Singing Dogs at Lowry Park Zoo

Singing Dogs at Lowry Pk Zoo

Singing Dog at Lowry Pk Zoo

Serve the LORD with gladness: come before his presence with singing. (Psalms 100:2 KJV)

On one of our trips to the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL, the New Guinea Singing Dogs were enjoying themselves with a duet.

Here is the video of them chorus howling.

 

 

The whole earth is at rest, and is quiet: they break forth into singing. (Isaiah 14:7 KJV)

The dogs were mentioned in Bali Myna and Singing Dogs. It also contains a video taken that day.

The New Guinea singing dog (also known as the New Guinea dingo, Hallstrom dog, bush dingo, New Guinea wild dog, and singer) is a wild dog once found throughout New Guinea. New Guinea singing dogs are named for their unique vocalization. Little is known about New Guinea singing dogs in their native habitat. There are only two confirmed photographs of wild singing dogs. Current genetic research indicates that the ancestors of New Guinea dingoes were probably taken overland through present day China to New Guinea by travelers

Compared to other species in its genus, the New Guinea singing dog is described as relatively short-legged and broad-headed. These dogs have an average shoulder height of 12–18 in (31–46 centimetres) and weigh 20–31 lb (9–14 kilograms). They do not have rear dewclaws.

Singing Dog Sign LPZ by Lee

Singing Dog Sign LPZ by Lee

The limbs and spine of Singers are very flexible, and they can spread their legs sideways to 90°, comparable to the Norwegian Lundehund. They can also rotate their front and hind paws more than domestic dogs, which enables them to climb trees with thick bark or branches that can be reached from the ground; however their climbing skills do not reach the same level as those of the gray fox.

The eyes, which are highly reflective, are almond-shaped and are angled upwards from the inner to outer corners with dark eye rims. Eye color ranges from dark amber to dark-brown. Their eyes exhibit a bright green glow when lights are shown in at them in low light conditions. These two features allow singing dogs to see more clearly in low light, a trait which is unusual in canids.

New Guinea singing dogs have erect, pointed, fur-lined ears. As with other wild dogs, the ‘ears’ perk or lay forward, which is suspected to be an important survival features for the species. The ears can be rotated like a directional receiver to pick up faint sounds. Singer tails should be bushy, long enough to reach the hock, free of kinks, and have a white tip.

Singing Dogs at Lowry Pk Zoo

Singing Dog at Lowry Pk Zoo

New Guinea singing dogs are named for their distinctive and melodious howl, which is characterized by a sharp increase in pitch at the start and very high frequencies at the end. According to observations the howling of these dogs can be clearly differentiated from that of Australian dingoes, and differs significantly from that of grey wolves and coyotes.

An individual howl lasts an average of 3 seconds, but can last as long as 5 seconds. At the start, the frequency rises and stabilizes for the rest of the howling, but normally shows abrupt changes in frequency.

New Guinea singing dogs sometimes howl together, which is commonly referred to as chorus howling. During chorus howling, one dog starts and others join in shortly afterward. In most cases, chorus howling is well synchronized, and the howls of the group end nearly simultaneously. Spontaneous howling is most common during the morning and evening hours. When they are kept with dogs that bark, Singers may mimic the other dogs. (Wikipedia with editing)

Do you sing?

Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord; (Ephesians 5:19 KJV)

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See:

Birds Of The Bible – Joy And Laughter

Bali Myna at Lowry Park and Palm Beach Zoos

(Found this on the Kid’s Blog, never posted here.)

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Interesting Birds – Fairywrens of Australia & New Guinea

Variegated Fairywren (Malurus lamberti) by Ian

Variegated Fairywren (Malurus lamberti) by Ian

Thinking

I know all the birds of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are Mine. (Psalm 50:11)

To listen – Fairywrens by Creation Moments

Splendid Fairywren (Malurus splendens) by Ian

Splendid Fairywren (Malurus splendens) by Ian

There are 13 species of a brightly plumed little songbird known as the fairy wren. The birds are found in Australia and New Guinea. So colorful are their feathers that the various species go by names like “superb,” “splendid” and “lovely.” However, even more noteworthy is the birds’ unusual behavior.

A male courting a female will bring her a flower petal. The petal usually matches his color or is a deeply contrasting color. Normally a perky little bird with an upright tail, when courting he lowers his tail and creeps around close to the ground. As he twists his body back and forth, he puffs out his cheek feathers. If the female accepts his courting, she builds their nest alone, lining it with bright parrot feathers. While they mate for life, they are not known for fidelity to their mates. When mature, females will go off on their own, but males may stay with their parents for a year or more. Their main duty is to guard the family nest. If danger approaches the nest, the guard will puff up his wings, lower his tail and scuttle through dry grass, pretending to be a mouse. The idea is to lure the predator away from the nest.

Lovely Fairywren (Malurus amabilis) by Ian

Lovely Fairywren (Malurus amabilis) by Ian

The beauty and unusual behavior of these little birds testifies to more than God’s creativity and love for beauty. They remind us of the beauty that was lost to God’s creation when it was tainted by man’s sin. Thankfully, some of that beauty that was lost can return to our lives through the forgiveness of sins that is found in Jesus Christ.

Prayer: Dear Father, I thank You for the beauty of Your creation and for giving me the forgiveness of sins in Jesus Christ. Amen.

References: Natural History, 11/94, pp. 56-62, “Faithful Philanderers

Copyright © 2010 Creation Moments, Inc., PO Box 839, Foley, MN  56329, www.creationmoments.com.


The Fairywrens are in the Maluridae – Australasian Wrens Family which is part of the Passeriforms Order. They are like in the true wrens (Troglodytidae family) in their shape and the way they cock their long tail. The Maluridae family not only includes the Fairywren, but also the Emu-wren and Grasswren. They range from 5-7.5 in (12-19 cm) to 8-8.5 in (20-22 cm). Most have a short, fine bill, while the Grasswren’s is a little thicker.

Superb Fairywren by Keith Blomerly