Birds Illustrated by Color Photography Move Finished

Snowy Egret in Breeding Plumage at Gatorland by Dan

Both Volume I and Volume II are completely moved to the Birds of the Bible for Kids blog. As best I could, all the links to photos, information and articles should be working properly. I am encouraging you to stop by and check out this latest volume.

Here is the rest of the latest blog over there:

I trust you will enjoy reading the articles. If you are not familiar with the Birds Illustrated by Color Photography, at the beginning of the index, they mention that the articles are written for the younger reader. Then, more information is given about the bird on a normal reading level. After that, I updated with current photos and information. Even though the original articles were produced in a magazine in 1897, they are worth repeating here.

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography Vol #1 – Complete covered the first Volume. Here is a list of the articles for Volume II. Please enjoy discovering interesting avian wonders from their Creator.

Volume 2, Number 1, July 1897

Wood Duck by Dan at Lake Hollingsworth

Wood Duck by Dan at Lake Hollingsworth [Real-not a painting]

Bird Song – July
The Bald-Headed Eagle
The Semi-Palmated Ring Plover
The Mallard Duck
The American Avocet
The Canvas-Back Duck
The Wood Duck
The Anhinga Or Snake Bird
The American Woodcock
The American Scoter
Old Abe
The Snowy Heron

Volume 2, Number 2, August 1897

Evening Grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertina) male by Raymond Barlow

Evening Grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertina) male by Raymond Barlow

Bird Song
The American Osprey
The Sora Rail
The Kentucky Warbler
The Red Breasted Merganser
The Yellow Legs
The Skylark
Wilson’s Phalarope
The Evening Grosbeak
The Turkey Vulture
To A Water-Fowl
Gambel’s Partridge

Volume 2, Number 3, September 1897

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) by BirdingPix

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) by BirdingPix

Bird Song – September
The Yellow Warbler
The Hermit Thrush
The Song Sparrow
The Cuckoo
The Ruby-Throated Humming Bird
The House Wren
The Phoebe
The Ruby-Crowned Kinglet
The Mourning Dove
How The Birds Secured Their Rights
The Captive’s Escape
The White-Breasted Nuthatch

Volume 2, Number 4, October 1897

Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus swainsoni) by Ian

Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus swainsoni) by Ian

The Blackburnian Warbler
The Lost Mate
The American Goldfinch
The Chimney Swift
Shore Lark
The Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker
The Warbling Vireo
The Wood Pewee
The Snowflake
The Slate-Colored Junco
The Kingbird

Volume 2, Number 5, November 1897

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) by Daves BirdingPix

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) by Daves BirdingPix

John James Audubon
The Summer Tanager
The American White-Fronted Goose
The Turnstone
The Belted Piping Plover
The Wild Turkey
The Cerulean Warbler
The Yellow-Billed Tropic Bird
The European Kingfisher
The Vermilion Fly-Catcher     Version II
The Lazuli Bunting
Bird Miscellany Plus

Volume 2, Number 6, December 1897

American Flamingo Beak at Gatorland by Lee

American Flamingo Beak at Gatorland by Lee

The Ornithological Congress
The Mountain Bluebird
The English Sparrow
Allen’s Humming Bird
The Green-Winged Teal
The Black Grouse
The American Flamingo
The Verdin
The Bronzed Grackle
The Ring-Necked Pheasant
More Bird Miscellany
The Yellow-Breasted Chat

Birds Vol 2 #6 – The Volume II. July to December 1897 – Index

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Wordless Birds

Learning from our Birds – The Leap of Faith – Re-post

My Christian friends I have met through blogging, Aussiebirder, just put out a very interesting and applicable application for faith. Please check out this blog:

The most interesting observation as a scientist that I have made over my years of birding and photographing birds is that of capturing what is termed the leap of faith. This phenomena is usually only observed in small passerines (tree perching birds) and not so much in larger species where much more effort is required to become airborne. The above photo was my first observation, taken of a Lord Howe Island Golden Whistler male leaping off a branch, into the air, quite confidently, with wings closed. My camera had caught something my limited human eye had not.

Rounded Up Some Bluebirds

Vol. 2 – 6 The Mountain Bluebird, which is from the Kid’s Section, had some Bluebirds skip out and break their links. They were too pretty to let them get away.

The Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited has some very interesting information about birds, but written from a young reader’s level. Here is the Mountain Bluebird reblogged with some added information and the Bluebirds back on their posts.

This was written back in 2013. Trust you enjoy this article and links to other Bluebird articles.

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Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) for Birds Illustrated

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) for Birds Illustrated

From col. Chi. Acad. Sciences. Copyrighted by
Nature Study Pub. Co., 1897, Chicago.

THE MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.

imgi

N an early number of Birds we presented a picture of the common Bluebird, which has been much admired. The mountain Bluebird, whose beauty is thought to excel that of his cousin, is probably known to few of our readers who live east of the Rocky Mountain region, though he is a common winter sojourner in the western part of Kansas, beginning to arrive there the last of September, and leaving in March and April. The habits of these birds of the central regions are very similar to those of the eastern, but more wary and silent. Even their love song is said to be less loud and musical. It is a rather feeble, plaintive, monotonous warble, and their chirp and twittering notes are weak. They subsist upon the cedar berries, seeds of plants, grasshoppers, beetles, and the like, which they pick up largely upon the ground, and occasionally scratch for among the leaves. During the fall and winter they visit the plains and valleys, and are usually met with in small flocks, until the mating season.

Nests of the Mountain Bluebird have been found in New Mexico and Colorado, from the foothills to near timber line, usually in deserted Woodpecker holes, natural cavities in trees, fissures in the sides of steep rocky cliffs, and, in the settlements, in suitable locations about and in the adobe buildings. In settled portions of the west it nests in the cornice of buildings, under the eaves of porches, in the nooks and corners of barns and outhouses, and in boxes provided for its occupation. Prof. Ridgway found the Rocky Mountain Bluebird nesting in Virginia City, Nevada, in June. The nests were composed almost entirely of dry grass. In some sections, however, the inner bark of the cedar enters largely into their composition. The eggs are usually five, of a pale greenish-blue.

The females of this species are distinguished by a greener blue color and longer wings, and this bird is often called the Arctic Bluebird. It is emphatically a bird of the mountains, its visits to the lower portions of the country being mainly during winter.

Heaped in the hollows of the grove, the autumn leaves lie dead;
They rustle to the eddying gust, and to the rabbits’ tread.
The Robin and the Wren are flown, and from the shrubs the Jay,
And from the wood-top calls the Crow all through the gloomy day.
—Bryant.

Summary:

MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.Sialia arctica. Other names: “Rocky Mountain” and “Arctic Bluebird.”

Range—Rocky Mountain region, north to Great Slave Lake, south to Mexico, west to the higher mountain ranges along the Pacific.

Nest—Placed in deserted Woodpecker holes, natural cavities of trees, nooks and corners of barns and outhouses; composed of dry grass.

Eggs—Commonly five, of pale, plain greenish blue.


Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Daves BirdingPix

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Daves BirdingPix

Lee’s Addition:

…In the LORD put I my trust: how say ye to my soul, Flee as a bird to your mountain? … If the foundations be destroyed, what can the righteous do? The LORD is in his holy temple, the LORD’S throne is in heaven: his eyes behold, his eyelids try, the children of men. … For the righteous LORD loveth righteousness; his countenance doth behold the upright.
(Psalms 11:1,3,4,7 KJV)

The Mountain Bluebird belongs to the Turdidae – Thrushes Family and as such have Thrush characteristics. Since blue is my favorite color, the bluebirds are some of my favorites. The Lord has used such variety in His coloration, that I am happy that blue was one of them. We have also the Eastern and Western Bluebirds plus the Asian and Philippine Fairy-bluebirds.

The Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a medium-sized bird weighing about 1.1 ounces (30 g) with a length from 6.3–7.9 in (16–20 cm). They have light underbellies and black eyes. Adult males have thin bills that are bright turquoise-blue and somewhat lighter beneath. Adult females have duller blue wings and tail, grey breast, grey crown, throat and back. In fresh fall plumage, the female’s throat and breast are tinged with red-orange; brownish near the flank contrasting with white tail underparts. Call is a thin few; Song is warbled high chur chur.

The mountain bluebird is migratory. Their range varies from Mexico in the winter to as far north as Alaska, throughout the western U.S. and Canada. Northern birds migrate to the southern parts of the range; southern birds are often permanent residents. Some birds may move to lower elevations in winter. They inhabit open rangelands, meadows, generally at elevations above 5,000 feet. Contrary to popular belief, mountain bluebirds are not a species of concern in the United States. The turn around in mountain bluebird numbers is due to the overwhelming efforts of landowners in the West to provide nest boxes for these birds. At one time, mountain bluebird numbers were threatened because of increased agricultural activities destroying habitats.

These birds hover over the ground and fly down to catch insects, also flying from a perch to catch them. They mainly eat insects, over 90%, and berries. They may forage in flocks in winter, when they mainly eat grasshoppers. Mountain bluebirds will come to a platform feeder with live meal worms, berries, or peanuts.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery nest

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery nest

Their breeding habitat is open country across western North America, including mountain areas, as far north as Alaska. They nest in pre-existing cavities or in nest boxes. In remote areas, these birds are less affected by competition for natural nesting locations than other bluebirds. Mountain bluebirds are a monogamous breed. The male can be seen singing from bare branches. The singing takes place right at dawn, just when the sun rises. Females usually build the nests themselves. Eggs: pale blue and unmarked, sometimes white. Clutch Size: 4-5 eggs. Young are naked and helpless at hatching and may have some down. Incubation normally last 14 days and the young will take about 21 days before they leave the nest. Both males and females fiercely protect the nest.

It is the state bird of Idaho and Nevada.

Mountain bluebirds are cavity nesters and can become very partial to a nest box, especially if they have successfully raised a clutch. They may even re-use the same nest, though not always. Providing nest boxes is a great way to observe these beautiful birds. Mountain bluebirds will not abandon a nest if human activity is detected close by or at the nest. Because of this, mountain bluebirds can be easily banded while they are still in the nest.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Margaret Sloan

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Margaret Sloan

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Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) by Ian Montgomery

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

The above article is an article in the monthly serial for October 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

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(Information from Wikipedia and other internet sources, with editing)

Next Article – The English Sparrow

The Previous Article – The Ornithological Congress

Gospel Presentation

Links:

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Birds Vol 2 #6 – The Volume II. July to December 1897 – Index

Yellow-Breasted Chat (Icteria virens) by USGS

Yellow-Breasted Chat (Icteria virens) by USGS

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VOLUME II. JULY TO DECEMBER, 1897.

INDEX.

(RELOCATED – CLICK HERE)

Anhinga, or Snake Bird, Anhinga Anhingapages  Page  26-27
Avocet, American, Recurvirostra Americana 14-15
Audubon, John James 161
Bird Song JulSep
Bird MiscellanyBird Miscellany Plus 195-235
Blue Bird, Mountain, Sialia arctica 203-205
Bunting, Lazuli, Passerina amoena 196-198-199
Chimney Swift, Chætura pelagica 131-133
Captive’s Escape 116
Chat, Yellow-Breasted, Icteria virens 236-238-239
Cuckoo, Yellow-Billed, Coccyzus americanus 94-95
Dove, Mourning, Zenaidura macrura 111-112-113
Duck, Canvas-back, Athya valisneria 18-20
Duck, Mallard, Anas boschas 10-11-13
Duck, Wood, Aix Sponsa 21-23-24
Eagle, Baldheaded, Haliœtus lencocephalus 2-3-5
Flamingo, Phœnicopterus ruber 218-221
Flycatcher, Vermillion, Pyrocephalus rubineus mexicanus 192-193
Gold Finch, American, Spinus tristis 128-129-130
Goose, White-fronted, Anser albifrons gambeli 166-168-169
Grackle, Bronzed, Quiscalus quiscula 228-230-231
Grosbeak, Evening, Cocothraustes vespertina 68-70-71
Grouse, Black, Tetrao tetrix 217-220-223
Heron, Snowy, Ardea candidissima 38-39
How the Birds Secured Their Rights 115
Humming Bird, Allen’s Selasphorus alleni 210-211
Humming Bird, Ruby-Throated, Trochilus colubris 97-100-103
Junco, Slate Colored, Junco hyemalis 153-155
Kingbird, Tyrannus tyrannus 156-158-159
Kingfisher, European, Alcedo ispida 188-190-191
Kinglet, Ruby-crowned, Regulus calendula 108-110
Lark, Horned, Otocoris alpestris 134-135
Lost Mate 126
Merganser, Red-Breasted, Merganser serrator 54-55
Nuthatch, White-Breasted, Sitta carolinensis 118-119
Old Abe 35
Ornithological Congress 201
Osprey, American, Pandion paliœtus carolinenses 42-43-45
Partridge, Gambel’s, Callipepla gambeli 78-79
Phalarope, Wilson’s, Phalaropus tricolor 66-67
Pheasant, Ring-Necked, Phasianus torquatus 232-233
Phœbe, Sayornis phœbe 106-107
Plover, Belted Piping, Aegialitis meloda circumcincta 174-175
Plover, Semipalmated Ring, Aegialitis semi-polmata 6-8-9
Rail, Sora, Porzana Carolina 46-48-49
Sapsucker, Yellow-bellied, Sphyrapicus varius 137-140-143
Scoter, American, Oidemia deglandi 32-33
Skylark, Alauda arvensis 61-63-64
Snake Bird, (Anhinga) Anhinga anhinga 26-27
Snowflake, Plectrophenax nivalis 150-151-152
Sparrow, English, Passer domesticus 206-208-209
Sparrow, Song, Melospiza fasciata 90-91-93
Summaries (See each bird)
Tanager, Summer, Piranga rubra 163-165
Teal, Green winged, Anas carolinensis 213-214-215
The Bird’s Story 224
Thrush, Hermit, Turdus Aonalaschkae 86-88-89
To a Water Fowl 76
Tropic Bird, Yellow-billed, Phaethon flavirostris 184-186-187
Turkey, Wild, Meleagris gallopava 177-180-183
Turnstone, Arenaria interpres 170-171
Verdin, Auriparus flaviceps 226-227
Vireo, Warbling, Vireo gilvus 138-141
Vulture, Turkey, Catharista Atrata 72-73-75
Warbler, Blackburnian, Dendroica blackburnia 123-125
Warbler, Cerulean, Dendrœca caerulea 178-181
Warbler, Kentucky, Geothlypis formosa 50-51-53
Warbler, Yellow, Dendroica æstiva 83-85
Woodcock, American, Philohela minor 28-30-31
Wren, House, Troglodytes ædon 98-101-104
Wood Pewee, Contopus Virens 144-146-147-
Yellow Legs, Totanus flavipes 58-60

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How precious also are Your thoughts to me, O God! How great is the sum of them! (Psalm 139:17 NKJV)

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Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

The above article is an article in the monthly serial for October 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

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Next Article – TBA

The Previous Article – The Yellow-breasted Chat

Wordless Birds

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Vol 2, #6 – The Ring-necked Pheasant

Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) "Ring-necked" for Birds Illustrated

Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) “Ring-necked” for Birds Illustrated

From col. Chi. Acad. Sciences. Copyrighted by
Nature Study Pub. Co., 1897, Chicago.

THE RING-NECKED PHEASANT.

(RELOCATED – CLICK HERE)