Lee’s Six Words – But If You Bite And Devour

Crocodile at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee 3-27-18

Crocodile at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee 3-27-18

“For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another. For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. But if ye bite and devour one another, take heed that ye be not consumed one of another.” (Galatians 5:13-15 KJV)

Crocodile at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee 3-27-18

Crocodile at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee 3-27-18

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[African Gharial or Long Nose crocodile]

Daily Devotionals

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Birds of the Bible – Yellow-billed Storks at Zoo Tampa

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee 032718

“And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.” (Deuteronomy 14:18 KJV)

We were at Lowry Park Zoo, now called Zoo Tampa at Lowry Park, and saw the Yellow-billed Storks in the Sulawesi aviary. This was the first time we have seen them in there. It gave a great opportunity to watch them up-close. Really, up-close! It was great!

Storks are mentioned in the Bible in five verses in the KJV. Leviticus 11:19, Deuteronomy 14:18, Psalm 104:18, Jeremiah 8:7, and Zechariah 5:9. The first two verses have to do with the “Do Not Eat” list, the next two with nesting and migration, and the last with a prophecy.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee 032718

The Yellow-billed stork (Mycteria ibis), sometimes also called the wood stork or wood ibis, is a large African wading stork species in the family Ciconiidae. It is widespread in regions south of the Sahara and also occurs in Madagascar.

The yellow-billed stork is closely related to 3 other species in the Mycteria genus: the American woodstork (Mycteria americana), the milky stork (Mycteria cinerea) and the painted stork (Mycteria leucocephala). It is classified as belonging to one clade with these 3 other species because they all display remarkable homologies in behavior and morphology. In one analytical study of feeding and courtship behaviours of the wood-stork family, M.P. Kahl attributed the same general ethology to all members of the Mycteria genus, with few species-specific variations. [Probably only one of that genus was onboard the Ark] These four species are collectively referred to as the wood-storks, which should not be confused with one alternative common name (wood-stork) for the yellow-billed stork.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee

Before it was established that the yellow-billed stork was closely related to the American woodstork, the former was classified as belonging to the genus Ibis, together with the milky stork and painted stork. However, the yellow-billed stork has actually long been recognised as a true stork and along with the other 3 related stork species, it should not strictly be called an ibis.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee 032718

It is a medium-sized stork standing 90–105 cm (35–41 in) tall. The body is white with a short black tail that is glossed green and purple when freshly moulted. The bill is deep yellow, slightly decurved at the end and has a rounder cross-section than in other stork species outside the Mycteria. Feathers extend onto the head and neck just behind the eyes, with the face and forehead being covered by deep red skin. Both sexes are similar in appearance, but the male is larger and has a slightly longer heavier bill. Males and females weigh approximately 2.3 kg (5.1 lb) and 1.9 kg (4.2 lb) respectively.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) ZTLP by Lee

Colouration becomes more vivid during the breeding season. In the breeding season, the plumage is coloured pink on the upperwings and back; the ordinarily brown legs also turn bright pink; the bill becomes a deeper yellow and the face becomes a deeper red.

Their diet comprises mainly small, freshwater fish of about 60-100mm length and maximally 150g, which they swallow whole. They also feed on crustaceans, worms, aquatic insects, frogs and occasionally small mammals and birds.

This species appears to rely mainly on sense of touch to detect and capture prey, rather than by vision. They feed patiently by walking through the water with partially open bills and probe the water for prey. Contact of the bill with a prey item is followed by a rapid snap-bill reflex, whereby the bird snaps shut its mandibles, raises its head and swallows the prey whole.[3] The speed of this reflex in the closely related American woodstork (Mycteria americana) has been recorded as 25 milliseconds[15] and although the corresponding reflex in the yellow-billed stork has not been quantitatively measured, the yellow-billed stork’s feeding mechanism appears to be at least qualitatively identical to that of the American woodstork.

Wood Stork at Gatorland Walking Past Me

In addition to the snap-bill reflex, the yellow-billed stork also uses a systematic foot stirring technique to sound out evasive prey. It prods and churns up the bottom of the water as part of a “herding mechanism” to force prey out of the bottom vegetation and into the bird’s bill. The bird does this several times with one foot before bringing it forwards and repeating with the other foot. Although they are normally active predators, they have also been observed to scavenge fish regurgitated by cormorants.

[Information from Wikipedia with editing]

Timmy and the Stork

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Hurricane Irma and the Animals at the Zoos

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) female Zoo Miami by Dan

“And there arose a great storm of wind, and the waves beat into the ship, so that it was now full. And he was in the hinder part of the ship, asleep on a pillow: and they awake him, and say unto him, Master, carest thou not that we perish? And he arose, and rebuked the wind, and said unto the sea, Peace, be still. And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. And he said unto them, Why are ye so fearful? how is it that ye have no faith? And they feared exceedingly, and said one to another, What manner of man is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” (Mark 4:37-41 KJV)

We here in Florida are preparing for Hurricane Irma to impact our state in the next few days. Dan and I have put in our supplies, and our just waiting to make a final decision to stay or go to a shelter. When we lived in Fort Lauderdale years ago, we went through the fringe of Hurricane Andrew. As you know, we like to visit zoos, especially Zoo Miami. During Andrew, the then Miami Metro Zoo was devastated. Thankfully, it was rebuilt and renamed Zoo Miami.

Thought I would check to see what is being done around the state at some of our favorite Zoos. What I found was more of what they did in previous hurricanes to protect the animals.

Victoria Crowned Pigeon (Goura victoria) by Lee at Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami is right in the path of a direct hit from Irma. The Wings of Asia aviary was built to new strong hurricane strengths, and we trust it can stand up to this new threat. Here are some links to what preparations are happening.

Animal caretakers prepping for Irma with lessons learned from Andrew

“Zoo Miami’s flamingos won’t be riding out Hurricane Irma in a bathroom like they were 25 years ago when Hurricane Andrew devastated the park.

Instead, the park’s majestic birds will be inside their steel and concrete enclosure—an upgrade from the iconic photo that shows the birds huddled in a hay-filled bathroom.

“It’s one of the things we learned from Andrew,” said Ron Magill a spokesman for Zoo Miami. “They will be safe.” CLICK THE LINK TO READ THE REST.

Here are two clips from the Hurricane Andrew damage.


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Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Brevard Zoo – Viera, Florida [from an article in Florida Today] They are on a “wait and see,”

“VIERA — Officials at Brevard Zoo, like a lot of people, are keeping a careful eye on Hurricane Irma.

But as of now it’s business as usual for the zoo staff and the 800 animals there.

Elliot Zirulnik, the communications manager at the zoo, said the zoo has a hurricane plan in place, which includes two-week stockpiles of food for the animals.

If a hurricane warning is issued for the area, then zoo staff will work on securing the animals.

The 800 animals at the zoo consist of 165 species.

“It’s a lot of work but it’s something our team is prepared for,” Zirulnik said.

The zoo is located in Viera, off Wickham Road, near Interstate 95.”

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Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) Jax Zoo by Lee

Jacksonville Zoo

Couldn’t find where they have written about the current hurricane approaching, but here is an interesting article about last year when Hurrican Matthew came through.

The Jacksonville Zoo bringing in ‘ride-out’ team to help protect animals, facility from Hurricane Matthew

I did not list Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa because it appears the hurricane is going to go up the east coast of Florida. They will prepare in Tampa, but also “wait and see.”

Inca Tern at Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

The Lord is in control of this storm and already knows where it will go, what and who will be affected by Hurricane Andrew. Your prayers for our residents of Florida; both we humans and the critters.

“The LORD is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.” (Nahum 1:7 KJV)

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Birdwatching at Zoos

Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo’s Parrots Plus

Macaw Flyover Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Macaw Flyover Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

You have seen many articles of our birdwatching adventures to Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, Florida. There are quite a few YouTube videos of the Zoo. Among some photos from our adventures, I wanted to share a few their videos. It starts off showing the Parrot Flyover with Macaws. Later in the video there are some baby Turacos. There are other animals shown.

For every kind of beasts, and of birds, and of serpents, and of things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed of mankind: (James 3:7 KJV)

Violet Turaco (Musophaga violacea) by Lee at LPZ

Violet Turaco (Musophaga violacea) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo

Here is a much better photo of a Violet (Violaceous) Turaco  (Musophaga violacea) that I took at the Brevard Zoo, Melbourne, Florida.

Violet Turaco (Musophaga violacea) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Violet Turaco (Musophaga violacea) Brevard Zoo by Lee

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Birdwatching Trips to Lowry Park Zoo
Lowry Park Zoo
Sunday Inspiration – Turacos
Musophagidae – Turacos
Houston Zoo – Vacation – Part 2 – Macaw and Turacos
Lord’s Avian Wonders – Can’t We Talk In Private? – Macaw

Gideon

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Lord’s Avian Wonders – Some Zoo Critters

Thought I would share some more photos from the Zoo and a video that has challenged me. So far, in this new year the Lord is treating me well. I trust it is starting out alright for you also.

A land which the LORD thy God careth for: the eyes of the LORD thy God are always upon it, from the beginning of the year even unto the end of the year. (Deuteronomy 11:12 KJV)

Sacred Ibis Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Sacred Ibis Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Squirrel Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Squirrel Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction. (Proverbs 1:7 KJV)

Bald Eagle Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Bald Eagle Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Bald Eagle Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Le

Bald Eagle Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Le

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. (John 1:1-3 KJV)

Inca Tern Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Inca Tern Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Inca Tern Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Inca Tern Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Thy word is true from the beginning: and every one of thy righteous judgments endureth for ever. (Psalms 119:160 KJV)

“Winning Life’s Battles” by Pastor Nathan Osborne was a great message that challenged for AD 2016. It is worth the time to watch. Our pastor’s messages are now being placed on the Faith Baptist Church website.

“Reach for the impossible” was one of his points that challenged my heart. I have some interesting challenges coming during this new year and the Lord has and is using this message to encourage me.

I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me. (Philippians 4:13 KJV)

Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me. I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing. (John 15:4-5 KJV)

I trust we will all have a productive new year. Whether it is accepting new challenges or just doing regular things like birdwatching and, then after finding the bird, trying to get a decent photo of it. :0)

Kookaburra Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Kookaburra Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Kookaburra Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Kookaburra Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit. (Ecclesiastes 7:8 KJV)

(Bolding in verses is mine)

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Birdwatching Trip – Zoo 12-31-15

Rainbow Lorikeet by Dan

Rainbow Lorikeet by Dan

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

Off we went on the last day of 2015 to try to pick up our updated Lowry Park Zoo passes. They still weren’t ready to issue all of the new ones, so, all was not lost. Never head to a zoo without a camera.

The place was sort of crowded because they were throwing a “Noon Days Eve” party for the young folks. At noon they had a count-down to Noon “10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1”. Then they shot off paper confetti and ribbons. They were all having a great time. Most of those kids would never make to 12 midnight anyway. For that matter, neither did Dan or I. :)

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Over in the Lorikeet feeding aviary, they seemed more colorful than normal and several of them were bouncing around and carrying on. Must have been their way of celebrating the coming New Year AD 2016. Also, like those celebrating, sometimes they get carried away and start becoming destructive.

A new Orangutan was born on December 21st and hoped to see the little one, but Momma had different plans. She was laying with the baby between her and her big arm and had a piece of cardboard over her. Her mate was nearby with leaves over his head. (This is normal for these at this zoo.)

Mom and Papa Orangutan

Mom and Papa Orangutan

Mom Orangutan looking out and weary.

Mom Orangutan looking out and weary.

Papa Orangutan blocks the view.

Papa Orangutan blocks the view.

When a crowd came around to look also, he got up and sat right in front of her to block all views. The Lord even gives His critters a sense that they need privacy.

Here is a beautiful creation that takes your breath away. Wow! How did the Lord come up with so many designs in all His critters, not just the birds. I have no idea what the second fish is. He looks happy. If you know, leave a comment.

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; And the fish of the sea will explain to you. Who among all these does not know That the hand of the LORD has done this, (Job 12:7-9 NKJV)

Off to check out the other birds and see what else was going on. Enjoy the photos. These were our last ones of AD 2015. By the way, the first bird I spotted this year was a Sandhill Crane. (Later the same day, 1st, saw a Belted Kingfisher and a Bald Eagle, plus more normal residents.

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You can see videos of a Masked Lapwing, a Demoiselle Crane and a Blue-faced Honeyeater that I also took by clicking the links.

Birdwatching Trips

Good News

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