Sunday Inspiration – Inca, Warbling and Various Finches

Uniform Finch (Haplospiza unicolor) ©WikiC

Uniform Finch (Haplospiza unicolor) ©WikiC

The whole earth is at rest, and is quiet: they break forth into singing. (Isaiah 14:7 KJV)

Trust you are enjoying seeing the avian beauties from this huge Thraupidae-Tanagers and Allies family (375). This is the seventh article from this family and this won’t be the last. Counting today’s group, there are 152 left to show you. It will most likely take this one and two more. The desire, of these Passerine Sunday Inspirations, is to let you SEE these fantastically created birds from the Lord. Unless you want me to play a symphony and put all 150+ birds in one slideshow, we will continue to give you “song sized” slideshows. With photos that allow permission to be used, so far, you’ve seen most of the species in the families.

First is a group of genera with only one or two species each.

Buff-throated Warbling Finch (Poospiza lateralis) ©WikiC

“The Inca finches (Incaspiza) are a genus of finch-like birds traditionally placed in the Emberizidae family, but it may be more closely related to the Thraupidae. Its current family status is incertae sedis. Both their scientific and common name refer to the Incan civilization. They are endemic to arid scrub in central and northern Peru. Buff-bridled, gray-winged and little Inca finches are restricted to the Marañón Valley. The rufous-backed Inca finch occurs either on the west slope of the Andes and both slopes of the Marañón Valley and is restricted to higher elevations, compared to great Inca finch which only occurs on the west slope of the Andes, but generally lower than the rufous-backed Inca finch. They are rather terrestrial, and typically forage within dense plant growth on the ground, but commonly perch higher, for example on the top of a tall cactus or in a small tree, when singing. They are typically seen singly or in pairs, but sometimes in small groups outside the breeding season. They normally do not take part in mixed-species flocks.” The problem is there are very few photos available for the six species in this genus.” (Wikipedia)

Black-and-rufous Warbling Finch (Poospiza nigrorufa) ©BirdPhotos.com

Black-and-rufous Warbling Finch (Poospiza nigrorufa) ©BirdPhotos.com

Poospiza is a genus of finch-like tanagers found in both the South American lowlands and the Andes mountains. Generally they are arboreal feeders in light woodland and scrub. All have extensive grey to their plumage, and have—often bold—white or rufous markings.” (Wikipedia)

Tucuman Mountain Finch (Compsospiza baeri) ©Flickr Ron Knight

Compsospiza is a genus of South American birds known as mountain finches (a name shared with several other species such as Poospiza caesar and Leucosticte). The two species were previously included in the genus Poospiza, but in 2009 the South American Classification Committee unanimously agreed to resurrect Compsospiza based on plumage, ecology, morphology and genetic evidence. They are restricted to shrubby woodland in the Andes of Bolivia and Argentina, and both have a grey and rufous plumage.

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The whole earth is at rest, and is quiet: they break forth into singing. (Isaiah 14:7 KJV)

“Quiet Rest” and “Sweet Hour of Prayer” ~  by Kathy Lisby – Nell Reese acc. on piano.

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More Sunday Inspirations

Sunday Inspiration – Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies I

Sunday Inspiration – Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies II

Sunday Inspiration – Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies III

Sunday Inspiration – Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies IV

Sunday Inspiration – Thraupidae – Dacnis, Honeycreepers, Conebills

Sunday Inspiration – Thraupidae – Flowerpiercer, Sierra Finches, Plus

Traupidae Family – Tanagers and Allies

Falling Plates

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Sunday Inspiration – Emberizidae Family II

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) ©WikiC

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) ©WikiC

“Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King, and my God.” (Psalms 84:3 KJV)

This week, as we continue in the Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows and allies Family, the next 50 or so will be highlighted. That will leave us with the last of the Emberizidae Family III and/or IV to finish up this family. Last week’s Sunday Inspiration had most of the Buntings from this Family.

Yellow-eyed Junco (Junco phaeonotus) ©WikiC

Yellow-eyed Junco (Junco phaeonotus) ©WikiC

American sparrows are a group of mainly New World passerine birds, forming part of the family Emberizidae. American sparrows are seed-eating birds with conical bills, brown or gray in color, and many species have distinctive head patterns.

Although they share the name sparrow, American sparrows are more closely related to Old World buntings (which are also in the family Emberizidae) than they are to the Old World sparrows (family Passeridae). American sparrows are also similar in both appearance and habit to finches, with which they sometimes used to be classified. (Wikipedia)

Many of the sparrows are just called “Little Brown Jobs” or LBJs. They are very numerous and common, yet they are special to the Lord. Matthew 10 quotes the Lord with these verses:

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (Dusky-extinct) ©WikiC

Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (Dusky-extinct) ©WikiC

“Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.” (Matthew 10:29 KJV)

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) by Daves BirdingPix

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) by Daves BirdingPix

“Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows.” (Matthew 10:31 KJV)

When a person knows the Lord he needs not to fear.

“Trust in the LORD, and do good; so shalt thou dwell in the land, and verily thou shalt be fed.” (Psalms 37:3 KJV)

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“His Eye Is On The Sparrow” ~ Kathy Lisby – Special at Faith Baptist

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Sunday Inspiration

Emberizidae –  Buntings, New World Sparrows & Allies

Birds of the Bible – Little Brown Jobs

Birds of the Bible – Sparrows

Fear: Breaking Every Chain

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Sunday Inspiration – Larks

Singing Bush Lark (Mirafra cantillans) by Nikhil Devassar

Singing Bush Lark (Mirafra cantillans) by Nikhil Devassar

The Lark family has 97 members which are busy doing what the Lord commanded them  to when they left the Ark:

Then God spoke to Noah, saying, “Go out of the ark, you and your wife, and your sons and your sons’ wives with you. Bring out with you every living thing of all flesh that is with you: birds and cattle and every creeping thing that creeps on the earth, so that they may abound on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.” So Noah went out, and his sons and his wife and his sons’ wives with him. Every animal, every creeping thing, every bird, and whatever creeps on the earth, according to their families, went out of the ark.(Genesis 8:15-19 NKJV)

Larks are passerine birds of the family Alaudidae. All species occur in the Old World, and in northern and eastern Australia. Only one, the Horned Lark, is native to North America. Habitats vary widely, but many species live in dry regions.

They have more elaborate calls than most birds, and often extravagant songs given in display flight (Kikkawa 2003). These melodious sounds (to human ears), combined with a willingness to expand into anthropogenic habitats — as long as these are not too intensively managed — have ensured larks a prominent place in literature and music, especially the Eurasian Skylark in northern Europe and the Crested Lark and Calandra Lark in southern Europe.

Personally, these Larks look very similar to Sparrows, which are very common.

Are not two sparrows sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will. (Matthew 10:29 NKJV)

Larks, commonly consumed with bones intact, have historically been considered wholesome, delicate, and light game. Yet. Traditionally larks are kept as pets in China. In Beijing, larks are taught to mimic the voice of other songbirds and animals. It is an old-fashioned habit of the Beijingers to teach their larks 13 kinds of sounds in a strict order (called “the 13 songs of a lark”, Chinese: 百灵十三套). The larks that can sing the full 13 sounds in the correct order are highly valued. (Info from Wikipedia)

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“His Eye Is On The Sparrow ” – by Kathy Lisby, Faith Baptist Church
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Sunday Inspirations

Alaudidae – Larks Family

Larks – Wikipedia

Sharing The Gospel

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Sunday Inspiration – Sparrows II

Savannah Sparrow singing by Ray

Savannah Sparrow singing by Raymond Barlow

Even the sparrow finds a home, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, at your altars, O LORD of hosts, my King and my God. Blessed are those who dwell in your house, ever singing your praise! Selah. (Psalms 84:3-4 ESV)

I know we used the Sparrows before with an orchestra playing “His Eye Is On The Sparrow, but this special by Kathy Lisby from Faith, is so good, I just have to share it.

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“His Eye Is On The Sparrow ” – by Kathy Lisby

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