World Bird Names – I.O.C. Version 9.1

Australian Boobook (Ninox boobook) by Ian Montgomery

Southern now Australian Boobook (Ninox boobook) by Ian Montgomery

The new version of the World Bird Names from the I. O. C. raised the count to “10,738 extant species and 158 extinct species of birds of the world (Version 9.1), with subspecies (20,046) and annotations.” These birds are classified into Classification of 40 Orders, 245 Families (plus 1 Incertae sedis), 2313 Genera (World Bird Names)

Version 8.2 had 10, 711 birds listed. That is a total gain of 27 birds. This is one of the largest increases I have noticed since starting to keep track of the versions. With the DNA studies ongoing, they are finding enough differences to raise these birds to species status.

In August of 2009, about the time I started the Birds of the World pages and doing these updates, I wrote: “Considering that there are over 10,300 birds, I may be awhile. Actually, the 224 bird families are the most important. So, that will be the starting place.” That is over 400 new birds that have been added in that time span.

It also helps me understand why the Lord didn’t need to place one pair of every living species in the world on the Ark. We know that the birds and creatures were created “after their kind or families.” They have been reproducing after their kinds and the variations are showing up, but yet a Stork kind is still a Stork kind. Looking through these additions and changes, it appears the “White-eye” kind/family group have been very busy.

“Every animal, every creeping thing, every bird, and whatever creeps on the earth, according to their families, went out of the ark.” (Genesis 8:19 NKJV)

Did every species of White-eyes or Storks need to be on the ark?

Reunion Olive White-eye (Zosterops olivaceus) ©WikiC

Reunion Olive White-eye (Zosterops olivaceus) ©WikiC

I’ll be busy for a while updating my pages again in the Birds of the World section. The Taxonomic changes haven’t even been looked at yet. Updates will be given as they are changed. Stay tuned!

Additions and Deletions:

The code indicates whether the bird was raised from a subspecies (AS), or (NEW), or (DEL) which is usually placed back as a subspecies.

ENGLISH NAME  (SCIENTIFIC NAME) CHANGE  CODE
Chaco Nothura (Nothura chacoensis) DEL AL
Rote Boobook (Ninox rotiensis) ADD AS
Timor Boobook (Ninox fusca) ADD AS
Alor Boobook (Ninox plesseni) ADD AS
Buru Boobook (Ninox hantu) ADD AS
Green-backed Hillstar (Urochroa leucura) ADD AS
Dry-forest Sabrewing (Campylopterus calcirupicola) ADD NEW
Chiriqui Foliage-gleaner (Automolus exsertus) ADD AS
Rufous-breasted Antpitta (Grallaricula leymebambae) ADD AS
Tapajos Antpitta (Myrmothera subcanescens) ADD AS
Spotted Scrubwren (Sericornis maculatus) ADD AS
Erlanger’s Lark (Calandrella erlangeri) DEL SSP
Rufous-capped Lark  (Calandrella eremica) ADD AS
Albertine Sooty Boubou (Laniarius holomelas) ADD AS
Steppe Grey Shrike (Lanius pallidirostris) DEL AL
Chivi Vireo (Vireo chivi) ADD AS
Western Square-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus occidentalis) ADD NEW
Sharpe’s Drongo (Dicrurus sharpei) ADD AS
Fanti Drongo (Dicrurus atactus) ADD AS
Glossy-backed Drongo  (Dicrurus divaricatus) ADD AS
Rote Leaf Warbler (Phylloscopus rotiensis) ADD NEW

Montane White-eye (Zosterops poliogastrus eurycricotus) ©WikiC

Mountain White-eye (Zosterops montanus) DEL AL
Swinhoe’s White-eye (Zosterops simplex) ADD AS
Enganno White-eye (Zosterops salvadorii) DEL AL
Hume’s White-eye (Zosterops auriventer) ADD AS
Sangkar White-eye (Zosterops melanurus) ADD AS
Socotra White-eye (Zosterops socotranus) ADD AS
Mbulu White-eye (Zosterops mbuluensis) ADD AS
Pale White-eye (Zosterops flavilateralis) ADD AS
Aldabra White-eye  (Zosterops aldabrensis) ADD AS
South Pare White-eye  (Zosterops winifredae) ADD AS
Southern Yellow White-eye (Zosterops anderssoni)  ADD AS
Broad-ringed White-eye  (Zosterops eurycricotus) ADD AS
Green White-eye (Zosterops stuhlmanni)  ADD AS
Chattering Gnatwren (Ramphocaenus sticturus) ADD AS
Himalayan Shortwing (Brachypteryx cruralis) ADD AS
Chinese Shortwing (Brachypteryx sinensis) ADD AS
Taiwan Shortwing (Brachypteryx goodfellowi) ADD AS
Cherrie’s Tanager (Ramphocelus costaricensis) DEL AL

Lesser Shortwing (Brachypteryx leucophris) ©Flickr Dave Curtis

Additions and Deletions – Version 9.1

Name Changes

PREVIOUS IOC LISTS SCIENTIFIC NAME IOC LIST V9.1
Southern Boobook (Ninox boobook) – Australian Boobook
Hantu Boobook (Ninox squamipila) –  Seram Boobook
Bicolored Mouse-warbler (Aethomyias nigrorufus) –  Bicolored Scrubwren
White-tailed Hillstar (Urochroa bougueri) – Rufous-gaped Hillstar
Square-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus ludwigii)  – Common Square-tailed Drongo
Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus)  – Warbling White-eye
Oriental White-eye (Zosterops palpebrosa) – Indian White-eye
Montane White-eye (Zosterops poliogastrus) – Heuglin’s White-eye
African Yellow White-eye (Zosterops senegalensis) – Northern Yellow White-eye
Long-billed Gnatwren (Ramphocaenus melanurus) – Trilling Gnatwren
Yellow-throated Petronia (Gymnoris superciliaris) – Yellow-throated Bush Sparrow
Bush Petronia (Gymnoris dentata) – Sahel Bush Sparrow
Yellow-spotted Petronia (Gymnoris pyrgita) – Yellow-spotted Bush Sparrow
Passerini’s Tanager (Ramphocelus passerinii) – Scarlet-rumped Tanager

Name Changes – Version 9.1

Yellow-spotted Petronia Now Yellow-spotted Bush Sparrow (Gymnoris pyrgita) ©WikiC

Plus, there were numerous changes in Taxonomy. Here is the link to those changes and why they were changed:

Taxonomic Updates Version 9.1

Birds of the World

I.O.C. World Bird List Version 8.2 – Updated

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Gray Jay now Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

I finally finished updating the Birds of the World pages to reflect the newest version, 8.2. of the IOC’s bird list. The family pages and the indexes have been modified. Since the photos on the site were hacked last year, the family pages were changed. Now the photos are at the bottom of the pages instead of with each name.

With this version, I added the Genera in with Green. Many of the new changes are in red and a few in blue. The red are spelling or Genera changes. Blue seems to represent reshuffled positions within a family. [I think – this is from their Excel spreadsheet]

White-crested Helmetshrike (Prionops plumatus) ©WikiC

Two families were moved into the Vangidae – Vanga and Allies family.

Here is the over update:

The IOC World Bird List 8.2 contains 10,711 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  246 Families (plus 1 Incertae Sedis) and 2,313 Genera.  The list also includes 20,055 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Changes include:

SPECIES ADDED:                15 

SPECIES DELETED:             3

ENGLISH NAMES:               18

TAXONOMY:                         18 incl revisions of  Campephagidae, Phylloscopidae and Locustellidae, and expansion of Vangidae to include helmetshrikes, woodshrikes, and shrike-flycatchers

Large woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis) ©WikiC

The three articles listed in the Time For Another Update From The I.O.C. explain the changes and saves me rewriting the same information.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

2018 checklist changes include few splits

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

The Indexes, Alphabetical Pages and Family Pages are all current here on the site:

Birds of the World

Alphabetical List of the Birds.

ORDER

Family

Families – Alphabetical (Scientific)

Families – Alphabetical (English)

Families – Taxonomic (Scientific – English)

Families – Taxonomic (English – Scientific)

Species Index

Time For Another Update From The I.O.C.

White-collared Seedeater (Sporophila torqueola) male by Kent Nickell

White-collared Seedeater (Sporophila torqueola) male by Kent Nickell Now Split

The latest update from the I.O.C. [8.2] just came out yesterday. Thankfully, they are only doing two a year now, not four. So, while I dig in and rearrange and update this site, here are a couple of articles about the latest changes that might interest you.

If you are new to this blog, several times a year, the birding authorities accept and reject proposals for splits, lumps and new species. Some are accepted and many are rejected for now. These articles help explain that procedure better than I can. So, look them over. They reveal the hows and whys of the latest changes.

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) by Kent Nickell

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) by Kent Nickell Now Split

This first one shows the changes very well and may save me doing the same.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

BirdWatching magazine has this article:

2018 checklist changes include few splits

This next article by David Sibley is really good and helps us understand these changes from a personal level:

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

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Latest update online here is the IOC 8.1. Stay tuned, I’m on it!

“My son, fear thou the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change:” (Proverbs 24:21 KJV)

I.O.C. Version 8.1 Update Completed

Dividing the Buntings and Sparrows – I.O.C. 8.1

Hang On To Your Hat – I.O.C. 8.1 Update Underway

Dividing the Buntings and Sparrows – I.O.C. 8.1

Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) ©WikiC

Dost thou know the balancings of the clouds, the wondrous works of him which is perfect in knowledge? (Job 37:16 KJV)

This latest I.O.C. list of World Bird Names is quite an undertaking. As these ornithologists from around the world gain information from the DNA studies, their thinking of Bird Families change. When the Lord created the world and the birds, He placed the DNA in living creatures and man, knowing that one day it would be discovered. With that said, they keep arranging birds different families.

The New World Sparrows and the Buntings were placed in one family called Emberizidae. Now the 44 Buntings own that family – Emberizidae – Buntings and the 136 New World Sparrows have been pulled out and are now in the new Passerellidae – New World Sparrows Family.

Sudan Golden Sparrow (Passer luteus) by Dan

Sudan Golden Sparrow (Passer luteus) by Dan

I realize many casual birdwatchers do well to put a name on a bird, let alone know what family to which they belong. Yet, when you look in a Bird Guide to find the name of the bird, it helps to know that they are divided into families.

This is just one of the new pages that have been adding to this site with the newest IOC update. Stay tuned, I’m still building pages. I have 8 or 9 more I am in the process of completing.

Emberizidae – Buntings

Passerellidae – New World Sparrows

New World Sparrows (Passerellidae) | HBW Alive

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Hang On To Your Hat – I.O.C. 8.1 Update Underway

Mixed Flock Eating 122717 Merritt Is NWR by Lee

“Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.” (Ecclesiastes 7:8 KJV)

The new I.O.C. 8.1 Update was released on the 25th of January and I began updating this blog. There were a few minor changes at the beginning of the Taxonomic Order. They added a Sclater’s Crowned Pigeon and deleted the Ruwenzori Nightjar. (Simple enough). Then the Raja Shelduck (Tadorna radjah) became the (Radjah radjah) and the Grey Noddy (Anous albivittus became albivitta)

Four more birds had name changes; White-headed Stilt to Pied Stilt, Southern Crowned Pigeon to Scheepmaker’s Crowned Pigeon, Indigo-crowned Quail-Dove to Purple Quail Dove, and the Admirable Hummingbird is now the Talamanca Hummingbird. Okay so far.

Mixed Flock Flyiing 122717 Merritt Is NWR by Lee

When we were at Merritt Island NWR in late December. There was a mixed flock of birds along the trail eating and drinking, then something spooked them and they all flew up at once and scattered. (Photo taken through the windshield) Why mention this?

Mixed Flock Flyiing 122717 Merritt Is NWR by Lee

The Antbirds, of the Thamnophilidae Family, were relaxing in their Taxonomy order within the family until the IOC decided to throw them all up in the air. All 236 have landed in a totally different sequence than before. So, the dust is flying as I am working on the newest update.

Stay tuned! This is just the beginning. There were eight new families created from others as we get further down the Taxonomic order of these families. I’ll let you know when some more family pages are updated. (I have been basically reworking this site.)

Once some dusk clears, I’ll present the links to the Families. [This dust is not helping my bronchitis. :) (of which I am about over with.)]

Birds of the World

Time For A New Update – I.O.C. Version 7.3

Northern Shoverler (now Spatula clypeata)

Therefore we will not fear, though the earth should change and though the mountains be shaken into the midst of the seas,” (Psalms 46:2 AMP)

The end of July, the I.O.C. released its newest update for the birds. This website is updated. The official number of extant (living) bird species is now 10,694, and there are 158 extinct species. There are 20,074 subspecies. There are also still 40 Orders of Avian wonders. An Order is a scientific way to categorize related birds. Orders are divided into the 238 Families of birds and 2 Incertae Sedis, with also contain all those subspecies. The two Incertae Sedis groups contain birds that they do not know how to classify.

Emu 20101021 Lowry Pk Zoo

Emu Lowry Pk Zoo by Lee

All the Family pages are up to date, plus all the First and Last Name indexes. Several challenges were to discard a Family page and make a new page. The Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) was by itself in the Dromaiidae family. The Cassowaries, also part of the Casuariiformes Order, are in the Casuariidae family. The Emu is now part of the Casuariidae family.

Sapayoa (Sapayoa aenigma) ©WikiC

The Sapayoa (Sapayoa aenigma) is now in its own Sapayoidae Family. It was previously in with the Broadbills of the Eurylaimidae family. This Sapayoa is now all by itself and the Emu now has company. :)

Another major time-consuming challenge was the resequencing of the Scolopacidae Family. That is the Sandpiper, Snipes and allies group. It appears they again tossed all the names in the air and let them settle where ever. It took considerable time to rearrange this family. With all the DNA studies, there will be other air tosses in the future.

Baikal Teal (Sibirionetta formosa) Zoo Miami by Lee

Baikal Teal (Sibirionetta formosa) Zoo Miami by Lee

The Duck Family also had a bit of scrambling and genus names changed. They split some of the Anas genus away. The Shovelers and Teals are now in the Spatula genus, and the Baikal Teal is Sibirionetta formosa.

Grey Noddy (Procelsterna albivitta) by Ian 5

Grey Noddy (Procelsterna albivitta) by Ian

The Blue Noddy is now (Anous ceruleus) and the Grey Noddy is (Anous albivittus). They were Procelsterna.

There were other changes which will be mentioned in Part 2 of this update. There were 14 new birds added and 2 deleted. Several other groups of birds were moved to other families.

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I.O.C. World Bird List

Birds of the World

Last Names of Birds

First Names of Birds

Bird Families

Latest I.O.C. Update is Version 7.2 – Name Changes

The latest update to the I.O.C.’s list of all the birds of the world was released near the end of April. This blogsite, Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus, is almost updated with this new version. All the indexes and the actual family pages are finished. The alphabetical list of names is all that is left for me to update.

Here are the name and spelling changes made with this new Version:

White-booted Racket-tail (Ocreatus underwoodii) by Ian

Booted now White-booted Racket-tail (Ocreatus underwoodii) by Ian

Rufous-bellied Hawk-Eagle (Lophotriorchis kienerii) now Rufous-bellied Eagle
Booted Racket-tail (Ocreatus underwoodi) now White-booted Racket-tail
Oriental Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone affinis) now Blyth’s Paradise Flycatcher
Irrawaddy Bulbul (Pycnonotus blanfordi) now Ayeyarwady Bulbul
Santa Marta Wood Wren (Henicorhina anachoreta) now Hermit Wood Wren
White-bellied Thrush (Zoothera margaretae) now Makira Thrush
Henri’s Snowfinch (Montifringilla henrici) now Tibetan Snowfinch
Tibetan Snowfinch (Montifringilla adamsi) now Black-winged Snowfinch
Eurasian Crimson-winged Finch (Rhodopechys sanguineus) now Asian Crimson-winged Finch

Tomorrow, I’ll try to present some more of the changes.

And the king of Babylon made Mattaniah his father’s brother king in his stead, and changed his name to Zedekiah. (2 Kings 24:17 KJV)