Geese – Creation Moments

Geese

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Psalm 50:11
“I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.”

Geese are large birds from the family Anatidae. This family – which includes geese, ducks, and swans – is presumed by creation researchers to be a baramin. Therefore, Noah took two anatidae on the Ark rather than two ducks, two geese, etc., and all the species of geese, ducks, and swans have developed since the end of the Flood.

In the Pacific Northwest, flocks of geese flying overhead are huge and noisy. I find them fascinating, particularly as they embark on or return from their migrations.

Canada geese migrate considerable distances. Geese identified by rings have traversed the Atlantic, ending up in Europe, having been ringed in North America.

Generally speaking, when a goose has found a mate, the pair stays together for life. Goslings hatch after about a month, and they are immediately able to walk, swim, and find their own food. It is delightful to see a pair of geese with a line of goslings waddling to the water, and then swimming away.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) ©WilliamWisePhotography.com

The ancient Celtic Christians used to use the wild goose as a symbol of the Holy Spirit. In the Bible, the Spirit is described as being “like a dove”, and doves in the Middle East are wild and untamable. However, in the West, doves often appear tame and peaceful. Geese, on the other hand, exhibit the same wildness in properties as the biblical dove. Thus, the use of the Wild Goose as a symbol of the Holy Spirit seems appropriate.

Prayer: We pray, Lord God, that You will guide us by Your Spirit, that in all the things we do, we may please You and glorify Your Name. Amen.

Author: Paul F. Taylor

Ref: Encyclopaedia Britannica, Goose Bird, accessed 12/28/2020. Image: CC BY-SA 3.0 unported.

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