Great Egret Nest – Gatorland

Eggs in Great Egret Nest Gatorland 02252021 by Lee

Eggs in Great Egret Nest Gatorland 02252021 by Lee

Just wanted to share a nest that we observed at Gatorland this week.  The Great Egret was standing and I was able to get a photo of the three eggs. Then I turned the video on while she inspected the nest and then settled down on the eggs.

After I had moseyed on down the boardwalk, I took this photo looking back at where I was standing:

Showing How close I was to nest Gatorland 02252021 by Lee

Showing How close I was to nest Gatorland 02252021 by Lee

If you make it larger, you will see how close we can get to some of these nest. This nest was the closest one to the rail. It is always enjoyable to journey over to Gatorland during the nesting season.

“If a bird’s nest happens to be before you along the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, with the mother sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother with the young; you shall surely let the mother go, and take the young for yourself, that it may be well with you and that you may prolong your days.” (Deuteronomy 22:6-7 NKJV)

We left both the mother and the eggs alone. I’m looking forward to more days in the future to go bird watching. Lord Willing!

More to come on this latest trip to Gatorland.

Gatorland Again – February 2021

Good News

Wishful Thinking

Tricolored Heron at Gatorland

Many times when we are young, we wonder or try to imagine what we will be like when we grow up. (Notice the bird in the upper right corner)

Great Blue Heron at Gatorland

This Great Blue Heron may be trying to remember his days of youth. (Notice the bird in the lower left corner)

Tricolored Heron and Great Blue Heron at Gatorland

Our smaller Tricolored Heron can wish all he wants, but he will never become a Great Blue Heron. The Lord, the Creator of all these Avian Wonders, made each of them slightly different.

Just as we in our lives have different talents and abilities, we should not try to be something that we were not created to be. The Lord has given each of us, as Christians, different areas of service. It may a small task, or it could be an enormous task.

“There are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. There are differences of ministries, but the same Lord. And there are diversities of activities, but it is the same God who works all in all. But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to each one for the profit of all:” (1 Corinthians 12:4-7 NKJV)

Each of these birds at Gatorland, are all created different, yet they all seem to enjoy hanging out there. Many of us enjoy being with others at our places of worship. We all have something we can do to help others.

Wood Stork at Gatorland

White Ibis at Gatorland

Great Egret at Gatorland

“For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.” (Jeremiah 29:11 NKJV)

Other Gatorland Post from the December 30th visit:

  1. Flamingo Filtering at Gatorland – 12/30/20
  2. Gator Tail Anyone?
  3. Our Gatorland Welcome 12-30-20
  4. Put Your Best Foot Forward
  5. Black Vultures Up Close At Gatorland

Wordless Birds

Nice Birdwatching Video About Circle B Bar Reserve

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix

Bible Birds – Herons

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (NKJV)

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle BGreat Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix Bible Birds – HeronsSnowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (Romans 1:20 NKJV)

 

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Great Horned Owl Youngsters at Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B 8-3-12 by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Butterfly Circle B by Lee 7-16-14

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee - cropped

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee – cropped

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B -7-22-11 by Lee

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B by Lee

Sunset at Circle B by TommyT

Which “Rail” Family Bird is This?

King Rail (Rallus elegans) Viera Wetlands 12-26-17 by Lee 2

“And they that know thy name will put their trust in thee: for thou, LORD, hast not forsaken them that seek thee. Sing praises to the LORD, which dwelleth in Zion: declare among the people his doings.” (Psalms 9:10-11 KJV)

Dan and I visited the east coast of Florida last week for several days. The first day, we stopped in to look around Viera Wetlands. It was around noon, and not the best time to view birds. It was quiet, but there is always something there to see. It was closed for some time after Hurricane Irma, and this is the first time we have been able to check out the birds there since then.

Knowing your common and local birds is important for birdwatching. Then, when something out of the ordinary appears, it may well catch your eye. As is the case with this bird. At first, pouring over the bird books and software, I thought it was a King Rail. If it is, then it would be a new LIFE bird for me. Now, I am not so sure what it is.

It appears to an immature bird, and most likely in the Rail Family. I would appreciate any who could leave a note with the correct ID for this bird. Here is another photo. Both of these were zoomed in and also cropped.

King Rail (Rallus elegans) Viera Wetlands 12-26-17 by Lee

Thankfully, as the verse above says, I do know the Lord’s Name and have put my trust in Him. Also, He knows our name. Now, if I just knew this bird’s name. :)

*** My First Bird of the Year was a House Finch at our feeder. ***

If you want, you can leave your 1st Bird of the Year below.

Joys and Challenges of Birdwatching

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland by Lee

“Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.” (Psalms 37:4 KJV)

While enjoying the birds and critters at Gatorland this week, I had another enjoyable adventure. In fact, at breakfast this morning, I was chuckling as I was again relating my tale to Dan. Most know that Dan is the “Bird Photographer” and I am the “Bird Watcher.” I only use a nice “point-and-shoot” camera that is always set on “Program” mode. In other words, I don’t know an “F-stop” from a “bus stop.”

Earlier, at Gatorland, I had been listening to, and watching a Blue-grey Gnatcatcher in the trees. I kept waiting for him to pop out so I could get a photo. This went on for some time, and most birders know how they do not stay still. Finally, he popped out on a limb in clear view. Pulled my camera and…. it was turned off. Needless to say by the time it was on, he was gone. Yuk! [Here is a photo from another adventure.]

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

Oh, well! There must be another adventure yet to enjoy.

Off I rolled on the motorized wheels, while Dan rested. Aha! I heard a Northern Mockingbird. Let’s see if I can have better luck this time.

“But the meek shall inherit the earth; and shall delight themselves in the abundance of peace.” (Psalms 37:11 KJV)

True birders know that “patience is a virtue.” I visually chased that Mockingbird through the bushes waiting for him to pop out. This time I made sure my camera was on. [Program mode also takes great “bush” pictures. Notice how clear the limb in the upper right corner.:o) ]

PAS-Mimi Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) program mode caught the log instead by Lee (8)r

“Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.” (Ecclesiastes 7:8 KJV)

I heard the Mockingbird first coming from these bushes, and thus began my delightful challenge of getting a photo of it.

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland

The northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. This species has rarely been observed in Europe. This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema Naturæ in 1758 as Turdus polyglottos. The northern mockingbird is known for its mimicking ability, as reflected by the meaning of its scientific name, ‘many-tongued mimic.’ The northern mockingbird has gray to brown upper feathers and a paler belly. Its tail and wings have white patches which are visible in flight.

Mockingbird in there

They teach taking photos with a 1/3 rule. Birdwatchers like me place them right in the center so we can find them later.

Northern Mockingbird (cropped)

Cropped – See, it is there.

The northern mockingbird is an omnivore. It eats both insects and fruits. It is often found in open areas and forest edges but forages in grassy land. The northern mockingbird breeds in southeastern Canada, the United States, northern Mexico, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands and the Greater Antilles.

Almost got him - at least the eye

Getting better, can see part of it.

The northern mockingbird is known for its intelligence. A 2009 study showed that the bird was able to recognize individual humans, particularly noting those who had previously been intruders or threats. Also, birds recognize their breeding spots and return to areas in which they had the greatest success in previous years. Urban birds are more likely to demonstrate this behavior. Finally, the mockingbird is influential in United States culture, being the state bird of five states, appearing in book titles, songs and lullabies, and making other appearances in popular culture. [Wikipedia with editing]

FINALLY!!!

Finally Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland

NOW HE FOUND ME!!!

He found me Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland

This is the Joy of Birdwatching. You have to love the Adventures, and saying a prayer now and then to ask the Lord to “Please” let the bird come in to view!!!

The whole series on Flickr

More Gatorland Adventures

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Great Egret Preening at Gatorland

I love watching the Great Egret with their long flowing feathers. Today the breeze was blowing gently and was able to catch this beautiful Great Egret on Video. Enjoy!

“He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High Shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the LORD, “He is my refuge and my fortress; My God, in Him I will trust.” Surely He shall deliver you from the snare of the fowler And from the perilous pestilence. He shall cover you with His feathers, And under His wings you shall take refuge; His truth shall be your shield and buckler.” (Psalms 91:1-4 NKJV)

These photos were also taken:

Great Egret at Gatorland

Great Egret at Gatorland

Great Egret Feathers at Gatorland

Great Egret at Gatorland

These photos are on the Flickr Site. Still testing.

 

Grey Parrot at Gatorland – December 2017

The Grey Parrot today at Gatorland looked quite bright-eyed. This was taken straight from the camera, no editing, and loaded up on my Flickr Site. This is an experiment. Since so many photos disappeared off of WordPress, I am trying to see how placing them on Flickr might be a new option. [One problem: Can’t seem to center the photo. Stays on left.]

Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus)

“The lamp of the body is the eye. Therefore, when your eye is good, your whole body also is full of light. But when your eye is bad, your body also is full of darkness. Therefore take heed that the light which is in you is not darkness. If then your whole body is full of light, having no part dark, the whole body will be full of light, as when the bright shining of a lamp gives you light.” (Luke 11:34-36 NKJV)

The Grey Parrot or African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) is an Old World parrot in the family Psittacidae. This article describes the Congo grey parrot. The Timneh parrot (Psittacus timneh) was earlier treated as conspecific but has since been split as a full species.

Grey parrots are monogamous breeders which nest in tree cavities. Each couple of parrots needs its own tree to nest. The hen lays three to five eggs, which she incubates for 30 days while being fed by her mate. The adults defend their nesting sites.  Both parents help take care of the chicks until they can go off on their own. Grey parrot chicks require feeding and care from their parents in the nest. The parents take care of them until four or five weeks after they are fledged. Young leave the nest at the age of 12 weeks. Little is known about the courtship behavior of this species in the wild. They weigh between 12 and 14 g at hatching and between 372 and 526 g when they leave their parents.

They are mostly frugivorous; most of their diet consists of fruit, nuts, and seeds. The species prefers oil palm fruit and also eat flowers and tree bark, as well as insects and snails. In the wild, the grey is partly a ground feeder. In captivity, it can eat sunflower seeds, bird pellets, a variety of fruits such as pears, orange, pomegranate, apple, and banana, and vegetables such as carrots, cooked sweet potato, celery, fresh kale, peas, and green beans. They also need a source of calcium. [Wikipedia with editing]

Yeah! We did a little birdwatching today!

Gatorland

Here was another bright-eyed Parrot today.

Parrot at Gatorland 12-21-17

 

Mandarin Duck Pair at Zoo Miami

While working on the Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen, I came across this video and decided to share it. We were at the Wings of Asia Aviary at Zoo Miami.

“When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.” (Psalms 8:3-5 KJV)

“The Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) is a perching duck species found in East Asia. It is medium-sized, at 41–49 cm (16–19 in) long with a 65–75 cm (26–30 in) wingspan. It is closely related to the North American wood duck, the only other member of the genus Aix. Aix is an Ancient Greek word which was used by Aristotle to refer to an unknown diving bird, and galericulata is the Latin for a wig, derived from galerum, a cap or bonnet.

The adult male has a red bill, large white crescent above the eye and reddish face and “whiskers”. The breast is purple with two vertical white bars, and the flanks ruddy, with two orange “sails” at the back. The female is similar to female wood duck, with a white eye-ring and stripe running back from the eye, but is paler below, has a small white flank stripe, and a pale tip to its bill.

Both the males and females have crests, but the crest is more pronounced on the male.

Like many other species of ducks, the male undergoes a moult after the mating season into eclipse plumage. When in eclipse plumage, the male looks similar to the female, but can be told apart by their bright yellow-orange beak, lack of any crest, and a less-pronounced eye-stripe.”[Wikipedia]

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen – Part I

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen – Part I

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

There is a Page on this blog called Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen. It has needed to be updated, plus with all the broken links that I have been repairing, this is going to be the main emphasis for a while. The Avian and Attributes articles will continue to be produced also. As the links are fixed and updated, the Parts will grow longer.

There is a reason for using the Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen, because it has the Families of the Birds of the World in Taxonomic order. As I find the birds we have seen, I will also be fixing the broken links on the Family pages. [So far, almost 1/3 to 1/2 of the family member page has broken links. It is becoming more obvious that the site WAS hacked.] This helps to fix each Family page in order, without jumping around.

Most of the page is self-explanatory. This is a list of ALL birds we, Dan and I, have SEEN. With photos where possible, because we did not take a picture of EVERY bird. Whether out in the wild, or in a zoo or similar place, THEY COUNT as far as this list is concerned. [Most bird counts are only for wild/free birds.]

**************** Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen ************

White-eared Catbird (Ailuroedus buccoides) Houston Zoo by Lee

“And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.” (Genesis 2:3 KJV)

Under Construction – Still Finding Our Pictures to put with the Birds

[The best photos are at Dan’s Photo Site USNDANSPIX or just Dan’s Pix]

I’ve decided to not only include wild birds we have seen, but also birds we have seen in zoos also. Most lists don’t let you include them, but still, I have seen them in person, so, they count to me. Going to put these in Taxonomic order and use the IOC names.

The ones we have seen in the wild (264 species[edit]) have a “*”  and the ones we saw at zoos are marked with the following code. A name in parenthesis is what they call them. The two numbers in brackets [ total birds in family –  our count ]

Zoo Abbreviations (BZ=Brevard Zoo, CZ=Cincinnati Zoo, HZ=Houston Zoo, LPZ=Lowry Park Zoo, JZ=Jacksonville Zoo, NA=National Aviary, NZ=National Zoo, MZ=Memphis Zoo, PB=Palm Beach Zoo, RZ=Riverbanks Zoo (SC), SAZ=San Antonio Zoo, SDZ=San Diego Zoo, TBF=Titusville Birding Festival, WA=Wings of Asia (at MetroZoo before Hurricane Andrew and new Wings of Asia at Zoo Miami or ZM=Zoo Miami),

Names with an extra name in (parenthesis) are what the Zoos calls them. Listed by Families:

Ostriches – Struthionidae [2-2]
Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) MZ RZ
Somali Ostrich (Struthio molybdophanes) SDZ

Rheas – Rheidae [2-0 ]

Kiwis – Apterygidae [5-0]

Cassowaries, Emus – Casuariidae [4- ]
Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) BZ by Lee HZ
Emu Photos (Dromaius novaehollandiae) LPZ by Lee, BZ by Dan

Tinamous – Tinamidae [47-1]
Elegant Crested Tinamou (Eudromia elegans) ZM by Dan, by Lee,  HZ by Lee

Screamers – Anhimidae [3-1]

Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) San Diego Zoo by Lee

Magpie Goose – Anseranatidae [1-1]

Magpie Goose (Anseranas semipalmata) by Lee LPZ

Magpie Goose (Anseranas semipalmata) by Lee Lowry Park Zoo

************ To Be Continued ***********

Ducks, Geese and Swans – Anatidae [173- ]

Megapodes (Family Megapodiidae)  [21- ]
Australian Brushturkey (Alectura lathami) NA
Wattled Brushturkey (Aepypodius arfakianus) WA

To see the rest of this page, Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen

Afraid To Stick Neck Out

Great Egret with head tucked in at Gatorland

“Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest.” (Ecclesiastes 9:10 KJV)

I found this Great Egret at Gatorland recently who was afraid to stick his neck out. Have you ever felt that way? As many readers are aware, there have been numerous broken links discovered on this site. Many pages have been fixed already, yet there are hundreds and hundreds more that need to be corrected. After chatting with WordPress again today, there is not much they can do to revive the deleted photos and music from the Media Cache. I did find out today, it is possible that this site was hacked. “You’re kidding,” I told them. “No, others have had that happen”.

For those of us on WordPress and other sites for that matter, they said it is very important to use a STRONG password. Also, to use a two-step authentification. I have since rechanged the password again. Here is a link to instructions on how to do this on WordPress.com.

Two Step Authentication

For now, I am not going to pull my head in, but am going to plug away at repairing the damage done to Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus. This was not quite the “Adventure”  I had in mind, but it would be wrong to pull my head in and give up. Who knows, maybe the Lord will help me improve it and find more ways to show forth His wonderful Birds and Creation. Stay tuned!

Great Egret at Gatorland by Dan

 

Gatorland Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbill landing at Gatorland by Lee 11-21-17

Yesterday, I shared the Boat-tailed Grackle female. Today, here are a few photos of two Roseate Spoonbills that landed on one of the trees at Gatorland. [Plus a bonus at the end]

Didn’t realize that she was already there.

The Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) is a gregarious wading bird of the ibis and spoonbill family, Threskiornithidae. It is a resident breeder in South America mostly east of the Andes, and in coastal regions of the Caribbean, Central America, Mexico, the Gulf Coast of the United States, and on central Florida’s Atlantic coast at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, adjoined with NASA Kennedy Space Center. They are also found here in Central Florida. These were at Gatorland in Orlando on 11/21/17.

Zoomed in even on this photo. The first ones were also cropped.

The roseate spoonbill is 71–86 cm (28–34 in) long, with a 120–133 cm (47–52 in) wingspan. The tarsus measures 9.7–12.4 cm (3.8–4.9 in), the culmen measures 14.5–18 cm (5.7–7.1 in) and the wing measures 32.3–37.5 cm (12.7–14.8 in) and thus the legs, bill, neck and spatulate bill all appear elongated. Adults have a bare greenish head (“golden buff” when breeding) and a white neck, back and breast (with a tuft of pink feathers in the center when breeding), and are otherwise a deep pink. The bill is grey.

Roseate Spoonbilsl landing at Gatorland by Lee 11-21-17

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Like the American flamingo, their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. Another carotenoid, astaxanthin, can also be found deposited in flight and body feathers. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age, whether breeding or not, and location. Unlike herons, spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. They alternate groups of stiff, shallow wingbeats with glides.

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Zoomed & Cropped

Roseate Spoonbills at Gatorland by Dan – Yawning

This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. In the United States, a popular place to observe roseate spoonbills is “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Roseate spoonbills must compete for food with snowy egrets, great egrets, tricolored herons and American white pelicans. [Wikipedia, with editing]
Threskiornithidae – Ibises, Spoonbills Family
***

“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name.” (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

Bonus:
I found this Great Egret along the edge and an alligator nearby with quite a look on its face. They really weren’t that close, but thought you would enjoy this series of photos. [Click to enlarge]

More Gatorland Adventures

Gatorland in Orlando, Florida

Hurricane Irma and the Animals at the Zoos

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

“And there arose a great storm of wind, and the waves beat into the ship, so that it was now full. And he was in the hinder part of the ship, asleep on a pillow: and they awake him, and say unto him, Master, carest thou not that we perish? And he arose, and rebuked the wind, and said unto the sea, Peace, be still. And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. And he said unto them, Why are ye so fearful? how is it that ye have no faith? And they feared exceedingly, and said one to another, What manner of man is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” (Mark 4:37-41 KJV)

We here in Florida are preparing for Hurricane Irma to impact our state in the next few days. Dan and I have put in our supplies, and our just waiting to make a final decision to stay or go to a shelter. When we lived in Fort Lauderdale years ago, we went through the fringe of Hurricane Andrew. As you know, we like to visit zoos, especially Zoo Miami. During Andrew, the then Miami Metro Zoo was devastated. Thankfully, it was rebuilt and renamed Zoo Miami.

Thought I would check to see what is being done around the state at some of our favorite Zoos. What I found was more of what they did in previous hurricanes to protect the animals.

Victoria Crowned Pigeon (Goura victoria) by Lee at Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami is right in the path of a direct hit from Irma. The Wings of Asia aviary was built to new strong hurricane strengths, and we trust it can stand up to this new threat. Here are some links to what preparations are happening.

Animal caretakers prepping for Irma with lessons learned from Andrew

“Zoo Miami’s flamingos won’t be riding out Hurricane Irma in a bathroom like they were 25 years ago when Hurricane Andrew devastated the park.

Instead, the park’s majestic birds will be inside their steel and concrete enclosure—an upgrade from the iconic photo that shows the birds huddled in a hay-filled bathroom.

“It’s one of the things we learned from Andrew,” said Ron Magill a spokesman for Zoo Miami. “They will be safe.” CLICK THE LINK TO READ THE REST.

Here are two clips from the Hurricane Andrew damage.


*

**

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Brevard Zoo – Viera, Florida [from an article in Florida Today] They are on a “wait and see,”

“VIERA — Officials at Brevard Zoo, like a lot of people, are keeping a careful eye on Hurricane Irma.

But as of now it’s business as usual for the zoo staff and the 800 animals there.

Elliot Zirulnik, the communications manager at the zoo, said the zoo has a hurricane plan in place, which includes two-week stockpiles of food for the animals.

If a hurricane warning is issued for the area, then zoo staff will work on securing the animals.

The 800 animals at the zoo consist of 165 species.

“It’s a lot of work but it’s something our team is prepared for,” Zirulnik said.

The zoo is located in Viera, off Wickham Road, near Interstate 95.”

**

Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) Jax Zoo by Lee

Jacksonville Zoo

Couldn’t find where they have written about the current hurricane approaching, but here is an interesting article about last year when Hurrican Matthew came through.

The Jacksonville Zoo bringing in ‘ride-out’ team to help protect animals, facility from Hurricane Matthew

I did not list Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa because it appears the hurricane is going to go up the east coast of Florida. They will prepare in Tampa, but also “wait and see.”

Inca Tern at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

The Lord is in control of this storm and already knows where it will go, what and who will be affected by Hurricane Andrew. Your prayers for our residents of Florida; both we humans and the critters.

“The LORD is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.” (Nahum 1:7 KJV)

***

Birdwatching at Zoos