Nice Birdwatching Video About Circle B Bar Reserve

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix

Bible Birds – Herons

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (NKJV)

This is by one of the photographers that visits Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland, Florida. It is only a few miles from our house “as the crow flies.” We have spent many enjoyable trips there. This was from Dennis Hollingsworth.
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle B Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) by Lee Circle BGreat Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Circle B By Dan'sPix Bible Birds – HeronsSnowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) Notice Yellow Feet by Lee at Circle B

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,” (Romans 1:20 NKJV)

 

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Sandhill Crane Chick at Circle B by Lee

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher at Circle B Reserve by Lee

Great Horned Owl Youngsters at Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B 8-3-12 by Lee

Snowy Egret Circle B by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Butterfly Circle B by Lee 7-16-14

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Dragonfly by Lee at Circle B

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee - cropped

Great Blue Heron with Catfish at Circle B by Lee – cropped

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B -7-22-11 by Lee

Wood Storks on top of tree at Circle B by Lee

Sunset at Circle B by TommyT

After the Storm – Zoos

Falcated Duck (Anas falcata) by Dan at Zoo Miami

“A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast: but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.” (Proverbs 12:10 KJV)

“Thy righteousness is like the great mountains; thy judgments are a great deep: O LORD, thou preservest man and beast.” (Psalms 36:6 KJV)

If you will recall, before Hurricane Irma attacked our state, we shared this blog with you: Hurricane Irma and the Animals at the Zoos

I was checking around the state to see what was being done to prepare for the Hurricane. Now, almost two months later, how did the Zoos do during and after the storm. We were discussing maybe visiting one of the zoos in a month or so, and I was wondering how much damage they received. Actually, one of our favorite birding places here in Lakeland, the Circle B Bar Reserve, just re-opened today, October 13, 2017. They had numerous downed trees and flooding.

While checking out my most favorite birding place at a Zoo, Zoo Miami, they are actually opening back up tomorrow, October 14th for the first time since Hurricane Irma.

Here are some articles and video that you might find informative as to how they did and how they protected their animals.


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Zoo Miami to Open Oct. 14, after Hurricane Irma
In the article, you will see a photo like this. Click it and the photos will open. Click through them to see some of the damage. WPLG1 of 62 PHOTOS: Ron Magill shares photos of Zoo Miami after Hurricane Irma

“We greatly look forward to opening Zoo Miami again,” Zoo Miami director Carol Kruse said.

Huge Ficus Tree at Zoo Miami ©RonMagill

Zoo Miami’s Massive Ficus, Downed by Irma, to Remain as Hyena ‘Furniture’

Go to Google and search: “Zoo Miami irma” and you will find many photos of the protected animals and damage around the Zoo. Most of these are Copyrighted and can not be shared here.

Here one more interesting article:

Hurricane Irma: survival stories from 27 zoos & sanctuaries 

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Birdwatching Trips

 

Huge Alligator at Circle B Bar Reserve on TV

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee

Alligator Circle B Bar Reserve by Lee taken in 2014

“And I will walk at liberty:…” (Psalms 119:45a KJV)

I thought you might enjoy seeing the huge alligator that strolled across the path at our favorite local place we go birdwatching. In fact, this was on the national news this evening. We have seen many gators out there, but glad this this one didn’t surprise us in the past.

Alligator about 8 ft by Lee at Circle B

Alligator about 8 ft by Lee at Circle B 2013

On the news they thought he was between 12-14 feet long and was just wanting to cross the path. Not bothering anyone.

“Then shalt thou walk in thy way safely, and thy foot shall not stumble.” (Proverbs 3:23 KJV)

No, we were not out there when this happened. [broken computer, back problems and almost bronchitis] No, this fellow had to do this without our watching him.  :)

Our previous adventures at Circle B

Other Birdwatching Adventures

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Lord’s Avian Wonders – Gnatcatcher Preening

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

“Be dressed in readiness, and keep your lamps lit. (Luke 12:35 NASB)

A visit to Circle B Bar Reserve last week provide a great opportunity to watch a Blue-grey Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) preening. Normally, they are flitting from here to there and never stay put long enough to catch a photo, let along some video.

To preen: personal grooming of a bird’s feathers especially by using its beak. Nice article at About Birding – What is Preening.

They are a very small songbird, 10–13 cm (3.9–5.1 in) in length and weighing only 5–7 g (0.18–0.25 oz). Adult males are blue-grey on the upperparts with white underparts, have a slender dark bill, and a long black tail edged in white. Females are less blue. Both sexes have a white eye ring.

The blue-grey gnatcatcher’s breeding habitat includes open deciduous woods and shrublands in southern Ontario, the eastern and southwestern United States, and Mexico. Though gnatcatcher species are common and increasing in number while expanding to the northeast,[4] it is the only one to breed in Eastern North America. They build a cone-like nest on a horizontal tree branch. The incubation period is 13 days for both sexes. Both parents construct the nest and feed the young; they may raise two broods in a season.

These birds migrate to the southern United States, Mexico, northern Central America – (Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras), Cuba, Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the Cayman Islands. Yeah! They come to Circle B in the winter!

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher preening at Circle B by Lee

They forage actively in trees or shrubs, mainly eating insects, insect eggs and spiders. They may hover over foliage (gleaning), or fly to catch insects in flight (hawking). The tail is often held upright while defending territory or searching for food.

The songs (and calls) are often heard on breeding grounds, (usually away from nest) and occasionally heard other times of the year. Calls: “zkreee, zkreee, zkreee”, Songs: “szpree zpree spreeeeey spree spre sprzrreeeee”

Your adornment must not be merely external–braiding the hair, and wearing gold jewelry, or putting on dresses; but let it be the hidden person of the heart, with the imperishable quality of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is precious in the sight of God. (1 Peter 3:3-4 NASB)

Birdwatching Trips 

Circle B Bar Reserve, FL

Wordless Birds – with Hummingbirds

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Circle B Birdwatching Trip February 2015

Great Blue Heron

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; (Job 12:7 NKJV)

Today we finally got to go birdwatching at Circle B Bar Reserve. We were asked to join Baron Brown (A.K.A. Golden Eagle) and one of the classes he teaches. We were introducing them to Birdwatching. For most of the twelve students, this was their first trip of watch birds.

“Train up a child in the way he should go [and in keeping with his individual gift or bent], and when he is old he will not depart from it. (Proverbs 22:6 AMP)

After we finished, we went to our church where I presented a Powerpoint presentation on birding. Then they got to eat pizza. Not sure which they enjoyed more, the birds or the pizza. ;0)

For Dan and I, this was our first real birdwatching trip of the year. We stopped by the shore of the AF base a week or so ago and birded for about 15-20 minutes. Today’s trip was about two hours long.

Limpkin

Limpkin

What did we see? Altogether, about 25-26 species were spotted. We saw some they didn’t see and they saw three Bald Eagles, that we didn’t see. (I stopped and waited for them to make a short trip up one of the trails. They are younger, you know.)

Osprey

Osprey

We were greeted in the parking lot by an Osprey sitting in the tree with a fish in his feet. That was a good start for them. From there we went out to the marsh where we started seeing the usual birds at Circle B; Great Egrets, Tri-colored Heron, Snowy Egrets, Little Blue Herons, Glossy and White Ibises, an Anhinga with wings spread, Limpkins, Great Blue Herons. There were lots of Turkey and Black Vultures flying overhead, and the Tree Swallows were zipping around all over the place. There was also a tree way down the marsh that was hosting a group of Double-crested Cormorants.

Water birds spotted were Coots, Common Moorhens, and a group of Blue-winged Teals.

Blue-winged Teals

Blue-winged Teals

All the heads turned when a Roseate Spoonbill flew by and later we saw one up close in the water. There was a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks sitting in a tree way off, but I zoomed in and was able to get a half-way decent photo of them. One even raised its tail up to preen, I suppose.

We were teaching them about listening for birds and some Mourning Doves, a Carolina Wren, some Red-bellied and Pileated Woodpeckers and a few others were heard.

While they were off down the trail, we added Red-winged Blackbirds and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher to our list. We had also seen 16 White Pelicans flying right by the park as we were arriving.

All total, not a bad birdwatching trip. Looking forward to more trips as 2015 progresses. Here are just some of today’s photos.

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Fantastic Week-end

Purple Gallinule Reaching Circle B

Purple Gallinule Reaching Circle B

We greatly enjoyed this past week-end. Dr. James J. S. Johnson, from Institute For Creation Research, who writes for this blog, came to speak at our church. We had not met him personally and so this was a time of getting to know him.

Dan and I, Dr. Jim (my name for him) and Golden Eagle (Baron) went birdwatching on Saturday. We took him to our favorite birding spot here, Circle B Bar Reserve. We saw 31 species, several “life birds” for him and one “life bird” for me, an Orange-crowned Warbler.

The Birders at Circle B Bar Reserve

The Birders at Circle B Bar Reserve

After we left there, we went to Lake Morton. I wanted two things to happen, but it didn’t. Was hoping to let them feed the Wood Stork over there and see a Wood Duck. Not to be. We saw one Wood Stork, but he must have already been fed. We did get to feed some of our other friends there. All total, we saw at least 19 species there. Also, the Lord prepared a great day for us. (Rained good part of Sunday, but Saturday was beautiful.)

Feeding White Ibises at Lake Morton

Dr Jim Feeding White Ibises at Lake Morton

While describing our trip later, I misused the word “boring” which got mistaken. What I meant was that compared other visits to those two places, the number of species were less than normal. Birdwatching adventures are never “boring.” How can they when you are out enjoying the Lord’s great creation? Amazing! Fabulous! Superb! Those are better words.

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; (Job 12:7 NKJV)

“You are worthy, O Lord, To receive glory and honor and power; For You created all things, And by Your will they exist and were created.” (Revelation 4:11 NKJV)

As Dr. James told us in his presentations, the Lord uses so much variety, provision, and design in each of His created beings, humans included. If we just slow down, God’s hand can clearly be seen. (my paraphrase) Just with the birds, the wing structure, specialized beaks, programmed travels, interconnection between bird and plant, and on and on. Oh, Praise the Lord!

Anhinga Lake Morton by Dan

Anhinga Lake Morton by Dan

 

I am including the list of birds seen at both places. Also, a short video of a Snowy Egret using his foot to stir up something to eat. Wonder how that habit came about? Could it be that the Lord programmed that in it because of promising to provide for them?

“Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds? (Luke 12:24 NKJV)

Also, Dr. Johnson’s talks showed slides with examples of these points. (From an excerpt)

Witnesses for God’s Truth – “This presentation reviews 5 different kinds of witnesses for God’s truth, each of which takes away excuses from anyone who pretends to have no witness of God and His glory:  (1) the physical creation, including our own physical bodies; (2) the uniqueness of humanity; (3) Scripture; (4) Christ’s incarnation; and (5) one more witness that we all are accountable for, and this one is quite scary!”

Lessons from the Zoo –  “Did you know that the animal kingdom, in all of its diversity, reveals God’s creative genius and glory in uncountable ways?  Why does God like and create variety in creation? How do the various animals living today, as well as other animals (like dinosaurs) which lived in earlier times, confirm the Bible’s account of creation – and refute Darwin’s evolutionary “natural selection” idea? This presentation provides a series of examples of big and little animals that display God’s handiwork in amazing ways. Mammals, reptiles, insects, spiders, fish, shellfish, jellyfish, and more!

Tricolored-Snowy-Great Egret-White Ibis at Circle B

Tricolored-Snowy-Great Egret-White Ibis at Circle B

Circle B Bar Reserve, Polk, US-FL
Nov 8, 2014 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Us, Dr J and Baron – 31 species

Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Anhinga
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
White Ibis
Glossy Ibis
Roseate Spoonbill  6
Black Vulture  50
Turkey Vulture  50
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Purple Gallinule
Common Gallinule
Stilt Sandpiper
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Gray Catbird
Orange-crowned Warbler
Palm Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Boat-tailed Grackle

Lake Morton, Polk, US-FL
Nov 8, 2014 10:30 AM – 11:15 AM
Us, Dr J. and Baron – 18 species (+1 other taxa)

Mute Swan
Black Swan
Black-necked Swan
Muscovy Duck (Established Feral)
Mallard (Domestic type)
Blue-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Anhinga
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
White Ibis
Common Gallinule
American Coot
Laughing Gull
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
Blue Jay
Palm Warbler
Boat-tailed Grackle

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