Sunday Inspiration – Guans

Cauca Guan (Penelope perspicax) chick ©BirdPhotos.com

Here is the second group of birds in the Cracidae Family. Last weeks Chachalacas were rather plain, but an interesting group. Today’s second set of species has 20 Guans and 4 Piping Guans.  You will notice a little more variety and coloring in these Guans, yet the overall shapes are similiar to the Chachalacas. “The guans are a number of bird genera which make up the largest group in the family Cracidae. They are found mainly in northern South America, southern Central America, and a few adjacent Caribbean islands. There is also the peculiar horned guan (Oreophasis derbianus) which is not a true guan, but a very distinct and ancient cracid with no close living relatives (Pereira et al. 2002).”

Rusty-margined Guan (Penelope superciliaris) ©BirdPhotos.com

Rusty-margined Guan (Penelope superciliaris) ©BirdPhotos.com

These are distributed through 6 genera. These are the birds in the Penelope genera; Band-tailed Guan, Bearded Guan, Baudo Guan, Andean Guan, Marail Guan, Rusty-margined Guan, Red-faced Guan, Crested Guan, Cauca Guan, White-winged Guan, Spix’s Guan, Dusky-legged Guan, White-crested Guan, Chestnut-bellied Guan, and White-browed Guan

Black-fronted Piping Guan (Pipile jacutinga) ©BirdPhotos.com

Black-fronted Piping Guan (Pipile jacutinga) ©BirdPhotos.com

There are 4 in the Pipile genera; Trinidad Piping Guan, Blue-throated Piping Guan, Red-throated Piping Guan, and the Black-fronted Piping Guan

Horned Guan (Oreophasis derbianus) ©©Flickr JoshMore

Horned Guan (Oreophasis derbianus) ©©Flickr JoshMore

Wattled Guan is in Aburria, Black Guan and Sickle-winged Guan are in the Chamaepetes genus, Highland Guan in the Penelopina and the Horned Guan in the Oreophasis generas.

I found this additional remark in Wikipedia rather amazing. “This indicates that the guans’ origin is in the northern Andes region, in the general area of Colombia or perhaps Ecuador; the date of their initial radiation is not well resolved due to the lack of fossil evidence but can be very roughly placed around 40–25 mya (Oligocene, perhaps some time earlier). The two basal lineages diverged during the Burdigalian, around 20–15 mya.(Pereira et al. 2002)” They have no proof or fossil evidence, yet they came up with these millions of years. Their initial radiation was the day they came off of the ark., which was not millions of years ago.

“Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, of all flesh, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth; that they may breed abundantly in the earth, and be fruitful, and multiply upon the earth. And Noah went forth, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons’ wives with him: Every beast, every creeping thing, and every fowl, and whatsoever creepeth upon the earth, after their kinds, went forth out of the ark.” (Genesis 8:17-19 KJV)

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“For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his pavilion: in the secret of his tabernacle shall he hide me; he shall set me up upon a rock.” (Psalms 27:5 KJV)


“Hide Thou Me” ~ ©The Hyssongs (with permission)

Verse and song picked because of how well these created birds are able to blend in and hide from their enemies..
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More Sunday Inspirations
Cracadaie Family – Wikipedia
Many Photos by BirdPhotos.com

In Our Place
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Sunday Inspiration – Hide Thou Me

Common Potoo (Nyctibius griseus) by Daves BirdingPix

Common Potoo (Nyctibius griseus) by Daves BirdingPix

“For he will hide me in his shelter in the day of trouble; he will conceal me under the cover of his tent; he will lift me high upon a rock. (Psalms 27:5 ESV)

Considering yesterday’s blog, the song, “Hide Thou Me” came to mind. This song was used before, but it is so appropriate. Today’s Inspiration features the birds in the Frogmouth and Potoo families. You will see how the Lord has provided for them to HIDE through their behavior and coloration He has given them.

Saw this on one of our follower’s blog, Third Eye View:

He who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe is as good as dead; his eyes are closed. ~Albert Einstein

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And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:31 KJV)

We will not hide them from their children, shewing to the generation to come the praises of the LORD, and his strength, and his wonderful works that he hath done. (Psalms 78:4 KJV)

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But the LORD has been my defense, And my God the rock of my refuge. (Psalms 94:22 NKJV)

“Hide Thou Me” – ©Rejoice! by the Hyssongs

Hide thou me
Ohh rock of ages
Hide thou me
Ohh rock of ages

Hide thou me
No other refuge
Can save but thee
Through this old world

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Sunday Inspirations

Here I Am

Podargidae – Frogmouths Family

Nyctibiidae – Potoos Family

Gospel Message

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Sunday Inspiration – Bittern

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) at Circle B by Lee

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Lee

The herds shall lie down in her midst, Every beast of the nation. Both the pelican and the bittern Shall lodge on the capitals of her pillars; Their voice shall sing in the windows; Desolation shall be at the threshold; For He will lay bare the cedar work. (Zephaniah 2:14 NKJV)

I enjoy “trying” to find bitterns. They can be right challenging because of the way the Lord designed them to be “hidden in plain view.” The American Bittern, at the top, landed right in front of us at Circle B last year. Otherwise, he would have blended right in and he would have been missed. Bitterns are also a Bird of the Bible.

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Bob-Nan

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) by Bob-Nan

Bitterns belong to the Ardeidae- Herons, Bitterns Family and most are well hidden while they search for food. “Bitterns are a classification of birds in the heron family, a family of wading birds. Species named bitterns tend to be the shorter-necked, often more secretive members of this family. Bitterns usually frequent reed beds and similar marshy areas, and feed on amphibians, reptiles, insects, and fish. Unlike the similar storks, ibises, and spoonbills, herons and bitterns fly with their necks retracted, not outstretched.” (Wikipedia)

Sunbitterns, which I added, are members of the Eurypygidae – Sunbittern Family. These comments from Woodland Park Zoo, show how their design helps hide them. “With its slow, deliberate walk on orange-colored legs and its long neck held parallel to the ground, the sunbittern resembles the sun-flecked forest interior. This spectacular frontal display is for threat or defense rather than courtship and is usually accompanied by a low hiss and bowing.”

“… they have vividly colored middle webs, which with wings fully spread show bright eyespots in red, yellow, and black. These are shown to other sunbitterns in courtship and threat displays, or used to startle potential predators. (Wikipedia)

This ability to hide brought to mind these verses:

Keep me as the apple of Your eye; Hide me under the shadow of Your wings, (Psalms 17:8 NKJV)

For in the day of trouble He will conceal me in His tabernacle; In the secret place of His tent He will hide me; He will lift me up on a rock. (Psalms 27:5 NASB)

Hide me from the secret counsel of evildoers, From the tumult of those who do iniquity, (Psalms 64:2 NASB)

Can anyone hide himself in secret places, So I shall not see him?” says the LORD; “Do I not fill heaven and earth?” says the LORD. (Jeremiah 23:24 NKJV)

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“Hide Thou Me” – ©Rejoice! by the Hyssongs

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