Birds of the Bible – Bitterns in Zephaniah

Cinnamon Bittern by Phil Kwong in Hong Kong

Cinnamon Bittern by Phil Kwong in Hong Kong

And flocks shall lie down in the midst of her, all the beasts of the nations: both the cormorant and the bittern shall lodge in the upper lintels of it; their voice shall sing in the windows; desolation shall be in the thresholds: for he shall uncover the cedar work. (Zephaniah 2:14 KJV)

This verse in Zephaniah is a bit confusing because some of the characteristics mentioned are not in line with a bittern’s normal behavior. So, let’s look into this verse a little deeper.

Pulling up my e-Sword program, I am heading to the “Compare” mode. Wow! This is going to be interesting. What a variation of birds and animals listed for that verse.

  • ACV, ASV, BBE, RV, Disciple’s, WEB – pelican and the porcupine
  • ABP, Brenton – chameleons; and hedgehogs
  • AKJV, KJV, IAV, JUB, UKJV, Webster – cormorant and the bittern
  • AMP, NAS77, NASB, YLT – pelican and the hedgehog
  • Bishops, Geneva – pellicanes and owles
  • CEV – all kinds of desert owls
  • CJB –  jackdaws and owls
  • Darby, ECB, HRB, LITV, JPS, MKJV, NKJV  – pelican and the bittern
  • DRB – bittern and the urchin
  • ERV – Owls and crows
  • ESV – owl and the hedgehog
  • GNB, MSG, NET – Owls
  • GW – pelicans and herons
  • HCSB, ISV, NIV, NRSV – desert owl and the screech owl
  • KJ2000 – vulture and the hedgehog
  • TRC – pelicans and storks

See what my mean?

Here are the Strong’s Definitions for those two word in order of occurance.

H6893
קאת
qâ’ath
kaw-ath’
From H6958; probably the pelican (from vomiting): – cormorant.

H7090
קפּד קפּוד
qippôd qippôd
kip-pode’, kip-pode’
From H7088; a species of bird, perhaps the bittern (from its contracted form): – bittern.

At least 14 versions use the “bittern” as one of the two birds. Now to look further in the verse, it mentions that they are lodged in the upper parts with their voice singing in the windows. That is where I am curious about it being a bittern. Have you heard a bittern “sing”? Here a few of their “songs” from xeno-canto.

Eurasian Bittern (Botaurus stellaris) ©WikiC

Eurasian Bittern (Botaurus stellaris) ©WikiC

Eurasian Bittern (Botaurus stellaris)

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Dans Pix

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Dans Pix

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus)

Pinnated Bittern (Botaurus pinnatus) by Daves BirdingPix ©WikiC

Pinnated Bittern (Botaurus pinnatus) by Daves BirdingPix ©WikiC

Pinnated Bittern (Botaurus pinnatus)

Stripe-backed Bittern (Ixobrychus involucris) ©Drawing WikiC

Stripe-backed Bittern (Ixobrychus involucris) ©Drawing WikiC

Stripe-backed Bittern (Ixobrychus involucris)

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis)  by Bob-Nan

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) by Bob-Nan

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis)

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis)

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I am not as concerned as to which birds were there as much as if you read the context, you realize that the birds and critters are there because the places are deserted. Like a “ghost town” you see in the movies, with creatures occupying the windows and rafters. Why? Because of the Lord’s judgement on the people. Verses 10-13 explain this:

This shall they have for their pride, because they have reproached and magnified themselves against the people of the LORD of hosts. The LORD will be terrible unto them: for he will famish all the gods of the earth; and men shall worship him, every one from his place, even all the isles of the heathen. Ye Ethiopians also, ye shall be slain by my sword. And he will stretch out his hand against the north, and destroy Assyria; and will make Nineveh a desolation, and dry like a wilderness. (Zephaniah 2:10-13 KJV)

Maybe we should heed the warnings and examples given throughout Scripture. We have a loving God and Lord who created everything and cares about it, but He is also a God of Judgment. John 3:16 tells us “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” But if you continue reading, you see that there is also judgment.

(17) For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.
(18) He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.
(19) And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.
(20) For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds should be reproved.
(21) But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God.
John 3:17-21 KJV

I trust you know the Lord as your personal Savior.

See:

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Birds of the Bible – Name Study – Heron

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) Watching young nearby by Lee at Viera Wetlands

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) Watching young nearby by Lee at Viera Wetlands

Let’s look into a name study for another Bird of the Bible – this time the Heron. Our fishing Green Heron directed my thinking towards the Heron. So, let’s see what we can find out about how they are mentioned in Scripture.

The Heron and their kind are mentioned in Leviticus and Deuteronomy in the list of “Unclean Birds” or the “Do not eat” list.

And the stork, the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat. (Leviticus 11:19 KJV)

And the stork, and the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat. (Deuteronomy 14:18 KJV)

Those are the only two references to Herons in the King James Version. But how do other versions translate this bird? That is what these name study articles do. Dig around in the Word. I use e-Sword’ s compare mode to see the different versions.

Brenton, as does the APB, DRB, ISV, and NET  has the Heron in Psalms:

There the sparrows will build their nests; and the house of the heron takes the lead among them. Psalms 104:17 Brenton)

The Bishops and CJB only use Heron in Deuteronomy, but not Leviticus.

The Phillips does not even use the word “Heron.”

Here is the Hebrew word used in these verses:

H601
אנפה
‘ănâphâh
an-aw-faw’
From H599; an unclean bird, perhaps the parrot (from its irascibility): – heron.

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The DRB also uses Heron in Job:

The wing of the ostrich is like the wings of the heron, and of the hawk. (Job 39:13 DRB)

The GW shows Heron in these verses:

“It will become the possession of herons. It will become pools of water. I’ll sweep it with the broom of destruction,” declares the LORD of Armies. (Isaiah 14:23 GW)

Pelicans and herons will take possession of the land. Owls and crows will live there. He will stretch the measuring line of chaos and the plumb line of destruction over it. (Isaiah 34:11 GW)

Flocks will lie down in it along with animals of every kind. Even pelicans and herons will nest on top of its columns. Listen! A bird will sing in a window. The doorway will be in ruins, because the LORD will expose the cedar beams. (Zephaniah 2:14 GW)

Isaiah 14:23 uses H7090 which is:

H7090
קפּד קפּוד
qippôd qippôd
kip-pode’, kip-pode’
From H7088; a species of bird, perhaps the bittern (from its contracted form): – bittern.

Isaiah 34:11 GW and Zephaniah 2:14 GW both use the same H7090. The word is translated as “Bittern” in the KJV for all three verses. The Ardeidae- Herons, Bitterns Family consists of Heron, Egrets and Bitterns so, there doesn’t seem to be a problem there, especially since the first two verses said, “heron after her kind.” They are related.

The DRB’s (1899 Douay-Rheims Bible) translation, to me, does not seem to match the rest of the other translations.

Boat-billed Heron (Cochlearius cochlearius) by Lee at LPZoo

Boat-billed Heron (Cochlearius cochlearius) by Lee at LPZoo

Herons:

The herons are long-legged freshwater and coastal birds in the family Ardeidae, with 72 recognised species (some are called “egrets” or “bitterns” instead of “heron”). Within Ardeidae, all members of the genera Botaurus and Ixobrychus are referred to as “bitterns”, and — including the Zigzag Heron or Zigzag Bittern — are a monophyletic group within the Ardeidae. However, egrets are not a biologically distinct group from the herons, and tend to be named differently because they are mainly white and/or have decorative plumes. Although egrets have the same build as herons, they tend to be smaller.

The classification of the individual heron/egret species is fraught with difficulty, and there is still no clear consensus about the correct placement of many species into either of the two major genera, Ardea and Egretta. One species formerly considered to constitute a separate monotypic family Cochlearidae, the Boat-billed Heron, is now regarded as a member of the Ardeidae.

Although herons resemble birds in some other families, such as the storks, ibises, spoonbills and cranes, they differ from these in flying with their necks retracted, not outstretched. They are also one of the bird groups that have powder down. Some members of this group nest colonially in trees, while others, notably the bitterns, use reedbeds.

Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) by W Kwong

Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) by W Kwong

The herons are a widespread family, they exist on all continents except Antarctica, and are present in most habitats except the coldest extremes of the Arctic, extremely high mountains and the driest deserts. Almost all species are associated with water, they are essentially non-swimming waterbirds that feed on the margins of lakes, rivers, swamps, ponds and the sea. They are predominately found in lowland areas, although some species live in alpine areas, and the majority of species occur in the tropics.

The herons are a highly mobile family, with most species being at least partially migratory. Birds are particularly inclined to disperse widely after breeding but before the annual migration where the species is colonial, searching out new feeding areas and reducing the pressures on feeding grounds near the colony. The migration typically occurs at night, usually as individuals or in small groups.

The herons and bitterns are carnivorous. The members of this family are mostly associated with wetlands and water, and feed on a variety of live aquatic prey. The diet includes a wide variety of aquatic animals, including fish, reptiles, amphibians, crustaceans, molluscs and aquatic insects. Individual species may be generalists or specialise in certain prey types, like the Yellow-crowned Night Heron, which specialises in crustaceans, particularly crabs. Many species will also opportunistically take larger prey, including birds and bird eggs, rodents, and more rarely carrion. Even more rarely there have been reports of herons eating acorns, peas and grains, but most vegetable matter consumed is accidental.

The most common hunting technique is for the bird to sit motionless on the edge of or standing in shallow water and wait until prey comes within range. (Birds of the Bible – Patient Herons) Birds may either do this from an upright posture, giving them a wider field of view for seeing prey, or from a crouched position, which is more cryptic and means the bill is closer to the prey when it is located. Having seen prey the head is moved from side to side, so that the heron can calculate the position of the prey in the water and compensate for refraction, and then the bill is used to spear the prey.

Reddish Egret scarring up breakfast

Reddish Egret scarring up breakfast

In addition to sitting and waiting, herons may feed more actively. They may walk slowly, at around or less than 60 paces a minute, snatching prey when it is observed. Other active feeding behaviours include foot stirring and probing, where the feet are used to flush out hidden prey. The wings may be used to frighten prey (or possibly attract it to shade) or to reduce glare; the most extreme example of this is exhibited by the Black Heron, which forms a full canopy with its wings over its body.

Some species of heron, such as the Little Egret and Grey Heron, have been documented using bait in order to lure prey to within striking distance. Herons may use items already in place, or actively add items to the water in order to attract fish. Items used may be man-made, such as bread; alternatively Striated Herons in the Amazon have been watched repeatedly dropping seeds, insects, flowers and leaves into the water to catch fish. (Green Heron Fishing With Bread)

(Heron information from Wikipedia with editing)

Names of Birds Study

Birds of the Bible – Herons

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Birds of the Bible – Jeremiah 8:7

Wood Stork with landing gear down

Wood Stork with landing gear down

Jeremiah 8:7 has been used in several Birds of the Bible articles before. See Birds of the Bible:

So what else can be found out about that verse? Those of you that follow this blog know that I enjoy digging into the Bible with my e-Sword program. It is a free program that can be downloaded. It has different versions of the Bible that can be downloaded free or some with a small fee. Also available are dictionaries, commentaries, maps, notes, references and STEP additions. For the price, FREE, it is hard to beat. There are also links to other sites to get even more add-ons. Check out their LINKS page. Two favorites of mine are the ESS and the Bible Support sites.

The Bible tells us to study the Bible and we should. I try to read several chapters every day and meditate on what I read. Then along with that I like to dig deeper into Scripture and mine some great promises and truths out. Then other times, like this article, I am just digging out the birds mentioned in the different versions of this verse. I don’t endorse every version I have loaded on my e-Sword, but I do like to compare all of them.

But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them; And that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Timothy 3:14-17 KJV)

Well, back to Jeremiah 8:7. Here’s the verse:

Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times; and the turtle and the crane and the swallow observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD. (Jeremiah 8:7 KJV)

Using the “Compare” mode, let’s see which birds are mentioned. Most mention the Stork, Turtle or Turtle-dove, Swallow, and the Crane. It is referring to them having the knowledge to know when to migrate, but “but my people know not the rules of the LORD.” (ESV) See the other articles for more details.

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Black-necked Stork (Jabiru) (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus) by Ian

Black-necked Stork (Jabiru) (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus) by Ian

The H####’s are from Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries. Using the KJV+ for the numbers.
H2624
חסידה
chăsı̂ydâh
khas-ee-daw’
Feminine of H2623; the kind (maternal) bird, that is, a stork: – X feather, stork.

Stork or storks – every version except two – DRB (kite), MSG (see bottom)
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Adamawa Turtle Dove (Streptopelia hypopyrrha) ©WikiC

Adamawa Turtle Dove (Streptopelia hypopyrrha) ©WikiC

H8449
תּר תּור
tôr tôr
tore, tore
Probably the same as H8447; a ring dove, often (figuratively) as a term of endearment: – (turtle) dove.

Dove, Turtle, Turtle-doves, Mourning Doves – same family, no problem
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Welcome Swallow (Hirundo neoxena) by Ian

Welcome Swallow (Hirundo neoxena) by Ian

H5693
עגוּר
‛âgûr
aw-goor’
Passive participle (but with active sense) of an unused root meaning to twitter; probably the swallow: – swallow.

Swallow – most versions
Swift – instead of Swift – ERV, NASB, NAS77, NIV, NIrV
Swift and Swallow – NKJV
The Swift and the Swallow both behave alike in some ways even though they are not in the same family. I even confuse them at times.
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Crane Migration over Israel

Crane Migration over Israel

H5483
סס סוּס
sûs sûs
soos, soos
From an unused root meaning to skip (properly for joy); a horse (as leaping); also a swallow (from its rapid flight): – crane, horse ([-back, -hoof]).
Now we see where two different birds could be used. From here on the different versions begin to differ.

Crane – Most use Crane, but here are some of the differences
Sparrows – APB, Brenton
Thrushes – CEV, ERV, ECB, GNB, LITV, NAS77, NASB
Quite a difference in the birds here.
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Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) by S Slayton

Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) by S Slayton

I saved the most interesting translation till last. Actually, it is a paraphrase and not a true translation. It does give me three more named birds. So far I haven’t seen them anywhere else, so for now they will not get their own page.

Cranes know when it’s time to move south for winter. And robins, warblers, and bluebirds know when it’s time to come back again. But my people? My people know nothing, not the first thing of GOD and his rule. (Jeremiah 8:7 MSG)

Does it matter if there is a difference in these versions? Yes and no. Yes, the Bible should be translated as close to the original as possible. No, in the sense that all these birds were given the knowledge to migrate by the Lord. And the truth of people not knowing the truth about God and what He wants for their lives. The birds obey, man doesn’t.

See More Birds of the Bible

Thought:

The method I used to study this verse can be applied to any verse or passage you wish to dig into. I used the Strong’s Hebrew and Greek because, of course, I have no clue as to what those word are. But using those help me/you understand the meaning of the word as it was originally written or as close as we can get to it. As our language has changed over the years, our meanings have also changed. It helps to read other versions when studying the Bible. I know some don’t agree and I won’t go there. The Lord has many truths to find in His Word. Maybe you like plants or animals, or like to study one person at a time, or a promise and the different ways it is presented, whatever. Study.

Gospel Message

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Disclaimer About Bible Version Usage

Eurasian Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) by Dan

Eurasian Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) by Dan

I would like to post a Disclaimer about the use of the different Bible versions that I use in my various blogs, especially the Birds of the Bible articles. Because I quote from different versions does not mean that I endorse them.  There are versions that translated God’s Word very faithfully by Godly men. There are some of the translations that are questionable as to “by whom” and “why” the translations were made.

When I do my Birds of the Bible articles, I like to “Compare” the different versions. I use e-Sword, a free Bible program from e-sword.net, and it has a “compare” mode that lets me see all the different versions of a verse I have loaded at the same time. I find it amazing that the different versions of Scripture translate a Greek or Hebrew word into so many different birds. When I do my articles, I write from an educational mode, an instructional mode and a spiritual mode.

Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. (2 Timothy 2:15 KJV)

Here is an example of what my “Compare” looks like with all the different versions I have loaded. I have some which I can’t even read, some are in Spanish, and I have the Latin Vulgate in here because many of the bird species use Latin in their names and I try to see if that will give me a clue as to which bird is intended.

Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) by Daves BirdingPix

Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) by Daves BirdingPix

Leviticus 11:17

(ACV) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

(ABP+) AndG2532 long-eared owl,G3563.3 andG2532 cormorant,G2674.1 andG2532 ibis,G2395.1

(ABP-G+) καιG2532 νυκτικορακαG3563.3 καιG2532 καταρρακτηνG2674.1 καιG2532 ιβινG2395.1

(AKJV) And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

(AMP) The owl, the cormorant, the ibis,

(ASV) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

(BBE) And the little owl and the cormorant and the great owl;

(Bishops) The Falcon, the Cormorant, the great Owle,

(Brenton) and the night-raven and the cormorant and the stork,

(CEV) (SEE 11:13)

(CJB) the little owl, the cormorant, the great owl,

(Darby) and the owl, and the gannet, and the ibis,

(DRB) The screech owl, and the cormorant, and the ibis.

(ERV) owls, cormorants, great owls,

(ESV) the little owl, the cormorant, the short-eared owl,

(Geneva) The litle owle also, and the connorant, and the great owle.

(GNB) (SEE 11:13)

(GW) little owls, cormorants, great owls,

(HCSB) the little owl, the cormorant, the long-eared owl,

(HOT+) ואתH853 הכוסH3563 ואתH853 השׁלךH7994 ואתH853 הינשׁוף׃H3244

(ISV) owl, cormorant, ibis,

(JPS) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl;

(KJV) And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

(KJV+) And the little owl,H3563 and the cormorant,H7994 and the great owl,H3244

(KJV-1611) And the little Owle, and the Cormorant, and the great Owle,

(KJVA) And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

(LBLA) el búho, el somormujo, el búho real,

(LITV) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the eared owl;

(LXX+) καιG2532 CONJ νυκτικορακαN-ASM καιG2532 CONJ καταρρακτηνN-ASM καιG2532 CONJ ιβινN-ASF

(MKJV) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the eared owl;

(MSG) owl, cormorant, ibis,

(NAS77) and the little owl and the cormorant and the great owl,

(NASB) and the little owl and the cormorant and the great owl,

(NASB+) and the littleH3563b owlH3563b and the cormorantH7994 and the N1greatH3244 owlH3244,

(NBLH) el búho, el somormujo, el búho real,

(NIrV) “‘They include little owls, cormorants and great owls.

(NIV) the little owl, the cormorant, the great owl,

(NKJV) the little owl, the fisher owl, and the screech owl;

(NRSV) the little owl, the cormorant, the great owl,

(NRSVA) the little owl, the cormorant, the great owl,

(RV) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl;

(SRV) Y el buho, y el somormujo, y el ibis,

(Translit+) . . kowcH3563 kowcH3563 . . shalakH7994 . . yanshuwphH3244 yanshuwphH3244

(Vulgate) bubonem et mergulum et ibin

(Webster) And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

(YLT) and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

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White Pelican at Lake Hollingsworth by Dan

White Pelican at Lake Hollingsworth by Dan

Or the next verse:

Leviticus 11:18

(ACV) and the horned owl, and the pelican, and the vulture,

(ABP+) andG2532 the purple-legged stork,G4209.2 andG2532 pelican,G3989.2 andG2532 swan,G2945.2

(ABP-G+) καιG2532 πορφυριωναG4209.2 καιG2532 πελεκαναG3989.2 καιG2532 κυκνονG2945.2

(AKJV) And the swan, and the pelican, and the gier eagle,

(AMP) The swan, the pelican, the vulture,

(ASV) and the horned owl, and the pelican, and the vulture,

(BBE) And the water-hen and the pelican and the vulture;

(Bishops) The Backe, the Pellicane, the Pye,

(Brenton) and the red-bill, and the pelican, and swan,

(CEV) (SEE 11:13)

(CJB) the horned owl, the pelican, the barn owl,

(Darby) and the swan, and the pelican, and the carrion vulture,

(DRB) And the swan, and the bittern, and the porphyrion.

(ERV) water hens, pelicans, carrion vultures,

(ESV) the barn owl, the tawny owl, the carrion vulture,

(Geneva) Also the redshanke and the pelicane, and the swanne:

(GNB) (SEE 11:13)

(GW) barn owls, pelicans, ospreys,

(HCSB) the white owl, the desert owl, the osprey,

(HOT+) ואתH853 התנשׁמתH8580 ואתH853 הקאתH6893 ואתH853 הרחם׃H7360

(ISV) water-hen, pelican, carrion,

(JPS) and the horned owl, and the pelican, and the carrion-vulture;

(KJV) And the swan, and the pelican, and the gier eagle,

(KJV+) And the swan,H8580 and the pelican,H6893 and the gier eagle,H7360

(KJV-1611) And the Swanne, and the Pellicane, and the Gier-eagle,

(KJVA) And the swan, and the pelican, and the gier eagle,

(LBLA) la lechuza blanca, el pelícano, el buitre común,

(LITV) and the barn owl, and the pelican and the owl-vulture;

(LXX+) καιG2532 CONJ πορφυριωναN-ASM καιG2532 CONJ πελεκαναN-ASM καιG2532 CONJ κυκνονN-ASM

(MKJV) and the barn owl, and the pelican, and the owl-vulture;

(MSG) water hen, pelican, Egyptian vulture,

(NAS77) and the white owl and the pelican and the carrion vulture,

(NASB) and the white owl and the pelican and the carrion vulture,

(NASB+) and the whiteH8580 owlH8580 and the N1pelicanH6893 and the carrionH7360 vultureH7360,

(NBLH) la lechuza blanca, el pelícano, el buitre común,

(NIrV) They include white owls, desert owls and ospreys.

(NIV) the white owl, the desert owl, the osprey,

(NKJV) the white owl, the jackdaw, and the carrion vulture;

(NRSV) the water hen, the desert owl, the carrion vulture,

(NRSVA) the water hen, the desert owl, the carrion vulture,

(RV) and the horned owl, and the pelican, and the vulture;

(SRV) Y el calamón, y el cisne, y el onocrótalo,

(Translit+) . . tanshemethH8580 . . qa’athH6893 . . rachamH7360 rachamH7360

(Vulgate) cycnum et onocrotalum et porphirionem

(Webster) And the swan, and the pelican, and the gier-eagle,

(YLT) and the swan, and the pelican, and the gier eagle,


e-Sword Home

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Birds of the Bible – Ibises

Southern Bald Ibis (Geronticus calvus) by Dan at LPZoo

Southern Bald Ibis (Geronticus calvus) by Dan at LPZoo

and for a long time birds and hedgehogs, and ibises and ravens shall dwell in it: and the measuring line of desolation shall be cast over it, and satyrs shall dwell in it. (Isaiah 34:11 Brenton)

While working on Birds of the Bible – Isaiah 34:11, I was pointing out how the different versions of the Bible translated that verse. One of the birds that appeared in those verses was the Ibis. After searching through e-Sword, “Ibis/Ibises” showed up in four different Scriptures. The Ibis is being added as a Bird of the Bible and will have it’s own page, Ibises.

Of course the Isaiah 34:11 verse, quoted above, has “ibises” in the Brenton and the ABP+ (Apostolic Bible Polyglot w/Strongs Numbers).
(ABP+) Birds, and hedgehogs, and ibises, and crows shall dwell in her; and [shall be put upon her cord a surveying of desolation]; and satyrs shall live in her.
(Brenton) and for a long time birds and hedgehogs, and ibises and ravens shall dwell in it: and the measuring line of desolation shall be cast over it, and satyrs shall dwell in it.

Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14 both have the list of clean and unclean birds that the Israelites were to observe.

Leviticus 11:17
(ABP+) And long-eared owl, and cormorant, and ibis,
(Darby) and the owl, and the gannet, and the ibis,
(DRB) The screech owl, and the cormorant, and the ibis.
(ISV) owl, cormorant, ibis,

Deuteronomy 14:16
(ABP+) and heron, and swan, and ibis,
(Darby) the owl, and the ibis and the swan,

There is one other reference to an “ibis” and that is in the GNB (Good News Bible) which I totally disagree with its translation.
(GNB) Who tells the ibis when the Nile will flood, or who tells the rooster that rain will fall?

Here is what the verse says in several other translations:
(KJV) Who hath put wisdom in the inward parts? or who hath given understanding to the heart?
(NASB) “Who has put wisdom in the innermost being Or given understanding to the mind?
(ESV) Who has put wisdom in the inward parts or given understanding to the mind?

The way it reads, there is no mention of a any kind of a bird or an ibis.

Wikipedia has this to say about the Ibis (edited) “The ibises (collective plural ibis; classical plurals ibides and ibes) are a group of long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae of the Pelicaniformes Order.
They all have long down curved bills, and usually feed as a group, probing mud for food items, usually crustaceans. In Florida, they probe around in yards looking for insects or whatever. Most species nest in trees, often with spoonbills or herons.
The word ibis comes from Greek and Latin, and probably from the Ancient Egyptian. According to Josephus, Moses employed ibes against serpents during a desert campaign into Ethiopia in his early life. Pliny the Elder also recounted, “The Egyptians invoked [ibes] against the serpents.”

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) by Dan at LPZoo

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) by Dan at LPZoo

In culture

The Sacred Ibis was an object of religious veneration in ancient Egypt, particularly associated with the god, Thoth. At the town of Hermopolis, ibises were reared specifically for sacrificial purposes and in the Serapeum at Saqqara, archaeologists found the mummies of one and a half million ibises and hundreds of thousands of falcons.
According to local legend in the Birecik area, the Northern Bald Ibis was one of the first birds that Noah released from the Ark as a symbol of fertility, and a lingering religious sentiment in Turkey helped the colonies there to survive long after the demise of the species in Europe. (Not found in Scripture)
The mascot of the University of Miami is an American White Ibis. The ibis was selected as the school mascot because of its legendary bravery during hurricanes. The ibis is the last sign of wildlife to take shelter before a hurricane hits and the first to reappear once the storm has passed.  By the same token, the short story The Scarlet Ibis used the hearty bird’s appearance and untimely demise inland to foreshadow one of the central character’s death.
The Sacred Ibis is the unit symbol of the Israeli Special Forces unit known as Unit 212 or Maglan in Hebrew: מגלן.”

Bare-faced Ibis (Phimosus infuscatus) by Robert Scanlon

Bare-faced Ibis (Phimosus infuscatus) by Robert Scanlon

Here is a list of the Ibises, by their genera

Threskiornis
African Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo
Malagasy Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis bernieri)
Black-headed Ibis (Threskiornis melanocephalus) – by Nikhil Devasar
Australian White Ibis (Threskiornis molucca) by Ian
Straw-necked Ibis (Threskiornis spinicollis)
Pseudibis
Red-naped Ibis (Pseudibis papillosa)
White-shouldered Ibis (Pseudibis davisoni) ARK
Giant Ibis (Pseudibis gigantea) ARK
Geronticus
Northern Bald Ibis (Geronticus eremita)
Southern Bald Ibis (Geronticus calvus) by Dan at L P Zoo
Nipponia
Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon)
Bostrychia
Olive Ibis (Bostrychia olivacea) IBC
Sao Tome Ibis (Bostrychia bocagei)
Spot-breasted Ibis (Bostrychia rara)
Hadada Ibis (Bostrychia hagedash)
Wattled Ibis (Bostrychia carunculata)
Theristicus
Plumbeous Ibis (Theristicus caerulescens)
Buff-necked Ibis (Theristicus caudatus) by Dario Sanches
Black-faced Ibis (Theristicus melanopis) b
Cercibis
Sharp-tailed Ibis (Cercibis oxycerca) IBC
Mesembrinibis
Green Ibis (Mesembrinibis cayennensis)
Phimosus
Bare-faced Ibis (Phimosus infuscatus) by Robert Scanlon
Eudocimus
American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) by Dan at Lake Morton
Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) by Dan at L P Zoo
Plegadis
Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) by Dan at Circle B
White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) ©USFWS
Puna Ibis (Plegadis ridgwayi)
Lophotibis
Madagascar Ibis (Lophotibis cristata)