When I Consider! – Capillary flow, Osmosis and Vacuum pressure

When I Consider!

When I Consider!

Evidence From Botany – January 4

On a hot summer day, one large tree can pump over a thousand gallons—that’s four ton—of water from the ground to it leaves. The water is collected from the soil through the roots. But the real work of pumping four tons of water, often 100 feet in the air, occurs at the top of the tree. The water is suctioned toward the treetop by three remarkably efficient mechanisms—capillary flow, osmosis and vacuum pressure. Osmosis and capillary action act in concert to move the water partway to the top of the tree, but the real driving force is a pressure differential created by the leaves within the vessels of the tree. The pressure differential is a result of water evaporating from the leaves of the tree, creating a suction throughout the vessels. This suction (measured as low as 1/20 of atmospheric pressure) helps to draw water from the roots all the way to the top of the tree. If you were to cut one of these vessels, you could actually hear a hissing sound as air rushed back in.

Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) by Daves BirdingPix

Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) by Daves BirdingPix up in a tree

The engineering excellence of this silent pumping system which efficiently delivers moisture to the very top of trees, is a not-so-silent witness against the idea that chance evolutionary processes (such as mutations) could have developed it.

Do you not know? Have you not heard? The LORD is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He will not grow tired or weary, and His understanding no one can fathom. Isaiah 40:28

From A Closer Look at the Evidence, by the Kleiss’

(Typed by Phyllis)

One thought on “When I Consider! – Capillary flow, Osmosis and Vacuum pressure

Please leave a Comment. They are encouraging.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s