Avian And Attributes – Zoologist

Avian And Attributes – Zoologist

Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) ©WikiC

Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) ©WikiC

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.” (John 1:1-3 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Zoologist

Zoologist
ZOOLOGIST, n. [from zoology.] One who is well versed in the natural history of animals, or who describes animals.

[Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828)]

The Lord Jesus Christ, the Creator of all that is in the world, truly was the first Zoologist. The Lord was definitely well versed in the animals, especially the birds. He knows every part of them and has an understanding of every function that He created in them. Most of all, He cares about each of them, as He does us. [Lee]

“Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.” (Matthew 10:29 KJV)


Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) ©WikiC

Zone-tailed Hawk

The Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) is a medium-sized hawk of warm, dry parts of the Americas. It is somewhat similar in plumage and flight style to a common scavenger, the turkey vulture, and may benefit from being able to blend into groups of vultures. It feeds on small vertebrates of all kinds (other than fish), including various small mammals and birds.

Zone-tailed hawks range from parts of southern Arizona, New Mexico, and western Texas almost throughout inland Mexico and the central portions of Central America down into eastern Colombia, Ecuador and, more sporadically, into Peru, southern Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, and northern Argentina.

Zone-tailed hawks can adapt to various habitats across their broad range, including both closed and open ones and wet and dry ones. Often, the largest numbers are found in rocky areas with access to water. They often reside in coniferous or pine-oak forests as well as timbered canyonland, hilly riverine woods, dry open boscage and scrub, humid forests and overgrown marshes. They may forage over ranches and even semi-desert, but always need at least scattered tree thickets for nesting. They may be distributed in elevation from sea-level to 3,000 m (9,800 ft), though are mainly found below 1,500 m (4,900 ft) in the north and below 500 m (1,600 ft) in the southern reaches of the breeding range.

Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) ©WikiC


*** This is the second time through some alphabetical Attributes of God. First time through I tried to use the last name of a bird alphabetically, and then this second time through, the first name of the bird was used. We trust you enjoyed this series. For now, another plan is in the works. Stay Tuned!!***

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “Z”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Lee’s Three Word Wednesday – 2/8/17

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Crested Guineafowl(Guttera pucherani) ©WikiC

THE SEEING EYE

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“The hearing ear, and the seeing eye, the LORD hath made even both of them.” (Proverbs 20:12 KJV)

Crested Guineafowl (Guttera pucherani) ©WikiC

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More Daily Devotionals

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Calliope Hummingbirds – North America’s Smallest

Calliope Hummingbird (Stellula calliope) Full Gorget ©WikiC

“He will bless them that fear the LORD, both small and great.” (Psalms 115:13 KJV)

Just finished reading an article in this month’s Bird Watcher’s Digest the “Calliope Hummingbird: Tiny Muse”, (July/August ’16). They are so tiny,

“a mere 2.75 to 3 inches in lenght and weighing less than a penny — and it is also the smallest long-distant avian migrant in the world. Some travel up to 5,600 miles anually.”

Can you image something that small flying that far?

Calliope Hummingbird (Stellula calliope) ©Wiki

Calliope Hummingbird (Stellula calliope) ©Wiki

Thought you might like to see another one of the Lord’s amazing avian wonders.

“This is the smallest breeding bird found in Canada and the United States. The only smaller species ever found in the U.S. is the bumblebee hummingbird, an accidental vagrant from Mexico. An adult calliope hummingbird can measure 7–10 cm (2.8–3.9 in) in length, span 11 cm (4.3 in) across the wings and weigh 2 to 3 g (0.071 to 0.106 oz). These birds have glossy green on the back and crown with white underparts. Their bill and tail are relatively short. The adult male has wine-red streaks on the throat, green flanks and a dark tail. Females and immatures have a pinkish wash on the flanks, dark streaks on the throat and a dark tail with white tips. The only similar birds are the rufous hummingbird and the Allen’s hummingbird, but these birds are larger with more distinct and contrasting rufous markings on tail and flanks, and longer central tail feathers.” (Wikipedia)

“And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great.” (Revelation 19:5 KJV)

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Trochilidae – Hummingbirds Family

Calliope Hummingbird – All About Birds

Calliope Hummingbird – What Bird

Calliope Hummingbird – Bird Web

Calliope Hummingbird – Audubon

Calliope Hummingbird – Wikipedia

Wordless Birds – With Hummingbirds
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Can There Be Design Without A Designer – Creation Moments

Northern Barred Owl (Strix varia) LPZ by Dan 2014

Northern Barred Owl (Strix varia) Lowry Park Zoo by Dan 2014

CAN THERE BE DESIGN WITHOUT A DESIGNER?

“For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead…” (Romans 1:20a)

Interesting Things from Smiley CentralA new science called biomimetics is making news. In the past we have talked about how some of man’s designs are often similar to God’s which do the same job. However, in biomimetics, researchers actively seek to study the creation to learn of designs that will solve engineering problems.

Can There Be Design Without a Designer?We are all familiar with the story of how thistle seeds inspired Velcro. Engineers have used the design of the owl’s wing to make the structures that carry electrical current to trains. The result is a much quieter ride. The moth’s eyes’ ability not to reflect light helps make it harder to be spotted by birds. The same design has now been used to make a nonreflective film. The result is a film that can be used to help prevent windows from reflecting light. This film will soon be available commercially. Many dyes are toxic, yet many creatures manage to show off bright colors without using toxic substances. Materials engineers studied how the jewel beetle produces its color. The result is a film that seems to change color depending on the angle from which you view it.

No scientist can offer a rational explanation for how so many thoughtful and efficient designs could be generated in a mindless universe. These designs are fingerprints God left all over the creation so that man might seek Him out.

Prayer:
I thank and praise You, dear Father, for the excellence and wonder You have left as fingerprints in the creation. Amen.

Notes:
Nikkei Weekly, 2/22/10, p. 17, “Biomimetics yields life-inspired products.”

Creation Moments ©2016

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More Interesting Things

Creation Moments

 

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Color That Man Did Not (Could Not) Create

Wood Duck and Mandarin Duck

COLOR THAT MAN DID NOT (COULD NOT) CREATE… ONLY THE MASTER CREATOR COULD

Received this in an email and thought I would share it. Not sure of the source of the photos, but absolutely know who the Master Creator was.

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day. (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

Click any photo to start the Gallery

Who Paints The Leaves?

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