Double-crested Cormorant Juvenile at Indian Rocks Beach

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 7

My niece, Angie, sent the above photo of a bird they observed at the Indian Rocks Beach shore in Florida. She asked what kind of a “sea duck” it was. She was close, but the cormorant family is totally separate. I let her know that it was a juvenile Double-crested Cormorant.

She later told me that it was almost struggling to get out of the water. Angie also provided me with more photos of this youngster. I may be wrong, but, being immature, it may have become too water-logged. I have never experienced seeing one “swimming ashore”. If they were to become too wet, that could happen, I suppose. Whatever the case, enjoy seeing her sequence of another fantastic creation from our Creator. He provides for us and the avian population with provisions to help us when in need.

“Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.” (Hebrews 4:16 KJV)

The Cormorant is listed in four verses in the Bible, therefore making it a Bird of the Bible. “And the pelican, and the gier eagle, and the cormorant,”
(Deuteronomy 14:17 KJV)

The Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. It occurs along inland waterways as well as in coastal areas, and is widely distributed across North America, from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska down to Florida and Mexico. Measuring 70–90 cm (28–35 in) in length, it is an all-black bird which gains a small double crest of black and white feathers in breeding season. It has a bare patch of orange-yellow facial skin. Five subspecies are recognized.

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 1

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 2

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 3

After fishing, cormorants go ashore, and are frequently seen holding their wings out in the sun. All cormorants have preen gland secretions that are used ostensibly to keep the feathers waterproof. Some sources state that cormorants have waterproof feathers while others say that they have water permeable feathers. Still others suggest that the outer plumage absorbs water but does not permit it to penetrate the layer of air next to the skin. The wing drying action is seen even in the flightless cormorant but commonly in the Antarctic shags and red-legged cormorants. Alternate functions suggested for the spread-wing posture include that it aids thermoregulation, digestion, balances the bird or indicates presence of fish. A detailed study of the great cormorant concludes that it is without doubt to dry the plumage.

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 4

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 5

Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach 6

The Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a member of the cormorant family of seabirds. It occurs along inland waterways as well as in coastal areas, and is widely distributed across North America, from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska down to Florida and Mexico. Measuring 70–90 cm (28–35 in) in length, it is an all-black bird which gains a small double crest of black and white feathers in breeding season. It has a bare patch of orange-yellow facial skin. Five subspecies are recognized.

The double-crested cormorant is found near rivers and lakes and along the coastline. It mainly eats fish and hunts by swimming and diving. Its feathers, like those of all cormorants, are not waterproof and it must spend time drying them out after spending time in the water.

[Info from Cormorant] and Double-Crested Cormorant from Wikipedia]

Another Birdwatching Trip

Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

The birds of the air, And the fish of the sea That pass through the paths of the seas. O LORD, our Lord, How excellent is Your name in all the earth! (Psalms 8:8-9 NKJV)

We just got back from another birdwatching trip. This time we birded the Honeymoon Island State Park and MacDill AFB beach. Was gone overnight and have many photos to prep. Here are just a few photos for now.

These Double-crested Cormorants were just sitting along the Gulf shore and one was sleeping. They seem to be tired and may have decided to stay on shore because of Hurricane Arthur’s bands of rain that kept sweeping the area the last two days. A man walked between the two and they didn’t even move.

Grey Kingbird (Tyrannus dominicensis) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

Grey Kingbird (Tyrannus dominicensis) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

This photo of a Kingbird, which is the best shot I have ever had of one, was also at the state park. (Actually, just checked, these are the only ones I have taken of Grey Kingbirds. This was a LIFE BIRD for me. Yeah!)

Today, July 4th, we checked out the shore on Tampa Bay at the base. The birds were few, but enough to give us a chance to get some photos. Without so many species, maybe I’ll be able to ID them. My ID’s of shorebirds is still weak. I will pouring be over my bird books again. Praise the Lord for bird books. (I still think the Lord should have hung tags on them.)

Trust those of us celebrating the Fourth have had a good day. We have!

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Honeymoon Island State Park

Birdwatching Trips

Birdwatching

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