McGuffey’s Fifth Reader – VI – The Singing Lesson

Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus frantzii) by Ian

Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus frantzii) by Ian

The Project Gutenberg EBook of McGuffey’s Fifth Eclectic Reader by William Holmes McGuffey

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Title: McGuffey’s Fifth Eclectic Reader Author: William Holmes McGuffey

VI. THE SINGING LESSON.

Jean Ingelow (b. 1830, d.1897) was born at Boston, Lincolnshire, England. Her fame as a poetess was at once established upon the publication of her “Poems” in 1863; since which time several other volumes have appeared. The most generally admired of her poems are “Songs of Seven” and “The High Tide on the Coast of Lincolnshire,” She has also written several successful novels, of which, “Off the Skelligs” is the most popular. “Stories Told to a Child,” “The Cumberers,” “Poor Mat,” “Studies for Stories,” and “Mopsa, the Fairy” are also well known. Miss Ingelow resided in London, England, and spent much of her time in deeds of charity.

1. A nightingale made a mistake;
She sang a few notes out of tune:
Her heart was ready to break,
And she hid away from the moon.
She wrung her claws, poor thing,
But was far too proud to weep;
She tucked her head under her wing,
And pretended to be asleep.

Crested Lark (Galerida cristata)

Crested Lark (Galerida cristata)

2. A lark, arm in arm with a thrush,
Came sauntering up to the place;
The nightingale felt herself blush,
Though feathers hid her face;
She knew they had heard her song,
She felt them snicker and sneer;
She thought that life was too long,
And wished she could skip a year.

Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) by Reinier Munguia

Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) by Reinier Munguia

3. “O nightingale!” cooed a dove;
“O nightingale! what’s the use?
You bird of beauty and love,
Why behave like a goose?
Don’t sulk away from our sight,
Like a common, contemptible fowl;
You bird of joy and delight,
Why behave like an owl?

4. “Only think of all you have done;
Only think of all you can do;
A false note is really fun
From such a bird as you!
Lift up your proud little crest,
Open your musical beak;
Other birds have to do their best,
You need only to speak!”

Thrush Nightingale (Luscinia luscinia) ©©SergeyYeliseev

Thrush Nightingale (Luscinia luscinia) ©©SergeyYeliseev

6. The nightingale shyly took
Her head from under her wing,
And, giving the dove a look,
Straightway began to sing.
There was never a bird could pass;
The night was divinely calm;
And the people stood on the grass
To hear that wonderful psalm.

Black-headed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

Black-headed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

6. The nightingale did not care,
She only sang to the skies;
Her song ascended there,
And there she fixed her eyes.
The people that stood below
She knew but little about;
And this tale has a moral, I know,
If you’ll try and find it out.

DEFINITIONS.—2. Saun’ter-ing, wandering idly, strolling. Snick’er, to laugh in a half-suppressed manner. 4. Crest, a tuft growing on an animal’s head. 5. Di-vine’ly, in a supreme degree. 6. Mor’al, the practical lesson which anything is fitted to teach.

NOTE.—The nightingale is a small bird, about six inches in length, with a coat of dark-brown feathers above and of grayish, white beneath. Its voice is astonishingly strong and sweet, and, when wild, it usually sings throughout the evening and night from April to the middle of summer. The bird is common in Europe, but is not found in America.

“The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land;” (Song of Solomon 2:12 KJV)

Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord;
(Ephesians 5:19 KJV)

McGuffey’s Fifth Grade Reader

Wordless Birds

Birds Are Wonderful: M, N, and O !

BIRDS  ARE  WONDERFUL  . . .  M,  N,  and  O !

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

Jesus said: “Therefore I say to you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink . . . Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air, . . . your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?”   (Matthew 6:25-26)

For welcoming in the year of our Lord 2020,  below follows the fifth advance installment of alphabet-illustrating birds of the world, as part of this new series (“Birds Are Wonderful  —  and Some Are a Little Weird*).  The letter M is illustrated by Magpies, Magnificent Frigatebird, and Motmots.  The letter N  illustrated by Nightingale, Needle-billed Hermit, and Nighthawk (also called “Nightjar”).  The letter O illustrated by Osprey, Oriental Stork, and Oystercatcher.

“M” BIRDS:   Magpies, Magnificent Frigatebird, and Motmots.

BAW-Magpie-MagnificentFrigatebirdBAW-Motmots

“N” BIRDS:  Nightingale, Needle-billed Hermit, and Nighthawk.

BAW-Nightingale-NeedlebilledHermitBAW-Nighthawk

“O” BIRDS:  Osprey, Oriental Stork, and Oystercatcher.

BAW-Osprey-OrientalStorkBAW-Oystercatcher

Birds are truly wonderful — and some, like the “egg-dumping” Oystercatcher, are a little bit odd, if not also weird!  (Stay tuned for more, D.v.)


* Quoting from “Birds Are Wonderful, and Some Are a Little Weird”, (c) AD2019 James J. S. Johnson   [used here by permission].

BAW-MagellanicOystercatcher-white-sand

 

Avian and Attributes – Name Above All Names

Common Nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos) ©WikiC

“Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name:” (Philippians 2:9 KJV)

“Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven.” (Psalms 148:13 KJV)

O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens.” (Psalms 8:1 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Name Above All Names

Names – These are often expressive of character or of relationship. God was revealed to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, as GOD ALMIGHTY, which indicates the character in which God was pleased to be known by them: He was not known to them as JEHOVAH. Exo_6:3. This does not mean that they had not heard of the name, but that it did not express the character of His relationship with them. To Moses, He said, “I am JEHOVAH,” and by this name He was known to Israel: it formed the basis of their relationship with God. When power was committed to the Gentiles under the headship of Nebuchadnezzar it was said, “THE GOD OF HEAVEN hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory.” Dan_2:37. In Christianity God is made known under the name of FATHER. Joh_20:17. Much is involved in the various names by which God has been pleased to make Himself known. So the Lord Jesus has various names: Son of God, Immanuel, Son of man, &c.: they all designate one Person, but each has its own import. Throughout the N. T., HIS NAME is the center of all blessing. Isa_9:6 Php_2:9-11. (Concise Bible Dictionary)


Common Nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos) ©WikiC

Common Nightingale

The Common Nightingale or simply nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos), also known as Rufous Nightingale, is a small passerine bird best known for its powerful and beautiful song. It was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family Turdidae, but is now more generally considered to be an Old World flycatcher, Muscicapidae.[2] It belongs to a group of more terrestrial species, often called chats.

It is a migratory insectivorous species breeding in forest and scrub in Europe and south-west Asia, and wintering in sub-Saharan Africa. It is not found naturally in the Americas. The distribution is more southerly than the very closely related thrush nightingale Luscinia luscinia. It nests on or near the ground in dense vegetation. Research in Germany found that favored breeding habitat of nightingales was defined by a number of geographical factors.   Muscicapidae Family


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose last name start with “N”

Old World Flycatcher – Wikipedia

Good News

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

A Song Greater Than The Nightingale’s Song – by April Lorier

A Song Greater Than The Nightingale’s Song

Nightingale

Nightingale

Who hasn’t heard Manhattan Transfer sing A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square? And did you know it was a Nightingale that inspired Tchaikovsky when he was composing his Humoresque opus 10-2? Even my grandson knows about the beauty of the Nightingale’s Song from Hans Christian Andersen’s story The Nightingale. In short, the Nightingale’s Song is a sound of pure beauty with quite a reputation. Ever heard a greater song?

Nightingales are named so because they frequently sing at night as well as during the day. The name means ‘night songstress’. As is usual, it is the male who sings, not the female. He does so with ulterior motives: to attract a mate.

The male nightingale is known for his singing, to the extent that human singers are sometimes admiringly referred to as nightingales; the song is loud, with an impressive range of whistles, trills and gurgles. Its song is particularly noticeable at night because few other birds are singing. This is why its name (in several languages) includes “night”.

Singing at dawn, during the hour before sunrise, is assumed to be important in defending the bird’s territory. Nightingales sing even more loudly in urban or near-urban environments, in order to overcome the background noise.

I know an even more beautiful song that helps me overcome the background noise of life. It’s God’s Song! Did you know God sings? The Bible says so!

In Zephaniah 3:17 it says:

The Lord your God is with you,
He is mighty to save.
He will take great delight in you,
He will quiet you with His love,
He will rejoice over you with singing.

Oh! What an awesome thought! The Creator of all nature thinks I’m so special, and takes such delight in me that He sings lullabies to quiet me with His love! It is an intimacy that surpasses the mother-child intimacy, and I depend upon it many nights. I even sing back to Him and drift off to a peaceful, natural sleep. During the most troubled times of my life, it’s been the only way I could sleep.

Me singing to my Heavenly Father is one thing; but knowing He rejoices over me with singing is just too awesome to comprehend. No wonder I love Him so much!

(c) 2009 April Lorier

For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse. Romans 1:20

Supplied by and reprinted with permission of April Lorier.

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