work that God does from beginning to end. I know that nothing is better for them than to rejoice, and to do good in their lives,” Ecclesiastes 3:11-12 [NKJV]

The Lady Amherst’s Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) is a bird of the  Galliformes Order and the family Phasianidae. The genus name is from Ancient Greek khrusolophos, “with golden crest”. The English name and amherstiae commemorates Sarah Amherst, wife of William Pitt Amherst, Governor General of Bengal, who was responsible for sending the first specimen of the bird to London in 1828.

7. Lady Amherst's Pheasant

7. Lady Amherst’s Pheasant

The species is native to southwestern China and far northern Myanmar, but has been introduced elsewhere. Previously, a self-supporting feral population was established in England, the stronghold of which was in West Bedfordshire. Lady Amherst first introduced the ornamental pheasant on her estates, near the Duke of Bedford’s Woburn Abbey, where the birds were also shot for game and interbred. However since late 2015 the species has been believed to be extirpated in Great Britain with no confirmed sightings since March 2015.

The adult male is 100–120 cm (23 in.) in length, its tail accounting for 80 cm of the total length. It is unmistakable with its nuchal cape white black, with a red crest. The long grey tail and rump is red, blue, dark green, white and yellow plumage. The “cape” can be raised in display. This species is closely related to the golden pheasant (C. pictus), but has a yellow eye, blue-green bare skin around it. The bill is horn-coloured and they had blue-gray legs.

Lady Amherst's Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) Female ©WikiC

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) Female ©WikiC

The female is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage all over, similar to that of the female common pheasant (P. colchicus) but with finer barring. She is very like the female golden pheasant, but has a darker head and cleaner underparts than the hen of that species.

Despite the male’s showy appearance, these birds are very difficult to see in their natural habitat, which is dense, dark forests with thick undergrowth. Consequently, little is known of their behaviour in the wild.

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) Zoo Miami by Lee

They feed on the ground on grain, leaves and invertebrates, but roost in trees at night. Whilst they can fly, they prefer to run, but if startled they can suddenly burst upwards at great speed, with a distinctive wing sound. The male has a gruff call in the breeding season. [Wikipedia with editing]

Wow! What another beautiful artistic Avian Wonder from our Lord.

GALLIFORMES – Fowl, Quail, Guans, Currasows, Megapodes

Phasianidae – Pheasants & Allies

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Wordless Birds

Our Missionaries – African Pied Wagtail

Brubru (Nilaus afer) ©Wiki My first guess

Years ago there were a few posts that featured some of the birds our missionaries see in their various locations. It was 2009 and 2010 actually. I even made a page to hold the different articles. What Our Missionaries See. It is located at the end of the Birds of the Bible list.

Recently, the thought of reviving that series has crossed my mind. Today, one of our Pastors, who moved on to a new position, has challenged me to ID a bird he keeps seeing in Uganda. Pastor Peter Brock is also a good friend who enjoys birdwatching. After three emails back and forth, and some photos, our mystery bird has been identified. At first I thought it was a Brubru, seen above.

Mystery Bird 1 by Pastor Pete

Mystery Bird 2 by Pastor Pete

He sent those two photos, then he got a better shot and sent this one.

Mystery Bird 3 by Pastor Pete

After this third photo, the search was back on to correct my first idea. How would you go about figuring out what bird he is seeing?

Back to Google, this was my search; “black and white bird with white brow in uganda” This search brought up some black and white birds, and the very first photo was:

African Pied Wagtail from Kenya http://www.ngkenya.com/fauna/birds.html

Aha!! That looks like his mystery bird. When I clicked that link, and looked down through those birds, the next link led me to a positive ID on this bird.

“Common bird of parks, lawns, pastures and farmland. Pumps long tail up and down as it forages along ground.” The link with that photo brought me to this beautiful African Pied Wagtail:

African Pied Wagtail from http://www.ngkenya.com

“Sharp black-and-white plumage and a long bobbing tail make this common bird farms and urban gardens easily recognizable.” [It is now that I figured it out.]

You can find out more about this beautiful avian wonder at African Pied Wagtail, Wikipedia, Kenya Natural History Guide, and HBAlive

We sense from Scripture, that challenging our minds is a good thing.

“And I set my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all that is done under heaven; this burdensome task God has given to the sons of man, by which they may be exercised.” (Ecclesiastes 1:13 NKJV)

I directed my mind to know, to investigate and to seek wisdom and an explanation,…” (Ecclesiastes 7:25a NASB)

Pastor Peter Brock now works with Reaching and Teaching International Ministries .

 

 

Artistic Birds – Galliformes Order – Monal

1. Himalayan Monal

Himalayan Monal (Lophophorus impejanus)

In the Artistic Birds – Galliformes Order I, you were introduced to some of the birds the Bare-faced Curassow, Crested Guineafowl, Gambel’s Quail, and the beautifully designed Golden Pheasant.

The Himalayan Monal definitely can be described by this verse, relating to the design of the tabernacle.

“He has filled them with skill to do all manner of work of the engraver and the designer and the tapestry maker, in blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine linen, and of the weaver—those who do every work and those who design artistic works.” (Exodus 35:35 NKJV) [emphasis added]

If you missed the introduction, we are referring to the Master Designer, the Lord Jesus Christ.

Himalayan Monal (Lophophorus impejanus) by Nikhil

“The Himalayan monal (Lophophorus impejanus), also known as the Impeyan monal and Impeyan pheasant, is a bird in the pheasant family, Phasianidae. It is the national bird of Nepal, where it is known as the danphe, and state bird of Uttarakhand, India, where it is known as the monal. It was also the state bird of Himachal Pradesh until 2007. The scientific name commemorates Lady Mary Impey, the wife of the British chief justice of Bengal Sir Elijah Impey.

Himalayan Monal (Lophophorus impejanus) ©WikiC

It is a relatively large-sized pheasant. The bird is about 70 centimetres long. The male weighs up to 2380 grams and the female 2150. The adult male has multi coloured plumage throughout, while the female, as in other pheasants, is more subdued in colour. Notable features in the male include a long, metallic green crest, coppery feathers on the back and neck, and a prominent white rump that is most visible when the bird is in flight. The tail feathers of the male are uniformly rufous, becoming darker towards the tips, whereas the lower tail coverts of females are white, barred with black and red.

Himalayan Monal (Lophophorus impejanus) Female ©WikiC

The female has a prominent white patch on the throat and a white strip on the tail. The first-year male and the juvenile resemble the female, but the first-year male is larger and the juvenile is less distinctly marked.

Himalayan Monal (Lophophorus impejanus) ©Arthur Grosset

The Himalayan monal’s native range extends from Afghanistan and Pakistan through the Himalayas in India, Nepal, southern Tibet, and Bhutan.[1] In Pakistan, it is most common in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and has also been recorded in Kaghan, Palas Valley, and Azad Kashmir.[3] It lives in upper temperate oak-conifer forests interspersed with open grassy slopes, cliffs and alpine meadows between 2400 and 4500 meters, where it is most common between 2700 and 3700 meters. It descends to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) in the winter. It tolerates snow and digs through it to obtain plant roots and invertebrate prey.

GALLIFORMES – Fowl, Quail, Guans, Currasows, Megapodes

Phasianidae – Pheasants & Allies

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Wordless Birds

Artistic Birds – Galliformes Order I

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) WikiC

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) WikiC

As mentioned, these “Artistic Birds” will be presented in “sort of” the Taxonomic Order. The first few orders do not have any particularly “artistic” birds. They were mostly created to blend in with their environment. Most likely for protection. These first Orders are:

But when we arrive at the Galliformes Order, the Creator’s Artistically Colorful Hand appears on many of these birds. There are five families in this Order.

[Clicking on these links have many photos of those in the families. Scientific and English links are identical.]

Megapodiidae ~~~ (English) – Megapodes – Not very colorful
(Scientific) –Cracidae ~~~ (English) – Chachalacas, Curassows & Guans – This group has fancy “hairdos” and throat pouches

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) Female ©WikiC

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) ©BirdPhotos

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) ©BirdPhotos

(Scientific) – Numididae ~~~ (English) – Guineafowl – Crested Guineafowl is the only one of note.

Crested Guineafowl (Guttera pucherani) ©WikiC

(Scientific) – Odontophoridae ~~~ (English) – New World Quail – Quails have artistic markings that help them blend in for protection. My favorite that shows an Artistic design is the Gambel’s Quail with this “painted” lines and that fancy feather.

Gambel's Quail (Callipepla gambelii) ©WikiC

Gambel’s Quail (Callipepla gambelii) ©WikiC

(Scientific) – Phasianidae ~~~ (English) – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies – This family is loaded with Artistic Birds, so, today here is just one of the beauties. More posts will present more of the Lord’s Hand at work in the design of these birds. What a Creator!

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) Male ©© NotMicroButSoft

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) Male ©© NotMicroButSoft

It is native to forests in mountainous areas of western China, but feral populations have been established in the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, the Falkland Islands, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand.[3] In England they may be found in East Anglia in the dense forest landscape of the Breckland as well as Tresco on the Isles of Scilly.

Golden Pheasant Magnolia Plantation by Lee Charleston 2014

The adult male is 90–105 cm (35–41 in) in length, its tail accounting for two-thirds of the total length. It is unmistakable with its golden crest and rump and bright red body. The deep orange “cape” can be spread in display, appearing as an alternating black and orange fan that covers all of the face except its bright yellow eye with a pinpoint black pupil.

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) ©WikiC

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) ©WikiC

to design artistic works, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of artistic workmanship.” (Exodus 35:32-33 NKJV) [These were workers that were given special gifts to work on the tabernacle. Wonder if any of them had seen “artistic birds” to help them visualize what their works?]

Click this link to see a full photo of this bird. When it comes up, click it again. Wow!

  Full Length Photo


GALLIFORMES – Fowl, Quail, Guans, Currasows, Megapodes

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Artistic Birds – Frigatebirds

Wordless Birds

Artistic Birds – Frigatebirds

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Bezalel was given much wisdom and understanding to help in the construction of the Tabernacle. He then was given the ability to train others to help. They were given abilities to help do the work also. Today, as Christians, we each are given talents and gifts to help in building the Church. Are we using those abilities?

“and He has filled him [Bezalel] with the Spirit of God, in wisdom and understanding, in knowledge and all manner of workmanship, to design artistic works, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of artistic workmanship. “And He has put in his heart the ability to teach, in him and Aholiab the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with skill to do all manner of work of the engraver and the designer and the tapestry maker, in blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine linen, and of the weaver—those who do every work and those who design artistic works.” (Exodus 35:31-35 NKJV)

When the Lord created the birds, He especially used His Ultimate Creative Ability. As mentioned in the Introduction to this new series, Artistic Work In Birds, we will looking for those birds which seem to have been painted/designed with great markings and other characteristics.

Frigatebirds

Frigatebirds (also listed as “frigate bird”, “frigate-bird”, “frigate”, “frigate-petrel”) are a family of seabirds called Fregatidae which are found across all tropical and subtropical oceans. The five extant species are classified in a single genus, Fregata. All have predominantly black plumage, long, deeply forked tails and long hooked bills. Females have white underbellies and males have a distinctive red gular pouch, which they inflate during the breeding season to attract females. Their wings are long and pointed and can span up to 2.3 metres (7.5 ft), the largest wing area to body weight ratio of any bird.

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Able to soar for weeks on wind currents, frigatebirds spend most of the day in flight hunting for food, and roost on trees or cliffs at night. Their main prey are fish and squid, caught when chased to the water surface by large predators such as tuna.

Now that is design and engineering! The Great and Magnificent Frigatebirds have a distinctive red gular pouch, and it had a few paint strokes added to make it more attractive. [I guess]

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male Displaying ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Starting off with a simple bird, also, will be working way through the birds sort of in Taxonomic order.

Frigatebirds – Wikipedia

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Wages or a Gift

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

MaCaw by Dan at Gatorland

MaCaw by Dan at Gatorland

While reading through the New King James Bible in Exodus, the word “Artistic” works and “Artist” designs appears thirteen times. In the King James Version, this word is translated “Cunning” or “Curious.” Other versions; NASB uses “skillful”and “inventive”; the ESV uses “skillfully or skilled” “artistic”; the AMP uses “skillfully or skilled” and “artistic designs.”

The verses are all referring to preparing the tabernacle. Many people gave supplies that were needed, but God gave those that were actually putting it together, special wisdom and gifts/talent to accomplish the different task.

“And God has put in Bezalel’s heart that he may teach, both he and Aholiab son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with wisdom of heart and ability to do all manner of craftsmanship, of the engraver, of the skillful workman, of the embroiderer in blue, purple, and scarlet [stuff] and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of those who do or design any skilled work.” (Exodus 35:34-35 AMP)

As I read these passages:

Exodus 28:25, 31:4, 35:32, 35:33, 35:35, 36:8, 36:35, 39:3, 39:8, 39:27,

the birds and their fantastic designs came to mind. How many birds that I have seen personally, or photos of that look like they were artistically designed? Many of them fascinate me. It looks like the Lord, in His Creation of these avian wonders, used a paintbrush as the colors and designs were added to the birds. I am sure a few also come to your memory also.

My first thought was of the Blue Jays that come to our yard frequently.

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) ©Flickr Stan Lupo

That is just a start. I would consider the Blue Jay “artistically designed. Wouldn’t You? How about that MaCaw?

Stay Tuned as a search through the Birds of the World seeks to see “Artistically” designed birds.

Birds of the World

Wordless Birds

Eleventh Anniversary – What Next?

Snowy Egret Viera Wetlands – 12-31-2018 by Lee

The last three post, which were about this Eleventh Anniversary of Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus, are listed below. But what about the future of this adventure with Birds, the Bible, and Birdwatching? Do I stop, slow-down, or continue? All three of those choices have crossed my mind.

What would you, my readers, want me to do? What do I want to do? What would the Lord have me do?

Could I be like Paul and say, “And having this confidence, I know that I shall abide and continue with you all for your furtherance and joy of faith;” (Philippians 1:25 KJV)?

Or like Paul told Timothy, “But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them;”(2 Timothy 3:14 KJV)?

Not sure how much joy or learning has been imparted, but the effort has been there. I trust the past 11 years has had useful information and been a blessing to most of you. I have thoroughly enjoyed writing these articles, along with my other writers, and been blessed by the Lord for these efforts.

Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) at South Lake Howard Nature Park by Lee

Because of the issues with the last two back surgeries, my birdwatching adventures have slowed way down. That is part of the dilemma. The use of a walker or cane prevents some adventures. There are always zoos and places with boardwalks. So, hopefully the Lord still has some of His birds for me to watch and maybe get their photos. Doing articles about those listed below are much easier because they only require an “at home adventure.” :)

Oh! What Do I Do?  – Flamingo at Gatorland – 3-8-16 by Lee

Here are my questions to readers:

Do you mind if the “out in the field” birdwatching isn’t written about as much?

Would you like to see some of the original “Birds of the Bible” articles updated? [That can be handled easily.]

Which series would you like to see more articles about?

It would be nice and very helpful if you could leave some remarks. Maybe you even have an idea for a new series.

Please leave a comment if you can. If you are not a blogger, you can leave remarks at Lee@leesbird.com

Dr Jim (JJSJ) and Golden Eagle Feeding – Lake Morton by Lee

Previous Articles about this Eleventh Anniversary:

 

 

I.C.R.’s Days of Praise – Instantaneous Creation

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

I.C.R.’s Days of Praise – Instantaneous Creation

BY HENRY M. MORRIS, PH.D. | THURSDAY, MAY 03, 2018

“Let them praise the name of the LORD: for he commanded, and they were created.” (Psalm 148:5)

The concept of “fiat creation” is opposed by evolutionists and all who believe in the so-called geologic ages. Nevertheless, this is clearly the teaching of the Word of God, and God was there! Psalm 148 exhorts all the stars to praise the Lord, and then notes that, as soon as God spoke, they “were created.” Similarly, “by the word of the LORD were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth. . . . For he spake, and it was done; he commanded, and it stood fast” (Psalm 33:6, 9).

It is worth noting that whenever the verbs “create” and “make” are used in reference to God’s work of creation, they are never in the present tense. God is not now creating or making stars or animals or people as theistic evolution requires; at the end of the six-day creation period, in fact, God “rested from all his work which God created and made” (Genesis 2:3).

Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) Reinier Munguia

Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) Reinier Munguia

This is the teaching of the New Testament also. “The worlds [that is, the space/time cosmos, the ‘aeons’] were framed [not ‘are being framed’] by the word of God [not ‘by processes of stellar evolution’], so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear [not ‘out of pre-existing materials,’ as required by theories of chemical and cosmic evolution]” (Hebrews 11:3).

The Lord Jesus Christ Himself confirmed the doctrine of recent creation.

“From the beginning of the creation [not, that is, four billion years after the solar system evolved] God made them [Adam and Eve] male and female” (Mark 10:6).

Thus, those who believe in the geologic ages are rejecting both the biblical record and the authority of Jesus Christ in order to attain ephemeral acceptance by the ungodly. This is a poor exchange! HMM


What a great devotional because it expresses exactly what I believe about God’s Creation. God created our marvellous Avian Wonders which did not evolve from dinosaurs. They were created the day after the birds.

Days of Praise Devotionals

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen – Part I

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

There is a Page on this blog called Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen. It has needed to be updated, plus with all the broken links that I have been repairing, this is going to be the main emphasis for a while. The Avian and Attributes articles will continue to be produced also. As the links are fixed and updated, the Parts will grow longer.

There is a reason for using the Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen, because it has the Families of the Birds of the World in Taxonomic order. As I find the birds we have seen, I will also be fixing the broken links on the Family pages. [So far, almost 1/3 to 1/2 of the family member page has broken links. It is becoming more obvious that the site WAS hacked.] This helps to fix each Family page in order, without jumping around.

Most of the page is self-explanatory. This is a list of ALL birds we, Dan and I, have SEEN. With photos where possible, because we did not take a picture of EVERY bird. Whether out in the wild, or in a zoo or similar place, THEY COUNT as far as this list is concerned. [Most bird counts are only for wild/free birds.]

**************** Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen ************

White-eared Catbird (Ailuroedus buccoides) Houston Zoo by Lee

“And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.” (Genesis 2:3 KJV)

Under Construction – Still Finding Our Pictures to put with the Birds

[The best photos are at Dan’s Photo Site USNDANSPIX or just Dan’s Pix]

I’ve decided to not only include wild birds we have seen, but also birds we have seen in zoos also. Most lists don’t let you include them, but still, I have seen them in person, so, they count to me. Going to put these in Taxonomic order and use the IOC names.

The ones we have seen in the wild (264 species[edit]) have a “*”  and the ones we saw at zoos are marked with the following code. A name in parenthesis is what they call them. The two numbers in brackets [ total birds in family –  our count ]

Zoo Abbreviations (BZ=Brevard Zoo, CZ=Cincinnati Zoo, HZ=Houston Zoo, LPZ=Lowry Park Zoo, JZ=Jacksonville Zoo, NA=National Aviary, NZ=National Zoo, MZ=Memphis Zoo, PB=Palm Beach Zoo, RZ=Riverbanks Zoo (SC), SAZ=San Antonio Zoo, SDZ=San Diego Zoo, TBF=Titusville Birding Festival, WA=Wings of Asia (at MetroZoo before Hurricane Andrew and new Wings of Asia at Zoo Miami or ZM=Zoo Miami),

Names with an extra name in (parenthesis) are what the Zoos calls them. Listed by Families:

Ostriches – Struthionidae [2-2]
Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) MZ RZ
Somali Ostrich (Struthio molybdophanes) SDZ

Rheas – Rheidae [2-0 ]

Kiwis – Apterygidae [5-0]

Cassowaries, Emus – Casuariidae [4- ]
Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) BZ by Lee HZ
Emu Photos (Dromaius novaehollandiae) LPZ by Lee, BZ by Dan

Tinamous – Tinamidae [47-1]
Elegant Crested Tinamou (Eudromia elegans) ZM by Dan, by Lee,  HZ by Lee

Screamers – Anhimidae [3-1]

Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) San Diego Zoo by Lee

Magpie Goose – Anseranatidae [1-1]

Magpie Goose (Anseranas semipalmata) by Lee LPZ

Magpie Goose (Anseranas semipalmata) by Lee Lowry Park Zoo

************ To Be Continued ***********

Ducks, Geese and Swans – Anatidae [173- ]

Megapodes (Family Megapodiidae)  [21- ]
Australian Brushturkey (Alectura lathami) NA
Wattled Brushturkey (Aepypodius arfakianus) WA

To see the rest of this page, Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen

The Snowy “Want-to-Be” at Gatorland

Great Egrets and a Snowy Egret at Gatorland

When we were at Gatorland a few weeks ago, I noticed two Great Egrets on the walkway rail. I zoomed in to get a better view of them. There were actually two Great Egrets and a Snowy Egret in between them.

Great Egrets and a Snowy Egret at Gatorland zoomed

By the time we arrived at their location, one of the Great Egrets had flown off to check something out. There sat the Great Egret and the Snowy Egret side-by-side. I thought maybe that Snowy was thinking he would like to be tall like this friendly Great Egret.

A Great Egret “Want to Be”

The Great Egret is tall and nice looking with his long yellow beak and black feet.

Great Egret up Close at Gatorland by Lee

The Snowy though shorter has a nice black beak and cool yellow feet.

Snowy Egret up close at Gatorland by Lee

Knowing that the Lord created both of these fine birds, He made them just the way He wanted them. One tall, one short. One with a black beak and the other with a yellow one. And He may have given height to the Great Egret, but He gave the shorter Snowy those neat yellow feet.

Do we get envious and desire what someone else has? Maybe taller, more talented, sing better, etc? God has made us just the way He wants us, and has provided us with different bodies, talents, abilities, and directions to serve Him. Are we content with what He has given us?

“Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.” (Philippians 4:11 KJV)

“And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.” (1 Timothy 6:8 KJV)

“Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” (Hebrews 13:5 KJV)

I am sure are Snowy Egret was not the least bit jealous or envious.

Snowy Egret up close at Gatorland by Lee


More posts from Gatorland:

Gatorland, FL

Gatorland’s Greedy Snowy Egret

Gatorland Roseate Spoonbills

Gatorland Grackle

*

 

Harriet, The Osprey

Osprey Harriet’s transmitter is safely attached ©Craig Koppie USFWS

James J. S. Johnson, [Dr. Jim, to me] sent a very interesting article to share with you all. It is about an Osprey, named Harriet, who lives up in the Baltimore, Maryland [USA] area. Recently they, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, mounted a satellite tracker on her. Wait, here is the article:

“…On July 10, Harriet was captured and fitted with a satellite transmitter to track her movements. The transmitter, which has a visible antenna, was comfortably and securely attached by a harness onto Harriet’s back.

Like so many other birds we see around the Chesapeake in spring and summer, ospreys begin to migrate to South America in September for the winter. Most of our Chesapeake osprey spend the colder months there, ranging from Venezuela, to as far south as Paraguay and even Argentina.”

Continue to the article, Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek, by CLICKING HERE

Harriot’s trip so far – Satelite ©USFWS


“Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south? Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high?” (Job 39:26-27 KJV)

We have also written articles along this line about tracking our migrating avian wonders from the Lord: