Celebrating the Life-Saving Heroism of Alaskan Dog Mushers (and their Sled Dogs) – Repost

What an interesting article that James J. S. Johnson wrote on his blog. I thought you might enjoy it. The video of an actual dog slide ride is really challenging.

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 Celebrating the Life-Saving Heroism of Alaskan Dog Mushers (and their Sled Dogs)

James J. S. Johnson, JD, ThD, CNHG

sleddogs-alaska-iditarod

As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.  Galatians 6:10

Imagine a celebration of Siberian husky sled dogs, harnessed together as a racing team, guided by their human driver (called a “musher”), zooming across frigid snow trails in rural Alaska:  this is what happens in a commemorative festival/event called the IDITAROD TRAIL RACE.  (See the YouTube video footage below.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI3bliK7R94

The Iditarod is an outdoors reenactment-like celebration of dogsled mushing, to remember the heroic relay race – through day and night, blizzard winds, snow, and ice – to save human lives, during a life-or-death crisis in January-February AD1925, when a highly contagious diphtheria plague struck like a serial killer, menacing the almost-unreachable population of Nome, Alaska.

The crisis…

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2 thoughts on “Celebrating the Life-Saving Heroism of Alaskan Dog Mushers (and their Sled Dogs) – Repost

  1. Thanks, Lee. By the way, if you need a connection to BIRDS, here it is: the sled dogs were fed SALMON as they raced to save plague-threatened lives in Nome, Alaska, when the relay mushers were transporting the diphtheria serum needed to stop the epidemic there. Of course, we all know that BALD EAGLES in Alaska love to eat SALMON, so the sled dogs were (at least a little bit!) in “competition” for a food source of Alaska’s coastal BALD EAGLES. Not that it’s likely that any of the eagles went hungry that year — and there is still a lot of SALMON along the coasts of Alaska!

    Liked by 1 person

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