Artistic Birds – Frigatebirds

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Bezalel was given much wisdom and understanding to help in the construction of the Tabernacle. He then was given the ability to train others to help. They were given abilities to help do the work also. Today, as Christians, we each are given talents and gifts to help in building the Church. Are we using those abilities?

“and He has filled him [Bezalel] with the Spirit of God, in wisdom and understanding, in knowledge and all manner of workmanship, to design artistic works, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of artistic workmanship. “And He has put in his heart the ability to teach, in him and Aholiab the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with skill to do all manner of work of the engraver and the designer and the tapestry maker, in blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine linen, and of the weaver—those who do every work and those who design artistic works.” (Exodus 35:31-35 NKJV)

When the Lord created the birds, He especially used His Ultimate Creative Ability. As mentioned in the Introduction to this new series, Artistic Work In Birds, we will looking for those birds which seem to have been painted/designed with great markings and other characteristics.

Frigatebirds

Frigatebirds (also listed as “frigate bird”, “frigate-bird”, “frigate”, “frigate-petrel”) are a family of seabirds called Fregatidae which are found across all tropical and subtropical oceans. The five extant species are classified in a single genus, Fregata. All have predominantly black plumage, long, deeply forked tails and long hooked bills. Females have white underbellies and males have a distinctive red gular pouch, which they inflate during the breeding season to attract females. Their wings are long and pointed and can span up to 2.3 metres (7.5 ft), the largest wing area to body weight ratio of any bird.

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Able to soar for weeks on wind currents, frigatebirds spend most of the day in flight hunting for food, and roost on trees or cliffs at night. Their main prey are fish and squid, caught when chased to the water surface by large predators such as tuna.

Now that is design and engineering! The Great and Magnificent Frigatebirds have a distinctive red gular pouch, and it had a few paint strokes added to make it more attractive. [I guess]

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male Displaying ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Starting off with a simple bird, also, will be working way through the birds sort of in Taxonomic order.

Frigatebirds – Wikipedia

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Wages or a Gift

Avian and Attributes – Sun

Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo

Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo

To Him who made great lights, For His mercy endures forever— The sun to rule by day, For His mercy endures forever; The moon and stars to rule by night, For His mercy endures forever.” (Psalms 136:7-9 NKJV)

SUN, n.
1. The splendid orb or luminary which, being in or near the center of our system of worlds, gives light and heat to all the planets. The light of the sun constitutes the day, and the darkness which proceeds form its absence, or the shade of the earth, constitutes the night. Psalm 136.
2. In popular usage, a sunny place; a place where the beams of the sun fall; as, to stand in the sun, that is, to stand where the direct rays of the sun fall.
3. Any thing eminently splendid or luminous; that which is the chief source of light or honor. The natives of America complain that the sun of their glory is set.
I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignty to posterity.
4. In Scripture, Christ is called the sun of righteousness, as the source of light, animation and comfort to his disciples.
5. The luminary or orb which constitutes the center of any system of worlds. The fixed stars are supposed to be suns in their respective systems.
Under the sun, in the world; on earth; a proverbial expression.
There is no new thing under the sun. Ecclesiastes  1.

“That which has been is what will be, That which is done is what will be done, And there is nothing new under the sun.” (Ecclesiastes 1:9 NKJV)”

Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

SUN, v.t. To expose to the sun’s rays; to warm or dry in the light of the sun; to insolate; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain.
–Then to sun thyself in open air.

Sun Lark (Galerida modesta)

Sun Lark (Galerida modesta)

The Sun Lark (Galerida modesta) or Nigerian Sun Lark is a species of lark in the family Alaudidae. It inhabits a broad horizontal area south of the Sahel, ranging from Guinea to South Sudan. Its natural habitats are dry savannah and subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. (Wikipedia)

Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) ©WikiC

The Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis), also known in aviculture as the Sun Conure, is a medium-sized, vibrantly colored parrot native to northeastern South America. The adult male and female are similar in appearance, with predominantly golden-yellow plumage and orange-flushed underparts and face. Sun parakeets are very social birds, typically living in flocks. They form monogamous pairs for reproduction, and nest in palm cavities in the tropics. Sun parakeets mainly feed on fruits, flowers, berries, blossoms, seeds, nuts, and insects. (Wikipedia)

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

 

Birds and Forest Fires

Black-backed Woodpecker ©Flicker Michael Woodruff

Black-backed Woodpecker ©Flicker Michael Woodruff

All About Birds re-published an article about how Forest Fires affect wildlife and people from Living Bird magazine.

I found it to be very interest how so abundantly birds, wildlife and plants revive after a forest fire. This article was about the Rice Ridge Fire burn in the Swan Mountains of Montana. They show many of the birds that are now coming back and abounding.

“You send forth Your Spirit, they are created; And You renew the face of the earth. May the glory of the LORD endure forever; May the LORD rejoice in His works. He looks on the earth, and it trembles; He touches the hills, and they smoke.” (Psalms 104:30-32 NKJV)

One avian wonder especially pointed out is the Black-backed Woodpecker.

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) by Daves BirdingPix

“The black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) also known as the Arctic three-toed woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker (23 cm (9.1 in) long) inhabiting the forests of North America.

Their breeding range is boreal forest across Canada, Alaska, the north-western United States, as well as northern Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Upper Michigan. In particular the species is a burnt-forest specialist, feeding on the outbreaks of wood-boring beetles that feed on recently burnt trees. The most important wood boring beetles taken are in the families Cerambycidae and Buprestidae, along with engraver beetles and Mountain pine beetle. Most food is obtained by pecking, a smaller proportion is obtained by gleaning off branches. Black-backed woodpeckers are generally non-migratory but historically have undertaken intermittent irruptions.

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) by Ian

Nest excavation occurs in April and May; a fresh nest is drilled each year into the sapwood of dead trees. Abandoned nests are used by other species of bird to nest in. The female lays three or four eggs, and incubation duties are shared between both parents, although the male alone incubates during the night. Upon hatching the altricial chicks are brooded until the nestling phase. Both parents feed the chicks, which take about 24 days to fledge.

Nest excavation occurs in April and May; a fresh nest is drilled each year into the sapwood of dead trees. Abandoned nests are used by other species of bird to nest in. The female lays three or four eggs, and incubation duties are shared between both parents, although the male alone incubates during the night. Upon hatching the altricial chicks are brooded until the nestling phase. Both parents feed the chicks, which take about 24 days to fledge.

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) by Ian

Black Backed Woodpecker

There are times when it is good to have things “renewed.”

“But those who wait on the LORD Shall renew their strength; They shall mount up with wings like eagles, They shall run and not be weary, They shall walk and not faint.” (Isaiah 40:31 NKJV)

Information about  the Black-backed Woodpecker from [Wikipedia]

Old Flames: The Tangled History of Forest Fires, Wildfire, and People

All About Birds – Black-backed Woodpecker

Wordless Woodpeckers

Now That’s A Parrot – Squawkzilla

Meet ‘Squawkzilla,’ the massive prehistoric parrot scientists say terrorized other birds

A reconstruction of Heracles inexpectatus, the New Zealand parrot. The team initially thought the fossils belonged to a giant eagle. Photograph: Brian Choo/Flinders University

“Fossils of the largest parrot ever recorded have been found in New Zealand. Estimated to have weighed about 7kg (1.1st), it would have been more than twice as heavy as the kākāpo, previously the largest known parrot.” (The Guardian)

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila) ©WikiC showing whiskers around beak

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila) ©WikiC showing whiskers around beak

“Palaeontologists have named the new species Heracles inexpectatus to reflect its unusual size and strength and the unexpected nature of the discovery.

Prof Trevor Worthy of Flinders University in Australia, the lead author of the research published in the journal Biology Letters, said: “Once we decided it was something new and interesting, the challenge was to figure out what family it was from.

“Because no giant parrots have been found previously, parrots were not on our radar – thus it took some time to differentiate all other birds essentially from parrots to conclude that the unique suite of characters was definitive of a parrot.”

Paul Scofield, a senior curator of natural history at Canterbury Museum, said the fossil had been excavated in 2008, and initially the team had thought the bones were part of a giant eagle.”

From the Washington Post: “The large bones, believed to be the bones of an ancient eagle, flew under the radar for a decade. It was during a research project in the lab of Flinders University paleontologist Trevor Worthy that a graduate student rediscovered the bones. After that, a team of researchers began reanalyzing the findings earlier this year, according to the BBC.

“It was completely unexpected and quite novel,” Worthy, the study’s lead author, told National Geographic. “Once I had convinced myself it was a parrot, then I obviously had to convince the world.”

Kea (Nestor notabilis) by Ian #1

Kea (Nestor notabilis) by Ian

Researchers concluded that the bird probably couldn’t fly and consumed what was along the ground and easy to reach, according to National Geographic. But that might not have been enough to satiate the giant parrot.

It’s possible the bird had more carnivorous ways, like another New Zealand parrot, the kea, which has been known to attack and subsequently munch upon living sheep, the magazine reported.


Keas, the world’s only alpine parrots, are native to New Zealand’s South Island. (Erin E. Williams for The Washington Post)

Michael Archer, a co-author of the research and paleontologist at the University of New South Wales, told National Geographic that heracles might have even been eating other parrots, giving way to a nickname: “Squawkzilla.”

Archer told Agence France-Presse the bird had “a massive parrot beak that could crack wide open anything it fancied.”

Heracles probably won’t be the final unforeseen fossil from the St. Bathans area, Worthy told AFP. The researchers have turned up many surprising birds and animals over the years.

“No doubt there are many more unexpected species yet to be discovered in this most interesting deposit,” Worthy said.”

Washington Post Article about Heracles inexpectatus.

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila) ©Dept of Conservation-To See Relative Size

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila) ©Dept of Conservation-To See Relative Size

Of course, those of us on this blog do not believe in millions of years, but that the Lord created everything, including this humongous Parrot. National Geographic says “The flightless ‘squawkzilla’ stood three feet tall and was twice the weight of the kakapo, the heaviest parrot alive today.”

“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name.” (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

Other’s with the same basic information:

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila) ©Dept of Conservation

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila) ©Dept of Conservation

Save The Parrots

Seagulls and Family Circus

Today’s Family Circus caught my attention and decided to see what could be found to go with it. This video from Cornell Lab of Ornithology tells about how the gulls signal each other over territory. If you ignore a few references to evolution, it is quite interesting.

“How can aggressive, predatory, and cannibalistic birds coexist in crowded breeding colonies? Explore the lives and territorial interactions of Herring and Great Black-backed gulls in a breeding colony on Maine’s Appledore Island.” [From the video page]

Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) by J Fenton

Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) by J Fenton

They seem to have quite a communication system. Reminds us of a few verses:

“But let your communication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: for whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil.” (Matthew 5:37 KJV)

“But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath: but let your yea be yea; and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemnation.” (James 5:12 KJV)


A few days ago, I posted this on the Bird of the Bible for Kids. Am in need of some feedback as to whether this might be a series. The McGuffey’s Readers were used in our schools to teach reading. There are quite a few good stories that mention birds. A few of those were posted.

My question: Would you look at them and possibly leave a comment? Yea or Nea.

I’m looking for “communications” on how to proceed. Thanks, Lee

World’s Fastest Seagull

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) ©

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) ©

‘World’s fastest seagull’ stuns experts

Jul. 30, 2019 – 1:26 – A lesser black-backed seagull, is stunning experts with its apparent speed, traveling more than 500 miles in just seven days. The seagull which was ringed on Burhou in the Channel islands on July 17, was later found at Ares Beach in A Coruna Spain, on July 24. Alderney Bird Observatory warden John Horton said that the distance traveled by the bird in such a short period of time was unusual.

Here is a link attached to this clip:

https://video.foxnews.com/v/6065781298001/#sp=show-clips

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (Heuglin's)

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (Heuglin’s)

The lesser black-backed gull was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th-century work, Systema Naturae, and it still bears its original name of Larus fuscus. The scientific name is from Latin. Larus appears to have referred to a gull or other large seabird, and fuscus meant black or brown.

“Will you set your eyes upon wealth, when [suddenly] it is gone? For riches certainly make themselves wings, like an eagle [ or Lesser-Black-backed Gull] that flies toward the heavens.” (Proverbs 23:5 AMP)

Lesser Black-backed Gull – All About Birds

Lesser Black-backed Gull – eBird

Lesser Black-backed Gull – Wikipedia

Avian and Attributes – Strong

Strong-billed Honeyeater (Melithreptus validirostris) by Ian 2

Strong-billed Honeyeater (Melithreptus validirostris) by Ian

“Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The LORD strong and mighty, the LORD mighty in battle.” (Psalms 24:7-8 KJV)

STRONG
Strong, a. [G., L. The sense of the radical word is to stretch, strain, draw, and probably from the root of stretch and reach.]

Having physical active power, or great physical power; having the power of exerting great bodily force; vigorous. A patient is recovering from sickness, but is not yet strong enough to walk. A strong man will lift twice his own weight.
That our oxen may be strong to labor. Psa 144.
Having physical passive power; having ability to bear or endure; firm; solid; as a constitution strong enough to bear the fatigues of a campaign.
Well fortified; able to sustain attacks;
Having great wealth, means or resources;

Strong-billed Honeyeater (Melithreptus validirostris) by Ian 1

Strong-billed Honeyeater (Melithreptus validirostris) by Ian 1

Moving with rapidity; violent; forcible; impetuous; as a strong current of water or wind; the wind was strong from the northeast; we had a strong tide against us.
Hale; sound; robust; as a strong constitution.
Powerful; forcible; cogent; adapted to make a deep or effectual impression on the mind or imagination; as a strong argument; strong reasons; strong evidence; a strong example or instance. – He used strong language.

Strong-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus) ©WikiC

Ardent; eager; zealous; earnestly engaged;
Affecting the sight forcibly; as strong colors.
Affecting the taste forcibly; as the strong flavor of onions.
Affecting the smell powerfully; as a strong scent.
Not of easy digestion; solid; as strong meat. Heb 5.
Well established; firm; not easily overthrown or altered;
Violent; vehement; earnest. – Who in the day of his flesh, when he offered up prayers with strong crying and tears– Heb 5.
Able; furnished with abilities. – I was stronger in prophecy than in criticism.
Having great force of mind, of intellect or of any faculty; as a man of strong powers of mind; a man of a strong mind or intellect; a man of strong memory, judgment or imagination.
Bright; glaring; vivid; as a strong light.
Powerful to the extent of force named; as an army ten thousand strong.

Strong-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus) ©Drawingi WikiC

Strong-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus) ©Drawingi WikiC

“Bow down thine ear to me; deliver me speedily: be thou my strong rock, for an house of defence to save me. For thou art my rock and my fortress; therefore for thy name’s sake lead me, and guide me.” (Psalms 31:2-3 KJV)

“The name of the LORD is a strong tower: the righteous runneth into it, and is safe.” (Proverbs 18:10 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian and Attributes – Stripes

Stripe-backed Bittern (Ixobrychus involucris) ©Drawing WikiC

Stripe-backed Bittern (Ixobrychus involucris) ©Drawing WikiC

“But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.” (Isaiah 53:5 KJV)

Stripe
STRIPE, n.
1. A line or long narrow division of any thing, of a different color from the ground as a stripe of red on a green ground; hence, any linear variation of color.
2. A strip or long narrow piece attached to something of a different color; as a long stripe sewed upon a garment.
3. The weal or long narrow mark discolored by a lash or rod.
4. A stroke made with a lash, whip, rod, strap or scourge.
Forty stripes may he give him, and not exceed. Deu 25.
[A blow with a club is not a stripe.]
5. Affliction; punishment; sufferings.
By his stripes are we healed. Isa 53.
STRIPE, v.t.
1. To make stripes; to form with lines of different colors; to variegate with stripes.
2. To stripe; to lash. [Little used.]

There are quite a few birds that have the word Stripe in their name. The first three birds below are called Stripe-backed, as that is what the Lord’s back must have looked like after He was beaten.

Stripe-backed Antbird (Myrmorchilus strigilatus)

Stripe-backed Antbird (Myrmorchilus strigilatus) ©Drawing WikiC

Stripe-backed Antbird (Myrmorchilus strigilatus) ©Drawing WikiC

Stripe-backed Bittern (Ixobrychus involucris) (Shown above)
Stripe-backed Wren (Campylorhynchus nuchalis)

Stripe-backed Wren (Campylorhynchus nuchalis) ©WikiC

Stripe-backed Wren (Campylorhynchus nuchalis) ©WikiC

Other birds with Striped in their name:
Striped Crake (Aenigmatolimnas marginalis)
Striped Cuckoo (Tapera naevia)
Striped Flowerpecker (Dicaeum aeruginosum)
Striped Flufftail (Sarothrura affinis)
Striped Honeyeater (Plectorhyncha lanceolata)
Striped Kingfisher (Halcyon chelicuti)
Striped Laughingthrush (Trochalopteron virgatum)

Striped Owl (Pseudoscops clamator)
Striped Pipit (Anthus lineiventris)
Striped Sparrow (Oriturus superciliosus)
Striped Treehunter (Thripadectes holostictus)
Striped Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus obsoletus)
Striped Woodpecker (Veniliornis lignarius)
Striped Wren-Babbler (Kenopia striata)

“For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth: Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously: Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed. For ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls.” (1 Peter 2:21-25 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Meet Another New Photographer – William Wise

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) ©williamwisephoto.com

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio) ©williamwisephoto.com

Thankfully, we have another new photographer who has given permission to use his photos. William Wise has been taking photos of quite a variety of topics for some time. And he also is a Christian.

You can check out the main page at William Wise Photography. He has five sections to view his various subjects:

Home

“O LORD, how manifold are your works! In wisdom have you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures.”  Psalm 104:24 

Shelter Photography

Shelter Puppy ©WilliamWisePhoto.com

Nature Photography

Downy Woodpeckerr ©WilliamWise.com

Creation Speaks

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

CREATION SPEAKS
Creation Speaks is a Biblical creation teaching ministry that uses writing and photography to teach the truth of our origin and other spiritual truths from the Bible. The lessons from God’s creation are also taught in multi-media presentations designed for Christian schools, youth and adult groups, and church Sunday School groups utilizing slideshows, videos, mounted and live animals.

Blogs

Like you, I will be busy looking through these many photos and articles for ideas for this blog. His theme in the Creation Speaks section is similar to what we try to do here. This is from his Creation Speaks section:

Here is a photo from one of his blogs: Fighting The Reflection…

Tufted Titmouse Picture

“For if you listen to the word and don’t obey, it is like glancing at your face in a mirror. You see yourself, walk away, and forget what you look like.” James 1:23-24 New Living Translation

Thank you William for this new permission. Lord’s Blessing on on your do. Keep up the good photography, I might need them here. :)

 

IOC Version 9.2- Indexes Up To Date – Part IV

Blue-naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) at Cincinnati Zoo) by Lee

Blue-naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) at Cincinnati Zoo) by Lee

Thanks for patience as the Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures blog is being updated to the new I.O.C. Version 9.2. Along with cataract eye surgery this week, brain freeze [Couldn’t get my Excel to build my links. Oh, no! Could it be old age?], and a holiday, I think most of it is finished.

“But now finish doing it also, so that just as there was the readiness to desire it, so there may be also the completion of it by your ability. For if the readiness is present, it is acceptable according to what a person has, not according to what he does not have.” (2 Corinthians 8:11-12 NASB)

These links are all working:

I am still updating these new Family pages. They added six new families, but one of them was the old Incertae Sedis Family (now Hyliidae-Hylias). It was a holding place for birds they didn’t know where to place. With all the DNA testing going on, they keep finding surprises. In the future, they will most like shuffle some more families and species around.

Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) ©Flickr Nic Borrows

New Families Added with Version 9.2
Calyptomenidae – African and Green Broadbills (9.2)
Cinclosomatidae – Jewel-babblers, Quail-thrushes (9.2)
Falcunculidae – Shriketit (9.2)
Hyliidae – Hylias, Pholidornis (9.2)
Coliidae – Mousebirds (9.2)
Philepittidae – Asities (9.2)

An interesting link from Birdwatching Daily about this new update.
North American Bird Checklist 2019

Order Pages are Updated

Good News

IOC Version 9.2- Name Changes – Part III

IOC Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019) Name Changes

The nice thing about these name changes is that the Scientific Name normally stays with the bird. Many countries refer to birds by various names, but the scientific name helps everyone know which avian wonder is being referred to.

PREVIOUS IOC LISTS – SCIENTIFIC NAME – New Name IOC LIST V9.2

Sumatran Frogmouth ((Batrachostomus poliolophus) Female ©WikiC

Short-tailed Frogmouth – Batrachostomus poliolophus – Sumatran Frogmouth

Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla haematonota ©Oiseaux_net

Napo Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla haematonota – Stipple-throated Antwren

PAS-Tham Rio Madeira Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ©Flickr Claudio Dias Timm

Rio Madeira Antwren (Epinecrophylla amazonica) ©Flickr Claudio Dias Timm

Madeira Stipple-throated Antwren – Epinecrophylla amazonica – Rio Madeira Antwren

Wayanad Laughingthrush (Pterorhinus delesserti) ©WikiC

Wynaad Laughingthrush – Pterorhinus delesserti – Wayanad Laughingthrush

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Grey Jay – Perisoreus canadensis – Canada Jay

Biak Whistler (Pachycephala megarhyncha)

Biak Whistler (Pachycephala megarhyncha) ©Flickr Graham Winterflood

Biak [Little] Shrikethrush – Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha – Biak Whistler

Arafura Shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) ©WikiC

Arafura Shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) ©WikiC

Little Shrikethrush – Colluricincla megarhyncha – Arafura Shrikethrush

Javan Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis banyumas) ©©Flickr

Hill Blue Flycatcher – Cyornis banyumas – Javan Blue Flycatcher

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Ray

Veracruz Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Ray

Rufous-naped Wren – Campylorhynchus rufinucha – Veracruz Wren

These were the name changes that I have found so far with this update. For those of us who have photos, it also required changing names of photos on the hard drive.

But names have been changing for years:

“Now among them from the sons of Judah were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah. Then the commander of the officials assigned new names to them; and to Daniel he assigned the name Belteshazzar, to Hananiah Shadrach, to Mishael Meshach and to Azariah Abed-nego.” (Daniel 1:6-7 NASB)

Now for the rest of the updates. Stay Tuned!

The Amazing Butterfly

World Birds I.O.C. Version 9.2 Part II

Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) ©Sci-news

Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) ©Sci-news

The post yesterday, I.O.C. 9.2 Update A Few Days Ago, was to inform you off the latest update. New birds aren’t usually discovered as much as the DNA studies they are providing better insight into how the birds are related. So, they like to shuffle things around, like the 5 new Families. The new species added are many times from subspecies being elevated to full species status.

Today, we will try to figure out who the new species are. As I type this, I have no clue until some investigation begins. So, Let’s Begin!

Version 9.2 (June 22, 2019)

The IOC World Bird List 9.2 contains 10,758 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  250 Families and 2,320 Genera.  The list also includes 20,034 subspecies, their ranges and  authors.

Updates include:

SPECIES ADDED:                25 

SPECIES DELETED:             5

ENGLISH NAMES:              9

TAXONOMY:                         37 including  sequence of Orders,  five new Families, and genera of  Petroicidae
Add Species

I know some of this below is confusing for some, but is beneficial for many birdwatchers.

Added Species:

Stejneger’s Scoter (Melanitta stejnegeri) – Split of Stejneger’s Scoter M. stejnegeri from White-winged Scoter M. deglandi
Australian Tern (Gelochelidon macrotarsa) – Split of G. macrotarsa is based on morphological differences
Malagasy Palm Swift (Cypsiurus gracilis) – from African Palm Swift Cypsiurus parvus split
Green-headed Hillstar (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar (Oreotrochilus estella stolzmanni)
Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar O. (estella) stolzmanni
Indochinese Roller (Coracias affinis) – Morphologically distinct Indochinese Roller is sister to Purple-winged Roller (C. temmincki) not to Indian Roller despite narrow hybrid zone
Small-headed Elaenia (Elaenia sordida) – Elaenia sordida is split (9.2) from Highland Elaenia based on mtDNA genetics and vocal
Ceara? Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) – Split of monotypic Ceara? Woodcreeper is based on genetic, morphological and vocal distinctions
Biak Whistler (Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha) – The endemic Biak Little ‘Shrikethrush’ C. m. melanorhyncha is a whistler, sister to Pachycephala phaionota. Elevated from ssp Colluricincla to species of Pachycephala. Rename

Little Shrikethrush spp Colluricincla spp – The following splits (9.2) of subspecies groups of the [Arafura] Little Shrikethrush species complex are based on genetics and morphology (Marki et al. 2018, Schodde pers. comm).
Variable Shrikethrush (Colluricincla fortis) – Arafura [Little] Shrikethrush C. megarhyncha Split (9.2) of Variable Shrikethrush includes ssp trobriandi and despecta (with neos and superflua)
Waigeo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla affinis) – Variable Shrikethrush C. fortis Split Waigeo Shrikethrush is monotypic
Mamberamo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla obscura) – Waigeo Shrikethrush C. affinis Split (9.2) of Mamberamo Shrikethrush includes ssp hybridus
Tagula Shrikethrush (Colluricincla discolor) – Split (9.2) monotypic Tagula Shrikethrush
Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush (Colluricincla tappenbecki) -Split (9.2) of Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush C. tappenbecki includes ssp madaraszi and maeandrina.
Rufous Shrikethrush (Colluricincla rufogaster) – Split (9.2) of Rufous Shrikethrush includes ssp griseata and goodsoni. Ssp aelptes and normani are included in goodsoni; gouldii and synaptica are included in nominate rufogaster.
Stejneger’s Scoter (Melanitta stejnegeri) – Split (9.2) of Stejneger’s Scoter M. stejnegeri from White-winged Scoter M. deglandi based on lack of hybridization and on morphological characters that include the black rather than brown flanks (deglandi also has brown tinged scapulars), a more obvious hook “nose” on stejnegeri, a longer white post-ocular mark on stejnegeri, and different bill coloration.
Australian Tern (Gelochelidon macrotarsa) – Split of G. macrotarsa is based on morphological differences (Rogers et al. 2005, HBW, Schodde pers. comm).
Malagasy Palm Swift (Cypsiurus gracilis) – Split of Malagasy Palm Swift from African Palm Swift (C. parvus) based on vocalizations and plumage coloration. Includes griveaudi on Comoro Is.
Green-headed Hillstar (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni) – Green-headed Hillstar is split from O. estella based on plumage differences and mtDNA relationship to O. melanogaster.
Blue-throated Hillstar (Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus) – Newly described species based on striking plumage differences from Andean Hillstar O. (estella) stolzmanni.. Genomic analysis of estella species complex desired. New Hummingbird Species Discovered in Ecuador
Indochinese Roller (Coracias affinis) – Morphologically distinct Indochinese Roller is sister to Purple-winged Roller (C. temmincki) not to Indian Roller despite narrow hybrid zone.
Small-headed Elaenia (Elaenia sordida) – Elaenia sordida is split (9.2) from Highland Elaenia based on mtDNA genetics and vocals (Rheindt et al. 2008, Minns 2017, HBW, SACC 806). ENG Small-headed Elaenia follows SACC.

Ceara Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) ©HBW

Ceara? Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus atlanticus) –  Split of monotypic Ceara? Woodcreeper is based on genetic, morphological and vocal distinctions. ENG: Ceara?
Biak Whistler (Pachycephala [Colluricincla] melanorhyncha) – The endemic Biak Little ‘Shrikethrush’ C. m. melanorhyncha is a whistler, sister to Pachycephala phaionota. Elevated from ssp Colluricincla to species of Pachycephala. Rename
Little Shrikethrush spp (Colluricincla) spp – The following splits (9.2) of subspecies groups of the [Arafura] Little Shrikethrush species complex are based on genetics and morphology, Schodde pers. comm).
Variable Shrikethrush (Colluricincla fortis) – Split (9.2) of Variable Shrikethrush includes ssp trobriandi and despecta (with neos and superflua)
Waigeo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla affinis) – Split Waigeo Shrikethrush is monotypic
Mamberamo Shrikethrush (Colluricincla obscura) – Split (9.2) of Mamberamo Shrikethrush includes ssp hybridus
Tagula Shrikethrush (Colluricincla discolor) – Split (9.2) monotypic Tagula Shrikethrush
Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush (Colluricincla tappenbecki) – Split (9.2) of Sepik-Ramu Shrikethrush C. tappenbecki includes ssp madaraszi and maeandrina.
Rufous Shrikethrush (Colluricincla rufogaster) – Split (9.2) of Rufous Shrikethrush includes ssp griseata and goodsoni. Ssp aelptes and normani are included in goodsoni; gouldii and synaptica are included in nominate rufogaster.
Hill Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis whitei) – C. whitei is split (9.2) from C. banyumas based on genetics and vocalizations. Includes subspecies lekhakuni, deignani, coerulifrons. Note transfer of established English name Hill Blue Flycatcher to C. whitei.
Indochinese Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis sumatrensis) – Widespread Indochinese Blue Flycatcher is split (9.2) from Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher based on morphology and vocalizations. Includes sumatrensis, indochina, lamprus.
Morotai White-eye (Zosterops dehaani) – Split of Morotai White-eye Z. dehaani from Cream-throated White-eye is based on distinct plumage, exceptional dawn song and submontane/montane ecology
Wakatobi White-eye (Zosterops flavissimus) – Split of Wakatobi White-eye is based on morphology, genetics, and vocalizations (O’Connell et al. 2019)
Campina Thrush (Turdus arthuri) – Split (9.2) of Campina Thrush T. arthuri from Black-billed Thrush T. ignobilis is based on sympatry without intergradation at two Colombian localities.
Pantepui Thrush (Turdus murinus) – Pantepui Thrush is split (9.2) from Black-billed Thrush T. ignobilis based on genetic divergence
Yucatan Gnatcatcher (Polioptila albiventri) – Split (9.2) of Yucatan Gnatcatcher P. albiventris from White-lored Gnatcatcher is based on genetic and vocal distinctions
Nicholson’s Pipit (Anthus nicholsoni) – Split (9.2) of South African pops of Long-billed Pipit is based on their allopatric distributions (southern and East African populations separated by ca. 1 800 km), their non-migratory nature and their high cyt b sequence divergence values. Includes palliditinctus, leucocraspedon, petricolus, and primarius.

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Barbery Falcon now Perregrine Falcon ©Drew Avery

Barbary Falcon now Perregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus pelegrinoides) ssp©Drew Avery

Deleted Species (I can only find 4)
Schouteden’s Swift (Schoutedenapus schoutedeni) DEL AL Scarce Swift S. myioptilus Deemed to be darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts subspecies chapini (Fishpool 2019)
Barbary Falcon (Falco pelegrinoides)SSP of Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus Barbary Falcon (including subspecies babylonicus) is genetically similar to other subspecies of Peregrine Falcon and treated thus. Demoted back to SSP
Negro Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla pyrrhonota)SSP Negro Stipple-throated Antwren was split from [Napo] Stipple-throated Antwren, but vocalizations are identical and morphological differences slight. Demoted back to SSP
Yasuni Antwren (Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai) – SSP Yasuni Stipple-throated Antwren was split from [Napo] Stipple-throated Antwren, but vocalizations are identical and morphological differences slight. Demoted back to SSP

“He determines and counts the number of the stars; He calls them all by their names. Great is our Lord and of great power; His understanding is inexhaustible and boundless.” (Psalms 147:4-5 AMP)

If the Lord knows the names of all the stars, I wonder what names He calls the Birds by?

Still need to rework the Indexes – Stay Tuned

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