What Is The Fate of the Barbuda Warbler?

Barbuda Warbler (Setophaga subita) ©WikiC

“The east wind carrieth him away, and he departeth: and as a storm hurleth him out of his place.” (Job 27:21 KJV)

“But the men marvelled, saying, What manner of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him!” (Matthew 8:27 KJV)

While working on the last Attributes and Avian article, – Bounty/Bountiful, I was using the “B – First Name of Birds” list to find a bird to use. The Barbuda Warbler (Setophaga subita) caught my attention. Also, one of our readers wrote a comment, wondering what happened to the birds during a hurricane.

The tiny island of Barbuda took a direct hit by Hurricane Irma and basically destroyed at least 95% of all structures. They have now evacuated all residents off of the island. [inhabited for the last 300 years] (BoingBoing article Not One Single Human Left on the Island) “With 95% of the island’s structures completely destroyed, all 1,800 residents have evacuated to nearby Antigua, and now live in shelters or with relatives. The only living creatures left on Barbuda are pets and livestock, which the non-profit group World Animal Protection are trying to feed and rescue.” So, what about the birds?

Barbuda Warbler (Setophaga subita) ©WikiC

The Barbuda Warbler is endemic to Barbuda. “In addition to the catastrophic impact on Barbuda’s human residents, concern turned to the storm’s effects on the island’s wildlife. The island’s only endemic bird, the near-threatened Barbuda warbler, numbered less than 2,000 individuals prior to the hurricane. It is unknown if the warbler survived the hurricane or its aftermath. Barbuda’s Codrington Lagoon, home to the largest colony of magnificent frigatebirds in the Caribbean, with an estimated 2,500 nesting pairs, was also inundated by the storm surge.” From Hurricane Irma article on Wikipedia. Also, from Wikipedia, “The Barbuda warbler (Setophaga subita) is a species of bird in the Parulidae family. It is endemic to the island of Barbuda in Antigua and Barbuda. Its natural habitat is tropical dry shrubland near wetland areas. It is threatened by habitat loss. It once was considered a subspecies of the Adelaide’s Warbler.”

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©USFWS

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©USFWS

Searching the internet, I couldn’t find out too much about the Barbuda Warbler, but here are a few articles about other bird species that you will find interesting.

Hurricane Irma Disaster Response team assess damage to wildlife populations on Barbuda  – The Bananaquit was found

Hurricane Irma hits Caribbean birds hard, forces closure of Everglades and other parks – BirdWatching – Mentions the Barbuda Warbler

“Irma left the island of Barbuda in ruins; about 95 percent of structures were destroyed or damaged, and nearly all residents were evacuated last week as Hurricane Jose threatened to hit. The fate of Barbuda Warbler, an endemic species that likely numbered less than 2,000 birds before Irma, is unknown.

Jeremy Ross, a scientist with the University of Oklahoma, wonders if Irma was an extinction-level event for the warbler.

Barbuda’s Codrington Lagoon, a RAMSAR-designated wetland and national park, was home to the largest colony of Magnificent Frigatebirds in the region (around 2,500 pairs). According to BirdsCaribbean, the lagoon “was breached during the storm and the sea has flowed in.”

“Thousands of birds must have perished,” said Andrew Dobson, president of BirdsCaribbean, in an article posted on Bernews.com.

Hurricane Irma Rare Bird Round-Up

Dan’s American Flamingo Gardens Photos

One article I wish I hadn’t found, tells about the destruction of so many Flamingo. Translated as “Hundreds of flamingos killed in Cayo Coco by Hurricane Irma

Barbuda Warbler by HBW

Our prayers go out to those who have had to be evacuated from Barbuda, but, also, to all those who have been visited by the Hurricanes this year.

” And I say unto you my friends, Be not afraid of them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do. But I will forewarn you whom ye shall fear: Fear him, which after he hath killed hath power to cast into hell; yea, I say unto you, Fear him. Are not five sparrows sold for two farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before God? But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: ye are of more value than many sparrows.” (Luke 12:4-7 KJV)

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Avian And Attributes – Always There (Omnipresence)

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Ian Montgomery

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Ian Montgomery

“Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” (Hebrews 13:5 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Always There  (Omnipresent)

OMNIPRES’ENT, a. Present in all places at the same time; ubiquitary; as the omnipresent Jehovah.

What a great promise. The Lord definitely was with all of us here in Florida as we rode out Hurricane Irma. We have friends and family around the state and around our area, yet the Lord was right there with each of us during the storm. As I begin the Avian and Attributes series back up, this time coming through using the First Name of birds to match the Attributes, the American Bittern was chosen because they are all over our state. Haven’t seen any yet, but then we haven’t been birdwatching, needless to say.

The eye of the storm went right over Winter Haven and it was a bit of a scary night with the winds howling on Sunday morning August 10. Had gust at least 88 mph, but thankfully we were staying with friends in a house (which never lost power.) We live in a manufactured house (mobile home) and we were all told to evacuate. Monday we came back to survey our place, and praise the Lord, we had minimal damage. We came back Tuesday to stay. I am including photos we took. Our electric came back on yesterday (Thursday 14th), and now we have air conditioning and the internet back up. Yeah!! Lost everything in the refrigerator and freezer, but that is replaceable. We have insurance and it should cover our damage. Again, the Lord is with us through all of this.

Our House before the storm

Our House after Irma – Carport minimal damage

Our church, Faith Baptist came through okay. Baron Brown, who writes on here as Golden Eagle, lost power, but no damage. Emma Foster’s parent’s house had no damage, nor lost electric. God is Good, All the Time!!!

P.S. The Sandhill Cranes in our neighborhood have visited us since the storm and the Doves. Haven’t seen any of the Finches yet. Trust they made it through the storm. The feeders are up and re-stocked.


American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Dans Pix

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Dan

American Bittern

The American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) is a species of wading bird in the heron family of the Pelican order of bird. It has a Nearctic distribution, breeding in Canada and the northern and central parts of the United States, and wintering in the U.S. Gulf Coast states, all of Florida into the Everglades, the Caribbean islands and parts of Central America.

It is a well-camouflaged, solitary brown bird that unobtrusively inhabits marshes and the coarse vegetation at the edge of lakes and ponds. In the breeding season, it is chiefly noticeable by the loud, booming call of the male. Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns Family

Click photos to see full size.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name start with “A”

Birds of the Bible – American Bittern

Ian’s Bird of the Week – American Bittern

“B” is for Bluebird and Bittern: “B” Birds, Part 1

Sunday Inspiration – Bittern

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Hurricane Irma and the Animals at the Zoos

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

“And there arose a great storm of wind, and the waves beat into the ship, so that it was now full. And he was in the hinder part of the ship, asleep on a pillow: and they awake him, and say unto him, Master, carest thou not that we perish? And he arose, and rebuked the wind, and said unto the sea, Peace, be still. And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. And he said unto them, Why are ye so fearful? how is it that ye have no faith? And they feared exceedingly, and said one to another, What manner of man is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” (Mark 4:37-41 KJV)

We here in Florida are preparing for Hurricane Irma to impact our state in the next few days. Dan and I have put in our supplies, and our just waiting to make a final decision to stay or go to a shelter. When we lived in Fort Lauderdale years ago, we went through the fringe of Hurricane Andrew. As you know, we like to visit zoos, especially Zoo Miami. During Andrew, the then Miami Metro Zoo was devastated. Thankfully, it was rebuilt and renamed Zoo Miami.

Thought I would check to see what is being done around the state at some of our favorite Zoos. What I found was more of what they did in previous hurricanes to protect the animals.

Victoria Crowned Pigeon (Goura victoria) by Lee at Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami is right in the path of a direct hit from Irma. The Wings of Asia aviary was built to new strong hurricane strengths, and we trust it can stand up to this new threat. Here are some links to what preparations are happening.

Animal caretakers prepping for Irma with lessons learned from Andrew

“Zoo Miami’s flamingos won’t be riding out Hurricane Irma in a bathroom like they were 25 years ago when Hurricane Andrew devastated the park.

Instead, the park’s majestic birds will be inside their steel and concrete enclosure—an upgrade from the iconic photo that shows the birds huddled in a hay-filled bathroom.

“It’s one of the things we learned from Andrew,” said Ron Magill a spokesman for Zoo Miami. “They will be safe.” CLICK THE LINK TO READ THE REST.

Here are two clips from the Hurricane Andrew damage.


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Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Brevard Zoo – Viera, Florida [from an article in Florida Today] They are on a “wait and see,”

“VIERA — Officials at Brevard Zoo, like a lot of people, are keeping a careful eye on Hurricane Irma.

But as of now it’s business as usual for the zoo staff and the 800 animals there.

Elliot Zirulnik, the communications manager at the zoo, said the zoo has a hurricane plan in place, which includes two-week stockpiles of food for the animals.

If a hurricane warning is issued for the area, then zoo staff will work on securing the animals.

The 800 animals at the zoo consist of 165 species.

“It’s a lot of work but it’s something our team is prepared for,” Zirulnik said.

The zoo is located in Viera, off Wickham Road, near Interstate 95.”

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Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) Jax Zoo by Lee

Jacksonville Zoo

Couldn’t find where they have written about the current hurricane approaching, but here is an interesting article about last year when Hurrican Matthew came through.

The Jacksonville Zoo bringing in ‘ride-out’ team to help protect animals, facility from Hurricane Matthew

I did not list Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa because it appears the hurricane is going to go up the east coast of Florida. They will prepare in Tampa, but also “wait and see.”

Inca Tern at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

The Lord is in control of this storm and already knows where it will go, what and who will be affected by Hurricane Andrew. Your prayers for our residents of Florida; both we humans and the critters.

“The LORD is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.” (Nahum 1:7 KJV)

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Birdwatching at Zoos