The Bird With The Broken Wing

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped. (Psalms 124:7 KJV)

Words: He­ze­ki­ah But­ter­worth (1839-1905).

Music: Dan­i­el B. Town­er, 1919

The Bird With The Broken Wing

Broken Wing of Pelican-Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehab Center

Broken Wing of Pelican-Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehab Center

I walked in the woodland meadows,
Where sweet the thrushes sing,
And found on a bed of mosses,
A bird with a broken wing;
I healed its wing, and each morning
It sang its old sweet strain,
But the bird with the broken pinion,
Never soared as high again,
Never soared as high again.

I found a young life broken
By sin’s seductive art,
And, touched with a Christlike pity,
I took him to my heart;
He lived with a nobler purpose,
And struggled not in vain,
But the life that sin had stricken,
Never soared as high again,
Never soared as high again.

Bare-eyed Thrush (Turdus tephronotus) by Daves BirdingPix

Bare-eyed Thrush (Turdus tephronotus) by Daves BirdingPix

But the bird with the broken pinion
Kept another from the snare,
The life that sin had stricken,
Raised another from despair;
Each loss has its own compensation,
There’s healing for each pain,
But the bird with the broken pinion
Never soared as high again,
Never soared as high again.


Now I rejoice, not that you were made sorry, but that your sorrow led to repentance. For you were made sorry in a godly manner, that you might suffer loss from us in nothing. For godly sorrow produces repentance leading to salvation, not to be regretted; but the sorrow of the world produces death.
(2 Corinthians 7:9-10 NKJV)

This hymn reminds me of a story I have heard numerous times about the effects of sin in our lives. We may repent, but the scars are still there. I found a copy, it’s a little long, but I hope you’ll read it.

“That was a significant, story of the man who gave his little son a hammer and some nails, and told him that whenever he did anything that was wrong he might drive one of the nails into the barn door. The boy was honest and diligent too, and in a few days he came to his father saying that the last nail was in its place well driven down. ” And now,” said the father, “whenever you do any specially good deed, you may draw out one of the nails.” This pleased the son. He was as diligent in goodness now as he had been in badness before. He carried his little sister over the rough places, and then went and drew a nail. He sawed some wood for a poor widow and drew another nail. He ran on willing errands for his mother that he might have a chance to draw more nails. In a few days the last one was removed, and he came with pride to tell his father.

“What, all drawn so soon?” said the father.

” Every one,” responded the son.

” Let us go and see,” said the father.

” Come, then,” said the son, and he led the way. ” See, see,” said the eager boy, ” there is not a nail left in the door, and I assure you that I did something good for every nail I drew.”

” I am glad, my dear son,” said the father, ” that the task of removing them is so quickly done, but then,” continued he sadly, ” don’t you see how you have marred and injured the door? The nails are gone, but the scars remain.” (A. J. Paterson)

The Gospel Message

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