Avian And Attributes – Song

Avian And Attributes – Song

Song Sparrow in white flowers by Daves BirdingPix

Song Sparrow in white flowers by Daves BirdingPix

“The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father’s God, and I will exalt him.” (Exodus 15:2 KJV)

Behold, God is my salvation; I will trust, and not be afraid: for the LORD JEHOVAH is my strength and my song; he also is become my salvation.” (Isaiah 12:2 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Song

SONG, n.
1. In general, that which is sung or uttered with musical modulations of the voice, whether of the human voice or that of a bird.
2. A little poem to be sung, or uttered with musical modulations; a ballad. The songs of a country are characteristic of its manners. Every country has its love songs, its war songs, and its patriotic songs.
3. A hymn; a sacred poem or hymn to be sung either in joy or thanksgiving, as that sung by Moses and the Israelites after escaping the dangers of the Arabian gulf and of Pharaoh; or of lamentation, as that of David over the death of Saul and Jonathan. Songs of joy are represented as constituting a part of heavenly felicity. [edited]

“Yet the LORD will command his lovingkindness in the daytime, and in the night his song shall be with me, and my prayer unto the God of my life.” (Psalms 42:8 KJV)


Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

Song Sparrow

The Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) is a medium-sized American sparrow. Among the native sparrows in North America, it is easily one of the most abundant, variable and adaptable species.

Though a habitat generalist, the Song sparrow favors brushland and marshes, including salt marshes, across most of Canada and the United States. They also thrive in human dominated areas such as in suburbs, agricultural fields, and along roadsides. Permanent residents of the southern half of their range, northern populations of the song sparrow migrate to the southern United States or Mexico during winter and intermingle with the native, non-migratory population. The song sparrow is a very rare vagrant to western Europe, with a few recorded in Great Britain and Norway.

These birds forage on the ground, in shrubs or in very shallow water. They mainly eat insects and seeds. Birds in salt marshes may also eat small crustaceans. They nest either in a sheltered location on the ground or in trees or shrubs.

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) Nest ©WikiC

The sparrow species derives it name from its colorful repertoire of songs. Enthusiasts report that one of the songs heard often in suburban locations closely resembles the opening four notes of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5. The male uses a fairly complex song to declare ownership of its territory and attract females.

Singing itself consists of a combination of repeated notes, quickly passing isolated notes, and trills. The songs are very crisp, clear, and precise, making them easily distinguishable by human ears

Song Sparrow by Ray

Song Sparrow by Ray

(Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows & Allies Family) (Song Sparrow – Wikipedia)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

6 thoughts on “Avian And Attributes – Song

  1. Now, this makes me want to locate some sparrows and listen more closely to see if I recognize Beethoven’s opening notes. Just think: he may have been listening to a sparrow one day (one of those few who migrated that far), heard those notes, and was so taken with them that he began his composition of that piece. After all, I’ve written an entire novel based on nothing but a 2-word prompt. :)

    Liked by 1 person

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