Nice Birdwatching Video About Circle B Bar Reserve

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix

Bible Birds – Herons

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (NKJV)

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle BGreat Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix Bible Birds – HeronsSnowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (Romans 1:20 NKJV)

 

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Great Horned Owl Youngsters at Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B 8-3-12 by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Butterfly Circle B by Lee 7-16-14

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee - cropped

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee – cropped

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B -7-22-11 by Lee

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B by Lee

Sunset at Circle B by TommyT

Which “Rail” Family Bird is This?

King Rail (Rallus elegans) Viera Wetlands 12-26-17 by Lee 2

“And they that know thy name will put their trust in thee: for thou, LORD, hast not forsaken them that seek thee. Sing praises to the LORD, which dwelleth in Zion: declare among the people his doings.” (Psalms 9:10-11 KJV)

Dan and I visited the east coast of Florida last week for several days. The first day, we stopped in to look around Viera Wetlands. It was around noon, and not the best time to view birds. It was quiet, but there is always something there to see. It was closed for some time after Hurricane Irma, and this is the first time we have been able to check out the birds there since then.

Knowing your common and local birds is important for birdwatching. Then, when something out of the ordinary appears, it may well catch your eye. As is the case with this bird. At first, pouring over the bird books and software, I thought it was a King Rail. If it is, then it would be a new LIFE bird for me. Now, I am not so sure what it is.

It appears to an immature bird, and most likely in the Rail Family. I would appreciate any who could leave a note with the correct ID for this bird. Here is another photo. Both of these were zoomed in and also cropped.

King Rail (Rallus elegans) Viera Wetlands 12-26-17 by Lee

Thankfully, as the verse above says, I do know the Lord’s Name and have put my trust in Him. Also, He knows our name. Now, if I just knew this bird’s name. :)

*** My First Bird of the Year was a House Finch at our feeder. ***

If you want, you can leave your 1st Bird of the Year below.

Joys and Challenges of Birdwatching

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland by Lee

“Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.” (Psalms 37:4 KJV)

While enjoying the birds and critters at Gatorland this week, I had another enjoyable adventure. In fact, at breakfast this morning, I was chuckling as I was again relating my tale to Dan. Most know that Dan is the “Bird Photographer” and I am the “Bird Watcher.” I only use a nice “point-and-shoot” camera that is always set on “Program” mode. In other words, I don’t know an “F-stop” from a “bus stop.”

Earlier, at Gatorland, I had been listening to, and watching a Blue-grey Gnatcatcher in the trees. I kept waiting for him to pop out so I could get a photo. This went on for some time, and most birders know how they do not stay still. Finally, he popped out on a limb in clear view. Pulled my camera and…. it was turned off. Needless to say by the time it was on, he was gone. Yuk! [Here is a photo from another adventure.]

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

Oh, well! There must be another adventure yet to enjoy.

Off I rolled on the motorized wheels, while Dan rested. Aha! I heard a Northern Mockingbird. Let’s see if I can have better luck this time.

“But the meek shall inherit the earth; and shall delight themselves in the abundance of peace.” (Psalms 37:11 KJV)

True birders know that “patience is a virtue.” I visually chased that Mockingbird through the bushes waiting for him to pop out. This time I made sure my camera was on. [Program mode also takes great “bush” pictures. Notice how clear the limb in the upper right corner.:o) ]

PAS-Mimi Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) program mode caught the log instead by Lee (8)r

“Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.” (Ecclesiastes 7:8 KJV)

I heard the Mockingbird first coming from these bushes, and thus began my delightful challenge of getting a photo of it.

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland

The northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. This species has rarely been observed in Europe. This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema Naturæ in 1758 as Turdus polyglottos. The northern mockingbird is known for its mimicking ability, as reflected by the meaning of its scientific name, ‘many-tongued mimic.’ The northern mockingbird has gray to brown upper feathers and a paler belly. Its tail and wings have white patches which are visible in flight.

Mockingbird in there

They teach taking photos with a 1/3 rule. Birdwatchers like me place them right in the center so we can find them later.

Northern Mockingbird (cropped)

Cropped – See, it is there.

The northern mockingbird is an omnivore. It eats both insects and fruits. It is often found in open areas and forest edges but forages in grassy land. The northern mockingbird breeds in southeastern Canada, the United States, northern Mexico, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands and the Greater Antilles.

Almost got him - at least the eye

Getting better, can see part of it.

The northern mockingbird is known for its intelligence. A 2009 study showed that the bird was able to recognize individual humans, particularly noting those who had previously been intruders or threats. Also, birds recognize their breeding spots and return to areas in which they had the greatest success in previous years. Urban birds are more likely to demonstrate this behavior. Finally, the mockingbird is influential in United States culture, being the state bird of five states, appearing in book titles, songs and lullabies, and making other appearances in popular culture. [Wikipedia with editing]

FINALLY!!!

Finally Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland

NOW HE FOUND ME!!!

He found me Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) at Gatorland

This is the Joy of Birdwatching. You have to love the Adventures, and saying a prayer now and then to ask the Lord to “Please” let the bird come in to view!!!

The whole series on Flickr

More Gatorland Adventures

*

Great Egret Preening at Gatorland

I love watching the Great Egret with their long flowing feathers. Today the breeze was blowing gently and was able to catch this beautiful Great Egret on Video. Enjoy!

“He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High Shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the LORD, “He is my refuge and my fortress; My God, in Him I will trust.” Surely He shall deliver you from the snare of the fowler And from the perilous pestilence. He shall cover you with His feathers, And under His wings you shall take refuge; His truth shall be your shield and buckler.” (Psalms 91:1-4 NKJV)

These photos were also taken:

Great Egret at Gatorland

Great Egret at Gatorland

Great Egret Feathers at Gatorland

Great Egret at Gatorland

These photos are on the Flickr Site. Still testing.

 

Grey Parrot at Gatorland – December 2017

The Grey Parrot today at Gatorland looked quite bright-eyed. This was taken straight from the camera, no editing, and loaded up on my Flickr Site. This is an experiment. Since so many photos disappeared off of WordPress, I am trying to see how placing them on Flickr might be a new option. [One problem: Can’t seem to center the photo. Stays on left.]

Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus)

“The lamp of the body is the eye. Therefore, when your eye is good, your whole body also is full of light. But when your eye is bad, your body also is full of darkness. Therefore take heed that the light which is in you is not darkness. If then your whole body is full of light, having no part dark, the whole body will be full of light, as when the bright shining of a lamp gives you light.” (Luke 11:34-36 NKJV)

The Grey Parrot or African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) is an Old World parrot in the family Psittacidae. This article describes the Congo grey parrot. The Timneh parrot (Psittacus timneh) was earlier treated as conspecific but has since been split as a full species.

Grey parrots are monogamous breeders which nest in tree cavities. Each couple of parrots needs its own tree to nest. The hen lays three to five eggs, which she incubates for 30 days while being fed by her mate. The adults defend their nesting sites.  Both parents help take care of the chicks until they can go off on their own. Grey parrot chicks require feeding and care from their parents in the nest. The parents take care of them until four or five weeks after they are fledged. Young leave the nest at the age of 12 weeks. Little is known about the courtship behavior of this species in the wild. They weigh between 12 and 14 g at hatching and between 372 and 526 g when they leave their parents.

They are mostly frugivorous; most of their diet consists of fruit, nuts, and seeds. The species prefers oil palm fruit and also eat flowers and tree bark, as well as insects and snails. In the wild, the grey is partly a ground feeder. In captivity, it can eat sunflower seeds, bird pellets, a variety of fruits such as pears, orange, pomegranate, apple, and banana, and vegetables such as carrots, cooked sweet potato, celery, fresh kale, peas, and green beans. They also need a source of calcium. [Wikipedia with editing]

Yeah! We did a little birdwatching today!

Gatorland

Here was another bright-eyed Parrot today.

Parrot at Gatorland 12-21-17

 

Mandarin Duck Pair at Zoo Miami

While working on the Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen, I came across this video and decided to share it. We were at the Wings of Asia Aviary at Zoo Miami.

“When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.” (Psalms 8:3-5 KJV)

“The Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) is a perching duck species found in East Asia. It is medium-sized, at 41–49 cm (16–19 in) long with a 65–75 cm (26–30 in) wingspan. It is closely related to the North American wood duck, the only other member of the genus Aix. Aix is an Ancient Greek word which was used by Aristotle to refer to an unknown diving bird, and galericulata is the Latin for a wig, derived from galerum, a cap or bonnet.

The adult male has a red bill, large white crescent above the eye and reddish face and “whiskers”. The breast is purple with two vertical white bars, and the flanks ruddy, with two orange “sails” at the back. The female is similar to female wood duck, with a white eye-ring and stripe running back from the eye, but is paler below, has a small white flank stripe, and a pale tip to its bill.

Both the males and females have crests, but the crest is more pronounced on the male.

Like many other species of ducks, the male undergoes a moult after the mating season into eclipse plumage. When in eclipse plumage, the male looks similar to the female, but can be told apart by their bright yellow-orange beak, lack of any crest, and a less-pronounced eye-stripe.”[Wikipedia]

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen – Part I

Life List of All the Birds We Have Seen