Our Missionaries – African Pied Wagtail

Brubru (Nilaus afer) ©Wiki My first guess

Years ago there were a few posts that featured some of the birds our missionaries see in their various locations. It was 2009 and 2010 actually. I even made a page to hold the different articles. What Our Missionaries See. It is located at the end of the Birds of the Bible list.

Recently, the thought of reviving that series has crossed my mind. Today, one of our Pastors, who moved on to a new position, has challenged me to ID a bird he keeps seeing in Uganda. Pastor Peter Brock is also a good friend who enjoys birdwatching. After three emails back and forth, and some photos, our mystery bird has been identified. At first I thought it was a Brubru, seen above.

Mystery Bird 1 by Pastor Pete

Mystery Bird 2 by Pastor Pete

He sent those two photos, then he got a better shot and sent this one.

Mystery Bird 3 by Pastor Pete

After this third photo, the search was back on to correct my first idea. How would you go about figuring out what bird he is seeing?

Back to Google, this was my search; “black and white bird with white brow in uganda” This search brought up some black and white birds, and the very first photo was:

African Pied Wagtail from Kenya http://www.ngkenya.com/fauna/birds.html

Aha!! That looks like his mystery bird. When I clicked that link, and looked down through those birds, the next link led me to a positive ID on this bird.

“Common bird of parks, lawns, pastures and farmland. Pumps long tail up and down as it forages along ground.” The link with that photo brought me to this beautiful African Pied Wagtail:

African Pied Wagtail from http://www.ngkenya.com

“Sharp black-and-white plumage and a long bobbing tail make this common bird farms and urban gardens easily recognizable.” [It is now that I figured it out.]

You can find out more about this beautiful avian wonder at African Pied Wagtail, Wikipedia, Kenya Natural History Guide, and HBAlive

We sense from Scripture, that challenging our minds is a good thing.

“And I set my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all that is done under heaven; this burdensome task God has given to the sons of man, by which they may be exercised.” (Ecclesiastes 1:13 NKJV)

I directed my mind to know, to investigate and to seek wisdom and an explanation,…” (Ecclesiastes 7:25a NASB)

Pastor Peter Brock now works with Reaching and Teaching International Ministries .

 

 

Tickle Me Tuesday – Dancing Birds I

Western Parotia (Parotia sefilata) ©NatGeo

Western Parotia (Parotia sefilata) ©NatGeo

Green Mumbles on his YouTube channel has a couple of video of male birds displaying for their female hopefuls. This is the first of two that he has done. Part II will be next week.

[Not fond of some of the music, but the birds are quite entertaining.]

“A time to weep, And a time to laugh; A time to mourn, And a time to dance;” (Ecclesiastes 3:4 NKJV)

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Laughing Kookaburras

2015’s Tickle Me Tuesday’s

Wages or a Gift

Avian and Attributes – Sword

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) by Michael Woodruff

“Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.” (Matthew 10:34-39 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sword

SWORD, n.
1. An offensive weapon worn at the side, and used by hand either for thrusting or cutting.
2. Figuratively, destruction by war.
I will bring a sword upon you. Lev 26. Isa 51.
3. Vengeance or justice.
She quits the balance, and resigns the sword.
4. Emblem of authority and power.
The ruler–beareth not the sword in vain. Rom 13.
5. War; dissension.
I came not to send peace, but a sword. Mat 10.
6. Emblem of triumph and protection.
The Lord–the sword of thy excellence. Deu 33.

SWORDED, a. Girded with a sword.


Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera)©WikiC

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera)©WikiC

The sword-billed hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) is a neotropical species of hummingbird from the Andean regions of South America. It is the sole member of the genus Ensifera and is characterized by its unusually long bill; it is the only bird to have a beak longer than the rest of its body. E. ensifera uses its bill to drink nectar from flowers with long corollas and has coevolved with the species Passiflora mixta. While most hummingbirds preen using their bills, E. ensifera must use its feet to scratch and preen due to its bill being so long. This uncommon bird is also one of the largest hummingbird species.

Sword-billed hummingbirds are found perched on the mid to upper level branches of neotropical trees. Its length ranges 13 to 14 cm from the tail tip to the base of the bill, with males slightly larger on average than females. The bill can additionally be over 10 cm long. Individuals weigh between 10-15 g making it one of the largest species of hummingbirds. As is characteristic of hummingbirds, is able to fly backwards and hover in the air. It also exhibits higher than average wing-disc loading than other members of its family.

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) Female ©WikiC

E. ensifera displays sexual dimorphism where plumage varies between males and females. Males have a coppery bronze head, bronze green back, bright green underbelly, blackish green throat, and bronze green tail. Females have a similarly colored head and back, a white belly speckled with green, a more olive colored throat, and grayish white edging around the tail.

The defining trait of this species is a beak longer than the rest of its body (excluding the tail). The tongue is also unusually long to span the length of the tube-shaped bill. The beak is black in color and curves slightly upwards. These adaptations help the hummingbird feed on flowers with long corollas that are inaccessible to other species.

[Wikipedia]

Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) female (right) with a buff-tailed coronet ©WikiC

“And he had in his right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp twoedged sword: and his countenance was as the sun shineth in his strength. And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last: I am he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of hell and of death.” (Revelation 1:16-18 KJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Superb

Superb Starling by Lee at Parrot Mountain, TN

I’m delighted to share the signs and miracles that the Most High God has worked in my life.

His signs are superb!
His miracles so powerful!
His kingdom is everlasting.
His rule is for all time.” Daniel 4:2-3 Common English Bible (CEB)

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) Male non-breeding plumage ©WikiC


Avian and Attributes – Superb

SUPERB‘, a. [L. superbus, proud, from super.]
1. Grand; magnificent; as a superb edifice; a superb colonnade.
2. Rich; elegant; as superb furniture or decorations.
4. Rich; splendid; as a superb entertainment.
5. August; stately.


I was surprised that the regular versions of the Bible did not use the word “Superb.” When I think of Our Lord Jesus Christ and God, the word “Superb” comes to mind. The CEB had 3 verses that used “superb,” but Daniel 4 above is the best one.

There are seven “Superb” birds in the latest list of birds, all of them very pretty birds, and have a super look about them. Don’t you agree?

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus)

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus) by Ian Montgomery

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus) by Ian

Superb Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus superbus)

Superb Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus superbus) by Ian

Superb Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus superbus) by Ian

Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) by Ian

Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) by Ian

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii)

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii) by Ian

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii) by Ian

Superb Pitta (Pitta superba)

Superb Pitta ©Surfbirds.com

Superb Pitta ©Surfbirds.com

Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus)

Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus) by Bob-Nan

Superb Sunbird (Cinnyris superbus)

Superb Sunbird (Cinnyris superbus) ©WikiC


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Tickle Me Tuesday’s – Flamingos

“They send forth their little ones like a flock, And their children dance.” (Job 21:11 NKJV)

“All the days of the afflicted are evil, But he who is of a merry heart has a continual feast.” (Proverbs 15:15 NKJV)

Flamingos or flamingoes /fləˈmɪŋɡz/ are a type of wading bird in the family Phoenicopteridae, the only bird family in the order Phoenicopteriformes. Four flamingo species are distributed throughout the Americas, including the Caribbean, and two species are native to Africa, Asia, and Europe.

The name “flamingo” comes from Portuguese or Spanish flamengo, “flame-colored”,

PHOENICOPTERIFORMES – Flamingos

Revived Tickle Me Tuesday’s

2015’s Tickle Me Tuesday’s

Peru’s Marvellous Hummingbird – Again

Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis)©©

Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis)©©

Peru’s Marvellous Hummingbird

(from Creation Moments)

In that day the LORD of hosts will be for a crown of glory and a diadem of beauty to the remnant of His people. (Isaiah 28:5)

In 1835, when scientists first saw Peru’s most unusual hummingbird, they were so overcome with its beauty that they gave it the name “Marvellous.” This little bird treats the eye to iridescent green, yellow, orange, and purple feathers. But its most unusual feature is its tail. While most birds have eight to twelve tail feathers, the Marvellous hummingbird has only four. Two of these are long, pointed, thorn-like feathers that don’t seem to help much in flying or landing. The other two feathers are truly marvellous. They are six inches long, three times the length of the bird’s two-inch body. On the end of these two long narrow feathers are large feather fans that nearly equal the surface area of its wings.

Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis) ©©

Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis) ©©

Astonishingly, the Marvelous hummingbird has complete control of these feathers. At rest, the bird perches with these two feathers hanging down an inch or so from its body, and then crossing them until they are horizontal. In flight and landing they provide remarkable maneuverability. During mating, the hummingbird moves them as semaphores. Interestingly enough, evolutionists admit that they are stumped as to why these unusual feathers should have evolved.

One look at our creation clearly shows that our Creator appreciates beauty. But even the beautiful Marvelous hummingbird is but a poor and cloudy hint of the beauty of our Creator Himself.

Prayer:
Dear Father, help me treat the beauty You have created as You would have me to do. Let me be filled with thanksgiving to You for it, and let it remind me that You are the source of all that is truly beautiful. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.
Notes:
Crawford H. Greenewalt. The Marvelous Hummingbird Rediscovered. National Geographic, Vol. 130, No. 1. P. 98-101.”

©Creation Moments 2014


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Lee’s Addition:

This was originally done in 2010, but needs to be re-blogged again. [Which I did in 2014, It’s now 2019, time for it again.] Also, the YouTube above was added. It is astonishing to watch the little bird in action. Thanks to one of our readers who found the video to add to their site. See The Vine Vigil.

The Marvellous Hummingbird is now the Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis). It is in the Hummingbird Family (Trochilidae) and is part of the Apodiformes Order.

Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis) ©WikiC-Gould_Troch._pl._161

Marvelous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis) ©WikiC-Gould_Troch._pl._161

The Marvelous (also Marvellous) Spatuletail (hummingbird), Loddigesia mirabilis, is a medium-sized (up to 5.9 in/15 cm long) white, green and bronze hummingbird adorned with blue crest feathers, a brilliant turquoise gorget, and a black line on its white underparts. It is the only member of the monotypic genus Loddigesia.

A Peruvian endemic, this species is found in the forest edge of the Río Utcubamba region. It was first reported in 1835 by the bird collector Andrew Matthews for George Loddiges. The Marvellous Spatuletail is unique among birds, for it has just four feathers in its tail. Its most remarkable feature is the male’s two long racquet-shaped outer tail feathers that cross each other and end in large violet-blue discs or “spatules”. He can move them independently.

Information gathered from Creation Moments, Wikipedia, and YouTube.

Wordless Birds



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Artistic Birds – Galliformes Order I

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) WikiC

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) WikiC

As mentioned, these “Artistic Birds” will be presented in “sort of” the Taxonomic Order. The first few orders do not have any particularly “artistic” birds. They were mostly created to blend in with their environment. Most likely for protection. These first Orders are:

But when we arrive at the Galliformes Order, the Creator’s Artistically Colorful Hand appears on many of these birds. There are five families in this Order.

[Clicking on these links have many photos of those in the families. Scientific and English links are identical.]

Megapodiidae ~~~ (English) – Megapodes – Not very colorful
(Scientific) –Cracidae ~~~ (English) – Chachalacas, Curassows & Guans – This group has fancy “hairdos” and throat pouches

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) Female ©WikiC

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) ©BirdPhotos

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) ©BirdPhotos

(Scientific) – Numididae ~~~ (English) – Guineafowl – Crested Guineafowl is the only one of note.

Crested Guineafowl (Guttera pucherani) ©WikiC

(Scientific) – Odontophoridae ~~~ (English) – New World Quail – Quails have artistic markings that help them blend in for protection. My favorite that shows an Artistic design is the Gambel’s Quail with this “painted” lines and that fancy feather.

Gambel's Quail (Callipepla gambelii) ©WikiC

Gambel’s Quail (Callipepla gambelii) ©WikiC

(Scientific) – Phasianidae ~~~ (English) – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies – This family is loaded with Artistic Birds, so, today here is just one of the beauties. More posts will present more of the Lord’s Hand at work in the design of these birds. What a Creator!

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) Male ©© NotMicroButSoft

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) Male ©© NotMicroButSoft

It is native to forests in mountainous areas of western China, but feral populations have been established in the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, the Falkland Islands, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand.[3] In England they may be found in East Anglia in the dense forest landscape of the Breckland as well as Tresco on the Isles of Scilly.

Golden Pheasant Magnolia Plantation by Lee Charleston 2014

The adult male is 90–105 cm (35–41 in) in length, its tail accounting for two-thirds of the total length. It is unmistakable with its golden crest and rump and bright red body. The deep orange “cape” can be spread in display, appearing as an alternating black and orange fan that covers all of the face except its bright yellow eye with a pinpoint black pupil.

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) ©WikiC

Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) ©WikiC

to design artistic works, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of artistic workmanship.” (Exodus 35:32-33 NKJV) [These were workers that were given special gifts to work on the tabernacle. Wonder if any of them had seen “artistic birds” to help them visualize what their works?]

Click this link to see a full photo of this bird. When it comes up, click it again. Wow!

  Full Length Photo


GALLIFORMES – Fowl, Quail, Guans, Currasows, Megapodes

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Artistic Birds – Frigatebirds

Wordless Birds

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Cat – Bird Fight

James J. S. Johnson made a remark on the Tickle Me Tuesday post. Dr. Jim, as I call him, suggested that we revive the Tickle Me Tuesday series. The last one was posted in 2015, so I am sure by now, there must be some more funny videos to discover.

In fact, this Epic Crow and Cat fight is just the one to start us off with a new “Tickle.”

by ignoramusky

These four are definitely not showing Kindness!!

“Be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another;” (Romans 12:10 NKJV)

Other Tickle Me Tuesday’s

Artistic Birds – Frigatebirds

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Bezalel was given much wisdom and understanding to help in the construction of the Tabernacle. He then was given the ability to train others to help. They were given abilities to help do the work also. Today, as Christians, we each are given talents and gifts to help in building the Church. Are we using those abilities?

“and He has filled him [Bezalel] with the Spirit of God, in wisdom and understanding, in knowledge and all manner of workmanship, to design artistic works, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of artistic workmanship. “And He has put in his heart the ability to teach, in him and Aholiab the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with skill to do all manner of work of the engraver and the designer and the tapestry maker, in blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine linen, and of the weaver—those who do every work and those who design artistic works.” (Exodus 35:31-35 NKJV)

When the Lord created the birds, He especially used His Ultimate Creative Ability. As mentioned in the Introduction to this new series, Artistic Work In Birds, we will looking for those birds which seem to have been painted/designed with great markings and other characteristics.

Frigatebirds

Frigatebirds (also listed as “frigate bird”, “frigate-bird”, “frigate”, “frigate-petrel”) are a family of seabirds called Fregatidae which are found across all tropical and subtropical oceans. The five extant species are classified in a single genus, Fregata. All have predominantly black plumage, long, deeply forked tails and long hooked bills. Females have white underbellies and males have a distinctive red gular pouch, which they inflate during the breeding season to attract females. Their wings are long and pointed and can span up to 2.3 metres (7.5 ft), the largest wing area to body weight ratio of any bird.

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Able to soar for weeks on wind currents, frigatebirds spend most of the day in flight hunting for food, and roost on trees or cliffs at night. Their main prey are fish and squid, caught when chased to the water surface by large predators such as tuna.

Now that is design and engineering! The Great and Magnificent Frigatebirds have a distinctive red gular pouch, and it had a few paint strokes added to make it more attractive. [I guess]

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male Displaying ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Starting off with a simple bird, also, will be working way through the birds sort of in Taxonomic order.

Frigatebirds – Wikipedia

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

Wages or a Gift

Artistic Work In Birds – Introduction

MaCaw by Dan at Gatorland

MaCaw by Dan at Gatorland

While reading through the New King James Bible in Exodus, the word “Artistic” works and “Artist” designs appears thirteen times. In the King James Version, this word is translated “Cunning” or “Curious.” Other versions; NASB uses “skillful”and “inventive”; the ESV uses “skillfully or skilled” “artistic”; the AMP uses “skillfully or skilled” and “artistic designs.”

The verses are all referring to preparing the tabernacle. Many people gave supplies that were needed, but God gave those that were actually putting it together, special wisdom and gifts/talent to accomplish the different task.

“And God has put in Bezalel’s heart that he may teach, both he and Aholiab son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with wisdom of heart and ability to do all manner of craftsmanship, of the engraver, of the skillful workman, of the embroiderer in blue, purple, and scarlet [stuff] and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of those who do or design any skilled work.” (Exodus 35:34-35 AMP)

As I read these passages:

Exodus 28:25, 31:4, 35:32, 35:33, 35:35, 36:8, 36:35, 39:3, 39:8, 39:27,

the birds and their fantastic designs came to mind. How many birds that I have seen personally, or photos of that look like they were artistically designed? Many of them fascinate me. It looks like the Lord, in His Creation of these avian wonders, used a paintbrush as the colors and designs were added to the birds. I am sure a few also come to your memory also.

My first thought was of the Blue Jays that come to our yard frequently.

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) ©Flickr Stan Lupo

That is just a start. I would consider the Blue Jay “artistically designed. Wouldn’t You? How about that MaCaw?

Stay Tuned as a search through the Birds of the World seeks to see “Artistically” designed birds.

Birds of the World

Wordless Birds

Avian and Attributes – Sun

Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo

Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo

To Him who made great lights, For His mercy endures forever— The sun to rule by day, For His mercy endures forever; The moon and stars to rule by night, For His mercy endures forever.” (Psalms 136:7-9 NKJV)

SUN, n.
1. The splendid orb or luminary which, being in or near the center of our system of worlds, gives light and heat to all the planets. The light of the sun constitutes the day, and the darkness which proceeds form its absence, or the shade of the earth, constitutes the night. Psalm 136.
2. In popular usage, a sunny place; a place where the beams of the sun fall; as, to stand in the sun, that is, to stand where the direct rays of the sun fall.
3. Any thing eminently splendid or luminous; that which is the chief source of light or honor. The natives of America complain that the sun of their glory is set.
I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignty to posterity.
4. In Scripture, Christ is called the sun of righteousness, as the source of light, animation and comfort to his disciples.
5. The luminary or orb which constitutes the center of any system of worlds. The fixed stars are supposed to be suns in their respective systems.
Under the sun, in the world; on earth; a proverbial expression.
There is no new thing under the sun. Ecclesiastes  1.

“That which has been is what will be, That which is done is what will be done, And there is nothing new under the sun.” (Ecclesiastes 1:9 NKJV)”

Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

SUN, v.t. To expose to the sun’s rays; to warm or dry in the light of the sun; to insolate; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain.
–Then to sun thyself in open air.

Sun Lark (Galerida modesta)

Sun Lark (Galerida modesta)

The Sun Lark (Galerida modesta) or Nigerian Sun Lark is a species of lark in the family Alaudidae. It inhabits a broad horizontal area south of the Sahel, ranging from Guinea to South Sudan. Its natural habitats are dry savannah and subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. (Wikipedia)

Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) ©WikiC

The Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis), also known in aviculture as the Sun Conure, is a medium-sized, vibrantly colored parrot native to northeastern South America. The adult male and female are similar in appearance, with predominantly golden-yellow plumage and orange-flushed underparts and face. Sun parakeets are very social birds, typically living in flocks. They form monogamous pairs for reproduction, and nest in palm cavities in the tropics. Sun parakeets mainly feed on fruits, flowers, berries, blossoms, seeds, nuts, and insects. (Wikipedia)

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

 

Birds and Forest Fires

Black-backed Woodpecker ©Flicker Michael Woodruff

Black-backed Woodpecker ©Flicker Michael Woodruff

All About Birds re-published an article about how Forest Fires affect wildlife and people from Living Bird magazine.

I found it to be very interest how so abundantly birds, wildlife and plants revive after a forest fire. This article was about the Rice Ridge Fire burn in the Swan Mountains of Montana. They show many of the birds that are now coming back and abounding.

“You send forth Your Spirit, they are created; And You renew the face of the earth. May the glory of the LORD endure forever; May the LORD rejoice in His works. He looks on the earth, and it trembles; He touches the hills, and they smoke.” (Psalms 104:30-32 NKJV)

One avian wonder especially pointed out is the Black-backed Woodpecker.

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) by Daves BirdingPix

“The black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) also known as the Arctic three-toed woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker (23 cm (9.1 in) long) inhabiting the forests of North America.

Their breeding range is boreal forest across Canada, Alaska, the north-western United States, as well as northern Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Upper Michigan. In particular the species is a burnt-forest specialist, feeding on the outbreaks of wood-boring beetles that feed on recently burnt trees. The most important wood boring beetles taken are in the families Cerambycidae and Buprestidae, along with engraver beetles and Mountain pine beetle. Most food is obtained by pecking, a smaller proportion is obtained by gleaning off branches. Black-backed woodpeckers are generally non-migratory but historically have undertaken intermittent irruptions.

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) by Ian

Nest excavation occurs in April and May; a fresh nest is drilled each year into the sapwood of dead trees. Abandoned nests are used by other species of bird to nest in. The female lays three or four eggs, and incubation duties are shared between both parents, although the male alone incubates during the night. Upon hatching the altricial chicks are brooded until the nestling phase. Both parents feed the chicks, which take about 24 days to fledge.

Nest excavation occurs in April and May; a fresh nest is drilled each year into the sapwood of dead trees. Abandoned nests are used by other species of bird to nest in. The female lays three or four eggs, and incubation duties are shared between both parents, although the male alone incubates during the night. Upon hatching the altricial chicks are brooded until the nestling phase. Both parents feed the chicks, which take about 24 days to fledge.

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) by Ian

Black Backed Woodpecker

There are times when it is good to have things “renewed.”

“But those who wait on the LORD Shall renew their strength; They shall mount up with wings like eagles, They shall run and not be weary, They shall walk and not faint.” (Isaiah 40:31 NKJV)

Information about  the Black-backed Woodpecker from [Wikipedia]

Old Flames: The Tangled History of Forest Fires, Wildfire, and People

All About Birds – Black-backed Woodpecker

Wordless Woodpeckers