I.O.C. Version 8.1 Update Completed

Yellow-Breasted Chat (Icteria virens) USGS

Yellow-Breasted Chat (Icteria virens) USGS

“The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the island, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest.” (Isaiah 34:14 KJV)

The I.O.C. Version 8.1 Update is finally completed on this blog. After issues with my Excel spreadsheet, all the pages are now current. It must have been some feathers from that family of birds they through up in the air. :) See: Hang On To Your Hat – I.O.C. 8.1 Update Underway the Thamnophilidae – Antbirds Family).

There actually was so many changes that I am only going to mention some of them. Here are the new families. The birds were taken from various families and given new places to dwell. Listed are the families at the end of the Passeriformes Order. Some were divided and others had avian wonders pulled from families and placed in these new ones. DNA research is the reason for Most of this shuffling.

Western Chat-Tanager (Calyptophilus tertius) ©Flickr Rafy Rodriguez

Emberizidae – Buntings – Split of New World Sparrows
Passerellidae – New World Sparrows – New
Calyptophilidae – Chat-tanagers – New
Phaenicophilidae – Hispaniolan Tanagers – New
Nesospingidae – Puerto Rican Tanager – New
Spindalidae – Spindalises – New
Zeledoniidae – Wrenthrush – New
Teretistridae – Cuban Warblers – New
Icteriidae – Yellow-breasted Chat – New
Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles and Blackbirds – Same
Parulidae – New World Warblers – Gave up birds
Mitrospingidae – Mitrospingid Tanagers – New
Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies – Same
Thraupidae – Tanagers and allies – Gave up birds

“The trees of the LORD are full of sap; the cedars of Lebanon, which he hath planted; Where the birds make their nests: as for the stork, the fir trees are her house.” (Psalms 104:16-17 KJV)

I realize that for most casual birdwatchers, this means very little. Yet, some birders take photos, myself included, and we like to put the correct name on the birds. Also, my photos are stored by families. This helps when writing articles or just trying to find a photo. The desire is that these updates also assist those reading and using the blog.

There are other changes and the best way to find them is by going to these pages from the I.O.C.:

Be sure to check out the Birds of the World pages:

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Why Use The Birds of the World?

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

The list of all the Birds of the World are updated about every four months. Which we try to keep up with their (I.O.C.) newest lists.

You are probably wondering why you would need it. Let me share some things about it and then give you some ideas how it my be handy for one of your school projects.

The I.O.C. is actually the International Ornithological Committee. “Ornithological” basically means those who study birds or bird related. They maintain a list of all the birds around the world. They set standards of how to name them, what scientific classification to place the birds in, and divide them into Orders and Families, etc.

They are needed because we may call a bird by one name, yet someone in a different country or area may call it by a different name. They realize that those two names belong to the same bird. It is a very hard task to keep track of all those 10,000 plus birds, but that is what they try to do.

They give every bird an English name as a standard. Then they also want every one to spell the words the same. For instance, some people spell the “Grey” or “Gray” to mean the same color. To keep things simple, all the birds are spelled as “Grey.” That is just one example.

There are committees all over the world working on the birds of the area they live in, then those committees get together to combine all the list to make one big list. That is what was just updated.

On our Birds of the World section, you will find the birds listed by Orders (40 main classifications), then by Families (240 groups of closely related birds). The reason all of that is not duplicated here would be very time-consuming. There are hundreds of pages and thousands of photos on that site.

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

Projects for school or your own information:

You know the name of a bird’s name, but need to find  the Species name,  Go to the Species Index to find these choices:

If you know that it called Madagascan something, go to the First Name of Bird  index and choose the “M” page

If you know it is a Duck, go to the Last Name of Bird  index and choose the “D – Last Name” page.

The Families have four indexes to help you find the Families of birds.

When you find your bird in the right family, almost every bird has a link to a photo or video.

I will share more tips on how to use those indexes in another article.

Another reason is because we believe the Lord created all the beautiful birds and He should get all the credit.

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. (Genesis 1:1 NKJV)

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

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Peterson’s Field Guide Videos Updated

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) by Ray

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) by Ray

Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9 KJV)

Peterson Field Guide-Videos

Finished updating the missing videos for the Peterson Field Guide videos. The Vodpod company stopped supporting its videos, which was unknown to me. All of these videos were on YouTube and are now working properly again.

They are very interesting and if you haven’t seen them or at least for a while, they are worth checking out. Here are some of the titles:

How-to Videos:

Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9 KJV)

How to Identify Birds
Topography (Parts of the Bird)
Bird Songs and Sounds
Range Maps

Bird Families:

Common Loon
Atlantic Puffin
Ducks, Geese, Swans
Wood Duck
Shorebirds Overview
Shorebirds ID
Gulls and Terns
Heron, Egrets, Bitterns – Updated
Wild Turkey
Raptors Overview
Raptors ID
Bald Eagle
Peregrine Falcon
Owls
Greater Roadrunner
Hummingbirds
Woodpeckers
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Flycatchers
Northern Mockingbird
Thrushes
American Robin
Warblers
Meadowlarks
Finches
Northern Cardinal
Sparrows

Enjoy! Dust is still flying as I’m still searching for other broken Vodpod videos.

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