The Created Sun and Moon – Re-post from I.C.R.

Solar Eclipse 2011 ©WikiC

“The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down, and hasteth to his place where he arose.” (Ecclesiastes 1:5 KJV)

It is He Who sits upon the circuit of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are like grasshoppers; it is He  Who stretches out the heavens like a curtain, and spreads them out as a tent to dwell in (Isaiah 40:22)

Dr. James J. S. Johnson (usually appearing as “JJSJ” on this blog), from the Institute for Creation Research, has released a Podcast about our Created Sun and Moon. Especially with the Total Eclipse of the Sun today (August 21st AD2017) by the Moon, across North America, we thought you would enjoy this information.

“What does Scripture say about the sun and the moon? How do these two “great lights” rule the heavens? Dr. Jim Johnson describes the sun and moon’s impact on our planet, as well as their effects on plants, animals, and humans. He also sheds light on a historical controversy involving Galileo…..” CLICK TO HEAR

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More from James J. S. Johnson

Airplane Fingers – Creation Moments

AIRPLANE FINGERS

” Then God said, ‘Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.'” Genesis 1:20

Aerodynamics, the science of flight, is a highly complex science. This is because many complex forces are acting on anything in flight. These forces include the power available for flight and drag produced by the flying object. Each of these categories include many additional forces that depend on the shape of the flying object, the shape and length of the wings, the speed and the altitude. This is why, for example, high altitude planes have very long wings.

Learjet 60 with winglets ©Myfreewallpapers

One critical force that has been under recent study is the turbulence that forms at the tips of the wings. The shorter the wing, the more energy consuming turbulence forms at the tip of the wing. Different wing designs have been tried to decrease this turbulence. Engineers have had some success reducing this turbulence with winglets. You may have seen these small vertical wings on the wingtips of some airplanes. Swiss researchers have been studying vultures with the hope of finding a better solution to this problem because vultures have a relatively short wing span that has proven to be surprisingly efficient. They discovered that this is because the feathers at the vultures’ wing tips spread out. They then tested a wing with a finger-like cascade of blades at the end.

Turkey Vulture in flight ©World Bird Sanctuary

Their new wing was more than four times more efficient than the average wing design in use today! It takes a great deal of faith in evolution to think that natural selection possesses such knowledge of aerodynamics. Clearly the vulture was designed by an intelligent Creator Who understands aerodynamics even better than we do!

Prayer:
I thank You, dear Father, that we can see Your wisdom in the creation. Amen.
Notes:
Wingfingers, Flying/January 1999, p.108. Photo: Learjet 60 with winglets. Courtesy of Adrian Pingstone. (PD)

©Creation Moments, with Permission, 2017

Wingtip Device – Wikipedia

More Interesting Articles

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Birdwatching at Sea Pines

 

Great Egret preening – from Sea Pines Rehab Hospital Wall – by Lee

Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.” (Genesis 1:20 NKJV)

Sea Pines Rehabilitation Hospital is located in Melbourne, Florida. As many of my readers know, I recently had extensive back surgery. Dr. James Billys, who did my surgery, practices in Melbourne. Four days after surgery [June 22nd],  I was released from Wuesthoff Hospital and was transferred to Sea Pines to begin my rehabilitation. What a fantastic place to start my recovery. Also, I am so thankful for all of you who have been praying for me as I am recovering.

Seabirds at Shore in Brevard County. Take n from wall of Sea Pine Rehab Hospital by Lee

This is not to tell about that, but to show you some of the great photos that covered the walls. Most of the photos were 3 feet x 4 feet, and were of birds and scenery around Brevard County, where Melbourne is located. Many of you will recall the articles that have been written about our birdwatching adventures over there. That is where Viera Wetlands, Brevard Zoo, Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge and other great places to watch God’s Creation are located.

Great Blue Heron Taking Off

A day or two before my two weeks of rehab finished, I felt well enough to go “Birdwatching at Sea Pines.” With cell phone in hand, sitting in the wheel chair, minus the foot rest, off I went. Propelling myself with either my feet or hands, I covered the whole place. The place was larger than I had imagined, and was tuckered by the time I returned to my room.

White Ibis Photo outside my room at Sea Pines

I trust you will enjoy the scenery and especially the bird pictures. Also, overlook that these were taken from wheel chair height and unfortunately not straight. Did the best I could to straighten them up. Enjoy!

Lee’s Six Word Saturday – 7/29/17

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Baby Turtle Emerging from the Sand for the 1st time - At Sea Pines Rehab Hospital by Lee

JUST SHALL COME OUT OF TROUBLE

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“The wicked is snared by the transgression of his lips: but the just shall come out of trouble.” (Proverbs 12:13 KJV)

Baby Turtle Emerging from the Sand for the 1st time – At Sea Pines Rehab Hospital by Lee

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More Daily Devotionals

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Sunday Inspiration – A New Day

Trust you will enjoy a different Sunday Inspiration. A friend sent this and I wanted to share it, plus, I have been dealing with my back problem and am awaiting surgery. Thanks for understanding not using birds for a change.

“This is the LORD’S doing; it is marvellous in our eyes. This is the day which the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.” (Psalms 118:23-24 KJV)

“The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever.” (Isaiah 40:8 KJV)

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More Sunday Inspirations

The Amazing Butterfly

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Why Kangaroo Rats Don’t Get Dehydrated in the Desert

An interesting article by Dr. Jim, JJSJ. I am reposting it here. The Lord’s amazing Providential Design is beyond our human comprehension of His Love and Care for all critters.

rockdoveblog

Behold, the hindermost of the nations shall be a wilderness, a dry land, and a desert. (Jeremiah 50:12b)

DESERT SCRUBLAND near EL PASO, TX photo credit: Pinterest

Kangaroo rats thrive in America’s hot, dry deserts — why don’t they suffer from being dehydrated?  How do they get enough water to survive, since they don’t need to drink water like almost all other mammals?   In short, God has designed and constructed kangaroo rats so that they get their water from their food, especially drought-resistant seeds that abound in the desert.  As they digest such xeric foods, the rats produce (within themselves) all the water that they need, metabolically (i.e., from the normal digestion process), and they retain most of that water by releasing very little of it in their urine (as noted below).

In sum, kangaroo rats are made to get their water form their food and to conserve it…

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Animal Heros Video To Watch – Emotional

Here Is A Video For You To Watch – Emotional

Be prepared to shed a tear. [I did.]

“And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day.” (Genesis 1:31 KJV)

These animals show such kindness to other animals. May they remind us to show kindness to those around us; to critters and especially our human acquaintances.

“And to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity.” (2 Peter 1:7 KJV)

“For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the LORD endureth for ever. Praise ye the LORD.” (Psalms 117:2 KJV)

“Nature of God” Video by Andie’s Isle

Nature of God Intro Page for Video by Andie's Isle

“Who is like unto thee, O LORD, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?” (Exodus 15:11 KJV)

Please Click the Link to View A Very Great Video – http://www.andiesisle.com/thenatureofgod.html

This was sent to me by our Mission’s Pastor Peter Brock.

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Wordless Toucan

Celebrating the Life-Saving Heroism of Alaskan Dog Mushers (and their Sled Dogs) – Repost

What an interesting article that James J. S. Johnson wrote on his blog. I thought you might enjoy it. The video of an actual dog slide ride is really challenging.

rockdoveblog

 Celebrating the Life-Saving Heroism of Alaskan Dog Mushers (and their Sled Dogs)

James J. S. Johnson, JD, ThD, CNHG

sleddogs-alaska-iditarod

As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.  Galatians 6:10

Imagine a celebration of Siberian husky sled dogs, harnessed together as a racing team, guided by their human driver (called a “musher”), zooming across frigid snow trails in rural Alaska:  this is what happens in a commemorative festival/event called the IDITAROD TRAIL RACE.  (See the YouTube video footage below.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI3bliK7R94

The Iditarod is an outdoors reenactment-like celebration of dogsled mushing, to remember the heroic relay race – through day and night, blizzard winds, snow, and ice – to save human lives, during a life-or-death crisis in January-February AD1925, when a highly contagious diphtheria plague struck like a serial killer, menacing the almost-unreachable population of Nome, Alaska.

The crisis…

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WHY BIRDWATCHING IS WORTHWHILE — 3 Lessons from a Box Turtle: Independence, Patience, and Frugality

 WHY BIRDWATCHING IS WORTHWHILE

3 Lessons from a Box Turtle: Independence, Patience, and Frugality

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

boxturtle-cloudy-day-animalhub

Peter seeing him [i.e., the apostle John] saith to Jesus, Lord, and what shall this man [i.e., John] do? Jesus saith unto him [i.e., Peter], If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee?   Follow thou Me.   (John 21:21-22)

Peter was quick to check on what others would or should be doing, but the Lord reminded Peter that personal accountability is more important. Yes, our lives are interdependent – however, practicing independence (especially as it applies to individual accountability) is an important life skill.  And that is also true of how box turtles live their humble lives, providing an object lesson to birdwatchers. Plus, turtles provide 2 more lessons for birdwatchers, as we shall see.

Turtle traits and birdwatching? Life lessons?

Recently I was reading an ecology perspective (a few excerpts of which are quoted hereinbelow) about the life of a Box Turtle  –  and it reminded me of 3 reasons why I enjoy birdwatching. [By the way, for a short video on Eastern Box Turtles, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-blYc9GkyFs  .]

Specifically, birding is a worthy investment for economic reasons – and because it encourages recreational independence, and patient resilience. More on those three reasons below.  (Of course, there are other worthy reasons for birdwatching  –  perhaps I will address them some other time.)

easternboxturtle-markswanson

BOX TURTLE LIVING: DON’T WORRY, BE HAPPY.

Imagine driving down a country road, where a turtle is slowly crossing – you try to avoid squashing the poor reptile, by swerving to miss it. Being a slow pedestrian, in traffic contexts, is a distinct disadvantage.  However, the turtle’s slowness is more of an advantage, most of the time, because its independent lifestyle is never in a rush to “keep up with the Joneses”.

Instead of allowing the image of a lethargic, indifferent creature to mislead you [as you consider the lifestyle of a rural turtle], envision these pedestrians as animals enviably insulated form [most of ] the vagaries of their setting. In fact, land tortoises seem more divorced form environmental stresses than any other Appalachian vertebrate.

The turtle’s habitat provides our first hint of its independence.  Box turtles live in a variety of terrestrial situations—though permanent water does not seem to be a requirement.  High densities of these reptiles commonly occur in woodlots with large trees, canopy gaps, and a diversified ground cover.  The turtles bask in openings in the canopy and munch on a variety of short plants.  The close ground cover of woody shrubs and leaf litter provide shelter.  To feed and bask, box turtles also frequently enter open areas adjacent to the woods.  . . . .

[Quoting  George Constanz, “Box Turtle’s Independence”, in HOLLOWS, PEEPERS, & HIGHLANDERS:  AN APPALCAHIAN MOUNTAIN ECOLOGY, 2nd ed. (W. Va. Univ. Press, 2004), page 127, emphasis added.]

EasternBoxTurtle.MattReinbold-Wikipedia.jpg

Another one of the box turtle’s built-in advantages is its patient resilience – it can survive a “tough neighborhood”, climatologically speaking.   (Patience, of course, is a benefit for any birder.)

One environmental condition [that] turtles do respond to is a cold snap in autumn. Box turtles enter hibernation with the first killing frost.  A wet fall [i.e., a rainy autumn] without a sudden freeze provides good conditions for entering hibernation.  Dry weather, which makes digging difficult, and a sudden freeze may trap some individuals above ground.  Surprisingly, box turtles do not hibernate below the frost line, but remain dormant at depths of up to five inches below the leaf litter.  . . . .

Members of the genus Terrapene, which includes the eastern box turtle, hibernate in shallow terrestrial burrows that feature a vertical extension to the surface.  In cold spells, turtles turn their heads farthest from the opening.  In Ohio, the average turtle spends 142 days in a burrow under three inches of leaf litter with its plastron [i.e., the ventral (“belly”) surface of the turtle’s shell] recessed two inches into the soil.  In such shallow retreats, box turtles are exposed to freezing temperatures, yet they usually survive.  Able to supercool to only -1.1 C [i.e., just below freezing] this strategy cannot be its entire secret [of winter weather survival]. . . .

In an astounding adaptation [i.e., an amazing design-feature that fits the turtle for filling that habitat], the box turtle is able to survive the freezing of 58 percent of its body water for seventy-three hours, making the box turtle the largest animal known to exhibit freeze-tolerance. . . . .

[Quoting  George Constanz, HOLLOWS, PEEPERS, & HIGHLANDERS:  AN APPALCAHIAN MOUNTAIN ECOLOGY, 2nd ed. (W. Va. Univ. Press, 2004), pages 128-129.]  In other words, turtles wait during “tough times” – and their patience is routinely rewarded.  (Likewise, birdwatchers who are patient and still are more likely to enjoy seeing the birds, especially if binoculars are handy – as opposed to scaring the birds off (by movements that startle them) due to spectator impatience.

easternboxturtle-shenandoahnp-va-wikipedia

A third advantageous trait of the box turtle is its metabolic frugality – turtles are slow to spend their energy, so that means they don’t need to eat a lot to replenish spent energy!

A box turtle’s daily behavior seems to be divorced form the caprice of its immediate environment. The condition of a turtle at any particular time appears more an integration of its past experiences than a reflection of its present stresses [due to three of the turtle’s  anatomical/physiological design-features].  . . . .

Most obviously, a box turtle’s shell takes the edge off environmental extremes by buffering its body from environmental stresses such as heat and drought. During severe drought, the tortoises do not concentrate around creeks—they merely seek moist sites within their home ranges, make a form [i.e., a depressions in surface vegetation, descending into only about one inch of topsoil] under a pile of leaves, and rest peacefully.  Second, their forms and hinged plastrons protect and conceal them from what few predators they do have, such as raccoons.  And third, box turtles have a low metabolism. Coupling that with omnivorous food habits, they enjoy a high supply—low demand economy and do not need to hustle.  They eat insects, earthworms, strawberries, [other] fruits, mushrooms, and many other foods, yet they burn these calories slowly.  In these ways, box turtles enjoy a tremendous hedge against environmental stresses.

[Quoting  George Constanz, HOLLOWS, PEEPERS, & HIGHLANDERS:  AN APPALCAHIAN MOUNTAIN ECOLOGY, 2nd ed. (W. Va. Univ. Press, 2004), page 131, emphasis added.]

In other words, the box turtle is frugal about metabolically “spending” its food energy – if it doesn’t spend a lot it doesn’t need a lot to live on. As the old saying goes, which surely applies to animal metabolism:  “if your output exceeds your input, your upkeep is your downfall”.

So how does this apply to birdwatching?

First, just as turtles are relatively independent, birdwatching is a pastime for those who are independent – there is no need for popular approval for birdwatching. Birdwatching can be done as a group, yet it also can be done individually.  Is birding “popular”?  Forget about “peer pressure” or “fashionableness” – birdwatching is worthwhile whether it is “in season” or “out of season”.  Independent-minded people are often birdwatchers, because birding is a wonderful avocation regardless of whether others do or do not appreciate it.

Second, just as turtles are patient and calm, birdwatching requires patience for best viewing results.

Third, just as turtles are economical in their metabolic “spending” habits, birdwatching is a pastime that is perfect for people of modest means, as well as for people of surplus means who are frugal with their resources. Many “hobbies” are expensive – but not birdwatching!

Although it is certainly possible to spend a lot of money (as a birdwatching), such as by taking a birding vacation to Costa Rica, a lot of birdwatching opportunities can be enjoyed with just a bird-book, binoculars, notepad, and pen.  Having an inexpensive “hobby” provides a very real economic freedomso one need not worry about the cost of birdwatching!  Furthermore, many educational resources, about birds, are available (free of charge) on the Internet, including the God-honoring blogsite LEESBIRD.COM !

So, enjoy your birdwatching opportunities – it’s good for practicing independence (instead of trying to “keep up with the Joneses”), it develops your patience, and it’s economically responsible!

><> JJSJ

PHOTO CREDITS:

Box Turtle on cloudy day: Animal Hub

Eastern Box Turtle near grass: Mark Swanson

Eastern Box Turtle close-up: Matt Reinbold

Eastern Box Turtle in leaves: Wikipedia

5 Eastern Box Turtles video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-blYc9GkyFs

A Curious Cheetah – from an email

A friend sent me this in an email and it is just to good to not pass on.

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A curious Cheetah got up close and personal with a Jeep on safari at the Masai Mara game reserve in Kenya when the animal jumped into the back seat of a jeep. The wild cat, with its razor sharp claws and teeth, sure is one kitty you’d rather not have curling up on your lap. But, nevertheless, the bold animal hopped into the back seat of a jeep as it drove through the African plains – much to the shock of an Irishman inside.

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

After entering the vehicle, it slowly sauntered over to Mickey McCaldin until it was barely a foot away from his face. Family friend David Horsey captured the tense standoff between the pair as it looked like the cheetah was going to make himself comfortable on Mickey’s lap. David, 62 from Mombasa, Kenya, said: ‘I’ve been living in Kenya all my life and I’ve never seen anything like this. ‘The cheetah just wasn’t scared of getting up close and personal. At first Mickey was really relaxed but I think he was quite concerned it might try and sit in his lap.

‘Unlike a domestic cat, you certainly don’t want that.’

Cheetah Joins Safari by David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari by David Horsey

At first, the cheetah simply looked at Irish tourist Mickey McCaldin curiously, but then it moved closer as if to curl up on his lap

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

At one point, the large cat was so close to Mickey that it was only about a foot away from his face Family friend David Horsey captured the tense standoff between the pair, including the moment that the animal leapt into the safari jeep making himself comfortable: The cheeky cheetah and his family casually lounged atop the group’s Land Cruiser jeep

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

David captured the pictures on June 12, as the group tracked a well-known family of cheetahs, whose mother is called Malaika. Having followed them for a couple of days previously, they observed that the family hadn’t had a kill for several days. David said: ‘The family had been looking for a gazelle for a few days with no luck. ‘As we’d been around for a couple of days, I think they were used to the jeep so the mom jumped on top to get a better view. ‘I think the other cheetah tried to follow her up but went a different way. ‘Once it had got bored of Mickey it turned away and looked out of the vehicle for a few minutes. ‘It just jumped out afterwards.’

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Photographer David, 62 from Mombasa, Kenya, said: ‘I’ve been living in Kenya all my life and I’ve never seen anything like this’

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Cheetah Joins Safari ©David Horsey

Surprise of their lives! The safari group was comprised of a guide, as well as Mickey, his wife, sister, photographer David and David’s wife. Mickey was out on vacation with his wife and sister, who are friends of David and his wife Vicky. David said: ‘Vicky and I have lived in Kenya all our lives but we never feel the urge to leave. ‘People always ask us where we’re going on vacation and it’s always around the game reserves. ‘You never know what you’re going to come across – just like this.’

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Maybe these Cheetahs are practicing for when this verse will be fulfilled in the future.

And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear. The wolf and the lamb shall feed together, and the lion shall eat straw like the bullock: and dust shall be the serpent’s meat. They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountain, saith the LORD. (Isaiah 65:24-25 KJV)

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