Sunday Inspiration – Pheasants and Allies II

Grey Francolin (Francolinus pondicerianus) by Nikhil Devasar

Grey Francolin (Francolinus pondicerianus) by Nikhil Devasar

“Now therefore, let not my blood fall to the earth before the face of the LORD: for the king of Israel is come out to seek a flea, as when one doth hunt a partridge in the mountains.” (1 Samuel 26:20 KJV)

Last week the introduction to the avian wonders of the Phasianidae – Pheasants and Allies Family I began. The first twenty-one (21) species were presented. With a 183 in this family, we will stay with this family for a few Sundays.

Today there are 2 Monal-Partridge (Tetraophasis) , 5 Snowcock (Tetraogallus), 10 Partridges in 3 genera (Lerwa) (Alectoris) and (Ammoperdix), and 17 Francolin in 4 genera (Francolinus), (Peliperdix), (Scleroptila) and (Dendroperdix). The Pternistis genus will be covered next time. It consistes of Francolins and Spurfowls.

Verreaux’s Monal-Partridge (Tetraophasis obscurus) ©gbwf.org

(Tetraophasis obscurus) is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found only in central China. Its natural habitat is boreal forests. The common name commemorates the French naturalist Jules Verreaux. The Szechenyi’s Monal-Partridge or buff-throated partridge (Tetraophasis szechenyii) is a species of bird in the family Phasianidae. It is found in China and India. Its natural habitat is boreal forests.

Tibetan Snowcock (Tetraogallus tibetanus) ©WikiC

Tibetan Snowcock (Tetraogallus tibetanus) ©WikiC

The Snowcocks are a group of bird species in the genus Tetraogallus of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are ground-nesting birds that breed in the mountain ranges of southern Eurasia from the Caucasus to the Himalayas and western China. Some of the species have been introduced into the United States. Snowcocks feed mainly on plant material. Snowcocks are bulky, long-necked, long-bodied partridge-like birds. Males and females are generally similar in appearance but females tend to be slightly smaller and rather duller in colouration than males. Their plumage is thick with a downy base to the feathers which helps them to withstand severe winter temperatures that may fall to −40 °C (−40 °F).

Rock Partridge (Alectoris graeca) ©Pixabay

Rock Partridge (Alectoris graeca) ©Pixabay

The genus Alectoris is a well-defined group of partridge species allied with coturnix and snowcocks and also related to partridge-francolins (Pternistes) and junglebush quail (Perdicula ). They are known collectively as rock partridges. The genus name is from Ancient Greek alektoris a farmyard chicken.

GAL-Phas Sand Partridge (Ammoperdix heyi) ©WikiC

Sand Partridge (Ammoperdix heyi) ©WikiC

The See-see partridge occurs in southwest Asia, and the Sand partridge in Egypt and the Middle East. Both are resident breeders in dry, open country, often in hill areas. Both partridges in this genus are 22–25 cm long, rotund birds. They are mainly sandy brown, with wavy white and brown stripes on their flanks.

Black Francolin (Francolinus francolinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Black Francolin (Francolinus francolinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Francolinus is a genus of birds in the francolin group of the partridge subfamily of the pheasant family. Its five species range from western and central Asia through to southern and south-eastern Asia.

Coqui Francolin(Peliperdix coqui) by Dave's BirdingPix

Coqui Francolin(Peliperdix coqui) by Dave’s BirdingPix

Peliperdix – Its four species range through tropical Sub-Saharan Africa.

Shelley’s Francolin (Scleroptila shelleyi) ©WikiC

Shelley’s Francolin (Scleroptila shelleyi) ©WikiC

Scleroptila – Its seven species range through Sub-Saharan Africa.

Crested Francolin (Dendroperdix sephaena) ©WikiC

Crested Francolin (Dendroperdix sephaena) ©WikiC

The Crested Francolin (Dendroperdix sephaena) – It is found in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

(Wikipedia, with editing)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not; so he that getteth riches, and not by right, shall leave them in the midst of his days, and at his end shall be a fool.” (Jeremiah 17:11 KJV)

“In the Garden” ~ Flute Solo Lauren D – Orchestra Concert

*

Sunday Inspirations

Pheasants and allies – Phasianidae

Birds of the Bible – Partridge

Sharing The Gospel

Sunday Inspiration – Flamingo Gardens

Birds at Flamingo Gardens by Lee 2014

Birds at Flamingo Gardens by Lee 2014

When Jesus had spoken these words, he went forth with his disciples over the brook Cedron, where was a garden, into the which he entered, and his disciples. And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples. (John 18:1-2 KJV)

…Did not I see thee in the garden with him? (John 18:26 KJV)

Dan and I stopped at Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida in November. Realized I haven’t said anything about it and decided to share some of the photos taken then.

We were there many years ago when they first opened. We lived in the area at the time. Flamingo Garden has grown and is a very delightful place to visit. They have an aviary which contains Florida native birds. Many have been injured and cannot be released to the wild again.

Please enjoy some of the sights as you listen to our orchestra play In “The Garden”. (Click arrow below the slideshow)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

“In The Garden” ~ Faith Baptist Orchestra with Flute Solo by Lauren D

*

Sunday Inspirations

Flamingo Gardens

Gideon

*

Birds in Hymns – In The Garden

Based on John 20:18

Mary Magdalene came and told the disciples that she had seen the Lord, and that he had spoken these things unto her.

Words & Music: C. Aus­tin Miles, March 1912:

In 1912 the music publisher Dr. Adam Geible wanted author and composer C. Austin Miles to write something that was “sympathetic in tone, breathng tenderness in every line; one that would bring tenderness in every line; one that would bring hope to the hopeless, rest for the weary, and downy pillows to dying beds.”

I read…the sto­ry of the great­est morn in his­to­ry: ‘The first day of the week com­eth Ma­ry Mag­da­lene ear­ly, while it was yet ve­ry dark, unto the se­pul­cher.’ In­stant­ly, com­plet­ely, there un­fold­ed in my mind the scenes of the gar­den of Jo­seph….Out of the mists of the gar­den comes a form, halt­ing, he­si­tat­ing, tear­ful, seek­ing, turn­ing from side to side in be­wil­der­ing amaze­ment. Fal­ter­ing­ly, bear­ing grief in ev­e­ry ac­cent, with tear-dimmed eyes, she whis­pers, ‘If thou hast borne him hence’… ‘He speaks, and the sound of His voice is so sweet the birds hush their sing­ing.’ Je­sus said to her, ‘Mary!’ Just one word from his lips, and for­got­ten the heart­aches, the long drea­ry hours….all the past blot­ted out in the pre­sence of the Liv­ing Pre­sent and the Eter­nal Fu­ture.’

This hymn was sung in the mo­vie Plac­es in the Heart, which won two Acad­e­my Awards in 1984.
C. Austin Miles (1868-1946)

I come to the garden alone
While the dew is still on the roses
And the voice I hear falling on my ear
The Son of God discloses.

Refrain

And He walks with me, and He talks with me,
And He tells me I am His own;
And the joy we share as we tarry there,
other has ever known.

He speaks, and the sound of His voice,
Is so sweet the birds hush their singing,
And the melody that He gave to me
Within my heart is ringing.

Refrain

I’d stay in the garden with Him
Though the night around me be falling,
But He bids me go; through the voice of woe
His voice to me is calling.

Refrain


References: In The Garden
Amazing Grace by Kenneth W. Osbeck, p. 116

Most information from The Cyber Hymnal

See ~ Wordless Birds

More ~ Birds in Hymns

*

 


Singing “In The Garden” by mercy2us

 

Musical Only by ilovetrains63

Another by gorgrel