Avian And Attributes – Ring

Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) ©WikiC

“But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.” ” It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.” (Luke 15:22-24, 32 KJV) [Refers to salvation]


Avian and Attributes – Ring

RING, n.
1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring, to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Exodus 25. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.
2. A circular course.
RING, n. [from the verb.]
1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as the ring of a bell.
2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as the ring of acclamations.
3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.
RING, v.t. [from the noun.
1. To encircle.
2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine’s snout.


Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) ©WikiC

The Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) is a European member of the thrush family, Turdidae. It is the mountain equivalent of the closely related common blackbird, and breeds in gullies, rocky areas or scree slopes.

“Ouzel” (or “ousel”) is an old name for common blackbird from Old English osle. “Ouzel” may also be applied to a group of superficially similar but unrelated birds, the dippers, the European representative of which is sometimes known as the water ouzel.

As with the English name, the scientific name also refers to the male’s obvious white neck crescent, being derived from the Latin words turdus, “thrush”, and torquatus, “collared”.

The adult male is all black except for a white crescent on the breast and a yellowish bill. The wings have a silvery appearance due to white feather edgings. The male sings its loud and mournful song from trees or rocks.

Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) Femaile ©WikiC Rainbirder

The female is similar but duller, and younger birds often lack the breast crescent. The juvenile has brown plumage.

This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema naturae in 1758 under its current scientific name.

It breeds in the higher regions of western and central Europe and also in the Caucasus and in the Scandinavian mountains. Most populations are migratory, wintering in the Mediterranean region. It is declining in parts of its range, particularly in Ireland.

It is territorial and normally seen alone or in pairs, although loose flocks may form on migration. When not breeding, several birds may also be loosely associated in good feeding areas, such as a fruiting tree, often with other thrushes.

There are other “Ring” named birds, but not just plain “Ring”:

Ring-billed Gull
Ringed Antpipit
Ringed Kingfisher
Ringed Teal
Ringed Warbling Finch
Ringed Woodpecker
Ring-necked Dove
Ring-necked Duck
Ring-necked Francolin
Ring-tailed Pigeon


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “R”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus. With Editing]

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