Hurricane Irma and the Animals at the Zoos

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

“And there arose a great storm of wind, and the waves beat into the ship, so that it was now full. And he was in the hinder part of the ship, asleep on a pillow: and they awake him, and say unto him, Master, carest thou not that we perish? And he arose, and rebuked the wind, and said unto the sea, Peace, be still. And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. And he said unto them, Why are ye so fearful? how is it that ye have no faith? And they feared exceedingly, and said one to another, What manner of man is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” (Mark 4:37-41 KJV)

We here in Florida are preparing for Hurricane Irma to impact our state in the next few days. Dan and I have put in our supplies, and our just waiting to make a final decision to stay or go to a shelter. When we lived in Fort Lauderdale years ago, we went through the fringe of Hurricane Andrew. As you know, we like to visit zoos, especially Zoo Miami. During Andrew, the then Miami Metro Zoo was devastated. Thankfully, it was rebuilt and renamed Zoo Miami.

Thought I would check to see what is being done around the state at some of our favorite Zoos. What I found was more of what they did in previous hurricanes to protect the animals.

Victoria Crowned Pigeon (Goura victoria) by Lee at Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami is right in the path of a direct hit from Irma. The Wings of Asia aviary was built to new strong hurricane strengths, and we trust it can stand up to this new threat. Here are some links to what preparations are happening.

Animal caretakers prepping for Irma with lessons learned from Andrew

“Zoo Miami’s flamingos won’t be riding out Hurricane Irma in a bathroom like they were 25 years ago when Hurricane Andrew devastated the park.

Instead, the park’s majestic birds will be inside their steel and concrete enclosure—an upgrade from the iconic photo that shows the birds huddled in a hay-filled bathroom.

“It’s one of the things we learned from Andrew,” said Ron Magill a spokesman for Zoo Miami. “They will be safe.” CLICK THE LINK TO READ THE REST.

Here are two clips from the Hurricane Andrew damage.


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Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Brevard Zoo – Viera, Florida [from an article in Florida Today] They are on a “wait and see,”

“VIERA — Officials at Brevard Zoo, like a lot of people, are keeping a careful eye on Hurricane Irma.

But as of now it’s business as usual for the zoo staff and the 800 animals there.

Elliot Zirulnik, the communications manager at the zoo, said the zoo has a hurricane plan in place, which includes two-week stockpiles of food for the animals.

If a hurricane warning is issued for the area, then zoo staff will work on securing the animals.

The 800 animals at the zoo consist of 165 species.

“It’s a lot of work but it’s something our team is prepared for,” Zirulnik said.

The zoo is located in Viera, off Wickham Road, near Interstate 95.”

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Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) Jax Zoo by Lee

Jacksonville Zoo

Couldn’t find where they have written about the current hurricane approaching, but here is an interesting article about last year when Hurrican Matthew came through.

The Jacksonville Zoo bringing in ‘ride-out’ team to help protect animals, facility from Hurricane Matthew

I did not list Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa because it appears the hurricane is going to go up the east coast of Florida. They will prepare in Tampa, but also “wait and see.”

Inca Tern at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

The Lord is in control of this storm and already knows where it will go, what and who will be affected by Hurricane Andrew. Your prayers for our residents of Florida; both we humans and the critters.

“The LORD is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.” (Nahum 1:7 KJV)

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Birdwatching at Zoos

Huge Alligator at Circle B Bar Reserve on TV

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee taken in 2014

“And I will walk at liberty:…” (Psalms 119:45a KJV)

I thought you might enjoy seeing the huge alligator that strolled across the path at our favorite local place we go birdwatching. In fact, this was on the national news this evening. We have seen many gators out there, but glad this this one didn’t surprise us in the past.

Alligator about 8 ft by Lee at Circle B

Alligator about 8 ft by Lee at Circle B 2013

On the news they thought he was between 12-14 feet long and was just wanting to cross the path. Not bothering anyone.

“Then shalt thou walk in thy way safely, and thy foot shall not stumble.” (Proverbs 3:23 KJV)

No, we were not out there when this happened. [broken computer, back problems and almost bronchitis] No, this fellow had to do this without our watching him.  :)

Our previous adventures at Circle B

Other Birdwatching Adventures

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Saffron Finch at the Cloud Forrest

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan (Cropped by Lee)

Saffron Finch – Male at Zoo Miami by Dan (Cropped by Lee)

“…covered with silver, and her (his) feathers with yellow gold.” (Psalms 68:13b KJV) (modified)

Dan and I took a ride down to Miami last week. A 200 mile ride. We stayed two nights before heading back home via Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida. We really have not been birdwatching too much lately, so this makes up for a very hot summer and health reasons. Monday and Tuesday we spent at Zoo Miami. On Monday, because we didn’t get there until 2 PM, we visited their Cloud Forrest and Amazon and Beyond Area. We spent all day Tuesday in the fantastic Wings of Asia Aviary. So, let the tales begin:

 Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) by Lee

Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) by Lee

I want to introduce you to the Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola). They are actually Tanagers from the Amazon Basin of South America. The Saffron Finch likes the open and semi-open lowlands and are widely distributed in “Columbia, northern Venezuela (where it is called “canario de tejado” or “roof canary”), western Ecuador, western Peru, eastern and southern Brazil (where it is called “canário da terra” or “native canary”), Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, northern Argentina, and Trinidad and Tobago. It has also been introduced to Hawaii, Puerto Rico and elsewhere.”

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

“Although commonly regarded as a canary, it is not related to the Atlantic canary. Formerly, it was placed in the Emberizidae but it is close to the seedeaters. The male is bright yellow with an orange crown which distinguishes it from most other yellow finches (the exception being the orange-fronted yellow finch). The females are more confusing and are usually just a slightly duller version of the male, but in the southern subspecies S. f. pelzelni they are olive-brown with heavy dark streaks.”

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

“Typically nesting in cavities, the saffron finch makes use of sites such as abandoned rufous hornero (Furnarius rufus) nests, bamboo branches and under house roofs – this species is tolerant of human proximity, appearing at suburban areas and frequenting bird tables. They have a pleasant but repetitious song which, combined with their appearance, has led to them being kept as caged birds in many areas.” (quotes are from Wikipedia’s Saffron Finch)

Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) Female ©WikiC

Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) Female ©WikiC

I didn’t see the female, if they had one, but thought you might like to see the difference between the male and the female.

Interesting Facts from WhatBird.com

  • Members of Thraupidae Family
  • They are about 6 inches in length.
  • The Saffron Finch is also known as the Yellow Finch and Pelzeln’s Finch.
  • It was first described by Carolus Linnaeus in 1766.
  • A group of finches has many collective nouns, including a “charm”, “company”, and “trembling” of finches.

Here is some video that I shot of this beauty. I tried to catch him in the trees and that is a challenge, as any birdwatcher knows. But then, to my surprise, he just decided that he needed a bath. Wow!

We have lots of photos from the trip, so stay tuned!

“Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.” (Psalms 51:7)

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Birdwatching Trips

Zoo Miami and the Wings of Asia FL

Thraupidae Family – Tanagers and Allies

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Gatorland From Dan’s Camera

Great Egret by Dan at Gatorland

Great Egret by Dan at Gatorland

And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat. (Deuteronomy 14:18 KJV)

Gatorland in Orlando, Florida is a great place to visit and especially to go birdwatching. We have had several articles about Gatorland (see below) and most of the photos have been by me, Lee. But, my husband, Dan, is THE photographer in our family.

Black-crowned Night Heron by Dan

Black-crowned Night Heron by Dan

Dan has a website where he places his photos. His site is Dan’s Pix. I thought you might enjoy seeing his photos from some of our trips there. These pictures were taken from his Gatorland folder.

Here is a slideshow of just the ones from the Heron Family. These have been compressed for this site, but if you swing by his site, you will see the uncompressed versions.

Remember his marvellous works that he hath done; his wonders, and the judgments of his mouth; (Psalms 105:5 KJV)

Most of our trips to Gatorland, FL 

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Surprised to See So Many Glossy Ibises – Migrating?

About 60 in this group of Glossy Ibis(Plegadis falcinellus) at MacDill 7-29-16 by Lee

“and for a long time birds and hedgehogs, and ibises and ravens shall dwell in it: and the measuring line of desolation shall be cast over it, and satyrs shall dwell in it.” (Isaiah 34:11 Brenton)

A week or so ago, while in Tampa, we spotted a huge flock of Glossy Ibises. One or two, three maybe, but well over 90? That was a total SURPRISE!

Glossy Ibis - about 60 in this batch

Glossy Ibis – about 60 in this batch

That is one of the joys of going birdwatching. You never know what may appear to when you think it will just be like last time. We go over to MacDill AFB every couple of months and half the time we take our cameras. They have a beach on the tip of the peninsula it sits on, and there usually is some avian wonders down there to observe. [As I’ve mentioned previously, my back has been acting up and we haven’t done much birding.] We can park just a few yards from the beach, which doesn’t require a lot of walking for me. This time of the year, there is usually not a lot of activity.

A little that a righteous man hath is better than the riches of many wicked. (Psalms 37:16 KJV)

Birds at the Shore at MacDill

Birds at the Shore at MacDill

I did catch Dan who had walked over to where most of the birds were. I only concentrated on a small shore bird near me.

09-MacDill AFB 7-29-2016 (14)

Western Sandpiper, I Think.

We had spotted all the Glossy Ibises in the field along the road to the beach and were hoping that they were still there when we returned from the beach. We were almost back to them when we were delighted to spot two Roseate Spoonbills.

Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill

Not far past them, we arrived where the Ibises had been and sure enough, they were waiting for us. My thinking is that they were on their way somewhere, in migration, and had landed to rest and feed. Possible to avoid a coming storm. Right after these photos were taken, we got soaked by a rainstorm as we were entering the commissary (Grocery).

Wikipedia has this to say about the “glossy ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) is a wading bird in the ibis family Threskiornithidae. The scientific name derives from Ancient Greek plegados and Latin, falcis, both meaning “sickle” and referring to the distinctive shape of the bill.”

Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) (1) by Dan's Pix

Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) in breeding plumage taken previously by Dan’s Pix

But still, why so many? Here is an answer, again from Wikipedia, “Populations in temperate regions breed during the local spring, while tropical populations nest to coincide with the rainy season. Nesting is often in mixed-species colonies. When not nesting, flocks of over 100 individuals may occur on migration, and during the winter or dry seasons the species is usually found foraging in small flocks. Glossy ibises often roost communally at night in large flocks, with other species, occasionally in trees which can be some distance from wetland feeding areas.” (bolding mine)

I’ve included a gallery of photos so you can see them better. If you look in the background, you will see many more of them. Also mixed in is another Roseate Spoonbill, Great Egrets, White Ibises and at least one Snowy Egret. When I zoomed in, the photos aren’t all that clear, but you can see the species.

Birds of the World – Threskiornithidae – Ibises, Spoonbills

Birds of the Bible – Ibises

Birds of the Bible – Isaiah 34:11

Glossy Ibis – Wikipedia

Glossy Ibis – All About Birds

Glossy Ibis – Audubon

Glossy Ibis – WhatBird

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San Diego Zoo’s White-crested Hornbill

White-crested Hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus albocristatus) SD Zoo

White-crested Hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus albocristatus ) SD Zoo

The LORD is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower. (Psalms 18:2 KJV)

Last year Dan and I made our coast to coast trip. Our five-week trip enabled us to go to the San Diego Zoo for two days. That was definitely on my “Bucket List” for that trip. Since we haven’t been able to do much birdwatching this year, I thought I would finally get around to doing some more articles about that fantastic trip.

Actually, I got discouraged with my pictures and sort of “gave up.” It wasn’t the pictures fault, it was mine. I had recently updated my photography software to an improved one. (Dan’s hand me down copy) As I have stated many times before, I am a birdwatcher, not a photographer. Dan is our great photographer with the nice camera and fancy lenses. Me, I shoot in “program” mode, but, I shoot 5-10 times more photos than Dan. Dan waits for the perfect shot or the right angle. Me? If it’s a bird, I shoot it before it can get away. Anyway, the software frustrated me and at the same time, a program I have been using for years to “shrink” my photos for the blog, was no longer available.

Thus, these photos have been sitting on my hard drive waiting for me to do something with them. Now that I understand the software better, and I now know how to “shrink” them, it’s time to bring them out of hiding.

White-crested Hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus albocristatus) SD Zoo Day 1

White-crested Hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus albocristatus) SD Zoo Day 1

Another big encouragement I received lately was a series of tips from a photographer whose site I follow. He is at Victor Rakmil Photography. My favorite one, that encouraged me, was the one about a squirrel. It had to do with “cropping.” I always cropped my photos at the end, but he said to start there first. Simple, but it made sense. The photos in this article were cropped and then fixed up a bit.

Buco White-crested Hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus albocristatus) SD Zoo

Buco White-crested Hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus albocristatus) SD Zoo

The White-crested Hornbill was my first attempt at this and I threw a few other photos in. Trust you enjoy them.

Back to this West African Long-tailed Hornbill. This is what the San Diego Zoo calls it, but it is actually a White-crested Hornbill subspecies (Tropicranus albocristatus albocristatus). They are from Guinea to the Ivory Coast. Length “70cm. Elongate, slender hornbill with a very long graduated tail. Predominately black but with bushy white crest extending from forecrown to nape, and white face. The relatively slender black bill with cream upper mandible has a casque that extends for most of its length.” (Birdlife.org) To see a really great photo of this bird, CLICK HERE. They live primarily in forest with dense tangles. Also in tall gallery and secondary forest.

Here is a recording of a White-crested Hornbill by xeno-canto.org

White-crested Hornbill (Tropicranus albocristatus albocristatus) is from the Bucerotidae (The Hornbill kind) See Avian Kinds on the Ark – What Is A Kind?

“Feeds mainly on insects but takes also spiders, slugs, lizards, snakes, nestlings and shrews and also fruit which is taken from the ground. Often follows driver-ants, bird groups or monkeys to hawk for insects disturbed by them. Little known about breeding. The nest is placed in a natural cavity in a tree or palm stump. The female seals the entrance with its own droppings. Lays 2 eggs.” (BirdForum.net)

He hath dispersed, he hath given to the poor; his righteousness endureth for ever; his horn shall be exalted with honour. (Psalms 112:9 KJV)

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Sea To Sea In 2015

Birds of the World

Bucerotidae – Hornbills

Victor Rakmil Photography

Gatorland’s Over-friendly Wood Stork

On our last trip to Gatorland a few weeks ago, one of the Wood Storks became almost a pest. Dan caught me leaning on the rail taking photos of the Wood Stork as he walked toward me.

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Toward Me by Dan

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Toward Me by Dan

Apparently, I was in the way, because,

Wood Stork walking on rail toward me.

Wood Stork walking on rail toward me.

Coming closer. Now you can see Dan taking the top photo.

Wood Stork walking on rail toward me.

Wood Stork walking on rail Coming toward me.

He is so close here, I could hardly focus on him. He then jumped-fly over my head. He almost knocked my cap off as I felt his feet on my cap.

Wood Stork walking on rail toward me.

Wood Stork walking on rail toward me.

He wanted on the other side and I WAS IN HIS WAY!!

Later, we came back past here, sure enough, our “over-friendly” Wood Stork was still hanging out for whatever hand out he might get.

Here are some more of Dan’s photos. Because of his long lens, either the Wood Stork or I was in focus.

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

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Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

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Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

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Now You Know Why He Was Walking Past Me

Now You Know Why He Was Walking Past Me

For every kind of beasts, and of birds, and of serpents, and of things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed of mankind: (James 3:7 KJV)

This bird was used to being around people and enjoyed being “hand-fed.”

Here are a few more of my photos of this “Close Encounter With the Over-Friendly Wood Stork.”

“The wings of the ostrich wave proudly, But are her wings and pinions like the kindly stork’s? (Job 39:13 NKJV)

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Birdwatching Trip – Zoo 12-31-15

Rainbow Lorikeet by Dan

Rainbow Lorikeet by Dan

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

Off we went on the last day of 2015 to try to pick up our updated Lowry Park Zoo passes. They still weren’t ready to issue all of the new ones, so, all was not lost. Never head to a zoo without a camera.

The place was sort of crowded because they were throwing a “Noon Days Eve” party for the young folks. At noon they had a count-down to Noon “10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1”. Then they shot off paper confetti and ribbons. They were all having a great time. Most of those kids would never make to 12 midnight anyway. For that matter, neither did Dan or I. :)

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Over in the Lorikeet feeding aviary, they seemed more colorful than normal and several of them were bouncing around and carrying on. Must have been their way of celebrating the coming New Year AD 2016. Also, like those celebrating, sometimes they get carried away and start becoming destructive.

A new Orangutan was born on December 21st and hoped to see the little one, but Momma had different plans. She was laying with the baby between her and her big arm and had a piece of cardboard over her. Her mate was nearby with leaves over his head. (This is normal for these at this zoo.)

Mom and Papa Orangutan

Mom and Papa Orangutan

Mom Orangutan looking out and weary.

Mom Orangutan looking out and weary.

Papa Orangutan blocks the view.

Papa Orangutan blocks the view.

When a crowd came around to look also, he got up and sat right in front of her to block all views. The Lord even gives His critters a sense that they need privacy.

Here is a beautiful creation that takes your breath away. Wow! How did the Lord come up with so many designs in all His critters, not just the birds. I have no idea what the second fish is. He looks happy. If you know, leave a comment.

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; And the fish of the sea will explain to you. Who among all these does not know That the hand of the LORD has done this, (Job 12:7-9 NKJV)

Off to check out the other birds and see what else was going on. Enjoy the photos. These were our last ones of AD 2015. By the way, the first bird I spotted this year was a Sandhill Crane. (Later the same day, 1st, saw a Belted Kingfisher and a Bald Eagle, plus more normal residents.

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You can see videos of a Masked Lapwing, a Demoiselle Crane and a Blue-faced Honeyeater that I also took by clicking the links.

Birdwatching Trips

Good News

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Lord’s Avian Wonders – Gnatcatcher Preening

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

“Be dressed in readiness, and keep your lamps lit. (Luke 12:35 NASB)

A visit to Circle B Bar Reserve last week provide a great opportunity to watch a Blue-grey Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) preening. Normally, they are flitting from here to there and never stay put long enough to catch a photo, let along some video.

To preen: personal grooming of a bird’s feathers especially by using its beak. Nice article at About Birding – What is Preening.

They are a very small songbird, 10–13 cm (3.9–5.1 in) in length and weighing only 5–7 g (0.18–0.25 oz). Adult males are blue-grey on the upperparts with white underparts, have a slender dark bill, and a long black tail edged in white. Females are less blue. Both sexes have a white eye ring.

The blue-grey gnatcatcher’s breeding habitat includes open deciduous woods and shrublands in southern Ontario, the eastern and southwestern United States, and Mexico. Though gnatcatcher species are common and increasing in number while expanding to the northeast,[4] it is the only one to breed in Eastern North America. They build a cone-like nest on a horizontal tree branch. The incubation period is 13 days for both sexes. Both parents construct the nest and feed the young; they may raise two broods in a season.

These birds migrate to the southern United States, Mexico, northern Central America – (Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras), Cuba, Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the Cayman Islands. Yeah! They come to Circle B in the winter!

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

They forage actively in trees or shrubs, mainly eating insects, insect eggs and spiders. They may hover over foliage (gleaning), or fly to catch insects in flight (hawking). The tail is often held upright while defending territory or searching for food.

The songs (and calls) are often heard on breeding grounds, (usually away from nest) and occasionally heard other times of the year. Calls: “zkreee, zkreee, zkreee”, Songs: “szpree zpree spreeeeey spree spre sprzrreeeee”

Your adornment must not be merely external–braiding the hair, and wearing gold jewelry, or putting on dresses; but let it be the hidden person of the heart, with the imperishable quality of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is precious in the sight of God. (1 Peter 3:3-4 NASB)

Birdwatching Trips 

Circle B Bar Reserve, FL

Wordless Birds – with Hummingbirds

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Close Encounter With A Snowy

Snowy Egret and Lee Gatorland by Dan

Snowy Egret and Lee Gatorland by Dan

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law. (Galatians 5:22-23 NKJV)

While we were at Gatorland, I had the delight to be able to get really close to a Snowy Egret. I was taking a photo of him when he got so close I couldn’t focus the camera. I backed the zoom out and realized just how close we were.

Snowy Egret stepped so close it blurred my shot.

Snowy Egret stepped so close it blurred my shot.

I tried to give my camera to Dan to get a photo of me and the Snowy. That spooked him and he flew off a few yards. I coached him back and thankful he came.

This time I handed Dan my camera down low and he stayed put. The following photos are what Dan took of the close encounter with my Snowy Egret friend. I could have touched the bird, if I had wanted, but have you ever seen that beak up close? Looked like a sharp needle from my point of view.

I am very thankful that the Lord created such a neat bird and helped him not be afraid of me. I am glad the Lord lets us have joy from just watching His critters.

The Chase Begins…

Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) by Lee

Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) by Lee

While we were at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum we wanted to see as many birds as possible. Birds from this part of the country were to be prize catches. We spotted a wren and we both turned our cameras on it. We had just arrived and it was the first native bird we saw.

Well, let the chase begin because that bird would not stay put, nor would it come out in the open. Here is a series of photos we took trying to get a “whole bird” photo:

And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart. (Jeremiah 29:13 KJV)

The Wren was not trying to avoid us, he was only searching for something to eat and we were searching for it.

As you can see, it finally came out in the clear. Those of you who like to photograph critters will understand the joy and agony of attempts like this. After all these attempts, I later found out that we had seen Cactus Wrens before, so it wasn’t a new “Life Bird.”

Later, we saw Cactus Wrens several more times and they showed off and didn’t give us such a hassle as the first one. Oh, the joys of birdwatching!

Here are some more Cactus Wren photos with the more cooperative birds:

Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: (Psalms 139:23 KJV)

Let us search and try our ways, and turn again to the LORD. (Lamentations 3:40 KJV)

I the LORD search the heart, I try the reins, even to give every man according to his ways, and according to the fruit of his doings. (Jeremiah 17:10 KJV)

Trust you enjoyed this adventure of our search for the Cactus Wren. They are members of the Wrens – Troglodytidae Family that has 84 species.

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Wrens – Troglodytidae Family

Wren – Wikipedia

Sea To Sea in 2015

Wordless Birds

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Houston Zoo – Vacation – Part 2-B

You were shown the Blue-chinned Macaws and five different Turacos in Houston Zoo – Vacation – Part 2. Now to show you some more of the neat birds from the Lord’s Creative Hand.

The next set of birds were outside and most were still damp from the rain.

Grey-winged Trumpeter and Racquet-tailed Rollers Exhibit

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Grey-winged Trumpeter’s Beautiful Feathers Houston Zoo by Lee

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Racket-tailed Roller (Coracias spatulatus) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

Racket-tailed Roller (Coracias spatulatus) Houston Zoo by Lee

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I kept trying to get a photo of the “racket-tail”, but he never really got in the right position. This was a new species to see for me.

Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

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Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus curvirostris) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus curvirostris) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

We have seen both the Cuckoos and the Malkohas before, but the Cuckoos were closer to us this time.

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Then a couple of favorites, the Kookabura, except this time it was a Blue-winged Kookabura, and a Micronesian Kingfisher.

Micronesian Kingfisher by Dan

Micronesian Kingfisher by Dan

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Blue-winged Kookaburra – What you looking at?  by Lee

Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Dan

Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Dan

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** Updated 6/27/15 **

Forgot about this video:

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